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  31. <title>Idioms Related To Building</title>
  32. <link>https://hicafe.app/learn-english/words/essential-idioms-for-speaking-en/idiom-related-to-building/</link>
  33. <dc:creator><![CDATA[hcbMatt]]></dc:creator>
  34. <pubDate>Thu, 25 Jul 2024 11:21:42 +0000</pubDate>
  35. <category><![CDATA[Idioms]]></category>
  36. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://hicafe.app/?p=5570</guid>
  37.  
  38. <description><![CDATA[<p>This is lesson 5 from Idiom Part 2. Each idiom is followed by its definition and examples. After you learn them, you can use them in your daily conversation. &#160; Previous English Idiom Lesson In our previous English idiom lesson, we cover below: Idioms Related To Breaking &#160; English Idiom Part 2- Lesson 5 1- [&#8230;]</p>
  39. <p>The post <a href="https://hicafe.app/learn-english/words/essential-idioms-for-speaking-en/idiom-related-to-building/">Idioms Related To Building</a> first appeared on <a href="https://hicafe.app">HiCafe</a>.</p>]]></description>
  40. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>This is lesson 5 from Idiom Part 2. Each idiom is followed by its definition and examples. After you learn them, you can use them in your daily conversation.</p>
  41. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  42. <h2>Previous English Idiom Lesson</h2>
  43. <p>In our previous English idiom lesson, we cover below:</p>
  44. <p><a href="/learn-english/words/essential-idioms-for-speaking-en/idiom-related-to-breaking-/">Idioms Related To Breaking</a></p>
  45. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  46. <h2>English Idiom Part 2- Lesson 5</h2>
  47. <p><b>1- Get a foot in the door= </b>To enter a business or organization at a low level, but with a chance of being more successful</p>
  48. <p>Making contacts can help you<b> get a foot in the door</b> when it comes to getting a job.</p>
  49. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  50. <p><b>2- Through the back door=</b> Using indirect or dishonest means to achieve an objective.</p>
  51. <p>There is always a chance to find a job<b> through the back door </b>if you have good connections in the company.</p>
  52. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  53. <p><b>3- Lay the foundation= </b>to produce the basic ideas or structures from which something much larger develops</p>
  54. <p>The two leaders have <b>laid the foundations</b> of a new era in cooperation between their countries.</p>
  55. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  56. <p><b>4- Like a tons of bricks=</b> very strongly or forcefully</p>
  57. <p>If dad finds out what you&#8217;ve been doing, he&#8217;ll come down on you<b> like a ton of bricks</b>!</p>
  58. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  59. <p><b>5- At death’s door= </b>to be very sick</p>
  60. <p>I was so ill with flu last week I thought I was <b>at death&#8217;s door</b>.</p>
  61. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  62. <p><b>6- Behind closed doors= </b>taking place secretly or without public knowledge</p>
  63. <p>Some important meetings among top management are conducted <b>behind closed doors</b>.</p>
  64. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  65. <p><b>7- Like talking to a brick wall= </b>the person you are speaking to does not listen</p>
  66. <p>I&#8217;ve tried to discuss my feelings with her, but it&#8217;s <b>like talking to a brick wall</b>.</p>
  67. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  68. <p><b>8- Going out of the window= </b>if sth goes out of the window, it does not exist anymore</p>
  69. <p>When he went, our happiness and our security <b>went out of the window.</b></p>
  70. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  71. <p><b>9- Bashing one’s head against a brick wall= </b>wasting one’s time</p>
  72. <p>I keep asking her not to park there, but it&#8217;s <b>like </b><b>bashing</b><b> my head against a </b><b>brick</b> <b>wall</b>.</p>
  73. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  74. <p><b>10- The corridor of power= </b>the higher levels of government where the most important decisions are made</p>
  75. <p>Sometimes in a company, people in the <b>corridors of power</b> get into heated discussions.</p>
  76. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  77. <p><strong>11- Smoke like a chimney</strong>= Smoke heavily, be a heavy smoker</p>
  78. <p>She <b>smokes like a chimney.</b></p>
  79. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  80. <p><b>12- On someone’s doorstep= </b>very close to someone is or lives</p>
  81. <p>One of the advantages of living downtown is that you&#8217;ve got everything right<b> on your doorstep. </b></p>
  82. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  83. <p><b>13- Cement an agreement or relationship= </b>Make it unlikely to change</p>
  84. <p>The European Union needs to do more to <b>cement its relationship</b> with the old Eastern Bloc countries.</p>
  85. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  86. <h2>Next English Idiom Lesson</h2>
  87. <p>In our next English idiom lesson, we cover below:</p>
  88. <p><a href="/learn-english/words/essential-idioms-for-speaking-en/idiom-related-to-cat-/">Idioms Related To Cat</a></p>
  89. <h2 align="center"></h2>
  90. <h2>Related Idioms</h2>
  91. <p>Here is the list of idioms related to this lesson.</p>
  92. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  93. <h2>Idiom Part 1 Outline</h2>
  94. <p>If you wish to explore all lessons that are covered in <a href="/home">HiCafe</a> Idiom Part 1, you can visit the <a href="/learn-english/practice-english-skills/essential-and-popular-english-idioms-part-1/">Essential and Popular English idioms- Part 1</a> page.</p>
  95. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  96. <h2>English Fluency Resources</h2>
  97. <p>If you like to read all of lessons related to English expressions, phrases, idioms, proverbs, slang and words, you can visit our <a href="/improve-english-fluency/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Improve English Fluency</a> page.</p><p>The post <a href="https://hicafe.app/learn-english/words/essential-idioms-for-speaking-en/idiom-related-to-building/">Idioms Related To Building</a> first appeared on <a href="https://hicafe.app">HiCafe</a>.</p>]]></content:encoded>
  98. </item>
  99. <item>
  100. <title>Idioms Related To Breaking</title>
  101. <link>https://hicafe.app/learn-english/words/essential-idioms-for-speaking-en/idiom-related-to-breaking/</link>
  102. <dc:creator><![CDATA[hcbMatt]]></dc:creator>
  103. <pubDate>Thu, 25 Jul 2024 11:17:44 +0000</pubDate>
  104. <category><![CDATA[Idioms]]></category>
  105. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://hicafe.app/?p=5569</guid>
  106.  
  107. <description><![CDATA[<p>This is lesson 4 from Idiom Part 2. Each idiom is followed by its definition and examples. After you learn them, you can use them in your daily conversation. &#160; Previous English Idiom Lesson In our previous English idiom lesson, we cover below: Idioms Related To Body &#160; English Idiom Part 2- Lesson 4 1- [&#8230;]</p>
  108. <p>The post <a href="https://hicafe.app/learn-english/words/essential-idioms-for-speaking-en/idiom-related-to-breaking/">Idioms Related To Breaking</a> first appeared on <a href="https://hicafe.app">HiCafe</a>.</p>]]></description>
  109. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>This is lesson 4 from Idiom Part 2. Each idiom is followed by its definition and examples. After you learn them, you can use them in your daily conversation.</p>
  110. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  111. <h2>Previous English Idiom Lesson</h2>
  112. <p>In our previous English idiom lesson, we cover below:</p>
  113. <p><a href="/learn-english/words/essential-idioms-for-speaking-en/idiom-related-to-body-/">Idioms Related To Body</a></p>
  114. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  115. <h2>English Idiom Part 2- Lesson 4</h2>
  116. <p><b>1- A smashing person= </b>if you say someone is smashing, you like them very much</p>
  117. <p>She is <b>a smashing person</b> as a friend.</p>
  118. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  119. <p><b>2- Going to pieces=  </b>become so upset or nervous</p>
  120. <p>My mother <b>went to pieces</b> after her father’s death.</p>
  121. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  122. <p><b>3- Breaking point= </b> when a person can no longer accept or deal with a situation because of too much pressure or stress.</p>
  123. <p>The situation reached <b>breaking point</b> when his son crashed the family car.</p>
  124. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  125. <p><b>4- (Someone needs) careful handling=</b> Pay more attention to someone since s/he is delicate and sensitive</p>
  126. <p>He needs <b>careful handling</b>. He&#8217;s brilliant, but he&#8217;s a bit sensitive to criticism.</p>
  127. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  128. <p><b>5- Coming from a broken home= </b>a family in which the parents are separated or divorced</p>
  129. <p>Almost all of these young people <b>came from broken homes</b>.</p>
  130. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  131. <p><b>6- To snap back= </b>to reply angrily</p>
  132. <p>She<b> snapped</b> <b>back</b> when we told her to clean the room.</p>
  133. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  134. <p><b>7- Shattered confidence= </b>to lose confidence</p>
  135. <p>Being rejected by seven job interviews in a row has <b>shattered my confidence</b> in applying for new jobs.</p>
  136. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  137. <p><b>8- If sb has a chip on his shoulder= </b>to seem angry all the time because you think you have been treated unfairly</p>
  138. <p>John has <b>got a chip on his shoulder</b> about his background.</p>
  139. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  140. <p><b>9- Put life back together= </b>to begin living in a normal way after suffering loss, hardship, etc.</p>
  141. <p>She <b>made a clean break with</b> the past and is starting to <b>put her life together</b>.</p>
  142. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  143. <p><b>10- Handle with kid gloves=</b> to deal with someone very gently or carefully</p>
  144. <p>Since these athletes grow up by being <b>handled with </b><b>kid</b><b> gloves</b>, they don&#8217;t know how the real world works.</p>
  145. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  146. <p><b>11- Mend the relationship= </b> repairing the relationship</p>
  147. <p>Diane wants a divorce, but Justin is trying to <b> mend the relationship</b>.</p>
  148. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  149. <p><b>12- Pick up the pieces= </b>to try to make a situation better after something bad has happened.</p>
  150. <p>After her business went bankrupt, she<b> picked up the pieces</b> and started again.</p>
  151. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  152. <p><b>13- Knock down with a feather=</b> extremely surprised</p>
  153. <p>I won 54 to 48 votes. I was completely overwhelmed; you could have<b> knocked me down with a feather.</b></p>
  154. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  155. <p><b>14- To break heart=</b> to make one feel very sad</p>
  156. <p>She really <b>broke</b> her mother&#8217;s<b> heart</b> when she left home.</p>
  157. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  158. <p><b>15- Crack (under the pressure)= </b>lose control of their emotions or actions because they are under a lot of pressure</p>
  159. <p>After two days of interrogation, his son <b>cracked (under the pressure)</b> and confessed to the murder.</p>
  160. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  161. <p><b>16- Feeling fragile= </b>feeling unwell either physically or mentally</p>
  162. <p>He&#8217;s <b>feeling fragile </b>this morning. He had a late night.</p>
  163. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  164. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  165. <h2>Next English Idiom Lesson</h2>
  166. <p>In our next English idiom lesson, we cover below:</p>
  167. <p><a href="/learn-english/words/essential-idioms-for-speaking-en/idiom-related-to-building-/">Idioms Related To Building</a></p>
  168. <h2 align="center"></h2>
  169. <h2>Related Idioms</h2>
  170. <p>Here is the list of idioms related to this lesson.</p>
  171. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  172. <h2>Idiom Part 1 Outline</h2>
  173. <p>If you wish to explore all lessons that are covered in <a href="/home">HiCafe</a> Idiom Part 1, you can visit the <a href="/learn-english/practice-english-skills/essential-and-popular-english-idioms-part-1/">Essential and Popular English idioms- Part 1</a> page.</p>
  174. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  175. <h2>English Fluency Resources</h2>
  176. <p>If you like to read all of lessons related to English expressions, phrases, idioms, proverbs, slang and words, you can visit our <a href="/improve-english-fluency/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Improve English Fluency</a> page.</p><p>The post <a href="https://hicafe.app/learn-english/words/essential-idioms-for-speaking-en/idiom-related-to-breaking/">Idioms Related To Breaking</a> first appeared on <a href="https://hicafe.app">HiCafe</a>.</p>]]></content:encoded>
  177. </item>
  178. <item>
  179. <title>Idioms Related To Body</title>
  180. <link>https://hicafe.app/learn-english/words/essential-idioms-for-speaking-en/idiom-related-to-body/</link>
  181. <dc:creator><![CDATA[hcbMatt]]></dc:creator>
  182. <pubDate>Wed, 24 Jul 2024 07:37:57 +0000</pubDate>
  183. <category><![CDATA[Idioms]]></category>
  184. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://hicafe.app/?p=5568</guid>
  185.  
