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  32. <title>In search of a digital town square</title>
  33. <link>https://zeldman.com/2024/02/21/in-search-of-a-digital-town-square/</link>
  34. <comments>https://zeldman.com/2024/02/21/in-search-of-a-digital-town-square/#comments</comments>
  35. <dc:creator><![CDATA[L. Jeffrey Zeldman]]></dc:creator>
  36. <pubDate>Wed, 21 Feb 2024 14:18:39 +0000</pubDate>
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  77. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://zeldman.com/?p=17685</guid>
  78.  
  79. <description><![CDATA[<p>Ever since an infantile fascist billionaire (hereafter, the IFB) decided to turn Twitter over to the racially hostile anti-science set, folks who previously used that network daily to discuss and amplify topics they cared about have either given up on the very premise of a shared digital commons, continued to post to Twitter while holding [&#8230;]</p>
  80. <p>The post <a href="https://zeldman.com/2024/02/21/in-search-of-a-digital-town-square/">In search of a digital town square</a> appeared first on <a href="https://zeldman.com">Zeldman on Web and Interaction Design</a>.</p>
  81. ]]></description>
  82. <content:encoded><![CDATA[
  83. <p class="has-drop-cap">Ever since an infantile fascist billionaire (hereafter, the IFB) decided to turn Twitter over to the racially hostile anti-science set, folks who previously used that network daily to discuss and amplify topics they cared about have either given up on the very premise of a shared digital commons, continued to post to Twitter while holding their noses, or sought a new digital place to call their own. This post is for the seekers, to compare notes.&nbsp;</p>
  84.  
  85.  
  86.  
  87. <p>These are my <em>personal</em> observations; your views may differ (and that’s more than okay). In this quick survey, I’m omitting specialty platforms like <a href="https://post.tribel.com/public/posts/1873fc30-69a8-11ed-bb22-b76b5a021845">Tribel</a>, <a href="https://post.news/feed">Post</a>, and <a href="https://substack.com/">Substack</a>. Feel free to comment, if you like.</p>
  88.  
  89.  
  90.  
  91. <h2 class="wp-block-heading" id="h-the-platforms">The platforms</h2>
  92.  
  93.  
  94.  
  95. <p><a href="https://bsky.app/profile/zeldman.bsky.social"><strong>BlueSky</strong></a>: The most beautifully elegant web interface. Also the best features (other than omission of hashtags). What Twitter should have become. I joined late—Jack didn’t invite me, likely a sign that I was no longer industrially relevant. I have few followers there, and my posts so far get little traction, but that could change. It’s so pretty (and the few friends that use it matter so much to me) that I keep using it, and I reserve judgement as to its future potential. <a href="https://bsky.app/profile/zeldman.bsky.social">https://bsky.app/profile/zeldman.bsky.social</a></p>
  96.  
  97.  
  98.  
  99. <p><a href="https://www.threads.net/@zeldman"><strong>Threads</strong></a>: Currently my primary alternative to Twitter, and the only place besides Twitter where my posts get at least some response. Not as visually refined as BlueSky, and with a curiously restricted single-hashtag-only policy. Although this editorial decision helps focus the mind, and likely also cuts down on spam, it interferes with amplifying multidimensional posts. But I digress.</p>
  100.  
  101.  
  102.  
  103. <p>Rough edges and restrictive tagging aside, Threads feels like the place that’s likeliest to inherit the mantle of default town square—if <em>any</em> social platform can do that in these new times, that is.</p>
  104.  
  105.  
  106.  
  107. <p>Threads got its huge jump start because, while the IFB was busy finding new ways to make Twitter less useful and more dangerous, Meta leveraged its huge installed Instagram base to give users a more or less instant social network hookup. If it’s easy, and comes with a built-in network of people I already follow, it wins—at least initially. </p>
  108.  
  109.  
  110.  
  111. <p>Meta may also blow their opportunity if they pursue misguided policies, such as impeding (by algorithmic fiat) “political speech” when democracies hang in the balance, regional wars threaten to become world wars, and the climate crisis is approaching a point of no return. <a href="https://www.threads.net/@zeldman">https://www.threads.net/@zeldman</a></p>
  112.  
  113.  
  114.  
  115. <p><a href="https://front-end.social/@zeldman"><strong>Mastodon</strong></a>: How do you decentralize a digital town square? Provide universal social connection without locking in participants? Mastodon (and federation generally) are an attempt to do those things. </p>
  116.  
  117.  
  118.  
  119. <p>These are important and noble goals, but Mastodon (and federation generally) are a long shot at replacing a primary walled garden like Twitter because they require a fair degree of geekery to set up, and the price tag of mass acceptance is ease of setup. (Compare Threads—easy set-up, built-in friends and followers if you already use Instagram—versus the learning curve with Mastodon.) <br><br>If BlueSky is MacOS and Threads is Windows, Mastodon is Linux: a great choice for techies, but likely too steep a hill for Ma and Pa Normie. A techie friend invited me to join, and I write there frequently, but, for whatever it’s worth, my Mastodon posts get very little in the way of responses. It is, nonetheless, a highly effective network for most who use it. <a href="https://front-end.social/@zeldman">https://front-end.social/@zeldman</a></p>
  120.  
  121.  
  122.  
  123. <p><a href="https://apartness.tumblr.com/"><strong>Tumblr</strong></a>: A bit o’ the OG weird wacky wonderful web, and a special place for nonconformist creative types. By its nature, and the nature of its fiercely loyal users, it is a cult jam. I was an early and enthusiastic Tumblr fan, but it was never my main axe, probably because, since the dawn of time itself, I have had <a href="http://zeldman.com">zeldman.com</a>. <br><br>For a while, when the IFB first started wrecking Twitter, an uptick in Tumblr usage suggested that the funky old network just might take over as the world’s town hall, but this hope was unrealistic, as Tumblr was never about being for everybody, and <em>Tumblristas</em> are mostly happy keeping the platform a home for self-selecting freaks, queers, and creatives. <br><br>I’ll note that Tumblr is part of the <a href="https://automattic.com/">Automattic</a> family, and I work at Automattic (just celebrated my fifth anniversary there!), but my opinions here are mine alone. BTW—in nearly 30 years of blogging, that’s the first time I’ve used that phrase. <a href="https://apartness.tumblr.com">https://apartness.tumblr.com</a></p>
  124.  
  125.  
  126.  
  127. <p><a href="https://www.linkedin.com/in/zeldman/"><strong>LinkedIn</strong></a>: A comparatively safe social network with a huge network built up over years, hence a great place to share work-related news and ideas. </p>
  128.  
  129.  
  130.  
  131. <p>Some early Twitter adopters of my acquaintance—especially those who mainly write about work topics like UX—have made LinkedIn their primary social home. For most working folks, it is undoubtedly a place to post and amplify at least some of the content that matters to you. OTOH, it’s not a place where I’d share deep takes on CSS (that’s probably Mastodon), cosplay (Tumblr), or personal true confessions (one’s blog, Threads, Twitter before the IFB took over). <a href="https://www.linkedin.com/in/zeldman">https://www.linkedin.com/in/zeldman</a></p>
  132.  
  133.  
  134.  
  135. <p><a href="https://twitter.com/zeldman"><strong>Twitter itself</strong></a>: During its heyday, before the IFB, and when it was the only game in town, I loved going there to see what clever things my smartest friends were saying, post my own <em>bon mots</em>, and promote content that mattered to me. <br><br>I’ll limit my comments on Twitter’s current state to noting that I still post there, from stubbornness as well as habit, and primarily in the (increasingly forlorn) hope that the IFB will eventually tire of his toy, or of the ceaseless financial hemorrhage, and go away, leaving the site to rebirth itself as an open source project or under the care of new, non-fascist owners. <br><br>Though the algorithm punishes my posts, and though I’m continually appalled by the MAGA posts, Russian disinformation, racist/ misogynist/ anti-semitic spew, and Trumpian ego of the current owner, I shall, at least for now, continue to defend my tiny turf there.</p>
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  145. <div class="wp-block-comments"><h2 id="comments" class="wp-block-comments-title has-medium-font-size">One response to &#8220;In search of a digital town square&#8221;</h2>
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  150. <div class="wp-block-column is-layout-flow wp-block-column-is-layout-flow" style="flex-basis:40px"><div class="wp-block-avatar"><img alt='L. Jeffrey Zeldman Avatar' src='https://secure.gravatar.com/avatar/350a70e175305fac28923d0622c87080?s=40&#038;d=robohash&#038;r=pg' srcset='https://secure.gravatar.com/avatar/350a70e175305fac28923d0622c87080?s=80&#038;d=robohash&#038;r=pg 2x' class='avatar avatar-40 photo wp-block-avatar__image' height='40' width='40'  style="border-radius:20px;" onerror="this.onerror=null;this.src='https://zeldman.com/wp-content/plugins/webmention/assets/img/mm.jpg';this.srcset='https://zeldman.com/wp-content/plugins/webmention/assets/img/mm.jpg';"/></div></div>
  151.  
  152.  
  153.  
  154. <div class="wp-block-column is-layout-flow wp-block-column-is-layout-flow"><div class="wp-block-comment-author-name has-small-font-size"><a rel="external nofollow ugc" href="https://zeldman.com/" target="_self" >L. Jeffrey Zeldman</a></div>
  155.  
  156.  
  157. <div class="wp-block-group is-layout-flex wp-block-group-is-layout-flex" style="margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:0px"><div class="wp-block-comment-date has-small-font-size"><time datetime="2024-02-21T11:34:27-05:00"><a href="https://zeldman.com/2024/02/21/in-search-of-a-digital-town-square/comment-page-1/#comment-4">21 February 2024</a></time></div>
  158.  
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  160.  
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  162. <div class="wp-block-comment-content"><p>Psst. Comments are back. This is a test.</p>
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  215. <p>The post <a href="https://zeldman.com/2024/02/21/in-search-of-a-digital-town-square/">In search of a digital town square</a> appeared first on <a href="https://zeldman.com">Zeldman on Web and Interaction Design</a>.</p>
  216. ]]></content:encoded>
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  218. <slash:comments>1</slash:comments>
  219. <post-id xmlns="com-wordpress:feed-additions:1">17685</post-id> </item>
  220. <item>
  221. <title>Boys! Ragu!</title>
  222. <link>https://zeldman.com/2024/02/07/boys-ragu/</link>
  223. <dc:creator><![CDATA[L. Jeffrey Zeldman]]></dc:creator>
  224. <pubDate>Wed, 07 Feb 2024 11:03:16 +0000</pubDate>
  225. <category><![CDATA[family]]></category>
  226. <category><![CDATA[glamorous]]></category>
  227. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://www.zeldman.com/?p=16004</guid>
  228.  
  229. <description><![CDATA[<p>When you were a kid, what was a meal you always looked forward to?</p>
  230. <p>The post <a href="https://zeldman.com/2024/02/07/boys-ragu/">Boys! Ragu!</a> appeared first on <a href="https://zeldman.com">Zeldman on Web and Interaction Design</a>.</p>
  231. ]]></description>
  232. <content:encoded><![CDATA[
  233. <figure class="wp-block-image size-full"><img fetchpriority="high" decoding="async" width="580" height="580" data-attachment-id="17710" data-permalink="https://zeldman.com/2024/02/07/boys-ragu/ragu-2/" data-orig-file="https://i0.wp.com/zeldman.com/wp-content/uploads/ragu.webp?fit=580%2C580&amp;ssl=1" data-orig-size="580,580" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta="{&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;orientation&quot;:&quot;0&quot;}" data-image-title="ragu" data-image-description="" data-image-caption="" data-medium-file="https://i0.wp.com/zeldman.com/wp-content/uploads/ragu.webp?fit=580%2C580&amp;ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i0.wp.com/zeldman.com/wp-content/uploads/ragu.webp?fit=580%2C580&amp;ssl=1" src="https://i0.wp.com/zeldman.com/wp-content/uploads/ragu.webp?resize=580%2C580&#038;ssl=1" alt="" class="wp-image-17710" srcset="https://i0.wp.com/zeldman.com/wp-content/uploads/ragu.webp?w=580&amp;ssl=1 580w, https://i0.wp.com/zeldman.com/wp-content/uploads/ragu.webp?resize=100%2C100&amp;ssl=1 100w, https://i0.wp.com/zeldman.com/wp-content/uploads/ragu.webp?resize=400%2C400&amp;ssl=1 400w, https://i0.wp.com/zeldman.com/wp-content/uploads/ragu.webp?resize=200%2C200&amp;ssl=1 200w" sizes="(max-width: 580px) 100vw, 580px" data-recalc-dims="1" /></figure>
  234.  
  235.  
  236.  
  237. <p><strong>When you were a kid, what was a meal you always looked forward to?</strong></p>
  238.  
  239.  
  240.  
  241. <p>Spaghetti with Ragu<img src="https://s.w.org/images/core/emoji/14.0.0/72x72/2122.png" alt="™" class="wp-smiley" style="height: 1em; max-height: 1em;" /> sauce. My mother did not enjoy cooking. We ate many convenience meals and enjoyed the heck out of ’em.</p>
  242.  
  243.  
  244.  
  245. <p>“Boys! Ragu!” Mom would holler from the kitchen.</p>
  246. <p>The post <a href="https://zeldman.com/2024/02/07/boys-ragu/">Boys! Ragu!</a> appeared first on <a href="https://zeldman.com">Zeldman on Web and Interaction Design</a>.</p>
  247. ]]></content:encoded>
  248. <post-id xmlns="com-wordpress:feed-additions:1">16004</post-id> </item>
  249. <item>
  250. <title>A Death at Walmart</title>
  251. <link>https://zeldman.com/2024/01/24/a-death-at-walmart/</link>
  252. <dc:creator><![CDATA[L. Jeffrey Zeldman]]></dc:creator>
  253. <pubDate>Wed, 24 Jan 2024 11:23:05 +0000</pubDate>
  254. <category><![CDATA[Design]]></category>
  255. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://www.zeldman.com/2024/01/24/a-death-at-walmart/</guid>
  256.  