  186. <description><![CDATA[<p>This is lesson 3 from Idiom Part 2. Each idiom is followed by its definition and examples. After you learn them, you can use them in your daily conversation. &#160; Previous English Idiom Lesson In our previous English idiom lesson, we cover below: Idioms Related To Birds &#160; English Idiom Part 2- Lesson 3 1- [&#8230;]</p>
  187. <p>The post <a href="https://hicafe.app/learn-english/words/essential-idioms-for-speaking-en/idiom-related-to-body/">Idioms Related To Body</a> first appeared on <a href="https://hicafe.app">HiCafe</a>.</p>]]></description>
  188. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>This is lesson 3 from Idiom Part 2. Each idiom is followed by its definition and examples. After you learn them, you can use them in your daily conversation.</p>
  189. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  190. <h2>Previous English Idiom Lesson</h2>
  191. <p>In our previous English idiom lesson, we cover below:</p>
  192. <p><a href="/learn-english/words/essential-idioms-for-speaking-en/idiom-related-to-bird-/">Idioms Related To Birds</a></p>
  193. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  194. <h2>English Idiom Part 2- Lesson 3</h2>
  195. <p><b>1- On Its lasting legs=</b>  Being in a such bad condition that it will soon be unable to work as it should</p>
  196. <p>It looks as though her grandfather&#8217;s<b> on his last legs.</b></p>
  197. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  198. <p><b>Note: </b>similar idiom is “<strong>It is seen better days</strong>”</p>
  199. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  200. <p><b>2- My hands are tied= </b>you are not free to behave in the way that you would like</p>
  201. <p>I&#8217;d like to raise people&#8217;s salaries but<b> my hands are tied.</b></p>
  202. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  203. <p><b>3- Face the fact= </b>to admit that something is true</p>
  204. <p>The time has come to<b> face the facts</b> and admit that the government&#8217;s policies aren&#8217;t working.</p>
  205. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  206. <p><b>4- Put a brave face= </b>to behave as if a problem is not important or does not worry you</p>
  207. <p>She seems all right but I think she&#8217;s just <b>putting on a brave face</b>.</p>
  208. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  209. <p><b>5- Come to a head= </b>reach a crisis</p>
  210. <p>The violence<b> came to a head </b>with the deaths of six youths.</p>
  211. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  212. <p><b>6- Hand it to sb= </b>give credit to someone</p>
  213. <p>I&#8217;ll <b>hand it to you.</b> You did a fine job.</p>
  214. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  215. <p><b>7- A good head for sth= </b>to have a natural ability to do something well</p>
  216. <p>She has <b>a good head for</b> painting.</p>
  217. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  218. <p><b>8- Never talk behind my back= </b>to talk unfairly about sb without them knowing<b> </b></p>
  219. <p>I dread to think what they <b>say </b>about me<b> behind my back.</b></p>
  220. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  221. <p><b>9- Sth gets on your nerves= </b>annoy someone</p>
  222. <p>Turn down your music, it&#8217;s <b>getting on my nerves. </b></p>
  223. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  224. <p><b>10- To get someone&#8217;s back up= </b>to annoy someone</p>
  225. <p>Just ignore him &#8211; he&#8217;s only trying <b>to get your back up.</b></p>
  226. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  227. <p><b>11- Your heart is not in sth/sb= </b>not feeling interested or enthusiastic about something</p>
  228. <p>I tried to make myself feel better by playing the guitar, but <b>my heart wasn&#8217;t in it.</b></p>
  229. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  230. <p><b>12- Dip your toe in the water= </b>to try an activity briefly to see if one likes it</p>
  231. <p>I&#8217;m not sure I want to join, but I&#8217;d like to <b>dip a toe in the wate</b>r.</p>
  232. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  233. <p><b>13- It’s a pain in the neck=</b> A source of annoyance</p>
  234. <p>Joan is a real<b> pain in the neck</b>, with her constant complaining.</p>
  235. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  236. <p><b>14- Put my food in sth= </b>to say something that causes someone to be embarrassed, upset, or hurt especially when the speaker did not expect that reaction</p>
  237. <p>I <b>put my foot in it</b> when I asked her about her job. I didn&#8217;t know she had just been fired.</p>
  238. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  239. <p><b>15- Get it off your chest= </b>say something that one has wanted to say for a long time</p>
  240. <p>I thought these meetings would help the kids <b>get</b> some of their <b>worries</b><b> off </b><b>their</b><b> chests.</b></p>
  241. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  242. <p><b>16- Put my finger at it= </b>to know or understand something, and be able to say exactly what it is</p>
  243. <p>Something seemed to be wrong, but I couldn’t<b> put my finger on it</b>.</p>
  244. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  245. <p><b>17- Elbow my way to the top= </b><b> </b>elbows other people or things out of the way, to achieve success by being aggressive and determined.</p>
  246. <p>Guys who <b>elbow their way to the top</b> will toss you aside the minute you can&#8217;t give them anything anymore.</p>
  247. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  248. <p><b>18- Cheeky= </b>disrespectful and offensively bold</p>
  249. <p>She usually hast a <b>cheeky</b> manner.</p>
  250. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  251. <p><b>19- Cocky= </b>arrogant</p>
  252. <p>The neighbors up the road are <b>cocky</b>.</p>
  253. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  254. <p><b>20- Shoulder the responsibilities= </b>to accept that you are responsible for something bad or difficult</p>
  255. <p>It is women who mainly <b>shoulder responsibility</b> for the care of elderly and disabled relatives.</p>
  256. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  257. <p><b>21- Pulling sb’s leg= </b>to try to persuade someone to believe something that is not true, as a joke</p>
  258. <p>Is it really your car or are you <b>pulling</b><b> my </b><b>leg</b>?</p>
  259. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  260. <p><b>22- Find my feet= </b> starting to feel confident and to deal with things successfully.</p>
  261. <p>I don&#8217;t know anyone in England but I am sure I will manage it when I<b> find my feet.</b></p>
  262. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  263. <p><b>23- Like a water off a duck’s back=</b> refer to a potentially hurtful remark or situation that has no apparent effect on the person involved.</p>
  264. <p>I&#8217;ve told him that he&#8217;s heading for trouble, but he doesn&#8217;t listen &#8211; it&#8217;s just <b>water</b><b> off a duck&#8217;s back</b>.</p>
  265. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  266. <p><b>24- Nosey= </b> too curious</p>
  267. <p>The neighbors up the road are <b>cocky and nosey</b> at the same time!</p>
  268. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  269. <p><b>25- goofy= </b>foolish</p>
  270. <p>The neighbors up the road are very <b>goofy</b>!</p>
  271. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  272. <h2>Next English Idiom Lesson</h2>
  273. <p>In our next English idiom lesson, we cover below:</p>
  274. <p><a href="/learn-english/words/essential-idioms-for-speaking-en/idiom-related-to-breaking-/">Idioms Related To Breaking</a></p>
  275. <h2 align="center"></h2>
  276. <h2>Related Idioms</h2>
  277. <p>Here is the list of idioms related to this lesson.</p>
  278. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  279. <h2>Idiom Part 1 Outline</h2>
  280. <p>If you wish to explore all lessons that are covered in <a href="/home">HiCafe</a> Idiom Part 1, you can visit the <a href="/learn-english/practice-english-skills/essential-and-popular-english-idioms-part-1/">Essential and Popular English idioms- Part 1</a> page.</p>
  281. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  282. <h2>English Fluency Resources</h2>
  283. <p>If you like to read all of lessons related to English expressions, phrases, idioms, proverbs, slang and words, you can visit our <a href="/improve-english-fluency/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Improve English Fluency</a> page.</p><p>The post <a href="https://hicafe.app/learn-english/words/essential-idioms-for-speaking-en/idiom-related-to-body/">Idioms Related To Body</a> first appeared on <a href="https://hicafe.app">HiCafe</a>.</p>]]></content:encoded>
  284. </item>
  285. <item>
  286. <title>Idioms Related To Bird</title>
  287. <link>https://hicafe.app/learn-english/words/essential-idioms-for-speaking-en/idiom-related-to-bird/</link>
  288. <dc:creator><![CDATA[hcbMatt]]></dc:creator>
  289. <pubDate>Wed, 24 Jul 2024 07:25:14 +0000</pubDate>
  290. <category><![CDATA[Idioms]]></category>
  291. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://hicafe.app/?p=5567</guid>
  292.  
  293. <description><![CDATA[<p>This is lesson 2 from Idiom Part 2. Each idiom is followed by its definition and examples. After you learn them, you can use them in your daily conversation. &#160; Previous English Idiom Lesson In our previous English idiom lesson, we cover below: Idioms Related To Animals &#160; English Idiom Part 2- Lesson 2 1- [&#8230;]</p>
  294. <p>The post <a href="https://hicafe.app/learn-english/words/essential-idioms-for-speaking-en/idiom-related-to-bird/">Idioms Related To Bird</a> first appeared on <a href="https://hicafe.app">HiCafe</a>.</p>]]></description>
  295. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>This is lesson 2 from Idiom Part 2. Each idiom is followed by its definition and examples. After you learn them, you can use them in your daily conversation.</p>
  296. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  297. <h2>Previous English Idiom Lesson</h2>
  298. <p>In our previous English idiom lesson, we cover below:</p>
  299. <p><a href="/learn-english/words/essential-idioms-for-speaking-en/idiom-related-to-animal-/">Idioms Related To Animals</a></p>
  300. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  301. <h2>English Idiom Part 2- Lesson 2</h2>
  302. <p><b>1- Kill two birds with one stone=</b> achieve two aims at once.</p>
  303. <p>I can bring your suit to the cleaners when I pick up the kids and<b> kill two </b><b>birds</b><b> with one </b><b>stone</b><b>.</b></p>
  304. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  305. <p><b>2- Watching me like a hawk=</b> to carefully watch sb/sth all the time</p>
  306. <p>When I was at home, mum and dad <b>watched</b><b> me like a </b><b>hawk</b><b>.</b></p>
  307. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  308. <p><b>3- Take sb under his wing=</b> start to protect and take care of sb</p>
  309. <p>He took the rookie pitcher<b> under his wing.</b></p>
  310. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  311. <p><b>4- In a flap= </b>confusion or panic</p>
  312. <p>He got <b>in a flap </b>over the delays in the schedule.</p>
  313. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  314. <p><b>5- Parrot fashion=</b> if you learn something parrot fashion you learn it word by word</p>
  315. <p>Babies repeat what we say in<b> parrot  fashion.</b></p>
  316. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  317. <p><b>6- Wouldn’t say boo to a goose= </b>sb who is shy and easily frightened</p>
  318. <p>He seemed the kind of chap who<b> wouldn&#8217;t say boo to a goose</b></p>
  319. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  320. <p><b>7- As the crow flies = </b>shortest route between two points</p>
  321. <p>It&#8217;s 10 miles <b>as the crow flies</b>.</p>
  322. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  323. <p><b>8- In one fell swoop=</b> all in one go.</p>
  324. <p>I got all my Christmas shopping done<b> in one </b><b>fell</b> <b>swoop</b>.</p>
  325. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  326. <p><b>9- As dead as dodo=</b> completely dead or extinct or no longer effective, valid, or interesting</p>
  327. <p>The campaign was <b>as dead as a dodo</b></p>
  328. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  329. <p><b>10- As sick as a parrot= </b>disappointed, unhappy, or depressed about sth</p>
  330. <p>He was<b> sick as a parrot </b>when he found out he had missed the first half of the movie.</p>
  331. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  332. <p><b>11- Fly the nest= </b>To move out of one&#8217;s parents&#8217; house for the first time.</p>
  333. <p>I&#8217;m so nervous to f<b>ly the nest </b>and start college this fall because I&#8217;ve never lived on my own before.</p>
  334. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  335. <p><b>12- Swan around= </b>to wander aimlessly</p>
  336. <p>She spends her time <b>swanning around</b> the world.</p>
  337. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  338. <p><b>13- Pecking order= </b>a hierarchy among people, nations or classes</p>
  339. <p>As an assistant manager, he was pretty low in the company&#8217;s <b>pecking order</b>.</p>
  340. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  341. <p><b>14- Nest egg=</b> a sum of money put as a reserve or saving</p>
  342. <p>Regular savings of small amounts of money is an excellent way of building a <b>nest</b> <b>egg</b><b>.</b></p>
  343. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  344. <h2>Next English Idiom Lesson</h2>
  345. <p>In our next English idiom lesson, we cover below:</p>
  346. <p><a href="/learn-english/words/essential-idioms-for-speaking-en/idiom-related-to-body-/">Idioms Related To Body</a></p>
  347. <h2 align="center"></h2>
  348. <h2>Related Idioms</h2>
  349. <p>Here is the list of idioms related to this lesson.</p>
  350. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  351. <h2>Idiom Part 1 Outline</h2>
  352. <p>If you wish to explore all lessons that are covered in <a href="/home">HiCafe</a> Idiom Part 1, you can visit the <a href="/learn-english/practice-english-skills/essential-and-popular-english-idioms-part-1/">Essential and Popular English idioms- Part 1</a> page.</p>
  353. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  354. <h2>English Fluency Resources</h2>
  355. <p>If you like to read all of lessons related to English expressions, phrases, idioms, proverbs, slang and words, you can visit our <a href="/improve-english-fluency/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Improve English Fluency</a> page.</p><p>The post <a href="https://hicafe.app/learn-english/words/essential-idioms-for-speaking-en/idiom-related-to-bird/">Idioms Related To Bird</a> first appeared on <a href="https://hicafe.app">HiCafe</a>.</p>]]></content:encoded>
  356. </item>
  357. <item>
  358. <title>Idioms Related To Animal</title>
  359. <link>https://hicafe.app/learn-english/words/essential-idioms-for-speaking-en/idiom-related-to-animal/</link>
  360. <dc:creator><![CDATA[hcbMatt]]></dc:creator>
  361. <pubDate>Wed, 24 Jul 2024 07:09:28 +0000</pubDate>
  362. <category><![CDATA[Idioms]]></category>
  363. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://hicafe.app/?p=5565</guid>
  364.  
  365. <description><![CDATA[<p>This is lesson 1 from Idiom Part 2. Each idiom is followed by its definition and examples. After you learn them, you can use them in your daily conversation. &#160; Previous English Idiom Lesson In our previous English idiom lesson, we cover below: Idioms Related To People Are Liquid &#160; English Idiom Part 2- Lesson [&#8230;]</p>
  366. <p>The post <a href="https://hicafe.app/learn-english/words/essential-idioms-for-speaking-en/idiom-related-to-animal/">Idioms Related To Animal</a> first appeared on <a href="https://hicafe.app">HiCafe</a>.</p>]]></description>
  367. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>This is lesson 1 from Idiom Part 2. Each idiom is followed by its definition and examples. After you learn them, you can use them in your daily conversation.</p>
  368. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  369. <h2>Previous English Idiom Lesson</h2>
  370. <p>In our previous English idiom lesson, we cover below:</p>
  371. <p><a href="/learn-english/words/essential-idioms-for-speaking-en/idiom-related-to-people-are-liquid/">Idioms Related To People Are Liquid</a></p>
  372. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  373. <h2>English Idiom Part 2- Lesson 1</h2>
  374. <p><b>1- Let the cat out of the bag= </b>disclose a secret</p>
  375. <p>Now that Viola had let the cat out of the bag, she had no option but to confess it.</p>
  376. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  377. <p><b>2- Take the bull by the horns= </b>face difficulty and overcome it decisively without avoiding it</p>
  378. <p>I <b>took the bull by the horns</b> and confronted him about his mistreatment of the workers.</p>
  379. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  380. <p><b>3- Not enough room to swing a cat=</b> An awkwardly small, confined space</p>
  381. <p>I&#8217;d rather have a bigger house, there&#8217;s <b>not enough room to swing a cat </b>in here.</p>
  382. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  383. <p><b>4- There are plenty fish in the sea=</b>  a single person still has lots of options out there for future partners</p>
  384. <p>Don&#8217;t cry over Pierre &#8211; there are plenty of fish in the sea!</p>
  385. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  386. <p><b>5- Like a fish out of water= </b>feeling awkward because of the unfamiliar situation</p>
  387. <p>I felt <b>like a fish out of </b><b>water</b> at my new school.</p>
  388. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  389. <p><b>6- The black sheep of the family=</b> people who are different from their family members in many respects</p>
  390. <p>Rachel is <b>the black sheep in the family</b> because she is an artist whereas everyone else is an economist.</p>
  391. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  392. <p><b>7- A wild goose chase= </b>send him to a hopeless (almost impossible) quest</p>
  393. <p>Those jerks sent me on <b>a wild goose chase</b> to find a copy of a book that hasn&#8217;t been released yet!</p>
  394. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  395. <p><b>8- Talk a hind legs off a donkey= </b>talking excessively</p>
  396. <p>She rarely spoke, but her brother could <b>talk the hind legs off a donkey</b>.</p>
  397. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  398. <p><b>9- Smell a rat= </b>to suspect or sense that something is wrong</p>
  399. <p>When he died, investigators were called in and soon they <b>smelled a rat</b>.</p>
  400. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  401. <p><b>10- For donkey’s years=</b> not seeing someone for a very long time</p>
  402. <p>I haven&#8217;t seen him <b>for donkey&#8217;s </b><b>years</b>.</p>
  403. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  404. <p><b>11- keep the wolf from the door=</b> to ward off poverty or hunger</p>
  405. <p>I work part-time to pay the mortgage and <b>keep the wolf from the door</b>.</p>
  406. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  407. <h2>Next English Idiom Lesson</h2>
  408. <p>In our next English idiom lesson, we cover below:</p>
  409. <p><a href="/learn-english/words/essential-idioms-for-speaking-en/idiom-related-to-bird-/">Idioms Related To Birds</a></p>
  410. <h2 align="center"></h2>
  411. <h2>Related Idioms</h2>
  412. <p>Here is the list of idioms related to this lesson.</p>
  413. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  414. <h2>Idiom Part 1 Outline</h2>
  415. <p>If you wish to explore all lessons that are covered in <a href="/home">HiCafe</a> Idiom Part 1, you can visit the <a href="/learn-english/practice-english-skills/essential-and-popular-english-idioms-part-1/">Essential and Popular English idioms- Part 1</a> page.</p>
  416. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  417. <h2>English Fluency Resources</h2>
  418. <p>If you like to read all of lessons related to English expressions, phrases, idioms, proverbs, slang and words, you can visit our <a href="/improve-english-fluency/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Improve English Fluency</a> page.</p><p>The post <a href="https://hicafe.app/learn-english/words/essential-idioms-for-speaking-en/idiom-related-to-animal/">Idioms Related To Animal</a> first appeared on <a href="https://hicafe.app">HiCafe</a>.</p>]]></content:encoded>
  419. </item>
  420. <item>
  421. <title>100 Phrases for Advanced English Speakers</title>
  422. <link>https://hicafe.app/practice-english-speaking/speaking-tips/100-phrases-for-advanced-english-speakers/</link>
  423. <dc:creator><![CDATA[hcbMatt]]></dc:creator>
  424. <pubDate>Tue, 23 Jul 2024 10:58:44 +0000</pubDate>
  425. <category><![CDATA[Tips]]></category>
  426. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://hicafe.app/?p=4867</guid>
  427.  
  428. <description><![CDATA[<p>&#160; Are you looking to boost your English fluency and impress others with your vocabulary?  This lesson is packed with over 100 advanced English phrases that will help you sound more confident and sophisticated in your everyday conversations. From talking about money and statistics to expressing your worries and hopes, we&#8217;ve got you covered! &#160; [&#8230;]</p>
  429. <p>The post <a href="https://hicafe.app/practice-english-speaking/speaking-tips/100-phrases-for-advanced-english-speakers/">100 Phrases for Advanced English Speakers</a> first appeared on <a href="https://hicafe.app">HiCafe</a>.</p>]]></description>
  430. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>&nbsp;</p>
  431. <p>Are you looking to boost your English fluency and impress others with your vocabulary?  This lesson is packed with over 100 advanced English phrases that will help you sound more confident and sophisticated in your everyday conversations. From talking about money and statistics to expressing your worries and hopes, we&#8217;ve got you covered!</p>
  432. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  433. <h3>Previous Conversation Tip Lesson</h3>
  434. <p><a href="/practice-english-speaking/speaking-tips/conversation-tips-for-expressing-shocks/">Conversation Tips for Expressing Shocks</a></p>
  435. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  436. <h2>Practice 100+ Advanced English Phrases</h2>
  437. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  438. <p>List of English phrases in this lesson:</p>
  439. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  440. <ul>
  441. <li aria-level="1">10 Ways to Avoid Answering a Question</li>
  442. <li aria-level="1">15 Phrases for Being Rich &amp; Poor</li>
  443. <li aria-level="1">10 Phrases for Talking about Statistics</li>
  444. <li aria-level="1">10 Ways to Say Someone’s Talented</li>
  445. <li aria-level="1">10 Phrases for Telling Someone to Wait</li>
  446. <li aria-level="1">10 Phrases for Estimating &amp; Guessing</li>
  447. <li aria-level="1">10 Phrases for Decisions</li>
  448. <li aria-level="1">10 Phrases for Good Luck &amp; Bad Luck</li>
  449. <li aria-level="1">10 Phrases for Worries &amp; Relief</li>
  450. <li aria-level="1">10 Phrases for Talking about the Future</li>
  451. <li aria-level="1">10 Phrases for Compliments</li>
  452. <li aria-level="1">15 Phrases for Certainty &amp; Probability</li>
  453. <li aria-level="1">10 Ways to Say Something is Interesting/Boring</li>
  454. <li aria-level="1">7 Phrases for Disappointment</li>
  455. <li aria-level="1">10 Ways to Say You Don’t Believe Someone</li>
  456. <li aria-level="1">10 Expressions for Bad People</li>
  457. <li aria-level="1">10 Words for Describing Speaking</li>
  458. <li aria-level="1">10 Phrases for Facial Expressions</li>
  459. <li aria-level="1">10 Phrases to Describe Offending or Upsetting People</li>
  460. <li aria-level="1">10 Phrases for Bad Travel Experiences</li>
  461. <li aria-level="1">10 Phrases for Drinking (Alcohol)</li>
  462. <li aria-level="1">15 Comparative Idioms</li>
  463. </ul>
  464. <h3>10 Ways to Avoid Answering a Question</h3>
  465. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  466. <ol>
  467. <li aria-level="1">No comment.</li>
  468. <li aria-level="1">I’m not at liberty to say.</li>
  469. </ol>
  470. <p>(= I don’t have permission to give the information)</p>
  471. <ol>
  472. <li aria-level="1">Wait and see.</li>
  473. </ol>
  474. <p>(= you will discover the answer later)</p>
  475. <ol>
  476. <li aria-level="1">Let me get back to you.</li>
  477. </ol>
  478. <p>(= I will give you the answer later)</p>
  479. <ol>
  480. <li aria-level="1">I’m sorry, that’s confidential.</li>
  481. <li aria-level="1">I’m sorry, that’s personal.</li>
  482. <li aria-level="1">I’d rather not talk about it.</li>
  483. <li aria-level="1">It’s none of your business.</li>
  484. <li aria-level="1">Mind your own business.</li>
  485. <li aria-level="1">Why do you want to know?</li>
  486. </ol>
  487. <p>#8 and #9 are rather rude – telling the other person to stop inquiring about your life</p>
  488. <h3>15 Phrases for Being Rich &amp; Poor</h3>
  489. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  490. <ol>
  491. <li aria-level="1">He’s short on cash.</li>
  492. <li aria-level="1">He’s broke.</li>
  493. </ol>
  494. <p>(= he has no money)</p>
  495. <ol>
  496. <li aria-level="1">His bank account is overdrawn.</li>
  497. <li aria-level="1">He’s just scraping by.</li>
  498. </ol>
  499. <p>(= he is just barely surviving on little money)</p>
  500. <ol>
  501. <li aria-level="1">He makes minimum wage.</li>
  502. </ol>
  503. <p>(= he earns the minimum salary)</p>
  504. <ol>
  505. <li aria-level="1">He’s pinching pennies.</li>
  506. <li aria-level="1">He’s scrimping and saving.</li>
  507. <li aria-level="1">She’s very wealthy.</li>
  508. <li aria-level="1">She’s quite well-off.</li>
  509. <li aria-level="1">She’s loaded.</li>
  510. <li aria-level="1">She’s filthy rich.</li>
  511. <li aria-level="1">She inherited a fortune.</li>
  512. <li aria-level="1">She’s making a killing.</li>
  513. <li aria-level="1">She’s raking in the cash.</li>
  514. <li aria-level="1">She’s rolling in dough.</li>
  515. </ol>
  516. <p>#6 and #7 express the idea that the person is trying to conserve money, when they have very little money.</p>
  517. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  518. <h3>10 Phrases for Talking about Statistics</h3>
  519. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  520. <ul>
  521. <li aria-level="1">The crime rate rose.</li>
  522. <li aria-level="1">The crime rate went up.</li>
  523. <li aria-level="1">There was a sharp increase in crime.</li>
  524. </ul>
  525. <p>(sharp = sudden and large)</p>
  526. <ul>
  527. <li aria-level="1">There was a gradual rise in crime.</li>
  528. <li aria-level="1">There was a spike in crime.</li>
  529. </ul>
  530. <p>(spike = a sudden increase and then decrease)</p>
  531. <ul>
  532. <li aria-level="1">The crime rate reached its peak.</li>
  533. </ul>
  534. <p>(peak = the highest point)</p>
  535. <ul>
  536. <li aria-level="1">The crime rate plateaued.</li>
  537. </ul>
  538. <p>(plateaued = stayed at the same level)</p>
  539. <ul>
  540. <li aria-level="1">There was a slight decrease in crime.</li>
  541. <li aria-level="1">The crime rate dropped.</li>
  542. <li aria-level="1">The crime rate plummeted.</li>
  543. </ul>
  544. <p>(= decreased a lot, very quickly)</p>
  545. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  546. <h3>10 Ways to Say Someone’s Talented</h3>
  547. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  548. <ul>
  549. <li aria-level="1">She was born to… [dance].</li>
  550. <li aria-level="1">He’s a natural.</li>
  551. <li aria-level="1">She could do it in her sleep.</li>
  552. <li aria-level="1">He knows it inside out.</li>
  553. </ul>
  554. <ul>
  555. <li aria-level="1">She knows [New York] like the back of her hand.</li>
  556. <li aria-level="1">She’s a walking encyclopedia of… [philosophy].</li>
  557. <li aria-level="1">He’s in a class of his own.</li>
  558. <li aria-level="1">He’s the best in the business.</li>
  559. <li aria-level="1">She’s very gifted.</li>
  560. <li aria-level="1">He’s a [chemistry] whiz.</li>
  561. </ul>
  562. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  563. <h3>10 Phrases for Telling Someone to Wait</h3>
  564. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  565. <ol>
  566. <li aria-level="1">Could you give me a minute?</li>
  567. <li aria-level="1">(informal) Hang on a sec / Just a sec.</li>
  568. <li aria-level="1">Hold on…</li>
  569. <li aria-level="1">Let me see/think…</li>
  570. <li aria-level="1">I’ll be right with you.</li>
  571. <li aria-level="1">Bear with me.</li>
  572. <li aria-level="1">That’ll have to wait.</li>
  573. <li aria-level="1">Be patient.</li>
  574. <li aria-level="1">Not so fast!</li>
  575. <li aria-level="1">Hold your horses!</li>
  576. </ol>
  577. <p>#9 and #10 are used for cautioning someone to wait and not make a bad decision or take reckless action.</p>
  578. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  579. <h3>10 Phrases for Estimating &amp; Guessing</h3>
  580. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  581. <ul>
  582. <li aria-level="1">If I had to take a guess, I’d say… [she’s about 35 years old].</li>
  583. <li aria-level="1">It’s difficult to say, but I think… [our customers are more satisfied].</li>
  584. <li aria-level="1">Off the top of my head, I’d say… [the company has 500 employees].</li>
  585. </ul>
  586. <p>(= what I remember/estimate, without checking the actual statistics)</p>