  257. <description><![CDATA[<p>At age 38, Janikka Perry died of a heart attack at work, on her bakery shift at Walmart in North Little Rock, Arkansas, but you will not find her … A Death at Walmart</p>
  258. <p>The post <a href="https://zeldman.com/2024/01/24/a-death-at-walmart/">A Death at Walmart</a> appeared first on <a href="https://zeldman.com">Zeldman on Web and Interaction Design</a>.</p>
  259. ]]></description>
  260. <content:encoded><![CDATA[
  261. <blockquote class="wp-block-quote is-layout-flow wp-block-quote-is-layout-flow"><p>At age 38, Janikka Perry died of a heart attack at work, on her bakery shift at Walmart in North Little Rock, Arkansas, but you will not find her …</p><cite><a href="https://longreads.com/2024/01/23/a-death-at-walmart/">A Death at Walmart</a></cite></blockquote>
  262. <p>The post <a href="https://zeldman.com/2024/01/24/a-death-at-walmart/">A Death at Walmart</a> appeared first on <a href="https://zeldman.com">Zeldman on Web and Interaction Design</a>.</p>
  263. ]]></content:encoded>
  264. <post-id xmlns="com-wordpress:feed-additions:1">15997</post-id> </item>
  265. <item>
  266. <title>Knowledge Management for the win</title>
  267. <link>https://zeldman.com/2024/01/22/knowledge-management-for-the-win/</link>
  268. <dc:creator><![CDATA[L. Jeffrey Zeldman]]></dc:creator>
  269. <pubDate>Mon, 22 Jan 2024 14:17:37 +0000</pubDate>
  270. <category><![CDATA[Best practices]]></category>
  271. <category><![CDATA[creativity]]></category>
  272. <category><![CDATA[Design]]></category>
  273. <category><![CDATA[Products]]></category>
  274. <category><![CDATA[The Essentials]]></category>
  275. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://www.zeldman.com/?p=15993</guid>
  276.  
  277. <description><![CDATA[<p>Knowledge management (KM) is the process of organizing, creating, using, and sharing collective knowledge within an organization.  Unlock and unblock For companies, institutions, and projects struggling to become more efficient and productive—and who these days is not?—solid knowledge management can unlock productivity and unblock awareness of customer needs, awareness of unrecognized gaps, creativity, alignment, product improvements, [&#8230;]</p>
  278. <p>The post <a href="https://zeldman.com/2024/01/22/knowledge-management-for-the-win/">Knowledge Management for the win</a> appeared first on <a href="https://zeldman.com">Zeldman on Web and Interaction Design</a>.</p>
  279. ]]></description>
  280. <content:encoded><![CDATA[
  281. <p class="has-drop-cap has-large-font-size">Knowledge management (KM) is the process of organizing, creating, using, and sharing collective knowledge within an organization. </p>
  282.  
  283.  
  284.  
  285. <h2 class="wp-block-heading" id="h-unlock-and-unblock">Unlock and unblock</h2>
  286.  
  287.  
  288.  
  289. <p>For companies, institutions, and projects struggling to become more efficient and productive—and who these days is not?—solid <a href="https://www.ibm.com/topics/knowledge-management">knowledge management</a> can unlock productivity and unblock awareness of customer needs, awareness of unrecognized gaps, creativity, alignment, product improvements, and greater success. </p>
  290.  
  291.  
  292.  
  293. <p>Conversely, lack of knowledge management—or half-hearted knowledge management that is incomplete and/or not widely shared—holds back any organization afflicted by it. </p>
  294.  
  295.  
  296.  
  297. <p>Most institutions, companies, and groups suffer from <em>at least</em> a partial lack of solid knowledge management. Fortunately, this is fixable by acknowledging the problem, understanding its sources, and addressing them in planned phases. Open source organizations can implement via iterative sprints, traditional companies via top-down project management.</p>
  298.  
  299.  
  300.  
  301. <h2 class="wp-block-heading" id="h-the-three-main-areas-of-knowledge-management">The three main areas of knowledge management</h2>
  302.  
  303.  
  304.  
  305. <p>The three main areas of knowledge management are:</p>
  306.  
  307.  
  308.  
  309. <ul>
  310. <li>Accumulating knowledge.</li>
  311.  
  312.  
  313.  
  314. <li>Storing knowledge.</li>
  315.  
  316.  
  317.  
  318. <li>Sharing knowledge.</li>
  319. </ul>
  320.  
  321.  
  322.  
  323. <p>Accumulating knowledge happens every time any member of a team achieves a task—or fails to achieve it and analyzes why. <br /><br />Storing knowledge can be as team-limited as reminders I jot down in my personal Notes app (useful only to me), or widely shared. Shared is better. <br /><br />Much of our knowledge resides in individual brains. Knowledge management enables it to be shared. Successful knowledge management enables everyone to find it.</p>
  324.  
  325.  
  326.  
  327. <h2 class="wp-block-heading" id="h-examples-of-successful-knowledge-management">Examples of successful knowledge management</h2>
  328.  
  329.  
  330.  
  331. <p>Successful knowledge management includes maintaining information in a place where it is easy to access, such as a centrally located online handbook or field guide. Examples include <a href="https://automattic.com/fieldguide/">the Automattic Employee Field Guide</a> (limited, public version; a richer version is available to employees only), <a href="https://www.ibm.com/design/language/">IBM Design Language</a>, the <a href="https://www.bbc.co.uk/newsstyleguide">BBC News Style Guide</a>, <a href="https://alistapart.com/about/style-guide/"><em>A List Apart</em> Style Guide</a>, and the W3C documentation such as <a href="https://www.w3.org/WAI/standards-guidelines/mobile/">Mobile Accessibility at W3C</a>. Those just getting started compiling an organizational field guide—or improving an existing one—may find Workable’s <a href="https://resources.workable.com/employee-handbook-policies">Sample Employee Handbook templates</a> useful, whether or not you use <a href="https://www.workable.com/hris/document-management">their product</a>. </p>
  332.  
  333.  
  334.  
  335. <blockquote class="wp-block-quote is-layout-flow wp-block-quote-is-layout-flow">
  336. <p><em>Taking advantage of all the expertise within an organization is a great way to maximize its potential. Companies have a well of untapped knowledge within their workforce that is lying dormant or siloed to individual staff or departments.</em></p>
  337.  
  338.  
  339.  
  340. <p><em>With the proper management structures in place, this knowledge can be found, stored, and made accessible to the wider workforce, offering tangible busines</em>s –&nbsp;<a href="https://www.valamis.com/hub/knowledge-management">Human Resources: Knowledge Management</a></p>
  341. </blockquote>
  342.  
  343.  
  344.  
  345. <p>Ponder this now, and either proactively agitate for it, or, at the very least, keep awareness of it on a sticky note that you can return to when a C-level executive asks why you or your team haven’t made as much progress, or worked as effectively and efficiently, as possible. <br /><br />Knowledge management is the secret sauce that enables organizations staffed by smart people to unlock their full potential.<br /><br />#</p>
  346.  
  347.  
  348.  
  349. <h4 class="wp-block-heading" id="h-read-these-next">Read these next:</h4>
  350.  
  351.  
  352.  
  353. <ul>
  354. <li><a href="https://www.zeldman.com/2020/10/01/the-dogs-wont-eat-it/">The Dogs Won’t Eat It</a></li>
  355.  
  356.  
  357.  
  358. <li><a href="https://alistapart.com/article/cult-of-the-complex/">The Cult of the Complex</a> (in <em>A List Apart</em>)</li>
  359. </ul>
  360. <p>The post <a href="https://zeldman.com/2024/01/22/knowledge-management-for-the-win/">Knowledge Management for the win</a> appeared first on <a href="https://zeldman.com">Zeldman on Web and Interaction Design</a>.</p>
  361. ]]></content:encoded>
  362. <post-id xmlns="com-wordpress:feed-additions:1">15993</post-id> </item>
  363. <item>
  364. <title>satyricon</title>
  365. <link>https://zeldman.com/2024/01/13/satyricon/</link>
  366. <dc:creator><![CDATA[L. Jeffrey Zeldman]]></dc:creator>
  367. <pubDate>Sat, 13 Jan 2024 13:04:21 +0000</pubDate>
  368. <category><![CDATA[glamorous]]></category>
  369. <category><![CDATA[bildungsroman]]></category>
  370. <category><![CDATA[My Glamorous Life]]></category>
  371. <category><![CDATA[satire]]></category>
  372. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://www.zeldman.com/?p=15988</guid>
  373.  
  374. <description><![CDATA[<p>The cruel and evil cannot be shamed.</p>
  375. <p>The post <a href="https://zeldman.com/2024/01/13/satyricon/">satyricon</a> appeared first on <a href="https://zeldman.com">Zeldman on Web and Interaction Design</a>.</p>
  376. ]]></description>
  377. <content:encoded><![CDATA[
  378. <p style="font-size:26px">In the bubble I blew for myself so it would be safe to grow up, satire was a weapon against evil. Of course I was wrong. Satire is how clever people amuse themselves about things over which they have no control. It saves no victim, stops no crime. The few minds it changes were ready to be changed.</p>
  379.  
  380.  
  381.  
  382. <p style="font-size:26px">The cruel and evil cannot be shamed. They do not read literature, and they cannot laugh at themselves. Those who laugh at the folly of evil men, they punish with extreme and ghastly pleasure.</p>
  383. <p>The post <a href="https://zeldman.com/2024/01/13/satyricon/">satyricon</a> appeared first on <a href="https://zeldman.com">Zeldman on Web and Interaction Design</a>.</p>
  384. ]]></content:encoded>
  385. <post-id xmlns="com-wordpress:feed-additions:1">15988</post-id> </item>
  386. <item>
  387. <title>Operation Paperclip (and other crimes)</title>
  388. <link>https://zeldman.com/2023/12/24/operation-paperclip-and-other-crimes/</link>
  389. <dc:creator><![CDATA[L. Jeffrey Zeldman]]></dc:creator>
  390. <pubDate>Sun, 24 Dec 2023 13:40:05 +0000</pubDate>
  391. <category><![CDATA[links]]></category>
  392. <category><![CDATA[war crimes]]></category>
  393. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://www.zeldman.com/?p=15975</guid>
  394.  
  395. <description><![CDATA[<p>Evil is rarely a solo project. Horrors and atrocities of the past may provide context for the horrors and atrocities happening right now in Gaza and the Congo. United States war crimes: Gosh, where to begin? Widespread rape by U.S. servicemen of Japanese, German, and French women; human experiments on non-white U.S. enlisted men “to [&#8230;]</p>
  396. <p>The post <a href="https://zeldman.com/2023/12/24/operation-paperclip-and-other-crimes/">Operation Paperclip (and other crimes)</a> appeared first on <a href="https://zeldman.com">Zeldman on Web and Interaction Design</a>.</p>
  397. ]]></description>
  398. <content:encoded><![CDATA[
  399. <p class="has-large-font-size">Evil is rarely a solo project. Horrors and atrocities of the past may provide context for the horrors and atrocities happening right now in Gaza and the Congo. </p>
  400.  
  401.  
  402.  
  403. <p><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_war_crimes">United States war crimes</a>: Gosh, where to begin? Widespread rape by U.S. servicemen of Japanese, German, and French women; human experiments on non-white U.S. enlisted men “to see how non-white races would react to being mustard gassed;” mass murders and torture in Vietnam, including burning “the membrane of the throats of Vietnamese children and holes in their stomachs by feeding them trioxane heat tablets in the middle of peanut butter cracker sandwiches from their rations” (you know, like you do); My Lai; Abu Ghraib; mass killings and torture of Haitians, including hanging prisoners by their genitals; and so much more. We, the good guys, did this shit. And these are only the crimes we know about.</p>
  404.  
  405.  
  406.  
  407. <p><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Paperclip">Operation Paperclip</a>: Immediately after WWII, the U.S. hired more than 1600 German scientists, engineers, and technicians, many of them former members (and several of them former leaders) of the Nazi Party. <em>Nice resumes, fellas, come work for us.</em> The Paperclip scientists won major awards in the U.S. for their advancements in aeronautics, and were hugely influential in the U.S. space program. Occasionally, one of the ex-Nazis was discovered to have done something especially heinous during his days in Germany. Never fear, the U.S. made sure to protect him. For instance, in 1951, Walter Schreiber was linked to human experiments conducted by Kurt Bloom at the <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ravensbr%C3%BCck_concentration_camp">Ravensbrück</a> concentration camp. The U.S. military helped Schreiber emigrate to Argentina, to escape punishment for his crimes. Nice.</p>
  408.  
  409.  
  410.  
  411. <p><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_cover-up_of_Japanese_war_crimes">American cover-up of Japaneses war crimes</a>: Although institutional racism made white European ex-Nazis more attractive to U.S. hiring teams than their Japanese counterparts, America was nonetheless willing to do favors for Japanese officials accused of crimes against humanity. Thus, immediately after the war, the occupying U.S. force deliberately covered up Japanese war crimes—including human experimentation that had been carried out on Chinese prisoners. Hey, we did it in Tuskegee, why shouldn’t the Japanese do it in China?</p>
  412.  
  413.  
  414.  
  415. <p><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Bloodstone">Operation Bloodstone</a>: The CIA hired high-ranking Nazi intelligence agents who’d committed war crimes to spy for us inside the Soviet Union, Latin America, Canada, and even domestically within the United States. Hey, why not.</p>
  416.  
  417.  
  418.  
  419. <p>Happy Holidays! Pray for peace and forgiveness.</p>
  420. <p>The post <a href="https://zeldman.com/2023/12/24/operation-paperclip-and-other-crimes/">Operation Paperclip (and other crimes)</a> appeared first on <a href="https://zeldman.com">Zeldman on Web and Interaction Design</a>.</p>
  421. ]]></content:encoded>
  422. <post-id xmlns="com-wordpress:feed-additions:1">15975</post-id> </item>
  423. <item>
  424. <title>Fly, my designers, fly!</title>
  425. <link>https://zeldman.com/2023/11/28/fly-my-designers-fly/</link>
  426. <dc:creator><![CDATA[L. Jeffrey Zeldman]]></dc:creator>
  427. <pubDate>Tue, 28 Nov 2023 13:02:45 +0000</pubDate>
  428. <category><![CDATA[A List Apart]]></category>
  429. <category><![CDATA[Career]]></category>
  430. <category><![CDATA[Community]]></category>
  431. <category><![CDATA[Coudal Partners]]></category>
  432. <category><![CDATA[creativity]]></category>
  433. <category><![CDATA[Design]]></category>
  434. <category><![CDATA[Designers]]></category>
  435. <category><![CDATA[glamorous]]></category>
  436. <category><![CDATA[Happy Cog™]]></category>
  437. <category><![CDATA[Indieweb]]></category>
  438. <category><![CDATA[links]]></category>
  439. <category><![CDATA[Mentoring]]></category>
  440. <category><![CDATA[Off My Lawn!]]></category>
  441. <category><![CDATA[Products]]></category>
  442. <category><![CDATA[Small Business]]></category>
  443. <category><![CDATA[social media]]></category>
  444. <category><![CDATA[State of the Web]]></category>
  445. <category><![CDATA[User Experience]]></category>
  446. <category><![CDATA[UX]]></category>
  447. <category><![CDATA[Web Design History]]></category>
  448. <category><![CDATA[wisdom]]></category>
  449. <category><![CDATA[entrepreneur]]></category>
  450. <category><![CDATA[entrepreneurial]]></category>
  451. <category><![CDATA[entrepreneurship]]></category>
  452. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://www.zeldman.com/?p=15952</guid>
  453.  
  454. <description><![CDATA[<p>Designers can either become drivers of business within their organizations, or they can create the businesses they want to drive. We’re entering an era of design entrepreneurship, in which some designers are realizing that they’re not just a designer employed by a business; they’re creative business people whose skill set is design. —The State of [&#8230;]</p>
  455. <p>The post <a href="https://zeldman.com/2023/11/28/fly-my-designers-fly/">Fly, my designers, fly!</a> appeared first on <a href="https://zeldman.com">Zeldman on Web and Interaction Design</a>.</p>
  456. ]]></description>
  457. <content:encoded><![CDATA[
  458. <blockquote class="wp-block-quote is-layout-flow wp-block-quote-is-layout-flow">
  459. <p>Designers can either become drivers of business within their organizations, or they can create the businesses they want to drive. We’re entering an <a href="https://www.betterbydesign.cc/p/the-era-of-design-entrepreneurship">era of design entrepreneurship</a>, in which some designers are realizing that they’re not just a designer employed by a business; they’re creative business people whose skill set is design.</p>
  460. <cite>—<a href="https://trends.uxdesign.cc/"><strong>The State of UX in 2024</strong></a></cite></blockquote>
  461.  
  462.  
  463.  
  464. <p>The quotation above is from a report at <a href="https://trends.uxdesign.cc/">trends.uxdesign.cc</a> subtitled “<strong>Enter Late-Stage UX</strong>.” It is an important thought. And if it seems like a new one to designers in their first decade of work, it will feel quite familiar to to those of us who earned our merit badges during the 1990s and 2000s. See, for instance, </p>
  465.  
  466.  
  467.  
  468. <h6 class="wp-block-heading" id="h-when-you-are-your-own-client-who-are-you-going-to-make-fun-of-at-the-bar"><a href="https://alistapart.com/article/beyourownclient/">When You Are Your Own Client, Who Are You Going To Make Fun Of At The Bar?</a></h6>
  469.  
  470.  
  471.  
  472. <p>by <a href="https://alistapart.com/author/coudal/">Jim Coudal</a> (2005), </p>
  473.  
  474.  
  475.  
  476. <h6 class="wp-block-heading"><a href="https://alistapart.com/article/startingabusiness/">Starting a Business: Advice from the Trenches</a></h6>
  477.  
  478.  
  479.  
  480. <p>by <a href="https://alistapart.com/author/kevinpotts/">Kevin Potts</a> (2003), and</p>
  481.  
  482.  
  483.  
  484. <h6 class="wp-block-heading" id="h-this-web-business-part-one"><a href="https://alistapart.com/article/business1/">THIS WEB BUSINESS, Part One</a></h6>
  485.  
  486.  
  487.  
  488. <p>by <a href="https://alistapart.com/author/scottkramer/">Scott Kramer</a> (2000, one of four terrific <em>ALA</em> articles by Scott on that subject). </p>
  489.  
  490.  
  491.  
  492. <p>That widespread, intoxicating entrepreneurial impulse led to a <a href="https://medium.com/@pseudoroom/now-more-than-ever-the-time-of-the-design-community-portal-is-once-again-upon-us-68313b030720">cornucopia</a> <a href="https://www.swiss-miss.com/">of</a> <a href="https://daringfireball.net/">internet</a> <a href="https://www.mirrorproject.com/">content</a> and <a href="https://iconfactory.com/">products</a> (and, eventually, <a href="https://fieldnotesbrand.com/products/foiled-again">“real-world”</a> <a href="https://squareup.com/us/en">products</a>, too). Some flopped. Some <a href="https://www.flickr.com/">flowered</a> for a magical season (or twelve), and then faded as times and the market changed. Some <a href="https://wordpress.org/">grew and grew</a>, growing communities with them. A few changed the world, for better or worse. (And, occasionally, for <a href="https://twitter.com/">both</a>.)</p>
  493.  
  494.  
  495.  
  496. <p>History repeats, but it also changes. If flying from your corporate perch feels like your best response to an industry where the idealism that led you to UX feels somewhat beside the point, go for it! —But first, check your bank balance, and talk with family, friends, and a business advisor, if you have one.</p>
  497.  
  498.  
  499.  
  500. <p>Trusting my ability to use design and words to say something original enabled me to <a href="https://www.zeldman.com/about/">work for myself (and with partners)</a> from 1999–2019, and it was good. Financially, running independent businesses is a perpetual rollercoaster, and it can crush your soul if your beloved creation fails to connect with a community. Some people exit rich. Others just exit. “Don’t burn any bridges” is a cliché that exists for a reason. But I digress.</p>
  501.  
  502.  
  503.  
  504. <p>“Consider entrepreneurship” is <strong>but one piece of useful advice</strong> in this year’s excellent State of UX report by <a href="http://linkedin.com/in/fabricioteixeira">Fabricio Teixeira</a> and <a href="http://twitter.com/caioab">Caio Braga</a>, with deeply clever illustrations by <a href="http://www.instagram.com/fabiobene/">Fabio Benê</a> and significant contributions from Emily Curtin (God bless the editors!) and Laura Vandiver.<br /><br />I invite you to read and bookmark the whole thing. I plan to reread it several times myself over the next weeks. It’s that deep, and that good. Hat tip to my colleague <a href="https://www.uxdx.com/profile/jill-quek/">Jill Quek</a> for sharing it.</p>
  505.  
  506.  
  507.  
  508. <p>Read: <a href="https://trends.uxdesign.cc/"><strong>The State of UX in 2024</strong></a>.</p>
  509.  
  510.  
  511.  
  512. <p></p>
  513. <p>The post <a href="https://zeldman.com/2023/11/28/fly-my-designers-fly/">Fly, my designers, fly!</a> appeared first on <a href="https://zeldman.com">Zeldman on Web and Interaction Design</a>.</p>
  514. ]]></content:encoded>
  515. <post-id xmlns="com-wordpress:feed-additions:1">15952</post-id> </item>
  516. <item>
  517. <title>Algorithm &#038; Blues</title>
  518. <link>https://zeldman.com/2023/11/10/algorithm-blues/</link>
  519. <dc:creator><![CDATA[L. Jeffrey Zeldman]]></dc:creator>
  520. <pubDate>Fri, 10 Nov 2023 11:57:40 +0000</pubDate>
  521. <category><![CDATA[Best practices]]></category>
  522. <category><![CDATA[blogger]]></category>
  523. <category><![CDATA[Blogs and Blogging]]></category>
  524. <category><![CDATA[Community]]></category>
  525. <category><![CDATA[content]]></category>
  526. <category><![CDATA[Content First]]></category>
  527. <category><![CDATA[Content-First]]></category>
  528. <category><![CDATA[creativity]]></category>
  529. <category><![CDATA[editorial]]></category>
  530. <category><![CDATA[findability]]></category>
  531. <category><![CDATA[Free Advice]]></category>
  532. <category><![CDATA[Ideas]]></category>
  533. <category><![CDATA[Indieweb]]></category>
  534. <category><![CDATA[industry]]></category>
  535. <category><![CDATA[links]]></category>
  536. <category><![CDATA[Marketing]]></category>
  537. <category><![CDATA[Off My Lawn!]]></category>
  538. <category><![CDATA[Own your content]]></category>
  539. <category><![CDATA[Platforms]]></category>
  540. <category><![CDATA[Publications]]></category>
  541. <category><![CDATA[Publishing]]></category>
  542. <category><![CDATA[Search]]></category>
  543. <category><![CDATA[Standards]]></category>
  544. <category><![CDATA[State of the Web]]></category>
  545. <category><![CDATA[Teapot]]></category>
  546. <category><![CDATA[The Essentials]]></category>
  547. <category><![CDATA[The Profession]]></category>
  548. <category><![CDATA[Wah!]]></category>
  549. <category><![CDATA[writing]]></category>
  550. <category><![CDATA[algorithm]]></category>
  551. <category><![CDATA[Fediverse]]></category>
  552. <category><![CDATA[indieweb]]></category>
  553. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://www.zeldman.com/?p=15937</guid>
  554.  
  555. <description><![CDATA[<p>Examining last week’s Verge-vs-Sullivan “Google ruined the web” debate, author Elizabeth Tai writes: I don’t know any class of user more abused by SEO and Google search than the writer. Whether they’re working for their bread [and] butter or are just writing for fun, writers have to write the way Google wants them to just [&#8230;]</p>
  556. <p>The post <a href="https://zeldman.com/2023/11/10/algorithm-blues/">Algorithm &#038; Blues</a> appeared first on <a href="https://zeldman.com">Zeldman on Web and Interaction Design</a>.</p>
  557. ]]></description>
  558. <content:encoded><![CDATA[
  559. <p>Examining last week’s Verge-vs-Sullivan “Google ruined the web” debate, <a href="https://elizabethtai.com/author/firediarist/">author Elizabeth Tai</a> writes:</p>
  560.  
  561.  
  562.  
  563. <blockquote class="wp-block-quote is-layout-flow wp-block-quote-is-layout-flow">
  564. <p>I don’t know any class of user more abused by SEO and Google search than the writer. Whether they’re working for their bread [and] butter or are just writing for fun, writers have to write the way Google wants them to just to get seen.</p>
  565.  
  566.  
  567.  
  568. <p>I wrote extensively about this in <em><a href="https://elizabethtai.com/blog/google-helpful-content-update/">Google’s Helpful Content Update isn’t kind to nicheless blogs</a> </em>and <em><a href="https://elizabethtai.substack.com/p/how-im-healing-from-algorithms">How I’m Healing from Algorithms </a></em>where I said: “Algorithms are forcing us to create art that fits into a neat little box — <em>their</em> neat little box.”<br /><br />So, despite Sullivan’s claims to the contrary, the Internet has sucked for me in the last 10 years. Not only because I was forced to create content in a way that pleases their many rules, but because I have to compete with SEO-optimized garbage fuelled by people with deep pockets and desires for deep pockets.</p>
  569. <cite><a href="https://elizabethtai.com/2023/11/09/is-the-internet-really-broken/"><strong>Is the Internet really broken?</strong></a></cite></blockquote>
  570.  
  571.  
  572.  
  573. <p>For digital creators who prefer to contain multitudes, Tai finds hope in abandoning the algorithm game, and accepting a loss of clout, followers, and discoverability as the price of remaining true to your actual voice and interests:</p>
  574.  
  575.  
  576.  
  577. <blockquote class="wp-block-quote is-layout-flow wp-block-quote-is-layout-flow">
  578. <p>However, this year, I regained more joy as a writer when I gave upon SEO and decided to become <a href="https://elizabethtai.com/2023/07/06/being-an-imperfect-gardener-of-my-digital-garden/">an imperfect gardener of my digital garden</a>. So there’s hope for us yet.</p>
  579. </blockquote>
  580.  
  581.  
  582.  
  583. <p> As for folks who don’t spend their time macro-blogging—“ordinary people” who <em>use</em> rather than spend significant chunks of their day <em>creating</em> web content—Tai points out that this, statistically at least a more important issue than the fate and choices of the artists formerly known as digerati, remains unsolved, but with glimmers of partially solution-shaped indicators in the form of a re-emerging indieweb impulse:</p>
  584.  
  585.  
  586.  
  587. <blockquote class="wp-block-quote is-layout-flow wp-block-quote-is-layout-flow">
  588. <p>Still, as much as I agree with The Verge’s conclusions, I feel that pointing fingers is useless. The bigger question is,&nbsp;<strong>How do we fix the Internet for the ordinary person?</strong></p>
  589.  
  590.  
  591.  
  592. <p>The big wigs don’t seem to want to answer that question thoroughly, perhaps because there’s no big money in this, so people have been trying to find solutions on their own.</p>
  593.  