  587. <ul>
  588. <li aria-level="1">It’s about… [10 miles away].</li>
  589. <li aria-level="1">It’s around… [three hours long].</li>
  590. <li aria-level="1">I wouldn’t be surprised if… [Peter asks Jill to marry him].</li>
  591. <li aria-level="1">There’s a good chance… [it’ll rain tomorrow].</li>
  592. <li aria-level="1">I have a feeling/hunch… [the boss won’t be happy about this].</li>
  593. </ul>
  594. <p>(hunch = an instinctive feeling)</p>
  595. <ul>
  596. <li aria-level="1">I bet… [he’ll be late].</li>
  597. <li aria-level="1">Your guess is as good as mine.</li>
  598. </ul>
  599. <p>(= I don’t know)</p>
  600. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  601. <h3>10 Phrases for Decisions</h3>
  602. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  603. <ul>
  604. <li aria-level="1">I’m debating between… [option A and option B]</li>
  605. <li aria-level="1">I can’t make up my mind.</li>
  606. <li aria-level="1">I’m on the fence.</li>
  607. </ul>
  608. <p>(= I’m in the middle, I don’t know what to decide)</p>
  609. <ul>
  610. <li aria-level="1">I’ll take that into consideration.</li>
  611. <li aria-level="1">On the other hand…</li>
  612. <li aria-level="1">I’m having second thoughts.</li>
  613. </ul>
  614. <p>(= I’m reconsidering my decision)</p>
  615. <ul>
  616. <li aria-level="1">I changed my mind.</li>
  617. <li aria-level="1">He convinced/persuaded me to…</li>
  618. <li aria-level="1">Looking back, I know it was the right decision.</li>
  619. <li aria-level="1">It’s up to you.</li>
  620. </ul>
  621. <p>(= You can decide)</p>
  622. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  623. <h3>10 Phrases for Good Luck &amp; Bad Luck</h3>
  624. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  625. <ul>
  626. <li aria-level="1">Good luck!</li>
  627. <li aria-level="1">Better luck next time.</li>
  628. </ul>
  629. <p>(say this after someone fails, and you hope they do better next time)</p>
  630. <ul>
  631. <li aria-level="1">Just my luck!</li>
  632. </ul>
  633. <p>(this is a sarcastic phrase meaning that something UNLUCKY happened)</p>
  634. <ul>
  635. <li aria-level="1">Lucky you!</li>
  636. <li aria-level="1">That was a stroke of luck.</li>
  637. </ul>
  638. <p>(= a sudden event of good luck)</p>
  639. <ul>
  640. <li aria-level="1">Some people have all the luck.</li>
  641. </ul>
  642. <p>(say this when someone else is constantly lucky, and you feel like you’re not lucky)</p>
  643. <ul>
  644. <li aria-level="1">As luck would have it…</li>
  645. </ul>
  646. <p>(= by chance)</p>
  647. <ul>
  648. <li aria-level="1">He’s down on his luck.</li>
  649. </ul>
  650. <p>(= he’s having a long period of bad luck or difficulty)</p>
  651. <ul>
  652. <li aria-level="1">No such luck.</li>
  653. </ul>
  654. <p>(= something good that could have happened, didn’t happen)</p>
  655. <ul>
  656. <li aria-level="1">What rotten luck!</li>
  657. </ul>
  658. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  659. <h3>10 Phrases for Worries &amp; Relief</h3>
  660. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  661. <ul>
  662. <li aria-level="1">I’m scared that…</li>
  663. <li aria-level="1">I can’t help thinking that…</li>
  664. </ul>
  665. <p>(use this for thoughts that you try to avoid, but they keep coming into your mind)</p>
  666. <ul>
  667. <li aria-level="1">It’s been keeping me up at night.</li>
  668. </ul>
  669. <p>(use this when you’re so worried about something that you can’t sleep)</p>
  670. <ul>
  671. <li aria-level="1">What if… ?</li>
  672. <li aria-level="1">Whew!</li>
  673. <li aria-level="1">Thank goodness!</li>
  674. <li aria-level="1">What a relief!</li>
  675. <li aria-level="1">You had me worried for a moment.</li>
  676. <li aria-level="1">You have no idea what a relief it is.</li>
  677. <li aria-level="1">That’s a huge load off my mind.</li>
  678. </ul>
  679. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  680. <h3>10 Phrases for Talking about the Future</h3>
  681. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  682. <ol>
  683. <li aria-level="1">It’ll happen any day now.</li>
  684. <li aria-level="1">It’s right around the corner.</li>
  685. <li aria-level="1">…in the near future.</li>
  686. <li aria-level="1">It will/won’t happen in our lifetime.</li>
  687. </ol>
  688. <p>(= in the next 40-50 years)</p>
  689. <ol>
  690. <li aria-level="1">It’s a sign/taste of things to come.</li>
  691. </ol>
  692. <p>(= it indicates how things will be in the future)</p>
  693. <ol>
  694. <li aria-level="1">I’m counting down the days until…</li>
  695. </ol>
  696. <p>(= I’m excited about the future event, I can’t wait for it to happen)</p>
  697. <ol>
  698. <li aria-level="1">Sooner or later… / It’s bound to happen eventually.</li>
  699. </ol>
  700. <p>(= it will definitely happen sometime in the future)</p>
  701. <ol>
  702. <li aria-level="1">I’ll get around to it.</li>
  703. </ol>
  704. <p>(= I’ll do it sometime in the future, but I don’t know exactly when)</p>
  705. <ol>
  706. <li aria-level="1">I’ll do it right away. / I’ll get right on it.</li>
  707. </ol>
  708. <p>(= I’ll do it immediately)</p>
  709. <ol>
  710. <li aria-level="1">Time will tell.</li>
  711. </ol>
  712. <p>(in the future, we will know if something is true/false or good/bad)</p>
  713. <p>#1, #2, and #3 are used to say something will happen soon.</p>
  714. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  715. <h3>10 Phrases for Compliments</h3>
  716. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  717. <p>#1-3 are used for complimenting a person’s appearance</p>
  718. <p>#4-6 for complimenting a person’s cooking</p>
  719. <p>#7-8 for complimenting a person’s home</p>
  720. <p>#9-10 for complimenting a person’s children.</p>
  721. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  722. <ol>
  723. <li aria-level="1">You look nice. / You look amazing!</li>
  724. <li aria-level="1">What a beautiful [necklace/dress/etc.]!</li>
  725. <li aria-level="1">I like your [shirt/shoes/haircut/etc.]</li>
  726. <li aria-level="1">The lasagna is delicious.</li>
  727. <li aria-level="1">You’re a fantastic cook.</li>
  728. <li aria-level="1">My compliments to the chef!</li>
  729. <li aria-level="1">What a nice apartment!</li>
  730. <li aria-level="1">You have a beautiful home.</li>
  731. <li aria-level="1">He’s/She’s so cute!</li>
  732. <li aria-level="1">Your kids are a lot of fun.</li>
  733. </ol>
  734. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  735. <h3>15 Phrases for Certainty &amp; Probability</h3>
  736. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  737. <ul>
  738. <li aria-level="1">I’m absolutely sure.</li>
  739. <li aria-level="1">I’m positive that…</li>
  740. <li aria-level="1">I have no doubt that…</li>
  741. <li aria-level="1">I’m a hundred percent certain.</li>
  742. <li aria-level="1">I’m convinced that…</li>
  743. <li aria-level="1">Chances are that…</li>
  744. </ul>
  745. <p>(= this will probably happen)</p>
  746. <ul>
  747. <li aria-level="1">Odds are that…</li>
  748. </ul>
  749. <p>(= this will probably happen)</p>
  750. <ul>
  751. <li aria-level="1">I seriously doubt it.</li>
  752. <li aria-level="1">I don’t think so.</li>
  753. <li aria-level="1">Probably not.</li>
  754. <li aria-level="1">It’s not very likely.</li>
  755. <li aria-level="1">There’s not much chance of that.</li>
  756. <li aria-level="1">I’d be very surprised if that happened.</li>
  757. <li aria-level="1">I wouldn’t bet on it.</li>
  758. </ul>
  759. <p>(= there’s a small chance it could happen… but it probably won’t happen)</p>
  760. <ul>
  761. <li aria-level="1">That’ll never happen.</li>
  762. </ul>
  763. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  764. <h3>10 Ways to Say Something is Interesting/Boring</h3>
  765. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  766. <ul>
  767. <li aria-level="1">It’s fascinating.</li>
  768. <li aria-level="1">It’s intriguing.</li>
  769. <li aria-level="1">I couldn’t tear myself away.</li>
  770. <li aria-level="1">I couldn’t put it down.</li>
  771. </ul>
  772. <p>(this phrase is used for en extremely interesting book)</p>
  773. <ul>
  774. <li aria-level="1">I was so into it, I lost track of time.</li>
  775. <li aria-level="1">It does nothing for me.</li>
  776. <li aria-level="1">I was bored to tears.</li>
  777. <li aria-level="1">I was bored to death.</li>
  778. </ul>
  779. <ul>
  780. <li aria-level="1">I was dying of boredom.</li>
  781. <li aria-level="1">It’s about as exciting as watching paint dry.</li>
  782. </ul>
  783. <p>(= it’s very boring)</p>
  784. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  785. <h3>10 Phrases for Cheering Someone Up</h3>
  786. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  787. <ul>
  788. <li aria-level="1">What’s the matter?</li>
  789. <li aria-level="1">What’s wrong?</li>
  790. <li aria-level="1">Are you all right?</li>
  791. <li aria-level="1">You look a bit down.</li>
  792. </ul>
  793. <p>(= a little sad)</p>
  794. <ul>
  795. <li aria-level="1">Is there anything I can do to help?</li>
  796. <li aria-level="1">Cheer up! / Chin up!</li>
  797. <li aria-level="1">It’s not so bad.</li>
  798. <li aria-level="1">Everything will be OK.</li>
  799. <li aria-level="1">Look on the bright side.</li>
  800. </ul>
  801. <p>(= consider the positive aspects)</p>
  802. <ul>
  803. <li aria-level="1">It’s not the end of the world.</li>
  804. </ul>
  805. <p>(this phrase is used when someone is upset about something small and trivial)</p>
  806. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  807. <h3>7 Phrases for Disappointment</h3>
  808. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  809. <ul>
  810. <li aria-level="1">What a pity!</li>
  811. <li aria-level="1">What a shame.</li>
  812. <li aria-level="1">How disappointing.</li>
  813. <li aria-level="1">That’s too bad.</li>
  814. <li aria-level="1">Bummer.</li>
  815. <li aria-level="1">It was a real letdown.</li>
  816. <li aria-level="1">It didn’t live up to my expectations.</li>
  817. </ul>
  818. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  819. <h3>10 Ways to Say You Don’t Believe Someone</h3>
  820. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  821. <ul>
  822. <li aria-level="1">Yeah, right.</li>
  823. <li aria-level="1">You’re kidding.</li>
  824. <li aria-level="1">You’re pulling my leg.</li>
  825. <li aria-level="1">That’s a bit of an exaggeration.</li>
  826. <li aria-level="1">He’s stretching the truth.</li>
  827. <li aria-level="1">He’s not telling the whole truth.</li>
  828. <li aria-level="1">She’s being economical with the truth.</li>
  829. </ul>
  830. <p>(= she’s lying or not telling the entire truth)</p>
  831. <ul>
  832. <li aria-level="1">His story is fishy.</li>
  833. <li aria-level="1">That’s an outright lie.</li>
  834. <li aria-level="1">That’s a pack of lies.</li>
  835. </ul>
  836. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  837. <h3>10 Expressions for Bad People</h3>
  838. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  839. <ul>
  840. <li aria-level="1">He’s a creep.</li>
  841. </ul>
  842. <p>(= unpleasant, suspicious, makes you afraid/uneasy)</p>
  843. <ul>
  844. <li aria-level="1">He’s a pervert.</li>
  845. </ul>
  846. <p>(= someone with disgusting sexual tendencies)</p>
  847. <ul>
  848. <li aria-level="1">He’s a sicko.</li>
  849. <li aria-level="1">He’s a scumbag.</li>
  850. <li aria-level="1">He’s an asshole.</li>
  851. <li aria-level="1">He’s a jerk.</li>
  852. <li aria-level="1">He’s a bastard.</li>
  853. <li aria-level="1">She’s a bitch.</li>
  854. </ul>
  855. <p>(= she’s irritating and unpleasant)</p>
  856. <ul>
  857. <li aria-level="1">She’s a psycho.</li>
  858. </ul>
  859. <p>(= crazy, irrational)</p>
  860. <ul>
  861. <li aria-level="1">She’s a slut.</li>
  862. </ul>
  863. <p>(= she has sex with a lot of people)</p>
  864. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  865. <h3>10 Words for Describing Speaking</h3>
  866. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  867. <ul>
  868. <li aria-level="1">He yelled.</li>
  869. <li aria-level="1">She screamed.</li>
  870. <li aria-level="1">I whispered.</li>
  871. </ul>
  872. <p>(= spoke in an extremely quiet voice)</p>
  873. <ul>
  874. <li aria-level="1">We chatted.</li>
  875. </ul>
  876. <p>(= had an informal conversation)</p>
  877. <ul>
  878. <li aria-level="1">He mumbled.</li>
  879. </ul>
  880. <p>(= spoke in a low voice, not clearly, without opening his mouth much)</p>
  881. <ul>
  882. <li aria-level="1">My kids whined.</li>
  883. </ul>
  884. <p>(= complained)</p>
  885. <ul>
  886. <li aria-level="1">He rambled. / He went on and on.</li>
  887. </ul>
  888. <p>(= talked too much without stopping)</p>
  889. <ul>
  890. <li aria-level="1">She stammered.</li>
  891. <li aria-level="1">I snapped at my husband.</li>
  892. </ul>
  893. <p>(= said a quick and angry remark)</p>
  894. <ul>
  895. <li aria-level="1">He muttered.</li>
  896. </ul>
  897. <p>(= spoke in a low voice, usually making complaints or negative comments)</p>
  898. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  899. <h3>10 Phrases for Facial Expressions</h3>
  900. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  901. <ul>
  902. <li aria-level="1">She was beaming.</li>
  903. </ul>
  904. <p>(= she had a big, radiant smile)</p>
  905. <ul>
  906. <li aria-level="1">The kids were smiling from ear to ear.</li>
  907. <li aria-level="1">He looked puzzled.</li>
  908. </ul>
  909. <p>(= confused)</p>
  910. <ul>
  911. <li aria-level="1">She grinned.</li>
  912. </ul>
  913. <p>(= had a small smile)</p>
  914. <ul>
  915. <li aria-level="1">He winced when the doctor gave him an injection.</li>
  916. </ul>
  917. <p>(= had a quick expression of pain)</p>
  918. <ul>
  919. <li aria-level="1">She gave me a dirty look.</li>
  920. </ul>
  921. <p>(= looked at me angrily)</p>
  922. <ul>
  923. <li aria-level="1">She blushed.</li>
  924. </ul>
  925. <p>(= her face turned red because she was embarrassed)</p>
  926. <ul>
  927. <li aria-level="1">His eyes were glazed over.</li>
  928. </ul>
  929. <p>(= he appeared</p>
  930. <ul>
  931. <li aria-level="1">Why the long face?</li>
  932. </ul>
  933. <p>(an informal expression to ask why someone looks sad or upset)</p>
  934. <ul>
  935. <li aria-level="1">Her expression was unreadable.</li>
  936. </ul>