  594.  
  595.  
  596. <p>We have the&nbsp;<a href="https://elizabethtai.com/2023/07/03/how-i-am-blogging-the-indieweb-way/">Indieweb movement</a>, the Fediverse like&nbsp;<a href="https://elizabethtai.com/2023/02/17/mastodon-trolls-and-filters/">Mastodon</a>&nbsp;and Substack rising to fill the gap. It’s a ragtag ecosystem humming beneath Google’s layer on the Internet. And I welcome its growth.</p>
  597. </blockquote>
  598.  
  599.  
  600.  
  601. <p>For more depth and fuller flavor, I encourage you to read the entirety of “<a href="https://elizabethtai.com/2023/11/09/is-the-internet-really-broken/">Is the internet really broken?</a>” on elizabethtai.com. (Then read her other writings, and follow her on our fractured social web.)</p>
  602.  
  603.  
  604.  
  605. <p><br /><em>“The independent content creator refuses to die.” – this website, ca. 1996, and again in 2001, paraphrasing Frank Zappa paraphrasing Edgar Varese, obviously. </em></p>
  606.  
  607.  
  608.  
  609. <p>Hat tip: <a href="https://front-end.social/@simoncox@seocommunity.social">Simon Cox</a>.</p>
  610. <p>The post <a href="https://zeldman.com/2023/11/10/algorithm-blues/">Algorithm &#038; Blues</a> appeared first on <a href="https://zeldman.com">Zeldman on Web and Interaction Design</a>.</p>
  611. ]]></content:encoded>
  612. <post-id xmlns="com-wordpress:feed-additions:1">15937</post-id> </item>
  613. <item>
  614. <title>Resistance makes side projects hard</title>
  615. <link>https://zeldman.com/2023/09/25/resistance-makes-side-projects-hard/</link>
  616. <dc:creator><![CDATA[L. Jeffrey Zeldman]]></dc:creator>
  617. <pubDate>Mon, 25 Sep 2023 11:18:18 +0000</pubDate>
  618. <category><![CDATA[Design]]></category>
  619. <category><![CDATA[links]]></category>
  620. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://www.zeldman.com/2023/09/25/resistance-makes-side-projects-hard/</guid>
  621.  
  622. <description><![CDATA[<p>Today marks 15 full months that I’ve been working on a side project called Crafd. It’s a community for people who make things by hand: In that time … Resistance makes side projects hard</p>
  623. <p>The post <a href="https://zeldman.com/2023/09/25/resistance-makes-side-projects-hard/">Resistance makes side projects hard</a> appeared first on <a href="https://zeldman.com">Zeldman on Web and Interaction Design</a>.</p>
  624. ]]></description>
  625. <content:encoded><![CDATA[
  626. <figure class="wp-block-image size-large"><img decoding="async" src="https://i0.wp.com/davemartinsblog.files.wordpress.com/2023/09/cleanshot-2023-09-20-at-09.30.08402x.png?quality=80&amp;w=960&amp;ssl=1" alt=""/></figure>
  627.  
  628.  
  629.  
  630. <blockquote class="wp-block-quote is-layout-flow wp-block-quote-is-layout-flow">
  631. <p>Today marks 15 full months that I’ve been working on a side project called Crafd. It’s a community for people who make things by hand: In that time …</p>
  632. <cite><a href="http://davemart.in/2023/09/20/resistance/">Resistance makes side projects hard</a></cite></blockquote>
  633.  
  634.  
  635. <p>The post <a href="https://zeldman.com/2023/09/25/resistance-makes-side-projects-hard/">Resistance makes side projects hard</a> appeared first on <a href="https://zeldman.com">Zeldman on Web and Interaction Design</a>.</p>
  636. ]]></content:encoded>
  637. <post-id xmlns="com-wordpress:feed-additions:1">15910</post-id> </item>
  638. <item>
  639. <title>How Columbia Ignored Women, Undermined Prosecutors and Protected a Predator For More Than 20 Years</title>
  640. <link>https://zeldman.com/2023/09/25/how-columbia-ignored-women-undermined-prosecutors-and-protected-a-predator-for-more-than-20-years/</link>
  641. <dc:creator><![CDATA[L. Jeffrey Zeldman]]></dc:creator>
  642. <pubDate>Mon, 25 Sep 2023 11:09:03 +0000</pubDate>
  643. <category><![CDATA[Reporting]]></category>
  644. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://www.zeldman.com/2023/09/25/how-columbia-ignored-women-undermined-prosecutors-and-protected-a-predator-for-more-than-20-years/</guid>
  645.  
  646. <description><![CDATA[<p>For more than two decades, patients of an OB/GYN named Robert Hadden warned Columbia University that he was sexually inappropriate and abusive. One … How Columbia Ignored Women, Undermined Prosecutors and Protected a Predator For More Than 20 Years</p>
  647. <p>The post <a href="https://zeldman.com/2023/09/25/how-columbia-ignored-women-undermined-prosecutors-and-protected-a-predator-for-more-than-20-years/">How Columbia Ignored Women, Undermined Prosecutors and Protected a Predator For More Than 20 Years</a> appeared first on <a href="https://zeldman.com">Zeldman on Web and Interaction Design</a>.</p>
  648. ]]></description>
  649. <content:encoded><![CDATA[
  650. <blockquote class="wp-block-quote is-layout-flow wp-block-quote-is-layout-flow">
  651. <p>For more than two decades, patients of an OB/GYN named Robert Hadden warned Columbia University that he was sexually inappropriate and abusive. One …</p>
  652. <cite><a href="https://longreads.com/2023/09/15/how-columbia-ignored-women-undermined-prosecutors-and-protected-a-predator-for-more-than-20-years/">How Columbia Ignored Women, Undermined Prosecutors and Protected a Predator For More Than 20 Years</a></cite></blockquote>
  653.  
  654.  
  655. <p>The post <a href="https://zeldman.com/2023/09/25/how-columbia-ignored-women-undermined-prosecutors-and-protected-a-predator-for-more-than-20-years/">How Columbia Ignored Women, Undermined Prosecutors and Protected a Predator For More Than 20 Years</a> appeared first on <a href="https://zeldman.com">Zeldman on Web and Interaction Design</a>.</p>
  656. ]]></content:encoded>
  657. <post-id xmlns="com-wordpress:feed-additions:1">15908</post-id> </item>
  658. <item>
  659. <title>A faster horse</title>
  660. <link>https://zeldman.com/2023/09/04/a-faster-horse/</link>
  661. <dc:creator><![CDATA[L. Jeffrey Zeldman]]></dc:creator>
  662. <pubDate>Mon, 04 Sep 2023 13:43:17 +0000</pubDate>
  663. <category><![CDATA[Accessibility]]></category>
  664. <category><![CDATA[Design]]></category>
  665. <category><![CDATA[IXD]]></category>
  666. <category><![CDATA[Usability]]></category>
  667. <category><![CDATA[User Experience]]></category>
  668. <category><![CDATA[UX]]></category>
  669. <category><![CDATA[essentials]]></category>
  670. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://www.zeldman.com/?p=15890</guid>
  671.  
  672. <description><![CDATA[<p>“The user is never wrong” means, when a user snags on a part of your UX that doesn’t work for her, she’s not making a mistake, she’s doing you a favor. To benefit from this favor, you must pay vigilant attention, prioritize the discovery, dig deeply enough to understand the problem, and then actually solve [&#8230;]</p>
  673. <p>The post <a href="https://zeldman.com/2023/09/04/a-faster-horse/">A faster horse</a> appeared first on <a href="https://zeldman.com">Zeldman on Web and Interaction Design</a>.</p>
  674. ]]></description>
  675. <content:encoded><![CDATA[
  676. <p class="has-large-font-size">“The user is never wrong” means, when a user snags on a part of your UX that doesn’t work for her, she’s not making a mistake, she’s doing you a favor.</p>
  677.  
  678.  
  679.  
  680. <p>To benefit from this favor, you must pay vigilant attention, prioritize the discovery, dig deeply enough to understand the problem, and then actually solve it.</p>
  681.  
  682.  
  683.  
  684. <p>In so doing, you will not only be secretly thanking the user who discovered your error, you’ll be aiding <em>all</em> of your users, and ultimately, attracting new ones.</p>
  685.  
  686.  
  687.  
  688. <p></p>
  689.  
  690.  
  691.  
  692. <p><br /><em>Think about this tomorrow. For today, Happy Labor Day to all who toil. </em></p>
  693. <p>The post <a href="https://zeldman.com/2023/09/04/a-faster-horse/">A faster horse</a> appeared first on <a href="https://zeldman.com">Zeldman on Web and Interaction Design</a>.</p>
  694. ]]></content:encoded>
  695. <post-id xmlns="com-wordpress:feed-additions:1">15890</post-id> </item>
  696. <item>
  697. <title>Through Your Tears &#038; Sorrow</title>
  698. <link>https://zeldman.com/2023/08/31/through-your-tears-sorrow/</link>
  699. <dc:creator><![CDATA[L. Jeffrey Zeldman]]></dc:creator>
  700. <pubDate>Thu, 31 Aug 2023 17:50:56 +0000</pubDate>
  701. <category><![CDATA[Design]]></category>
  702. <category><![CDATA[ava]]></category>
  703. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://www.zeldman.com/?p=15888</guid>
  704.  
  705. <description><![CDATA[<p>My daughter Ava has written a new essay about autism, trauma, and the mysteries of socialization.</p>
  706. <p>The post <a href="https://zeldman.com/2023/08/31/through-your-tears-sorrow/">Through Your Tears &#038; Sorrow</a> appeared first on <a href="https://zeldman.com">Zeldman on Web and Interaction Design</a>.</p>
  707. ]]></description>
  708. <content:encoded><![CDATA[
  709. <p>My daughter Ava has written <a href="https://avazeldman.com/2023/08/31/shmile/">a new essay about autism, trauma, and the mysteries of socialization</a>.</p>
  710.  
  711.  
  712.  
  713. <figure class="wp-block-embed is-type-wp-embed is-provider-ava-zeldman wp-block-embed-ava-zeldman"><div class="wp-block-embed__wrapper">
  714. <blockquote class="wp-embedded-content" data-secret="AVphYJgk14"><a href="https://avazeldman.com/2023/08/31/shmile/">Shmile</a></blockquote><iframe class="wp-embedded-content" sandbox="allow-scripts" security="restricted" title="&#8220;Shmile&#8221; &#8212; Ava Zeldman" src="https://avazeldman.com/2023/08/31/shmile/embed/#?secret=XH7hCmhpNL#?secret=AVphYJgk14" data-secret="AVphYJgk14" width="580" height="327" frameborder="0" marginwidth="0" marginheight="0" scrolling="no"></iframe>
  715. </div></figure>
  716. <p>The post <a href="https://zeldman.com/2023/08/31/through-your-tears-sorrow/">Through Your Tears &#038; Sorrow</a> appeared first on <a href="https://zeldman.com">Zeldman on Web and Interaction Design</a>.</p>
  717. ]]></content:encoded>
  718. <post-id xmlns="com-wordpress:feed-additions:1">15888</post-id> </item>
  719. <item>
  720. <title>My Liz Danzico Joke</title>
  721. <link>https://zeldman.com/2023/08/25/my-liz-danzico-joke/</link>
  722. <dc:creator><![CDATA[L. Jeffrey Zeldman]]></dc:creator>
  723. <pubDate>Fri, 25 Aug 2023 11:57:34 +0000</pubDate>
  724. <category><![CDATA[Design]]></category>
  725. <category><![CDATA[industry]]></category>
  726. <category><![CDATA[Information architecture]]></category>
  727. <category><![CDATA[essentials]]></category>
  728. <category><![CDATA[IXD]]></category>
  729. <category><![CDATA[Liz Danzico]]></category>
  730. <category><![CDATA[UX]]></category>
  731. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://www.zeldman.com/?p=15885</guid>
  732.  
  733. <description><![CDATA[<p>I used to tell a joke I made up. An American goes to the Vatican on Easter Sunday, joining a huge crowd of worshippers who gaze up in awe at a raised platform. On the platform stands the Pope. Beside him is Liz Danzico. The American turns to a nearby man and asks, &#8220;Excuse me. Who [&#8230;]</p>
  734. <p>The post <a href="https://zeldman.com/2023/08/25/my-liz-danzico-joke/">My Liz Danzico Joke</a> appeared first on <a href="https://zeldman.com">Zeldman on Web and Interaction Design</a>.</p>
  735. ]]></description>
  736. <content:encoded><![CDATA[
  737. <p class="has-large-font-size">I used to tell a joke I made up. An American goes to the Vatican on Easter Sunday, joining a huge crowd of worshippers who gaze up in awe at a raised platform. On the platform stands the Pope. Beside him is <a href="https://bobulate.com/about/">Liz Danzico</a>.</p>
  738.  
  739.  
  740.  
  741. <p>The American turns to a nearby man and asks, &#8220;Excuse me. Who is that with the Holy Father?&#8221;</p>
  742.  
  743.  
  744.  
  745. <p>The man answers, &#8220;I don’t-a know who&#8217;s the guy in the pointy hat, but that’s-a Liz Danzico up there.&#8221;</p>
  746.  
  747.  
  748.  
  749. <p></p>
  750.  
  751.  
  752.  