  937. <p>(= you can’t know what she is feeling)</p>
  938. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  939. <h3>10 Phrases to Describe Offending or Upsetting People</h3>
  940. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  941. <ul>
  942. <li aria-level="1">They got off on the wrong foot.</li>
  943. </ul>
  944. <p>(= when they first met, they didn’t get along)</p>
  945. <ul>
  946. <li aria-level="1">He got on the teacher’s bad side.</li>
  947. <li aria-level="1">She took offense at his comment.</li>
  948. <li aria-level="1">He has a chip on his shoulder.</li>
  949. </ul>
  950. <p>(= he is easily offended)</p>
  951. <ul>
  952. <li aria-level="1">She got bent out of shape.</li>
  953. <li aria-level="1">He left in a huff.</li>
  954. <li aria-level="1">She got her panties in a wad.</li>
  955. <li aria-level="1">He has a short fuse.</li>
  956. </ul>
  957. <p>(= he gets angry easily)</p>
  958. <ul>
  959. <li aria-level="1">She dissed my mother.</li>
  960. </ul>
  961. <p>(= she insulted/disrespected my mother)</p>
  962. <ul>
  963. <li aria-level="1">He got his nose out of joint.</li>
  964. </ul>
  965. <p>#5, #7, #10 all mean the person got irritated/annoyed</p>
  966. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  967. <h3>10 Phrases for Bad Travel Experiences</h3>
  968. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  969. <ul>
  970. <li aria-level="1">My flight was overbooked.</li>
  971. </ul>
  972. <p>(overbooked = there were too many passengers and not enough seats)</p>
  973. <ul>
  974. <li aria-level="1">My flight was delayed/canceled.</li>
  975. <li aria-level="1">My luggage was lost.</li>
  976. <li aria-level="1">I was jet-lagged.</li>
  977. </ul>
  978. <p>(= I felt tired because of the time zone difference between my origin and destination)</p>
  979. <ul>
  980. <li aria-level="1">My hotel was in a seedy area.</li>
  981. </ul>
  982. <p>(seedy = possibly unsafe)</p>
  983. <ul>
  984. <li aria-level="1">I was mugged.</li>
  985. </ul>
  986. <p>(= I was robbed on the street)</p>
  987. <ul>
  988. <li aria-level="1">The weather was miserable.</li>
  989. <li aria-level="1">I got the runs.</li>
  990. </ul>
  991. <p>(= diarrhea)</p>
  992. <ul>
  993. <li aria-level="1">The place was a tourist trap.</li>
  994. </ul>
  995. <p>(= made only for tourists; not authentic)</p>
  996. <ul>
  997. <li aria-level="1">I couldn’t wait to get back home.</li>
  998. </ul>
  999. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1000. <h3>10 Phrases for Drinking (Alcohol)</h3>
  1001. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1002. <ul>
  1003. <li aria-level="1">It’s on me.</li>
  1004. </ul>
  1005. <p>(= I’ll buy you a drink)</p>
  1006. <ul>
  1007. <li aria-level="1">I’d like to make a toast.</li>
  1008. </ul>
  1009. <p>(= I’d like to honor a person/event/idea)</p>
  1010. <ul>
  1011. <li aria-level="1">Here’s to… (your health / the New Year / our success)!</li>
  1012. <li aria-level="1">Another round of drinks, please.</li>
  1013. <li aria-level="1">Put it on my tab.</li>
  1014. </ul>
  1015. <p>(tab = bill to pay later, before you leave)</p>
  1016. <ul>
  1017. <li aria-level="1">He’s a bit tipsy.</li>
  1018. </ul>
  1019. <p>(= a little bit drunk)</p>
  1020. <ul>
  1021. <li aria-level="1">He’s completely sloshed/wasted/plastered.</li>
  1022. </ul>
  1023. <p>(= completely drunk)</p>
  1024. <ul>
  1025. <li aria-level="1">She’s trying to drown her sorrows.</li>
  1026. </ul>
  1027. <p>(= drinking alcohol for relief from pain/sadness)</p>
  1028. <ul>
  1029. <li aria-level="1">I’m the designated driver.</li>
  1030. </ul>
  1031. <p>(= I’m not drinking alcohol because I will drive other people home later)</p>
  1032. <ul>
  1033. <li aria-level="1">I had a hangover. / I was hung over.</li>
  1034. </ul>
  1035. <p>(= the bad feeling you have the morning after drinking too much)</p>
  1036. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1037. <h3>15 Comparative Idioms</h3>
  1038. <ul>
  1039. <li aria-level="1">It’s as light as a feather.</li>
  1040. <li aria-level="1">It’s as dry as a bone.</li>
  1041. <li aria-level="1">It’s as flat as a pancake.</li>
  1042. <li aria-level="1">He’s as mad as a hornet.</li>
  1043. <li aria-level="1">It’s as old as the hills.</li>
  1044. <li aria-level="1">It’s as quick as lightning.</li>
  1045. <li aria-level="1">She’s as sick as a dog.</li>
  1046. <li aria-level="1">He’s as strong as an ox.</li>
  1047. <li aria-level="1">They’re as different as night and day.</li>
  1048. <li aria-level="1">She’s as stubborn as a mule.</li>
  1049. <li aria-level="1">He’s as proud as a peacock.</li>
  1050. <li aria-level="1">She’s as white as a sheet.</li>
  1051. </ul>
  1052. <p>(usually used when someone is very afraid or very sick)</p>
  1053. <ul>
  1054. <li aria-level="1">It’s as solid as a rock.</li>
  1055. <li aria-level="1">It’s as good as new.</li>
  1056. </ul>
  1057. <p>(used after something broken has been repaired)</p>
  1058. <ul>
  1059. <li aria-level="1">It’s as clear as mud.</li>
  1060. </ul>
  1061. <p>(= it’s not clear at all)</p>
  1062. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1063. <h3>Conclusion</h3>
  1064. <p>You&#8217;ve just explored the bes of advanced English phrases. By practicing these expressions, you&#8217;ll be able to communicate more effectively. Remember, the key to mastering any language is consistent practice and exposure.  So, start using these phrases in your conversations, and watch your fluency soar! Keep learning, keep practicing, and most importantly, keep having fun with the beautiful world of language!</p>
  1065. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1066. <h3>Next Conversation Tip Lesson</h3>
  1067. <p>TBD</p>
  1068. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1069. <h3>Related Conversation Lessons</h3>
  1070. <p>None</p>
  1071. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1072. <h2>Practice Conversation with HiCafe App</h2>
  1073. <p>By using <a href="/home">HiCafe</a> App, you can join free discussion events and <a href="/practice-english-conversation/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Practice English Conversation</a> online or in-person and improve your verbal skills.</p>
  1074. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1075. <h2>All Conversation Lessons</h2>
  1076. <p>To see and read all of our conversation lessons, you can visit our <a href="/improve-english-speaking-skills/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Improve English Speaking Skills</a> page.</p><p>The post <a href="https://hicafe.app/practice-english-speaking/speaking-tips/100-phrases-for-advanced-english-speakers/">100 Phrases for Advanced English Speakers</a> first appeared on <a href="https://hicafe.app">HiCafe</a>.</p>]]></content:encoded>
  1077. </item>
  1078. <item>
  1079. <title>Conversation Tips for Expressing Shocks</title>
  1080. <link>https://hicafe.app/practice-english-speaking/speaking-tips/conversation-tips-for-expressing-shocks/</link>
  1081. <dc:creator><![CDATA[hcbMatt]]></dc:creator>
  1082. <pubDate>Tue, 23 Jul 2024 10:55:25 +0000</pubDate>
  1083. <category><![CDATA[Tips]]></category>
  1084. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://hicafe.app/?p=4865</guid>
  1085.  
  1086. <description><![CDATA[<p>&#160; Sometimes, life throws us into unexpected predicaments, and it can be hard to react when something unexpected and upsetting happens. Whether it&#8217;s a natural disaster or a personal loss, it&#8217;s important to find ways to express shock and disbelief. This lesson will guide you through some common phrases and expressions that can help you [&#8230;]</p>
  1087. <p>The post <a href="https://hicafe.app/practice-english-speaking/speaking-tips/conversation-tips-for-expressing-shocks/">Conversation Tips for Expressing Shocks</a> first appeared on <a href="https://hicafe.app">HiCafe</a>.</p>]]></description>
  1088. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>&nbsp;</p>
  1089. <p>Sometimes, life throws us into unexpected predicaments, and it can be hard to react when something unexpected and upsetting happens. Whether it&#8217;s a natural disaster or a personal loss, it&#8217;s important to find ways to express shock and disbelief. This lesson will guide you through some common phrases and expressions that can help you communicate your emotions.</p>
  1090. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1091. <h3>Previous Conversation Tip Lesson</h3>
  1092. <p><a href="/practice-english-speaking/speaking-tips/conversation-tips-for-giving-orders-and-instructions/">Conversation Tips for Giving Orders and Instructions</a></p>
  1093. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1094. <h2>Expressing shock in English</h2>
  1095. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1096. <p>Here’s a list of some common expressions to help you express shock and disbelief.<br />
  1097. &nbsp;</p>
  1098. <h3>Shock</h3>
  1099. <ul>
  1100. <li aria-level="1">I was shocked to hear…</li>
  1101. <li aria-level="1">The news came as a complete shock.</li>
  1102. <li aria-level="1">We’re all in complete shock.</li>
  1103. <li aria-level="1">Everyone’s reeling from the shock of…</li>
  1104. <li aria-level="1">It happened out of the blue.</li>
  1105. <li aria-level="1">Who could have predicted it?</li>
  1106. <li aria-level="1">I (just) can’t get over ….</li>
  1107. <li aria-level="1">We were completely taken aback by…</li>
  1108. <li aria-level="1">I was just stunned by…</li>
  1109. </ul>
  1110. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1111. <h3>Disbelief</h3>
  1112. <ul>
  1113. <li aria-level="1">I just can’t believe…</li>
  1114. <li aria-level="1">It’s unbelievable.</li>
  1115. <li aria-level="1">I / You just can’t imagine…</li>
  1116. <li aria-level="1">Words can’t describe… (how I feel about / the terrible devastation etc)</li>
  1117. <li aria-level="1">There’s no way it could have happened.</li>
  1118. </ul>
  1119. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1120. <h3>Saying how bad something is</h3>
  1121. <ul>
  1122. <li aria-level="1">It’s so awful.</li>
  1123. <li aria-level="1">It’s terrible / What terrible news.</li>
  1124. <li aria-level="1">It’s a tragedy.</li>
  1125. <li aria-level="1">It’s a catastrophe (pronounced “ca – tas – tra – fee” with the stress on “-tas”)</li>
  1126. <li aria-level="1">This is the worst thing that could have happened.</li>
  1127. </ul>
  1128. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1129. <h3>The after effects</h3>
  1130. <p>Here are some words and phrases frequently used to discuss the short-term and long-term impacts of a natural disaster or other tragic events.</p>
  1131. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1132. <ul>
  1133. <li aria-level="1">To come to terms with = to accept:</li>
  1134. </ul>
  1135. <p>The community is slowly coming to terms with the loss of their homes after the flood.</p>
  1136. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1137. <ul>
  1138. <li aria-level="1">To assess the damage = to find out the extent of the damage:</li>
  1139. </ul>
  1140. <p>Local officials are determining the extent of the damage caused by the recent wildfire.</p>
  1141. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1142. <ul>
  1143. <li aria-level="1">To provide emergency relief / emergency assistance:</li>
  1144. </ul>
  1145. <p>Many volunteers are working tirelessly to provide emergency assistance to those affected by the hurricane.</p>
  1146. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1147. <ul>
  1148. <li aria-level="1">To give moral support = to sympathize with the victims: Friends and family gathered to give moral support to those who lost their loved ones.</li>
  1149. </ul>
  1150. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1151. <ul>
  1152. <li aria-level="1">To learn the lessons = to learn from something: After the tornado, it’s crucial for schools to learn the lessons about safety protocols.</li>
  1153. </ul>
  1154. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1155. <ul>
  1156. <li aria-level="1">To be better prepared: The recent storm emphasized the need for communities to be better prepared for future disasters.</li>
  1157. </ul>
  1158. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1159. <h3>Conclusion</h3>
  1160. <p>The phrases shared in this lesson can serve as a guide to express shock, disbelief, and sympathy. By using these expressions, we can better support one another while navigating through the difficult aftermath of such events. Remember, sharing how you feel can be a crucial step in the healing process.</p>
  1161. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1162. <h3>Next Conversation Tip Lesson</h3>
  1163. <p><a href="/practice-english-speaking/speaking-tips/100-phrases-for-advanced-english-speakers/">100 Phrases for Advanced English Speakers</a></p>
  1164. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1165. <h3>Related Conversation Lessons</h3>
  1166. <p>None</p>
  1167. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1168. <h2>Practice Conversation with HiCafe App</h2>
  1169. <p>By using <a href="/home">HiCafe</a> App, you can join free discussion events and <a href="/practice-english-conversation/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Practice English Conversation</a> online or in-person and improve your verbal skills.</p>
  1170. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1171. <h2>All Conversation Lessons</h2>
  1172. <p>To see and read all of our conversation lessons, you can visit our <a href="/improve-english-speaking-skills/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Improve English Speaking Skills</a> page.</p><p>The post <a href="https://hicafe.app/practice-english-speaking/speaking-tips/conversation-tips-for-expressing-shocks/">Conversation Tips for Expressing Shocks</a> first appeared on <a href="https://hicafe.app">HiCafe</a>.</p>]]></content:encoded>
  1173. </item>
  1174. <item>
  1175. <title>Conversation Tips for Giving Orders and Instructions</title>
  1176. <link>https://hicafe.app/practice-english-speaking/speaking-tips/conversation-tips-for-giving-orders-and-instructions/</link>
  1177. <dc:creator><![CDATA[hcbMatt]]></dc:creator>
  1178. <pubDate>Tue, 23 Jul 2024 10:54:37 +0000</pubDate>
  1179. <category><![CDATA[Tips]]></category>
  1180. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://hicafe.app/?p=4863</guid>
  1181.  
  1182. <description><![CDATA[<p>&#160; Giving orders can be tricky!  You want to be clear and concise, but also respectful and avoid sounding bossy.  This lesson will guide you through some different ways to phrase requests and instructions so you can get what you need done without upsetting anyone.  Let&#8217;s dive in! &#160; Previous Conversation Tip Lesson Conversation Tips- [&#8230;]</p>
  1183. <p>The post <a href="https://hicafe.app/practice-english-speaking/speaking-tips/conversation-tips-for-giving-orders-and-instructions/">Conversation Tips for Giving Orders and Instructions</a> first appeared on <a href="https://hicafe.app">HiCafe</a>.</p>]]></description>
  1184. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>&nbsp;</p>
  1185. <p>Giving orders can be tricky!  You want to be clear and concise, but also respectful and avoid sounding bossy.  This lesson will guide you through some different ways to phrase requests and instructions so you can get what you need done without upsetting anyone.  Let&#8217;s dive in!</p>
  1186. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1187. <h3>Previous Conversation Tip Lesson</h3>
  1188. <p><a href="/practice-english-speaking/speaking-tips/conversation-tips-hesitating-phrases-in-english/">Conversation Tips- Hesitating Phrases in English</a></p>
  1189. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1190. <h2>How to Give orders and instructions</h2>
  1191. <h3>1. Use the imperative form</h3>
  1192. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1193. <p>We use the imperative form to give orders, warnings and advice:</p>
  1194. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1195. <ul>
  1196. <li aria-level="1">Put your phone away!</li>
  1197. <li aria-level="1">Pay close attention to what I&#8217;m saying!</li>
  1198. </ul>
  1199. <ul>
  1200. <li aria-level="1">Watch out!</li>
  1201. </ul>
  1202. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1203. <p>To avoid sounding rude when giving direct orders, especially to adults, we often soften the imperative form by using phrases like “let’s” or “please.”</p>
  1204. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1205. <p>Let’s eat now.</p>
  1206. <p>Please don’t interrupt me.</p>
  1207. <h3>2. Use a modal verb to turn the order into a request</h3>
  1208. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1209. <p>We use modals to change the mood of a sentence. For example, “You should go home ” is more polite than “Go home!”</p>
  1210. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1211. <p>Other modal verbs you can use to make requests are:</p>
  1212. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1213. <ul>
  1214. <li aria-level="1">Could: Could you please wait in the waiting room until the doctor calls you?</li>
  1215. <li aria-level="1">Can: Can you please grab me a cup of coffee?</li>
  1216. <li aria-level="1">Will: Will you close the door behind you?</li>
  1217. <li aria-level="1">Would: Would you come over here for a sec?</li>
  1218. </ul>
  1219. <h3>3. Use an introductory phrase to soften the order.</h3>
  1220. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1221. <p>Instead of using a direct command, you can use a more indirect phrase to make your request. Here are some common ways to phrase an order, ranging from the most indirect to the most direct:</p>
  1222. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1223. <ul>
  1224. <li aria-level="1">Would you mind possibly… (+ ing) (Most indirect)</li>
  1225. </ul>
  1226. <p>Would you mind possibly putting your shoes away? It&#8217;s a bit messy in here.</p>
  1227. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1228. <ul>
  1229. <li aria-level="1">I was hoping you could … (+ infinitive without to)</li>
  1230. </ul>
  1231. <p>I was hoping you could take a look at this code for me.</p>
  1232. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1233. <ul>
  1234. <li aria-level="1">Do you think you could … (+ infinitive without to)</li>
  1235. </ul>
  1236. <p>Do you think you could help me finish up this presentation?</p>
  1237. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1238. <ul>
  1239. <li aria-level="1">If you have a couple of minutes spare…</li>
  1240. </ul>
  1241. <p>If you have a couple of minutes spare, could you help me with these boxes?</p>
  1242. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1243. <ul>
  1244. <li aria-level="1">I’d like you to…</li>
  1245. </ul>
  1246. <p>I&#8217;d like you to run this code through the debugger.</p>
  1247. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1248. <ul>
  1249. <li aria-level="1">I want you to…</li>
  1250. </ul>
  1251. <p>I want you to complete this task by tomorrow.</p>
  1252. <h3>4. Use sequencing words</h3>
  1253. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1254. <p>You can use sequencing words to make instructions clear.</p>
  1255. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1256. <ul>
  1257. <li aria-level="1">First, unplug the device.</li>
  1258. <li aria-level="1">Secondly, use a screwdriver to open the back panel.</li>
  1259. <li aria-level="1">Then, carefully remove the two black wires.</li>
  1260. </ul>
  1261. <h3>Conclusion</h3>
  1262. <p>By utilizing the techniques outlined above—such as using the imperative form softly, incorporating modal verbs, employing introductory phrases, and using sequencing words—you can convey your requests clearly in English. So, the next time you need to ask someone for help, try these approaches to make your message both clear and kind!</p>
  1263. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1264. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1265. <h3>Next Conversation Tip Lesson</h3>
  1266. <p><a href="/practice-english-speaking/speaking-tips/conversation-tips-for-expressing-shocks/">Conversation Tips for Expressing Shocks</a></p>
  1267. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1268. <h3>Related Conversation Lessons</h3>
  1269. <p>None</p>
  1270. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1271. <h2>Practice Conversation with HiCafe App</h2>
  1272. <p>By using <a href="/home">HiCafe</a> App, you can join free discussion events and <a href="/practice-english-conversation/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Practice English Conversation</a> online or in-person and improve your verbal skills.</p>
  1273. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1274. <h2>All Conversation Lessons</h2>
  1275. <p>To see and read all of our conversation lessons, you can visit our <a href="/improve-english-speaking-skills/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Improve English Speaking Skills</a> page.</p><p>The post <a href="https://hicafe.app/practice-english-speaking/speaking-tips/conversation-tips-for-giving-orders-and-instructions/">Conversation Tips for Giving Orders and Instructions</a> first appeared on <a href="https://hicafe.app">HiCafe</a>.</p>]]></content:encoded>
  1276. </item>
  1277. <item>
  1278. <title>Conversation Tips-Hesitating Phrases in English</title>
  1279. <link>https://hicafe.app/practice-english-speaking/speaking-tips/conversation-tips-hesitating-phrases-in-english/</link>
  1280. <dc:creator><![CDATA[hcbMatt]]></dc:creator>
  1281. <pubDate>Tue, 23 Jul 2024 10:51:23 +0000</pubDate>
  1282. <category><![CDATA[Tips]]></category>
  1283. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://hicafe.app/?p=4861</guid>
  1284.  
  1285. <description><![CDATA[<p>&#160; Ever get stuck in a conversation, mind going blank, and wish you had some magic words to buy you some time? Don&#8217;t worry, we&#8217;ve all been there! There are some super helpful phrases you can use when you forget a word or need a moment to gather your thoughts.  These phrases are like little [&#8230;]</p>
  1286. <p>The post <a href="https://hicafe.app/practice-english-speaking/speaking-tips/conversation-tips-hesitating-phrases-in-english/">Conversation Tips-Hesitating Phrases in English</a> first appeared on <a href="https://hicafe.app">HiCafe</a>.</p>]]></description>
  1287. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>&nbsp;</p>
  1288. <p>Ever get stuck in a conversation, mind going blank, and wish you had some magic words to buy you some time? Don&#8217;t worry, we&#8217;ve all been there! There are some super helpful phrases you can use when you forget a word or need a moment to gather your thoughts.  These phrases are like little lifesavers for your fluency – they show the listener you&#8217;re still on track, and they give you a chance to regroup.  Let&#8217;s dive into these handy phrases!</p>
  1289. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1290. <h3>Previous Conversation Tip Lesson</h3>
  1291. <p><a href="/practice-english-speaking/speaking-tips/conversation-tips-for-complaining/">Conversation Tips for Complaining</a></p>
  1292. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1293. <h2>Hesitating Phrases in English</h2>
  1294. <h3>Hesitating Phrases</h3>
  1295. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1296. <ol>
  1297. <li aria-level="1">It’s on the tip of my tongue</li>
  1298. </ol>
  1299. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1300. <p>Use this phrase when you know the word, but it just slipped your mind.  The other person will be cool and wait for you to remember, or you can just keep talking without stressing about it.</p>
  1301. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1302. <ul>
  1303. <li aria-level="1">I was just at the store and saw this amazing  &#8230; It&#8217;s on the tip of my tongue&#8230;  It&#8217;s a kind of fruit, but it&#8217;s green and really sour.  Anyway, I decided not to buy it.</li>
  1304. </ul>
  1305. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1306. <ol>
  1307. <li aria-level="1">So, what I mean to say is…</li>
  1308. </ol>
  1309. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1310. <p>Use this when your words are all jumbled up and you want to try again with a simpler explanation.</p>
  1311. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1312. <ul>
  1313. <li aria-level="1">I was trying to explain that new video game I&#8217;m playing, but it&#8217;s hard to describe.  So what I mean to say is, it&#8217;s a lot like that one we used to play, but with more&#8230;  zombies?  Yeah, zombies.  And you can build things.</li>
  1314. </ul>
  1315. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1316. <ol>
  1317. <li aria-level="1">It’ll come to me in a minute</li>
  1318. </ol>
  1319. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1320. <p>Use this when you forget a word, an idea or a name. The phrase helps your fluency, because you can move on to your next idea.</p>
  1321. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1322. <ul>
  1323. <li aria-level="1">We went to this awesome restaurant last night.  The food was so good&#8230;  And they had this amazing  &#8230;  It&#8217;ll come to me in a minute.  It was something with cheese and bread.  Anyway, I&#8217;ll remember later.</li>
  1324. </ul>
  1325. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1326. <ol>
  1327. <li aria-level="1">So what was I saying?</li>
  1328. </ol>
  1329. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1330. <p>Use this when you have to switch gears ( maybe someone interrupted) and you want to get back to what you were saying.  It gives you a second to remember your thoughts.</p>
  1331. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1332. <ul>
  1333. <li aria-level="1">Oh, sorry!  Did you say something?  I was thinking about that new job I applied for.  Anyway, so what was I saying?  Oh yeah, I was asking about your weekend plans!</li>
  1334. </ul>
  1335. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1336. <ol>
  1337. <li aria-level="1">What was I saying again?</li>
  1338. </ol>
  1339. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1340. <p>You can use this in the same way as “So what was I saying?”</p>
  1341. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1342. <ul>
  1343. <li aria-level="1">This is hilarious!  I forgot how this happened&#8230; What was I saying again?  Oh yeah, the time I accidentally went to the wrong store and bought a dozen  &#8230;  Oh, I can&#8217;t remember!  Maybe later.</li>
  1344. </ul>
  1345. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1346. <h3>Phrases when you forget a word</h3>
  1347. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1348. <ol>
  1349. <li aria-level="1">What’s the word again?</li>
  1350. </ol>
  1351. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1352. <p>Use this when you want someone to help you find the word.</p>
  1353. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1354. <ul>
  1355. <li aria-level="1">We were talking about that new movie with the  &#8230; What&#8217;s the word again?  It&#8217;s like a robot, but it&#8217;s not really a robot.  You know, with the metal body?  &#8230;</li>
  1356. </ul>
  1357. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1358. <ol>
  1359. <li aria-level="1">The thingummy (pronounced “thing-uhm-ee”)</li>
  1360. </ol>
  1361. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1362. <p>This is a word you can use to replace the word that you’ve forgotten. (In particular, words for objects which have a technical purpose.)</p>
  1363. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1364. <ul>
  1365. <li aria-level="1">Can you pass me that thingummy?  It&#8217;s the one you use to open the bottle.</li>
  1366. </ul>
  1367. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1368. <ol>
  1369. <li aria-level="1">The whatchamacallit (pronounced “what-cha-ma-call-it”)</li>
  1370. </ol>
  1371. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1372. <p>This is another word for “thingummy”.</p>
  1373. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1374. <ul>
  1375. <li aria-level="1">The whatchamacallit is broken on my phone, so I can&#8217;t take pictures anymore.</li>
  1376. </ul>
  1377. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1378. <h3>Conclusion</h3>
  1379. <p>So there you have it!  A little arsenal of phrases to help you navigate those sticky moments when you&#8217;re speaking English.  Remember, it&#8217;s okay to pause, it&#8217;s okay to hesitate, and it&#8217;s okay to ask for a little help.  These phrases are your friends – use them wisely and watch your fluency soar!</p>
  1380. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1381. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1382. <h3>Next Conversation Tip Lesson</h3>
  1383. <p><a href="/practice-english-speaking/speaking-tips/conversation-tips-for-giving-orders-and-instructions/">Conversation Tips for Giving Orders and Instructions</a></p>
  1384. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1385. <h3>Related Conversation Lessons</h3>
  1386. <p>None</p>
  1387. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1388. <h2>Practice Conversation with HiCafe App</h2>
  1389. <p>By using <a href="/home">HiCafe</a> App, you can join free discussion events and <a href="/practice-english-conversation/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Practice English Conversation</a> online or in-person and improve your verbal skills.</p>
  1390. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1391. <h2>All Conversation Lessons</h2>
  1392. <p>To see and read all of our conversation lessons, you can visit our <a href="/improve-english-speaking-skills/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Improve English Speaking Skills</a> page.</p><p>The post <a href="https://hicafe.app/practice-english-speaking/speaking-tips/conversation-tips-hesitating-phrases-in-english/">Conversation Tips-Hesitating Phrases in English</a> first appeared on <a href="https://hicafe.app">HiCafe</a>.</p>]]></content:encoded>
  1393. </item>
  1394. <item>
  1395. <title>Conversation Tips for Complaining</title>
  1396. <link>https://hicafe.app/practice-english-speaking/speaking-tips/conversation-tips-for-complaining/</link>
  1397. <dc:creator><![CDATA[hcbMatt]]></dc:creator>
  1398. <pubDate>Mon, 22 Jul 2024 06:59:54 +0000</pubDate>
  1399. <category><![CDATA[Tips]]></category>
  1400. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://hicafe.app/?p=4859</guid>
  1401.  