  753. <p></p>
  754. <p>The post <a href="https://zeldman.com/2023/08/25/my-liz-danzico-joke/">My Liz Danzico Joke</a> appeared first on <a href="https://zeldman.com">Zeldman on Web and Interaction Design</a>.</p>
  755. ]]></content:encoded>
  756. <post-id xmlns="com-wordpress:feed-additions:1">15885</post-id> </item>
  757. <item>
  758. <title>The Next Generation of Web Layouts</title>
  759. <link>https://zeldman.com/2023/08/04/the-next-generation-of-web-layouts/</link>
  760. <dc:creator><![CDATA[L. Jeffrey Zeldman]]></dc:creator>
  761. <pubDate>Fri, 04 Aug 2023 13:18:49 +0000</pubDate>
  762. <category><![CDATA[A List Apart]]></category>
  763. <category><![CDATA[art direction]]></category>
  764. <category><![CDATA[Design]]></category>
  765. <category><![CDATA[Standards]]></category>
  766. <category><![CDATA[State of the Web]]></category>
  767. <category><![CDATA[Web Design]]></category>
  768. <category><![CDATA[Web Design History]]></category>
  769. <category><![CDATA[Web Standards]]></category>
  770. <category><![CDATA[webfonts]]></category>
  771. <category><![CDATA[Websites]]></category>
  772. <category><![CDATA[webtype]]></category>
  773. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://www.zeldman.com/?p=15868</guid>
  774.  
  775. <description><![CDATA[<p>Who will design the next generation of readable, writerly web layouts? Layouts for sites that are mostly writing. Designed by people who love writing. Where text can be engaging even if it isn’t offset by art or photography. Where text is the point. With well considered&#160;flexible typesetting,&#160;modular scaling, and&#160;readable&#160;measures&#160;across a full range of proportions and [&#8230;]</p>
  776. <p>The post <a href="https://zeldman.com/2023/08/04/the-next-generation-of-web-layouts/">The Next Generation of Web Layouts</a> appeared first on <a href="https://zeldman.com">Zeldman on Web and Interaction Design</a>.</p>
  777. ]]></description>
  778. <content:encoded><![CDATA[
  779. <p>Who will design the next generation of readable, writerly web layouts?</p>
  780.  
  781.  
  782.  
  783. <p>Layouts for sites that are mostly writing. Designed by people who love writing. Where text can be engaging even if it isn’t offset by art or photography. Where text is the point.</p>
  784.  
  785.  
  786.  
  787. <p>With well considered&nbsp;<a href="https://href.li/?https://alistapart.com/article/flexible-typesetting/">flexible typesetting</a>,&nbsp;<a href="https://href.li/?https://alistapart.com/article/more-meaningful-typography/">modular scaling</a>, and&nbsp;<a href="https://href.li/?https://alistapart.com/article/how-we-read/">readable</a>&nbsp;<a href="https://href.li/?https://fonts.google.com/knowledge/glossary/measure_line_length">measures</a>&nbsp;across a full range of proportions and devices. With optional small details that make reading screens of text a pleasure instead of a chore. With type sizes that are easy to read without needing to zoom in. And with a range of interesting sans and serif fonts (including&nbsp;<a href="https://href.li/?https://alistapart.com/blog/post/variable-fonts-for-responsive-design/">variable fonts</a>) that support reading and encourage creative exploration where headlines are concerned.</p>
  788.  
  789.  
  790.  
  791. <h2 class="wp-block-heading" id="h-well-how-did-we-get-here"><strong>Well? How did we get here?</strong></h2>
  792.  
  793.  
  794.  
  795. <p>The web has come along way since design meant <a href="https://www.amazon.com/Creating-Killer-Web-Sites-Third-Generation/dp/1568302894/ref=sr_1_2?crid=AV8E3RYWU88J&amp;keywords=david+siegel+web+design+book&amp;qid=1691150674&amp;s=books&amp;sprefix=david+siegel+web+design+book%2Cstripbooks%2C85&amp;sr=1-2">crafting UIs in Photoshop</a> and exporting them as sliced GIFs. Flash. SiFR. Table layout. <a href="https://alistapart.com/blog/post/15-years-of-dao/">Rebellion and rethinking</a>. Liquid layout. Semantic HTML and CSS layout. <a href="https://alistapart.com/article/switchymclayout/">Adaptive layout</a>. <a href="https://alistapart.com/article/responsive-web-design/">Responsive layout</a>. <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AMPKmh98XLY">Intrinsic layout</a>. Web fonts. Big type and super lightweight UX emphasizing readability was <a href="https://acrl.ala.org/techconnect/post/big-type-and-readability/">new (and controversial!) in 2012</a>. We’ve long since accepted and improved upon it. Today’s news, magazine, and blog pages are more flexible, readable, and refined than ever before.<br /><br />So what comes next? For writers, one hopes that what’s next is a fresh crop of small, innovative advancements. Improvements that are felt by readers, even when they aren’t always consciously noticed. Layouts that are not merely legible, but actually feel <em>inevitable</em>, at all sizes and <em>in all contexts</em>.<br /></p>
  796.  
  797.  
  798.  
  799. <h2 class="wp-block-heading" id="h-beyond-outside-the-box"><strong>Beyond outside the box</strong></h2>
  800.  
  801.  
  802.  
  803. <p>Services like <a href="https://typetura.com/?">Typetura</a> may point the way. A marriage of type and tech, Typetura is different from other typesetting methods. An <a href="https://labs.jensimmons.com/">intrinsic</a> typography technology, it “enables you to design with more flexibility, while dramatically reducing code.” Disclaimer: I’m friends with, and have long admired the work of, Typetura founder <a href="https://scottkellum.com/">Scott Kellum</a>. <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Designing_with_Web_Standards"><em>Designing With Web Standards</em></a> readers will recognize his name from the Kellum Image Replacement days of the early 2000s, but that ain’t the half of what he has done for web design, e.g. inventing&nbsp;<a href="https://patents.google.com/patent/US10769348B1/en">dynamic typographic systems</a>,&nbsp;<a href="https://www.adweek.com/programmatic/why-vox-media-chose-to-build-not-buy-a-programmatic-stack/">high impact ad formats</a>,&nbsp;<a href="https://developers.google.com/web/updates/2016/12/performant-parallaxing">new parallax techniques</a>, and&nbsp;<a href="https://typetura.scottkellum.com/typetura-js">fluid typesetting technology</a>. Scott was also the coder, along with <a href="https://fortes.com/filipe/">Filipe Fortes</a>, of <a href="https://www.rogerblack.com/">Roger Black</a>’s late, lamented <a href="https://www.rogerblack.com/blog/post/we_save_trees">Treesaver</a> technology. But I digress.<br /><br /><strong>The tech is not the point</strong>—<em>except</em> in so far as it improves our ability to think beyond our current understanding of what design and layout means. Just as Gutenberg’s printing press was not the point, but it was the point of departure. Initially, the invention of movable type reproduced the writing we already knew (i.e. the King James Bible). But ultimately, by freeing writing and reading from narrow elite circles and bringing it to more (and more diverse) minds, Gutenberg’s invention transformed what writing was and could be—from the invention of newspapers to the fiction of Virginia Woolf to multimedia experiences, and perhaps even to the web.</p>
  804.  
  805.  
  806.  
  807. <p>Let us all to play with <a href="https://front-end.social/@jensimmons">Jen Simmons</a>’s <a href="https://talks.jensimmons.com/15TjNW">intrinsic web layout ideas</a> and Scott Kellum and partners’s <a href="https://www.linkedin.com/company/typetura/">Typetura</a>. While we also <a href="https://v7.robweychert.com/blog/2020/03/v7-timeline-taking-shape/">sketch</a> <a href="https://v4.jasonsantamaria.com/articles/pretty-sketchy/">in pencil</a> and spend time looking at well designed books —printed, bound ones as well as digital publications in various devices. And specifically, not just fabulous coffee table books, but books that you’ve reread over and over, to understand what, beyond the text itself, encourages that reading response. So that, together, we may take the experiences of both reading and writing to the next level.</p>
  808.  
  809.  
  810.  
  811. <h2 class="wp-block-heading" id="h-appendix-resources">Appendix: Resources</h2>
  812.  
  813.  
  814.  
  815. <figure class="wp-block-image size-full"><img decoding="async" width="580" height="422" data-attachment-id="15874" data-permalink="https://zeldman.com/2023/08/04/the-next-generation-of-web-layouts/zeld-2023-08-04-at-9-15-44-am/" data-orig-file="https://i0.wp.com/zeldman.com/wp-content/uploads/2023/08/zeld-2023-08-04-at-9.15.44-AM.png?fit=1676%2C1220&amp;ssl=1" data-orig-size="1676,1220" data-comments-opened="0" data-image-meta="{&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;orientation&quot;:&quot;0&quot;}" data-image-title="zeld-2023-08-04-at-9.15.44-AM" data-image-description="" data-image-caption="" data-medium-file="https://i0.wp.com/zeldman.com/wp-content/uploads/2023/08/zeld-2023-08-04-at-9.15.44-AM.png?fit=300%2C218&amp;ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i0.wp.com/zeldman.com/wp-content/uploads/2023/08/zeld-2023-08-04-at-9.15.44-AM.png?fit=1024%2C745&amp;ssl=1" src="https://i0.wp.com/www.zeldman.com/wp-content/zeld-2023-08-04-at-9.15.44-AM.png?resize=580%2C422&#038;ssl=1" alt="" class="wp-image-15874" data-recalc-dims="1"/></figure>
  816.  
  817.  
  818.  
  819. <p>If you’re new to the interplay between design and code on the open web, or if you just want a refresher, here are some evergreen links for your further learning and pleasure:</p>
  820.  
  821.  
  822.  
  823. <ul>
  824. <li><a href="https://www.smashingmagazine.com/2018/05/guide-css-layout/">Getting Started with CSS Layout—Rachel Andrew, <em>Smashing Magazine</em></a></li>
  825.  
  826.  
  827.  
  828. <li><a href="https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/CSS/CSS_Grid_Layout">CSS Grid Layout—MDN web docs</a></li>
  829.  
  830.  
  831.  
  832. <li><a href="https://gridbyexample.com/examples/">Grid by Example—Rachel Andrew</a></li>
  833.  
  834.  
  835.  
  836. <li><a href="https://css-tricks.com/snippets/css/complete-guide-grid/">A Complete Guide to Grid—Chris House, CSS-Tricks</a></li>
  837.  
  838.  
  839.  
  840. <li><a href="https://alistapart.com/article/practical-grid">Practical CSS Grid: Adding Grid to an Existing Design—Eric Meyer,&nbsp;<em>A List Apart</em></a></li>
  841.  
  842.  
  843.  
  844. <li><a href="http://labs.jensimmons.com/">Jen Simmons Labs</a></li>
  845.  
  846.  
  847.  
  848. <li><a href="https://www.youtube.com/layoutland">Layout Land—YouTube</a></li>
  849.  
  850.  
  851.  
  852. <li><a href="https://abookapart.com/products/the-new-css-layout">A Book Apart:&nbsp;<em>The New CSS Layout</em>, by Rachel Andrew</a></li>
  853.  
  854.  
  855.  
  856. <li><a href="https://alistapart.com/article/the-story-of-css-grid-from-its-creators">The Story of CSS Grid, from its Creators—Aaron Gustafson,&nbsp;<em>A List Apart</em></a></li>
  857.  
  858.  
  859.  
  860. <li><a href="http://www.zeldman.com/2018/05/02/transcript-intrinsic-web-design-with-jen-simmons-the-big-web-show/">Transcript: Intrinsic Web Design with Jen Simmons (The Big Web Show)</a></li>
  861.  
  862.  
  863.  
  864. <li><a href="https://www.zeldman.com/2016/01/11/cssgrid/">CSS Grid Layout with Rachel Andrew (The Big Web Show)</a></li>
  865.  
  866.  
  867.  
  868. <li><a href="https://studiozeldman.github.io/poynter-style-guide-2017/">My Poynter Style Guide</a></li>
  869.  
  870.  
  871.  
  872. <li><a href="https://www.zeldman.com/2017/02/06/readable-branded-design/">Authoritative, Readable, Branded: Report from Poynter Design Challenge, Part 2</a></li>
  873. </ul>
  874.  
  875.  
  876.  
  877. <p><br /></p>
  878. <p>The post <a href="https://zeldman.com/2023/08/04/the-next-generation-of-web-layouts/">The Next Generation of Web Layouts</a> appeared first on <a href="https://zeldman.com">Zeldman on Web and Interaction Design</a>.</p>
  879. ]]></content:encoded>
  880. <post-id xmlns="com-wordpress:feed-additions:1">15868</post-id> </item>
  881. <item>
  882. <title>ARG for thee and me</title>
  883. <link>https://zeldman.com/2023/06/13/arg-for-thee-and-me/</link>
  884. <dc:creator><![CDATA[L. Jeffrey Zeldman]]></dc:creator>
  885. <pubDate>Tue, 13 Jun 2023 21:53:16 +0000</pubDate>
  886. <category><![CDATA[automattic]]></category>
  887. <category><![CDATA[family]]></category>
  888. <category><![CDATA[glamorous]]></category>
  889. <category><![CDATA[Health]]></category>
  890. <category><![CDATA[love]]></category>
  891. <category><![CDATA[parenting]]></category>
  892. <category><![CDATA[Serenity]]></category>
  893. <category><![CDATA[essentials]]></category>
  894. <category><![CDATA[Zeldman]]></category>
  895. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://www.zeldman.com/?p=15833</guid>
  896.  
  897. <description><![CDATA[<p>When I joined a tech company after working for myself for 20 years, the corporate world had changed in many ways. One, in particular, struck me. My old jobs had existed in environments so laddish and rowdy that even I, as a man, had felt uncomfortable in them. So I’d gotten out. For 20 years, [&#8230;]</p>
  898. <p>The post <a href="https://zeldman.com/2023/06/13/arg-for-thee-and-me/">ARG for thee and me</a> appeared first on <a href="https://zeldman.com">Zeldman on Web and Interaction Design</a>.</p>
  899. ]]></description>
  900. <content:encoded><![CDATA[
  901. <figure class="wp-block-image alignwide size-full"><img loading="lazy" decoding="async" width="580" height="435" data-attachment-id="15841" data-permalink="https://zeldman.com/2023/06/13/arg-for-thee-and-me/img_7501/" data-orig-file="https://i0.wp.com/zeldman.com/wp-content/uploads/2023/06/IMG_7501.jpg?fit=2048%2C1536&amp;ssl=1" data-orig-size="2048,1536" data-comments-opened="0" data-image-meta="{&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;orientation&quot;:&quot;1&quot;}" data-image-title="IMG_7501" data-image-description="" data-image-caption="" data-medium-file="https://i0.wp.com/zeldman.com/wp-content/uploads/2023/06/IMG_7501.jpg?fit=300%2C225&amp;ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i0.wp.com/zeldman.com/wp-content/uploads/2023/06/IMG_7501.jpg?fit=1024%2C768&amp;ssl=1" src="https://i0.wp.com/www.zeldman.com/wp-content/IMG_7501.jpg?resize=580%2C435&#038;ssl=1" alt="Drawing by Ava Zeldman from several years ago portrays her father, Jeffrey Zeldman, as a king. The word &quot;king&quot; and the secondary text &quot;@ zeldman&quot; are written on the page, drawn by finger. The entire piece was drawn by finger on an iPad. The cartoon portrait is surprisingly accurate while also conjuring feelings of antiquity. There is a pink wash over the digital canvas. " class="wp-image-15841" data-recalc-dims="1"/></figure>
  902.  
  903.  
  904.  
  905. <p class="has-drop-cap has-normal-font-size">When I joined a tech company after working for myself for 20 years, the corporate world had changed in many ways. One, in particular, struck me. My old jobs had existed in environments so laddish and rowdy that even I, as a man, had felt uncomfortable in them. So I’d gotten out. <br /><br />For 20 years, I ran my own businesses. I prioritized impact over profit. I prized adherence to a set of beliefs over survival. If marketplace disruptions made pivoting to an ugly business model the only way to keep a company going, I shut that company down—even when I wasn’t sure what I would do next.</p>
  906.  
  907.  
  908.  
  909. <p>After shutting down enough of my companies to convince me that maybe “business” wasn’t my strength, what I did next, in 2019, was to join&nbsp;<a href="https://automattic.com/">Automattic, Inc.</a>—<a href="https://automattic.com/about/">the people behind</a>&nbsp;WordPress.com, Jetpack, WooCommerce, Simplenote, Tumblr, and other web-based empowerment tools.<br /><br />It’s nothing like the places where I used to work.<br /></p>
  910.  
  911.  
  912.  
  913. <p>We believe in Open Source. Follow a <a href="https://automattic.com/creed/">Creed</a>. Instead of laddishness, we support and even celebrate difference. One way that support flows is through <a href="https://automattic.com/automattician-resource-groups/">Employee Resource Groups</a>, which we at Automattic call Automattician Resource Groups, or ARGs—so that’s the name I’ll use here.</p>
  914.  
  915.  
  916.  
  917. <p>ARGs are communities, formed around personal identity and situation, where colleagues connect with and support each other and work together toward common goals. </p>
  918.  
  919.  
  920.  
  921. <p>At Automattic, we have several of these ARG communities. Eventually, as the lead of Automattic’s Employer Brand activity, I plan to join them all. Initially, I joined two: Neurodiverseomattic and Queeromattic. I saw myself as an ally. In joining these two ARGs, I hoped to become wiser and kinder; to increase my ability to support, live, and work with family, friends, and colleagues; to deepen my interpersonal skills; and to grow in compassion and understanding.&nbsp;<br /><br />I accomplished those goals, but I also gained something I hadn’t expected.</p>
  922.  
  923.  
  924.  
  925. <p></p>
  926.  
  927.  
  928.  
  929. <p>It started with Neurodiverseomattic, a group that provides support and resources for neurodivergent Automatticians (including but not limited to autism, ADHD, dyslexia) and their allies. <br /><br />As the dad of an autistic daughter (who also suffers from an alphabet soup of additional diagnoses), I have the joy of loving, living with, and learning from one of the most brilliant minds I’ve ever encountered. But I also have the challenge of supporting someone whose life, through no fault of her own, is often painfully difficult. </p>
  930.  
  931.  
  932.  
  933. <p>I must listen when she needs an ear. Advise when she seeks help—and occasionally when she doesn’t. </p>
  934.  
  935.  
  936.  
  937. <p>Autism, in my daughter’s case, simultaneously includes remarkable, magical, wondrous capabilities, along with painful, mostly social, disabilities.&nbsp;</p>
  938.  
  939.  
  940.  
  941. <p></p>
  942.  
  943.  
  944.  
  945. <p>Some Neurodiverseomattic members are neurodiverse themselves; some are neurotypical but support neurodiverse family members; many, maybe most, are neurodiverse themselves&nbsp;<em>and also</em>&nbsp;support neurodiverse family members.</p>
  946.  
  947.  
  948.  
  949. <p>Over months, the more I shared experiences with members of my ARG, the better I became at meeting the challenges of parenting an autistic, depressed, anxious, dyslexic, artistic, gifted, emotionally intense, profoundly insightful teenager. And the more I came to realize that other members of my family had also been on the spectrum. Like my late father. And maybe my late brother. And, in a different way, my late mom. And…</p>
  950.  
  951.  
  952.  
  953. <p>And the more <a href="https://avazeldman.com/">Ava</a> shared her past experiences of being bullied, misunderstood, abandoned, and confused, the more I realized that I myself had had many of the same feelings and experiences growing up that she was having.<br /><br />Like Ava, I had gone through a period of crying every day at the thought of going to school. The terror of brutal bullying and the shame of not fighting back. The shock of trusted friends laughing at me, not with me, or pretending not to know me. Lubricating their rise in the social ranks by pretending to find me ridiculous. Or maybe not pretending.</p>
  954.  
  955.  
  956.  
  957. <p>Like Ava, I’d concocted strange fantasies to try to understand why these things happened to me. Had I committed some crime? Was I a mistake? Had my parents been bribing my school friends to pretend to like me, and then run out of money?<br /><br />So much of what Ava experienced, I had experienced. And so, it seemed, had many of my neurodiverse colleagues who courageously shared their stories. </p>
  958.  
  959.  
  960.  
  961. <p>And, finally, reader, it sank in: <br /><br />I’m not just the president of hair club for men, I’m also a customer. </p>
  962.  
  963.  
  964.  
  965. <p>I’m on the spectrum. Of course I am. And always have been.&nbsp;Of course. And just never, ever knew.</p>
  966.  
  967.  
  968.  
  969. <p><br /><br />Once I saw it, I was amazed that I’d never realized or even wondered about it.&nbsp;<br /><br />Once I saw it, I was grateful to work at a place where we’re afforded the kind of support that can not only help us improve our people skills, but can also introduce us, on a deeper level, to ourselves.</p>
  970.  
  971.  
  972.  
  973. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  974.  
  975.  
  976.  
  977. <p>And meanwhile, as an ally, I also joined Queeromattic.&nbsp;<a href="https://www.zeldman.com/2022/06/28/im-here/">Need I say more</a>?</p>
  978.  
  979.  
  980.  
  981. <p><br />Okay, I will.</p>
  982.  
  983.  
  984.  
  985. <p>The world I grew up in was so homophobic, and the romantic films I grew up watching were so prescriptive, that I got in touch with my heterosexuality long before I reached puberty … and didn’t recognize my queer side for decades. <br /><br />Not even when I made out with a boy. (Hey, I was drunk.) Or years later, when I made out with another boy. (Hey, I was drunk, and, anyway, he looked like a girl.) </p>
  986.  
  987.  
  988.  
  989. <p>My new self-knowledge is mostly academic. Divorce has freed me of certain illusions, a spiritual practice has brought a taste of inner peace, and aging has eased up on the hormonal gas pedal, so that I no longer confuse attraction for a plan, or feelings for fate. Parenting keeps me plenty busy and fulfilled, and singlehood may not be exciting, but I’ve had enough excitement for multiple lifetimes. </p>
  990.  
  991.  
  992.  
  993. <p>Romantic love is for those still willing to risk everything. I prefer to hold onto what I have left. Because I know it’s a hell of a lot.<br /><br />Thanks to the wisdom, vulnerability, truthfulness, and compassion of the friends I’ve made through my company’s ARGs, I have come to better know myself. It gives me pride, no pun intended. It even grants me serenity. And for that, I am grateful.</p>
  994.  
  995.  
  996.  
  997. <hr class="wp-block-separator has-alpha-channel-opacity is-style-dots"/>
  998.  
  999.  
  1000.  
  1001. <p><em>Illustration by <a href="https://avazeldman.com/">Ava Zeldman</a>.</em> <em>This article <a href="https://medium.com/@zeldman/arg-for-thee-and-me-bbaf94f44e69">also appears on Medium</a>.</em><br /></p>
  1002. <p>The post <a href="https://zeldman.com/2023/06/13/arg-for-thee-and-me/">ARG for thee and me</a> appeared first on <a href="https://zeldman.com">Zeldman on Web and Interaction Design</a>.</p>
  1003. ]]></content:encoded>
  1004. <post-id xmlns="com-wordpress:feed-additions:1">15833</post-id> </item>
  1005. <item>
  1006. <title>My father’s story</title>
  1007. <link>https://zeldman.com/2023/04/12/my-fathers-story/</link>
  1008. <dc:creator><![CDATA[L. Jeffrey Zeldman]]></dc:creator>
  1009. <pubDate>Wed, 12 Apr 2023 19:38:01 +0000</pubDate>
  1010. <category><![CDATA[family]]></category>
  1011. <category><![CDATA[glamorous]]></category>
  1012. <category><![CDATA[author]]></category>
  1013. <category><![CDATA[engineer]]></category>
  1014. <category><![CDATA[engineering]]></category>
  1015. <category><![CDATA[engineers]]></category>
  1016. <category><![CDATA[father]]></category>
  1017. <category><![CDATA[Maurice Zeldman]]></category>
  1018. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://www.zeldman.com/?p=15816</guid>
  1019.  
  1020. <description><![CDATA[<p>When he was eight years old, my dad taught himself to take apart watches and put them back together. He supported his mother by doing watch repairs at that age out of her little jewelry stand, and a few years later by delivering clothes for a Chinese laundry. As a laundry delivery boy, he earned [&#8230;]</p>
  1021. <p>The post <a href="https://zeldman.com/2023/04/12/my-fathers-story/">My father’s story</a> appeared first on <a href="https://zeldman.com">Zeldman on Web and Interaction Design</a>.</p>
  1022. ]]></description>
  1023. <content:encoded><![CDATA[
  1024. <p class="has-large-font-size">When he was eight years old, my dad taught himself to take apart watches and put them back together. He supported his mother by doing watch repairs at that age out of her little jewelry stand, and a few years later by delivering clothes for a Chinese laundry. </p>
  1025.  
  1026.  
  1027.  
  1028. <figure class="wp-block-image size-full is-style-default"><img loading="lazy" decoding="async" width="580" height="653" data-attachment-id="15819" data-permalink="https://zeldman.com/2023/04/12/my-fathers-story/photo643803338649_inner_266-199-650-183-292-621-662-609/" data-orig-file="https://i0.wp.com/zeldman.com/wp-content/uploads/2023/04/Photo643803338649_inner_266-199-650-183-292-621-662-609.jpg?fit=1549%2C1744&amp;ssl=1" data-orig-size="1549,1744" data-comments-opened="0" data-image-meta="{&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;1622102767&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;orientation&quot;:&quot;0&quot;}" data-image-title="Photo643803338649_inner_266-199-650-183-292-621-662-609" data-image-description="" data-image-caption="" data-medium-file="https://i0.wp.com/zeldman.com/wp-content/uploads/2023/04/Photo643803338649_inner_266-199-650-183-292-621-662-609.jpg?fit=266%2C300&amp;ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i0.wp.com/zeldman.com/wp-content/uploads/2023/04/Photo643803338649_inner_266-199-650-183-292-621-662-609.jpg?fit=910%2C1024&amp;ssl=1" src="https://i0.wp.com/www.zeldman.com/wp-content/Photo643803338649_inner_266-199-650-183-292-621-662-609.jpg?resize=580%2C653&#038;ssl=1" alt="My father, Maurice Zeldman, as a young man." class="wp-image-15819" data-recalc-dims="1"/></figure>
  1029.  
  1030.  
  1031.  
  1032. <p>As a laundry delivery boy, he earned no salary—he lived off tips. <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emanuel_Glicen_Romano">Emanuel Romano</a>, a starving modern painter and customer of the laundry service, could not afford to tip Murray, but in lieu of cash, he offered to teach the boy how to paint. My father accepted the lessons and painted for most of the rest of his life. (Our home in Pittsburgh would one day be filled with Murray’s paintings. All would be lost in the flood that later destroyed his home.)</p>
  1033.  
  1034.  
  1035.  
  1036. <p>In his early years, Murray couldn’t read. He was probably autistic and dyslexic, but nobody back then knew from that. And a public school in Queens in the 1930s was certainly not going to have the resources to help a child with those issues. When beating him didn’t improve his skills, the school labeled him “sub-normal” and stuck him in Special Ed. He would likely have remained there and become a janitor, or a grifter like his father (my grandfather). But one remarkable public school teacher spotted Murray’s gifts. “This boy is brilliant,” he said.&nbsp;</p>
  1037.  
  1038.  
  1039.  
  1040. <p>That changed everything. <br /><br />(Everything except my grandfather, from whom my dad got nothing but violence and psychological cruelty. When Murray was one of two kids from his neighborhood to be accepted into Bronx Science—a rigorously academic public high school specializing in engineering, mathematics, and the sciences—his father said simply, “They’ve made a mistake.”)</p>
  1041.  