  1402. <description><![CDATA[<p>&#160; We&#8217;ve all been there –  you&#8217;re trying to enjoy your day, but then something goes wrong! Complaining is a natural part of life, but it&#8217;s important to do it politely, especially in English. This lesson will show you how to express your concerns effectively and avoid any misunderstandings, ensuring you get the resolution you [&#8230;]</p>
  1403. <p>The post <a href="https://hicafe.app/practice-english-speaking/speaking-tips/conversation-tips-for-complaining/">Conversation Tips for Complaining</a> first appeared on <a href="https://hicafe.app">HiCafe</a>.</p>]]></description>
  1404. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>&nbsp;</p>
  1405. <p>We&#8217;ve all been there –  you&#8217;re trying to enjoy your day, but then something goes wrong! Complaining is a natural part of life, but it&#8217;s important to do it politely, especially in English. This lesson will show you how to express your concerns effectively and avoid any misunderstandings, ensuring you get the resolution you need!</p>
  1406. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1407. <h3>Previous Conversation Tip Lesson</h3>
  1408. <p><a href="/practice-english-speaking/speaking-tips/conversation-tips-for-talking-about-the-past/">Conversation Tips for Talking about the Past</a></p>
  1409. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1410. <h2>How to Complain in English</h2>
  1411. <h3>In a shop</h3>
  1412. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1413. <p>You’re in a shop and the assistant gives you the wrong size/color.</p>
  1414. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1415. <ul>
  1416. <li aria-level="1">Excuse me, I think there might be a mistake with this purchase. This doesn&#8217;t seem to be the right size/color I ordered.</li>
  1417. </ul>
  1418. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1419. <ul>
  1420. <li aria-level="1">Sorry, but I&#8217;m concerned that this item seems slightly damaged. Could you please have a look?</li>
  1421. </ul>
  1422. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1423. <h3>In a hotel</h3>
  1424. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1425. <ul>
  1426. <li aria-level="1">Excuse me, I&#8217;m having some trouble with the internet connection in my room. Could you please assist?</li>
  1427. </ul>
  1428. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1429. <ul>
  1430. <li aria-level="1">Sorry to bother you, but there appears to be a leak in the bathroom.  Would you mind sending someone to take a look?</li>
  1431. </ul>
  1432. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1433. <ul>
  1434. <li aria-level="1">I&#8217;m afraid I need to make a complaint.  I left a valuable item in the safe, but it&#8217;s no longer there.  Can someone please help me with this?</li>
  1435. </ul>
  1436. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1437. <ul>
  1438. <li aria-level="1">I&#8217;m afraid there seems to be a mix-up with my room.  I booked a room with a view, but this one doesn&#8217;t have one.</li>
  1439. </ul>
  1440. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1441. <p>When people apologize, they normally say “sorry” and offer to put the situation right.</p>
  1442. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1443. <ul>
  1444. <li aria-level="1">Excuse me, but my drink is flat. Could you please replace it?</li>
  1445. </ul>
  1446. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1447. <p>I&#8217;m sorry about that. I&#8217;ll get you a fresh one right away!</p>
  1448. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1449. <ul>
  1450. <li aria-level="1">Excuse me, I think we&#8217;ve been waiting a bit longer than expected. Could you please check on our order?</li>
  1451. </ul>
  1452. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1453. <p>Sorry for the delay! Your order is almost ready. I&#8217;ll make sure you get your food as soon as possible.</p>
  1454. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1455. <h4>Speaking tip</h4>
  1456. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1457. <p>Using &#8220;sorry&#8221; when complaining can seem odd at first. But, it shows that you&#8217;re trying to be polite and respectful, and it&#8217;s a great way to get the situation fixed! Remember, everyone makes mistakes, and a calm and respectful approach often gets the best results.</p>
  1458. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1459. <h3>Conclusion</h3>
  1460. <p>Remember, even when you&#8217;re feeling frustrated, a polite and respectful tone can go a long way in getting your point across in English. By using phrases like &#8220;excuse me&#8221; and &#8220;sorry,&#8221; you&#8217;ll come across as more understanding and likely to get the outcome you&#8217;re looking for! Don&#8217;t be afraid to speak up, and remember, it&#8217;s always best to find a solution that works for everyone.</p>
  1461. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1462. <h3>Next Conversation Tip Lesson</h3>
  1463. <p><a href="/practice-english-speaking/speaking-tips/conversation-tips-hesitating-phrases-in-english/">Conversation Tips- Hesitating Phrases in English</a></p>
  1464. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1465. <h3>Related Conversation Lessons</h3>
  1466. <p>None</p>
  1467. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1468. <h2>Practice Conversation with HiCafe App</h2>
  1469. <p>By using <a href="/home">HiCafe</a> App, you can join free discussion events and <a href="/practice-english-conversation/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Practice English Conversation</a> online or in-person and improve your verbal skills.</p>
  1470. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1471. <h2>All Conversation Lessons</h2>
  1472. <p>To see and read all of our conversation lessons, you can visit our <a href="/improve-english-speaking-skills/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Improve English Speaking Skills</a> page.</p><p>The post <a href="https://hicafe.app/practice-english-speaking/speaking-tips/conversation-tips-for-complaining/">Conversation Tips for Complaining</a> first appeared on <a href="https://hicafe.app">HiCafe</a>.</p>]]></content:encoded>
  1473. </item>
  1474. <item>
  1475. <title>Conversation Tips for Talking about the Past</title>
  1476. <link>https://hicafe.app/practice-english-speaking/speaking-tips/conversation-tips-for-talking-about-the-past/</link>
  1477. <dc:creator><![CDATA[hcbMatt]]></dc:creator>
  1478. <pubDate>Mon, 22 Jul 2024 06:58:37 +0000</pubDate>
  1479. <category><![CDATA[Tips]]></category>
  1480. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://hicafe.app/?p=4857</guid>
  1481.  
  1482. <description><![CDATA[<p>&#160; When learning to speak about your past in English, it&#8217;s important to use the correct verb forms, time expressions, and connectors to effectively communicate your experiences. By mastering these essential tools, you can share your life story with clarity and coherence. &#160; Previous Conversation Tip Lesson Tips for Talking about Probability and Making Predictions [&#8230;]</p>
  1483. <p>The post <a href="https://hicafe.app/practice-english-speaking/speaking-tips/conversation-tips-for-talking-about-the-past/">Conversation Tips for Talking about the Past</a> first appeared on <a href="https://hicafe.app">HiCafe</a>.</p>]]></description>
  1484. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>&nbsp;</p>
  1485. <p>When learning to speak about your past in English, it&#8217;s important to use the correct verb forms, time expressions, and connectors to effectively communicate your experiences. By mastering these essential tools, you can share your life story with clarity and coherence.</p>
  1486. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1487. <h3>Previous Conversation Tip Lesson</h3>
  1488. <p><a href="/practice-english-speaking/speaking-tips/tips-for-talking-about-probability-and-making-predictions/">Tips for Talking about Probability and Making Predictions</a></p>
  1489. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1490. <h2>Talking about your Past</h2>
  1491. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1492. <p>Use these tips to help you speak about your past in English.</p>
  1493. <h3>Born</h3>
  1494. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1495. <p>Remember to use the past form of the verb “to be” with “born”:</p>
  1496. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1497. <ul>
  1498. <li aria-level="1">I was born</li>
  1499. <li aria-level="1">You were born</li>
  1500. <li aria-level="1">He was born</li>
  1501. <li aria-level="1">We were born</li>
  1502. <li aria-level="1">They were born</li>
  1503. </ul>
  1504. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1505. <p>Examples</p>
  1506. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1507. <ul>
  1508. <li aria-level="1">I was born … (in 2003)</li>
  1509. <li aria-level="1">He was born … (ten years ago)</li>
  1510. <li aria-level="1">They were born … (in Paris / in hospital / at home)</li>
  1511. </ul>
  1512. <h3>Time expressions</h3>
  1513. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1514. <ul>
  1515. <li aria-level="1">For the first five years of my life, we lived in a cottage. Then, we moved to the city and everything changed.</li>
  1516. </ul>
  1517. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1518. <ul>
  1519. <li aria-level="1">I learned to read when I was 4! In total, I attended school for 10 years.</li>
  1520. </ul>
  1521. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1522. <ul>
  1523. <li aria-level="1">In 2010, I landed my first job as a software engineer.</li>
  1524. </ul>
  1525. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1526. <h3>Emotions, feelings and states</h3>
  1527. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1528. <p>Use the verb “to be” to talk about emotions in the past.</p>
  1529. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1530. <ul>
  1531. <li aria-level="1">Despite being broke, we were always laughing and having fun.</li>
  1532. </ul>
  1533. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1534. <p>You can also use “feel” (“felt” in the past tense) but this is less common.</p>
  1535. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1536. <ul>
  1537. <li aria-level="1"> I felt utterly worried when I moved to a new city.</li>
  1538. </ul>
  1539. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1540. <p>Use “was” or “were” to talk about jobs.</p>
  1541. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1542. <ul>
  1543. <li aria-level="1">My grandfather was a skilled carpenter.</li>
  1544. </ul>
  1545. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1546. <p>You can also use “worked as a / an”:</p>
  1547. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1548. <ul>
  1549. <li aria-level="1">He worked as a chef at a fancy restaurant.</li>
  1550. </ul>
  1551. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1552. <p>To talk about how many or how much of something, use “there was” or “there were”.</p>
  1553. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1554. <ul>
  1555. <li aria-level="1">There were always so many books in our house!</li>
  1556. </ul>
  1557. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1558. <ul>
  1559. <li aria-level="1">There were many interesting places to visit.</li>
  1560. </ul>
  1561. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1562. <ul>
  1563. <li aria-level="1">There was smoke all over the house when I entered.</li>
  1564. </ul>
  1565. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1566. <h3>Difficult verbs</h3>
  1567. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1568. <p>Be careful how you use these:</p>
  1569. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1570. <ol>
  1571. <li aria-level="1">To start</li>
  1572. </ol>
  1573. <p>You only start something once.</p>
  1574. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1575. <ul>
  1576. <li aria-level="1">I started learning to code back in 2018.</li>
  1577. <li aria-level="1">I started college three years ago.</li>
  1578. </ul>
  1579. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1580. <ol>
  1581. <li aria-level="1">To meet</li>
  1582. </ol>
  1583. <p>You meet someone on a single or repeated occasion. It doesn’t mean “to know”.</p>
  1584. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1585. <ul>
  1586. <li aria-level="1">I met my best friend on a camping trip.</li>
  1587. <li aria-level="1">I met my husband at university.</li>
  1588. </ul>
  1589. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1590. <ol>
  1591. <li aria-level="1">To know</li>
  1592. </ol>
  1593. <p>To know someone or something is a state – not an event.</p>
  1594. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1595. <ul>
  1596. <li aria-level="1">I didn&#8217;t know how to swim until I was 10.</li>
  1597. <li aria-level="1">I knew lots of celebrities when I lived in New York.</li>
  1598. </ul>
  1599. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1600. <h3>Use simple connectors to tell a story</h3>
  1601. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1602. <ol>
  1603. <li aria-level="1">And = adds an idea</li>
  1604. </ol>
  1605. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1606. <p>I went to the store and bought a new laptop.</p>
  1607. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1608. <ol>
  1609. <li aria-level="1">But = gives a contrast</li>
  1610. </ol>
  1611. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1612. <p>I wanted to go to the concert, but I didn&#8217;t have enough money.</p>
  1613. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1614. <ol>
  1615. <li aria-level="1">So = gives a result</li>
  1616. </ol>
  1617. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1618. <p>The train was delayed, so I missed my meeting.</p>
  1619. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1620. <p>(When you write English, you don’t need a comma before and, but or so if both parts of the sentence are short.)</p>
  1621. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1622. <ol>
  1623. <li aria-level="1">Because = gives a reason</li>
  1624. </ol>