  1042.  
  1043.  
  1044. <p>Murray enlisted in the Navy at 17 to fight the Nazis, but they surrendered before he reached Germany. The navy then shipped him off to Japan, but the atomic bomb got there first. </p>
  1045.  
  1046.  
  1047.  
  1048. <p>On returning after the war, he attended CUNY on the G.I. Bill, studying electrical engineering. He eventually took his Masters—not bad for a slum kid from a poor family. He would go on to work in robotics, fluid hydraulics, and even early typesetting computers. He came the director of a Research &amp; Development laboratory in Pittsburgh, and afterwards, spent 25 years working for himself as an author, consultant, and lecturer.</p>
  1049.  
  1050.  
  1051.  
  1052. <p>Below is his biography from twenty years ago. At the time, he was still vigorous, still flying all over the world as a consultant and lecturer. If you wish, you may skip down to the bottom, where I tell what became of him.</p>
  1053.  
  1054.  
  1055.  
  1056. <blockquote class="wp-block-quote is-layout-flow wp-block-quote-is-layout-flow">
  1057. <p><strong>Maurice Zeldman, President</strong></p>
  1058.  
  1059.  
  1060.  
  1061. <p>A world authority in the field of project management, Mr. Zeldman has consulted and led seminars for over 180 client organizations. His in-company and public seminars have been presented around the world. Advanced project managers use his special techniques to create realistic estimates, time frames, and implementations which enable the completion of these development projects on schedule and within budgets.</p>
  1062.  
  1063.  
  1064.  
  1065. <p>Before launching his EMZEE Associates consultancy, Mr. Zeldman served with Rockwell International as the Corporate Director of Technical Development for the Industrial &amp; Marine Divisions. Responsible for all of the division&#8217;s new product and process development projects, he designed, built, and staffed an Engineering Development Center for the corporation.</p>
  1066.  
  1067.  
  1068.  
  1069. <p>Previously Mr. Zeldman served with Perkin Elmer in the development of an Atomic Absorption Spectrometer, and with American Machine &amp; Foundry as Chief Engineer of the Versatran Robot business venture.</p>
  1070.  
  1071.  
  1072.  
  1073. <p>He is the author of “Keeping Technical Projects on Target” and “Robotics: What Every Engineer Should Know.” (<a href="https://www.amazon.com/stores/Maurice-I.-Zeldman/author/B001KI7L8U?ref=ap_rdr&amp;store_ref=ap_rdr&amp;isDramIntegrated=true&amp;shoppingPortalEnabled=true">Book links at Amazon</a>.)</p>
  1074. </blockquote>
  1075.  
  1076.  
  1077.  
  1078. <p>My mother died in 2000 after seven years with Alzheimer’s. </p>
  1079.  
  1080.  
  1081.  
  1082. <p>My father remarried the next year. </p>
  1083.  
  1084.  
  1085.  
  1086. <p>His second wife divorced him when he came down with dementia at age 91. </p>
  1087.  
  1088.  
  1089.  
  1090. <p>He was also experiencing seizures. While he was hospitalized for one of them, his house flooded, and everything he owned was destroyed. </p>
  1091.  
  1092.  
  1093.  
  1094. <p>My brother Pete found our father a clean, decent nursing home to live in. </p>
  1095.  
  1096.  
  1097.  
  1098. <p>There, his dementia progressed quickly. </p>
  1099.  
  1100.  
  1101.  
  1102. <p>The last time he saw me with my daughter, he mistook her for my wife and asked how we two had met. </p>
  1103.  
  1104.  
  1105.  
  1106. <p>He accused the nursing home staff of soiling his underwear while he slept. </p>
  1107.  
  1108.  
  1109.  
  1110. <p>He often sneaked out of the facility to buy scissors, which he smuggled back into the home. (Scissors were contraband because the home feared that their demented patients would use the blades to harm themselves. He had no practical use for the scissors, but was incensed at being told he could not have them.)</p>
  1111.  
  1112.  
  1113.  
  1114. <p>During the first year of the Covid pandemic, he contracted pneumonia. </p>
  1115.  
  1116.  
  1117.  
  1118. <p>He died at age 93 while in palliative care. He was alone.</p>
  1119.  
  1120.  
  1121.  
  1122. <p>#</p>
  1123. <p>The post <a href="https://zeldman.com/2023/04/12/my-fathers-story/">My father’s story</a> appeared first on <a href="https://zeldman.com">Zeldman on Web and Interaction Design</a>.</p>
  1124. ]]></content:encoded>
  1125. <post-id xmlns="com-wordpress:feed-additions:1">15816</post-id> </item>
  1126. <item>
  1127. <title>His Service</title>
  1128. <link>https://zeldman.com/2023/03/31/his-service/</link>
  1129. <dc:creator><![CDATA[L. Jeffrey Zeldman]]></dc:creator>
  1130. <pubDate>Sat, 01 Apr 2023 00:24:19 +0000</pubDate>
  1131. <category><![CDATA[Pete Zeldman]]></category>
  1132. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://www.zeldman.com/?p=15806</guid>
  1133.  
  1134. <description><![CDATA[<p>We laid my brother Pete to rest today. They brought him out in a bespoke coffin his wife Cheryl designed. It had a red top, and its white sides were covered in Pete’s quirky figure drawings. He’d have loved it. Several of us had written about Pete, and the officiant read our statements to the [&#8230;]</p>
  1135. <p>The post <a href="https://zeldman.com/2023/03/31/his-service/">His Service</a> appeared first on <a href="https://zeldman.com">Zeldman on Web and Interaction Design</a>.</p>
  1136. ]]></description>
  1137. <content:encoded><![CDATA[
  1138. <p class="has-large-font-size">We laid my brother Pete to rest today. They brought him out in a bespoke coffin his wife Cheryl designed. It had a red top, and its white sides were covered in Pete’s quirky figure drawings. He’d have loved it.</p>
  1139.  
  1140.  
  1141.  
  1142. <p>Several of us had written about Pete, and the officiant read our statements to the assembly. Our words were sweet and funny and loving and not at all conventional. (How could they be? The man was anything but.)</p>
  1143.  
  1144.  
  1145.  
  1146. <p>Then Pete’s friend Andy Davy delivered the eulogy. It was not about the musician’s musician or the beloved music teacher but the private man: his warmth, his intelligence, the intensity of his friendship.</p>
  1147.  
  1148.  
  1149.  
  1150. <p>Cheryl wrote the final tribute. It was the saddest and most beautiful of all. The officiant read it to us so Cheryl would not have to speak.</p>
  1151.  
  1152.  
  1153.  
  1154. <p>Then, as the auditorium loudspeakers played—what else?—a Pete Zeldman drum solo, the curtains closed on the lonely little red-topped coffin, and the people rose and filed slowly away.</p>
  1155.  
  1156.  
  1157.  
  1158. <p></p>
  1159.  
  1160.  
  1161.  
  1162. <p></p>
  1163. <p>The post <a href="https://zeldman.com/2023/03/31/his-service/">His Service</a> appeared first on <a href="https://zeldman.com">Zeldman on Web and Interaction Design</a>.</p>
  1164. ]]></content:encoded>
  1165. <post-id xmlns="com-wordpress:feed-additions:1">15806</post-id> </item>
  1166. <item>
  1167. <title>Immersive Content and Usability</title>
  1168. <link>https://zeldman.com/2023/03/30/immersive-content-and-usability/</link>
  1169. <dc:creator><![CDATA[L. Jeffrey Zeldman]]></dc:creator>
  1170. <pubDate>Thu, 30 Mar 2023 17:25:38 +0000</pubDate>
  1171. <category><![CDATA[A Book Apart]]></category>
  1172. <category><![CDATA[Accessibility]]></category>
  1173. <category><![CDATA[Advocacy]]></category>
  1174. <category><![CDATA[Authoring]]></category>
  1175. <category><![CDATA[Best practices]]></category>
  1176. <category><![CDATA[books]]></category>
  1177. <category><![CDATA[Design]]></category>
  1178. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://www.zeldman.com/?p=15800</guid>
  1179.  
  1180. <description><![CDATA[<p>As the lines between our physical and digital surroundings continue to blur, it’s more important than ever to design usable and accessible content for our ever-expanding array of contexts. In 2021, A Book Apart and I were delighted to bring you Preston So’s Voice Content and Usability, the definitive book on voice content, and A [&#8230;]</p>
  1181. <p>The post <a href="https://zeldman.com/2023/03/30/immersive-content-and-usability/">Immersive Content and Usability</a> appeared first on <a href="https://zeldman.com">Zeldman on Web and Interaction Design</a>.</p>
  1182. ]]></description>
  1183. <content:encoded><![CDATA[
  1184. <figure class="wp-block-image alignfull size-full"><img loading="lazy" decoding="async" width="580" height="414" data-attachment-id="15803" data-permalink="https://zeldman.com/2023/03/30/immersive-content-and-usability/aba-mug-group-3-hp_1100x2x-progressive-png/" data-orig-file="https://i0.wp.com/zeldman.com/wp-content/uploads/2023/03/aba-mug-group-3-hp_1100x@2x.progressive.png.webp?fit=2200%2C1571&amp;ssl=1" data-orig-size="2200,1571" data-comments-opened="0" data-image-meta="{&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;orientation&quot;:&quot;0&quot;}" data-image-title="aba-mug-group-3-hp_1100x@2x.progressive.png" data-image-description="" data-image-caption="" data-medium-file="https://i0.wp.com/zeldman.com/wp-content/uploads/2023/03/aba-mug-group-3-hp_1100x@2x.progressive.png.webp?fit=300%2C214&amp;ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i0.wp.com/zeldman.com/wp-content/uploads/2023/03/aba-mug-group-3-hp_1100x@2x.progressive.png.webp?fit=1024%2C731&amp;ssl=1" src="https://i0.wp.com/www.zeldman.com/wp-content/aba-mug-group-3-hp_1100x@2x.progressive.png.webp?resize=580%2C414&#038;ssl=1" alt="So little time, so many wonderful, evergreen titles. The A Book Apart library for people who design, write, and code ... in coffee mug format." class="wp-image-15803" data-recalc-dims="1"/></figure>
  1185.  
  1186.  
  1187.  
  1188. <p class="has-large-font-size">As the lines between our physical and digital surroundings continue to blur, it’s more important than ever to design usable and accessible content for our ever-expanding array of contexts.</p>
  1189.  
  1190.  
  1191.  
  1192. <p>In 2021, <a href="https://abookapart.com/">A Book Apart</a> and I were delighted to bring you Preston So’s <em><a href="https://abookapart.com/products/voice-content-and-usability">Voice Content and Usability</a></em>, the <em>definitive</em> book on voice content, and A Book Apart’s first voice title.</p>
  1193.  
  1194.  
  1195.  
  1196. <p>Now, in 2023, we’re thrilled to present Preston’s brilliant follow-up, <strong><em><a href="https://abookapart.com/products/immersive-content-and-usability">Immersive Content and Usability</a></em></strong>, coming April 18.<br /><br />Armed with this book, you’ll create incisive and inclusive user-centered experiences across augmented, extended, and virtual realities, transforming the physical world into an exciting new canvas for content.</p>
  1197.  
  1198.  
  1199.  
  1200. <p>Pre-order now! <a href="https://abookapart.com/products/immersive-content-and-usability">https://abookapart.com/products/immersive-content-and-usability</a></p>
  1201. <p>The post <a href="https://zeldman.com/2023/03/30/immersive-content-and-usability/">Immersive Content and Usability</a> appeared first on <a href="https://zeldman.com">Zeldman on Web and Interaction Design</a>.</p>
  1202. ]]></content:encoded>
  1203. <post-id xmlns="com-wordpress:feed-additions:1">15800</post-id> </item>
  1204. <item>
  1205. <title>Valediction</title>
  1206. <link>https://zeldman.com/2023/03/20/valediction/</link>
  1207. <dc:creator><![CDATA[L. Jeffrey Zeldman]]></dc:creator>
  1208. <pubDate>Mon, 20 Mar 2023 16:46:10 +0000</pubDate>
  1209. <category><![CDATA[family]]></category>
  1210. <category><![CDATA[glamorous]]></category>
  1211. <category><![CDATA[Pete Zeldman]]></category>
  1212. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://www.zeldman.com/?p=15793</guid>
  1213.  
  1214. <description><![CDATA[<p>When my mother was pregnant with my younger brother Pete, my father took her to see West Side Story in New York. My mom said every time the orchestra played, Pete kicked in her womb, keeping perfect time. Some people are born to play the drums. Pete played before he was born. He never stopped. [&#8230;]</p>
  1215. <p>The post <a href="https://zeldman.com/2023/03/20/valediction/">Valediction</a> appeared first on <a href="https://zeldman.com">Zeldman on Web and Interaction Design</a>.</p>
  1216. ]]></description>
  1217. <content:encoded><![CDATA[
  1218. <p class="has-large-font-size">When my mother was pregnant with my younger brother Pete, my father took her to see <em>West Side Story</em> in New York. My mom said every time the orchestra played, Pete kicked in her womb, keeping perfect time. Some people are born to play the drums. Pete played before he was born. He never stopped.</p>
  1219.  
  1220.  
  1221.  