  1625. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1626. <p>We decided to travel to Japan because my sister lives there.</p>
  1627. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1628. <p>“Because” can go at the beginning or in the middle of a sentence.</p>
  1629. <p>Because the weather was so awful, we didn’t enjoy the day</p>
  1630. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1631. <ol>
  1632. <li aria-level="1">Then = explains what happened next</li>
  1633. </ol>
  1634. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1635. <p>I graduated from college, then I started working full-time.</p>
  1636. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1637. <ol>
  1638. <li aria-level="1">After = says what happened in a time following an event, or as a result of something else</li>
  1639. </ol>
  1640. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1641. <p>After the snowstorm, the roads were covered in ice.</p>
  1642. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1643. <p>She left the house, after yelling at me.</p>
  1644. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1645. <h3>Conclusion</h3>
  1646. <p>Mastering the art of talking about your past in English opens up a world of possibilities for sharing your stories, connecting with others, and expressing yourself authentically  Keep practicing, don&#8217;t be afraid to make mistakes, and enjoy the journey of discovering your own unique voice!</p>
  1647. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1648. <h3>Next Conversation Tip Lesson</h3>
  1649. <p><a href="/practice-english-speaking/speaking-tips/conversation-tips-for-complaining/">Conversation Tips for Complaining</a></p>
  1650. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1651. <h3>Related Conversation Lessons</h3>
  1652. <p>None</p>
  1653. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1654. <h2>Practice Conversation with HiCafe App</h2>
  1655. <p>By using <a href="/home">HiCafe</a> App, you can join free discussion events and <a href="/practice-english-conversation/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Practice English Conversation</a> online or in-person and improve your verbal skills.</p>
  1656. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1657. <h2>All Conversation Lessons</h2>
  1658. <p>To see and read all of our conversation lessons, you can visit our <a href="/improve-english-speaking-skills/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Improve English Speaking Skills</a> page.</p><p>The post <a href="https://hicafe.app/practice-english-speaking/speaking-tips/conversation-tips-for-talking-about-the-past/">Conversation Tips for Talking about the Past</a> first appeared on <a href="https://hicafe.app">HiCafe</a>.</p>]]></content:encoded>
  1659. </item>
  1660. <item>
  1661. <title>Tips for Talking about Probability and Making Predictions</title>
  1662. <link>https://hicafe.app/practice-english-speaking/speaking-tips/tips-for-talking-about-probability-and-making-predictions/</link>
  1663. <dc:creator><![CDATA[hcbMatt]]></dc:creator>
  1664. <pubDate>Mon, 22 Jul 2024 06:57:21 +0000</pubDate>
  1665. <category><![CDATA[Tips]]></category>
  1666. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://hicafe.app/?p=4855</guid>
  1667.  
  1668. <description><![CDATA[<p>&#160; Ever wondered how to talk about possibilities and what might happen in the future? Well, in this lesson you learn about it! English has a bunch of ways to express probability, from super certain to highly unlikely.  We&#8217;re diving into the world of  &#8220;might,&#8221; &#8220;could,&#8221; and &#8220;will,&#8221; along with some handy tips to make [&#8230;]</p>
  1669. <p>The post <a href="https://hicafe.app/practice-english-speaking/speaking-tips/tips-for-talking-about-probability-and-making-predictions/">Tips for Talking about Probability and Making Predictions</a> first appeared on <a href="https://hicafe.app">HiCafe</a>.</p>]]></description>
  1670. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>&nbsp;</p>
  1671. <p>Ever wondered how to talk about possibilities and what might happen in the future? Well, in this lesson you learn about it! English has a bunch of ways to express probability, from super certain to highly unlikely.  We&#8217;re diving into the world of  &#8220;might,&#8221; &#8220;could,&#8221; and &#8220;will,&#8221; along with some handy tips to make your predictions sound smart. Let&#8217;s get started!</p>
  1672. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1673. <h3>Previous Conversation Tip Lesson</h3>
  1674. <p><a href="/practice-english-speaking/speaking-tips/conversation-tips-for-telling-a-story/">Conversation Tips for Telling a Story</a></p>
  1675. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1676. <h2>How to Talk about probability and predictions</h2>
  1677. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1678. <p>There are many ways of saying that something will probably or possibly happen in English.</p>
  1679. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1680. <h3>Probable</h3>
  1681. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1682. <ul>
  1683. <li aria-level="1"><strong>Bound to</strong> = certain: With all that practice, she&#8217;s bound to ace that presentation!</li>
  1684. </ul>
  1685. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1686. <ul>
  1687. <li aria-level="1"><strong>Sure to</strong> = certain: He&#8217;s sure to win the lottery &#8211; he&#8217;s got a lucky streak!</li>
  1688. </ul>
  1689. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1690. <ul>
  1691. <li aria-level="1"><strong>Likely to</strong> = probable: We&#8217;re likely to see a rise in online shopping this holiday season.</li>
  1692. </ul>
  1693. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1694. <ul>
  1695. <li aria-level="1"><strong>Definite</strong> = sure: She&#8217;s a definite candidate for the promotion &#8211; she&#8217;s been killing it!</li>
  1696. </ul>
  1697. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1698. <ul>
  1699. <li aria-level="1"><strong>Probable=</strong> It&#8217;s probable that we&#8217;ll have a snowstorm this winter, based on last year&#8217;s weather.</li>
  1700. </ul>
  1701. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1702. <ul>
  1703. <li aria-level="1"><strong>Likely=</strong> With the current political climate, an election is likely within the next year.</li>
  1704. </ul>
  1705. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1706. <ul>
  1707. <li aria-level="1"><strong>Will definitely happen=</strong> There will definitely be a huge party at the office for the company anniversary.</li>
  1708. </ul>
  1709. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1710. <ul>
  1711. <li aria-level="1"><strong>Will probably happen=</strong> They&#8217;ll probably release a new phone model in the spring.</li>
  1712. </ul>
  1713. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1714. <h3>Possible</h3>
  1715. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1716. <ul>
  1717. <li aria-level="1"><strong>May</strong>: We may go to the concert tonight &#8211; depends on how we feel after work.</li>
  1718. </ul>
  1719. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1720. <ul>
  1721. <li aria-level="1"><strong>Might</strong>: There might be a new flavor of ice cream at the store &#8211; I&#8217;ll have to check!</li>
  1722. </ul>
  1723. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1724. <ul>
  1725. <li aria-level="1"><strong>Could</strong>: There could be a traffic jam on the highway &#8211; it&#8217;s rush hour.</li>
  1726. </ul>
  1727. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1728. <ul>
  1729. <li aria-level="1">… <strong>is possible:</strong> Do you think they&#8217;ll raise the price of gas again? Yes, that&#8217;s possible.</li>
  1730. </ul>
  1731. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1732. <ul>
  1733. <li aria-level="1">…<strong> is unlikely</strong>: It&#8217;s unlikely that I&#8217;ll win the raffle &#8211; I never seem to get lucky.</li>
  1734. </ul>
  1735. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1736. <ul>
  1737. <li aria-level="1"><strong>Will possibly</strong>: She&#8217;ll possibly come over later tonight &#8211; she&#8217;s been busy all day.</li>
  1738. </ul>
  1739. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1740. <ul>
  1741. <li aria-level="1"><strong>Probably won’t:</strong> They probably won&#8217;t make it to the meeting on time &#8211; they&#8217;re always running late.</li>
  1742. </ul>
  1743. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1744. <ul>
  1745. <li aria-level="1"><strong>Definitely won’t:</strong> I definitely won&#8217;t eat that spicy curry &#8211; my stomach can&#8217;t handle it!</li>
  1746. </ul>
  1747. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1748. <ul>
  1749. <li aria-level="1">…<strong> is highly unlikely</strong>: It&#8217;s highly unlikely that we&#8217;ll get a vacation this year &#8211; the budget&#8217;s tight.</li>
  1750. </ul>
  1751. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1752. <p><b>Note: Be careful of the word order.</b></p>
  1753. <p>“Definitely” and “probably” come after “will” (in positive sentences) and before “won’t” in negative sentences.</p>
  1754. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1755. <h3>Variations</h3>
  1756. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1757. <p>You can add words to alter the strength of probability:</p>
  1758. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1759. <ul>
  1760. <li aria-level="1">Highly likely / unlikely (= very likely / unlikely)</li>
  1761. </ul>
  1762. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1763. <ul>
  1764. <li aria-level="1">Quite likely / probable / possible (= more likely, probable or possible)</li>
  1765. </ul>
  1766. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1767. <ul>
  1768. <li aria-level="1">Could possibly / probably</li>
  1769. </ul>
  1770. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1771. <ul>
  1772. <li aria-level="1">Most definitely won’t (= even more unlikely)</li>
  1773. </ul>
  1774. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1775. <h3>Making predictions</h3>
  1776. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1777. <p>When we want to say what we think will happen in the future, we can either use will followed by the verb without to, or going to followed by the verb.</p>
  1778. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1779. <ul>
  1780. <li aria-level="1">What do you think will happen in the next year with the stock market?</li>
  1781. </ul>
  1782. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1783. <ul>
  1784. <li aria-level="1">This weekend is going to be packed with events &#8211; I&#8217;m so busy!</li>
  1785. </ul>
  1786. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1787. <ul>
  1788. <li aria-level="1">There won&#8217;t be any time for relaxation this month &#8211; it&#8217;s all work.</li>
  1789. </ul>
  1790. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1791. <ul>
  1792. <li aria-level="1">He isn&#8217;t going to win the election &#8211; he&#8217;s not very popular with voters.</li>
  1793. </ul>
  1794. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1795. <p><b>Speaking tip</b>: Because we also use will to talk about intentions and strong decisions, we often use going to to sound more objective.</p>
  1796. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1797. <p>&#8220;He won&#8217;t help us&#8221; can imply his decision not to assist. However, &#8220;He isn&#8217;t going to help us&#8221; sounds more like a neutral prediction or stating an objective fact – perhaps he lacks the ability to help us.</p>
  1798. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1799. <h4>Make Predictions based on existing knowledge</h4>
  1800. <p>We can make predictions based on what we can see now. To do this, we use going to and the verb.</p>
  1801. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1802. <p>For example:</p>
  1803. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1804. <ul>
  1805. <li aria-level="1">Watch out! You&#8217;re going to spill your coffee!</li>
  1806. </ul>
  1807. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1808. <ul>
  1809. <li aria-level="1">It&#8217;s going to be a great day for a picnic &#8211; the weather is perfect!</li>
  1810. </ul>
  1811. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1812. <h3>Conclusion</h3>
  1813. <p>Now you&#8217;ve got the tools to talk about the future with confidence and precision. Remember to choose your words wisely and be aware of the strength of probability.  Whether you&#8217;re predicting a sunny day or a win for your favorite team, you&#8217;ve got this! Keep practicing, and soon you&#8217;ll be a master of predictions!</p>
  1814. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1815. <h3>Next Conversation Tip Lesson</h3>
  1816. <p><a href="/practice-english-speaking/speaking-tips/conversation-tips-for-talking-about-the-past/">Conversation Tips for Talking about the Past</a></p>
  1817. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1818. <h3>Related Conversation Lessons</h3>
  1819. <p>None</p>
  1820. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1821. <h2>Practice Conversation with HiCafe App</h2>
  1822. <p>By using <a href="/home">HiCafe</a> App, you can join free discussion events and <a href="/practice-english-conversation/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Practice English Conversation</a> online or in-person and improve your verbal skills.</p>
  1823. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1824. <h2>All Conversation Lessons</h2>
  1825. <p>To see and read all of our conversation lessons, you can visit our <a href="/improve-english-speaking-skills/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Improve English Speaking Skills</a> page.</p><p>The post <a href="https://hicafe.app/practice-english-speaking/speaking-tips/tips-for-talking-about-probability-and-making-predictions/">Tips for Talking about Probability and Making Predictions</a> first appeared on <a href="https://hicafe.app">HiCafe</a>.</p>]]></content:encoded>
  1826. </item>
  1827. </channel>
  1828. </rss>
  1829.  

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