  1222. <figure data-carousel-extra='{"blog_id":1,"permalink":"https:\/\/zeldman.com\/2023\/03\/20\/valediction\/"}'  class="wp-block-gallery has-nested-images columns-default is-cropped wp-block-gallery-1 is-layout-flex wp-block-gallery-is-layout-flex">
  1223. <figure class="wp-block-image size-large"><img loading="lazy" decoding="async" width="580" height="859" data-attachment-id="15794" data-permalink="https://zeldman.com/2023/03/20/valediction/r1-02729-0043/" data-orig-file="https://i0.wp.com/zeldman.com/wp-content/uploads/2023/03/R1-02729-0043.jpeg?fit=1228%2C1818&amp;ssl=1" data-orig-size="1228,1818" data-comments-opened="0" data-image-meta="{&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;1576664742&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;orientation&quot;:&quot;0&quot;}" data-image-title="" data-image-description="" data-image-caption="" data-medium-file="https://i0.wp.com/zeldman.com/wp-content/uploads/2023/03/R1-02729-0043.jpeg?fit=203%2C300&amp;ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i0.wp.com/zeldman.com/wp-content/uploads/2023/03/R1-02729-0043.jpeg?fit=692%2C1024&amp;ssl=1" data-id="15794" src="https://i0.wp.com/www.zeldman.com/wp-content/R1-02729-0043.jpeg?resize=580%2C859&#038;ssl=1" alt="Pete Zeldman as a child. Sitting on a green chair in a green room, his arm resting on a table. Pete has dark hair and is wearing shorts or a bathing suit." class="wp-image-15794" data-recalc-dims="1"/></figure>
  1224.  
  1225.  
  1226.  
  1227. <figure class="wp-block-image size-large"><img loading="lazy" decoding="async" width="580" height="859" data-attachment-id="15795" data-permalink="https://zeldman.com/2023/03/20/valediction/r1-02729-0050/" data-orig-file="https://i0.wp.com/zeldman.com/wp-content/uploads/2023/03/R1-02729-0050.jpeg?fit=1228%2C1818&amp;ssl=1" data-orig-size="1228,1818" data-comments-opened="0" data-image-meta="{&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;1576664742&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;orientation&quot;:&quot;0&quot;}" data-image-title="R1-02729-0050" data-image-description="" data-image-caption="" data-medium-file="https://i0.wp.com/zeldman.com/wp-content/uploads/2023/03/R1-02729-0050.jpeg?fit=203%2C300&amp;ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i0.wp.com/zeldman.com/wp-content/uploads/2023/03/R1-02729-0050.jpeg?fit=692%2C1024&amp;ssl=1" data-id="15795" src="https://i0.wp.com/www.zeldman.com/wp-content/R1-02729-0050.jpeg?resize=580%2C859&#038;ssl=1" alt="Murray Zeldman (RIP) dragging his sons Pete (RIP, yellow jacket) and Jeffrey (grimacing, red South Park style winter head wear) on a sled through the snow. Probably taken in West Hempstead, Long Island, New York, although it might have been elsewhere." class="wp-image-15795" data-recalc-dims="1"/></figure>
  1228.  
  1229.  
  1230.  
  1231. <figure class="wp-block-image size-large"><img loading="lazy" decoding="async" width="580" height="861" data-attachment-id="15796" data-permalink="https://zeldman.com/2023/03/20/valediction/scan-18/" data-orig-file="https://i0.wp.com/zeldman.com/wp-content/uploads/2023/03/Scan-18.jpg?fit=702%2C1042&amp;ssl=1" data-orig-size="702,1042" data-comments-opened="0" data-image-meta="{&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;1399204976&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;orientation&quot;:&quot;1&quot;}" data-image-title="" data-image-description="" data-image-caption="" data-medium-file="https://i0.wp.com/zeldman.com/wp-content/uploads/2023/03/Scan-18.jpg?fit=202%2C300&amp;ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i0.wp.com/zeldman.com/wp-content/uploads/2023/03/Scan-18.jpg?fit=690%2C1024&amp;ssl=1" data-id="15796" src="https://i0.wp.com/www.zeldman.com/wp-content/Scan-18.jpg?resize=580%2C861&#038;ssl=1" alt="Posed portrait photograph of Jeffrey and Peter Zeldman as children. Jeffrey, about seven years old, wears business attire. Pete, about three, wears checked overall shorts." class="wp-image-15796" data-recalc-dims="1"/></figure>
  1232. </figure>
  1233.  
  1234.  
  1235.  
  1236. <p>He loved music and courted danger. At age two, one day, he took my father’s LPs out of the record cabinet, spread them on the floor, and walked on them. When my father came home, he spanked Pete. The next day, Pete did the same thing again. And again, my father punished him. Every day it was the same. One day my mother tried to intervene as my brother was just starting to lay out a fresh pile of LPs. “Peter,” she said. “Do you want Daddy to spank you?” My brother shivered in fear. And continued to spread the records on the floor. Finally, my father put a combination lock on his record cabinet. My brother picked the lock.</p>
  1237.  
  1238.  
  1239.  
  1240. <p>Pete had his own ideas. Most were better than walking on Dad’s records. Many were brilliant. Some people march to their own drum. Pete marched to a whole set.&nbsp;</p>
  1241.  
  1242.  
  1243.  
  1244. <p>You could not stop him. He was full of life, full of energy. My idea of a great summer vacation was inhaling the musty aroma of books in an air conditioned library. But my brother was out from sunup till sundown—running around, making friends, buying candy for all the other kids in the neighborhood out of his tiny allowance. He loved other people. He paid attention to them.</p>
  1245.  
  1246.  
  1247.  
  1248. <p>I have a lifetime of stories about him. So does everyone who knew him. He was full of life, full of energy, a clock that never wound down. And now, he’s gone, leaving a Pete Zeldman shaped hole in the universe.&nbsp;</p>
  1249.  
  1250.  
  1251.  
  1252. <p>Goodbye, brother. I love you. I will keep your memory close. And maybe when time ends for me, too, I will see you again.</p>
  1253.  
  1254.  
  1255.  
  1256. <hr class="wp-block-separator has-alpha-channel-opacity"/>
  1257.  
  1258.  
  1259.  
  1260. <p><em>Written for</em> <a href="https://lodge.afuneralnotice.com/n/49dadf50?fbclid=IwAR3o-FZEjTxQqa3VSjWsKfvUZO_er42rfyyRoEM_yHTzwSdYoj54SxKW_Q4"><em>Funeral Service, 31 March, 2023</em></a>. </p>
  1261. <p>The post <a href="https://zeldman.com/2023/03/20/valediction/">Valediction</a> appeared first on <a href="https://zeldman.com">Zeldman on Web and Interaction Design</a>.</p>
  1262. ]]></content:encoded>
  1263. <post-id xmlns="com-wordpress:feed-additions:1">15793</post-id> </item>
  1264. <item>
  1265. <title>Twitter Blues</title>
  1266. <link>https://zeldman.com/2023/02/02/twitter-blue/</link>
  1267. <dc:creator><![CDATA[L. Jeffrey Zeldman]]></dc:creator>
  1268. <pubDate>Thu, 02 Feb 2023 14:01:53 +0000</pubDate>
  1269. <category><![CDATA[Design]]></category>
  1270. <category><![CDATA[industry]]></category>
  1271. <category><![CDATA[tweets]]></category>
  1272. <category><![CDATA[twitter]]></category>
  1273. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://www.zeldman.com/?p=15758</guid>
  1274.  
  1275. <description><![CDATA[<p>Before the present owner, I was a Twitter Blue customer, because I always pay for software—to support its creators and help prevent it from disappearing, as so many great websites and platforms have done over the years.&#160; It wasn’t about the Twitter Blue pro features, to be honest, because they were few and inessential. For [&#8230;]</p>
  1276. <p>The post <a href="https://zeldman.com/2023/02/02/twitter-blue/">Twitter Blues</a> appeared first on <a href="https://zeldman.com">Zeldman on Web and Interaction Design</a>.</p>
  1277. ]]></description>
  1278. <content:encoded><![CDATA[
  1279. <p class="has-large-font-size">Before the present owner, I was a Twitter Blue customer, because I always pay for software—to support its creators and help prevent it from disappearing, as so many great websites and platforms have done over the years.&nbsp;</p>
  1280.  
  1281.  
  1282.  
  1283. <p>It wasn’t about the Twitter Blue pro features, to be honest, because they were few and inessential.<br /><br />For instance, the ability to unsend a tweet for 30 seconds turned out to be more of an annoyance than an asset. Its value could be replicated without the feature, simply by taking a few seconds to reread your post before hitting Send. Most of the time, the feature felt to me like an annoying delay before every tweet went up. <br /><br />And as Twitter compulsion is closely connected to the dopamine hit of instant gratification—<em>voila! your thought is out there in the world, quick as the firing of a synapse!</em>—waiting 30 seconds soon came to feel like a drag on the experience, not a benefit worth paying for. Like a cigarette that takes thirty seconds to deliver nicotine when you drag on it.</p>
  1284.  
  1285.  
  1286.  
  1287. <p>Nevertheless, as long as I had the income to do so, I would have continued to pay, simply to help Twitter keep going. <br /><br />Because we’ve all seen what happens to beloved platforms after they run for too long on fumes. Investors grab lifeboats. Founders sell to a new owner who rapidly <a href="https://pluralistic.net/2023/01/21/potemkin-ai/#hey-guys">enshittifies</a> the platform. Or the product disappears. Or it lingers as an under-resourced shadow of its former self, like a loved one with a tragically wasting disease. (Something I know far too much about.)</p>
  1288.  
  1289.  
  1290.  
  1291. <p>Besides: Twitter, as a town square, was important. Leaving its future health to the mercies of subscription models and advertising was risky enough. <br /><br />Just as, despite the many obstacles to true representative democracy that threaten my country, it remains my sacred duty to vote, so too—as a user and fellow creator—did it feel like my duty to vote for Twitter’s continued existence with my wallet. (Again, acknowledging the privilege of having employment and at least a modicum of disposable income.)&nbsp;</p>
  1292.  
  1293.  
  1294.  
  1295. <p>I won’t rehash the history of the new regime’s dangerous decisions and confounding errors of judgement—and that’s putting it charitably. Or share my anxieties about the Beloved Platform turning into a red-pilled fuckfest of racist, sexist pile-ons.&nbsp;</p>
  1296.  
  1297.  
  1298.  
  1299. <p>Even when a longtime web acquaintance persuaded the new owner to “democratize” the blue checkmark by charging for it (and we’ll skip that history, which is still in progress, as well), I kept using Twitter, kept paying my Twitter Blue dues, and kept hoping for the best. <br /><br />Even as brilliant people with vital jobs got kicked out by the thousands. Even when respected friends and colleagues abandoned Twitter like it was a room that smelled of corpses. Even when each day’s freshly absurd Twitter news cycle conjured disbelief worthy of U.S. Election Night 2016.</p>
  1300.  
  1301.  
  1302.  
  1303. <p>“Maybe it won’t be so bad,” I whispered to myself.<br /><br />“I’ll hang in there,” I said. <br /><br />As if continuing to use Twitter was some bizarre loyalty test to the platform itself, and not to the ideas and human beings that drove it. Like loyalty to a friend who drives his car into trees while drunk. “I’m not going to abandon him now, he needs help.”</p>
  1304.  
  1305.  
  1306.  
  1307. <p>Here comes the punchline: one day Twitter emailed me to say that my Twitter Blue account was being discontinued, but I would soon have the opportunity to pay for an exciting *new* version of Twitter Blue.<br /><br />Then Twitter emailed me inviting me to roll over my credit card so as to become a member of the new Twitter Blue. Which made me wonder: do I continue to go by the principle of paying for software I use, even when I disapprove of the direction in which a new owner is taking the platform? Or do I register my dislike of that direction by refusing to pay, even if it accelerates the death of the platform? (Whereas I was still hoping for the platform to survive and right itself, no pun intended.)</p>
  1308.  
  1309.  
  1310.  
  1311. <p>In the end, and I know I’ll lose many of you here, I decided to keep paying. And now the promised punchline: Twitter was unable to accept my credit card, and the subscription failed.&nbsp;</p>
  1312.  
  1313.  
  1314.  
  1315. <p>I tried for maybe 30 minutes.<br /><br />I’ve successfully used software for over 30 years, and I’ve written a few things about UX and web design and development, so I generally have some idea of what I’m doing when I interact with internet content, and I also know that shopping carts are supposed to work. They’re not supposed to make users think. They’re supposed to make it easy to pay, whether you actually need the product or not.</p>
  1316.  
  1317.  
  1318.  
  1319. <p>Yet somehow—I wonder if it had to do with (illegally) firing most of the staff?—Twitter was not able to take my money.<br /><br />The attempt to subscribe failed. Over and over. Perhaps it was my higher power telling me something. Perhaps it was my unconscious telling me something. But most likely, it was simple engineering and UX incompetence, caused by the removal of almost everyone at Twitter who knew what they were doing.</p>
  1320.  
  1321.  
  1322.  
  1323. <p>And the second punchline? I still have my blue checkmark. Which I’ve had since, like, 2006, or whenever the original Twitter first bestowed it. I guess because I’m of some small note in my field.<br /><br />Of course, for all of having 322K followers, almost nobody sees my tweets, as the stats (and lack of engagement) plainly show me. <br /><br />So either most of my 322K followers have abandoned the platform, or the algorithm works to minimize my footprint. And, theoretically, that latter situation would change if I paid Twitter the monthly $8—or, I believe it has gone up to $11, now, with price increases over time part of this week’s strategy to frighten folks into subscribing while they can still afford do so.</p>
  1324.  
  1325.  
  1326.  
  1327. <p>But I tried to give Twitter my money, even when I had Enormous Doubts that it was the right thing to do. And they simply wouldn’t take it. La de da. And for now I’m content to wait, peck my posts into the maw of the blind white whale, and see what changes next.&nbsp;</p>
  1328.  
  1329.  
  1330.  
  1331. <p>Twitter Blue, Twitter Blues, Twitter blew it.</p>
  1332. <p>The post <a href="https://zeldman.com/2023/02/02/twitter-blue/">Twitter Blues</a> appeared first on <a href="https://zeldman.com">Zeldman on Web and Interaction Design</a>.</p>
  1333. ]]></content:encoded>
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