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  30. <item>
  31. <title>Idioms Related To Business is War</title>
  32. <link>https://hicafe.app/learn-english/words/essential-idioms-for-speaking-en/idiom-related-to-business-is-war/</link>
  33. <dc:creator><![CDATA[hcbMatt]]></dc:creator>
  34. <pubDate>Tue, 18 Jun 2024 07:11:28 +0000</pubDate>
  35. <category><![CDATA[Idioms]]></category>
  36. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://hicafe.app/?p=3395</guid>
  37.  
  38. <description><![CDATA[<p>This is lesson 2 from Idiom Part 1. Each idiom is followed by its definition and examples. After you learn them, you can use them in your daily conversation. &#160; 1-Give up without a flight = surrender without putting up any resistance The company wants to fire Mike with no reason, but he doesn’t want [&#8230;]</p>
  39. <p>The post <a href="https://hicafe.app/learn-english/words/essential-idioms-for-speaking-en/idiom-related-to-business-is-war/">Idioms Related To Business is War</a> first appeared on <a href="https://hicafe.app">HiCafe</a>.</p>]]></description>
  40. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>This is lesson 2 from Idiom Part 1. Each idiom is followed by its definition and examples. After you learn them, you can use them in your daily conversation.</p>
  41. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  42. <p><b>1-Give up without a flight = </b>surrender without putting up any resistance</p>
  43. <p>The company wants to fire Mike with no reason, but he doesn’t want to <b>give up</b> <b>without a fight</b>.</p>
  44. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  45. <p><b>2- Join forces = </b>To combine efforts</p>
  46. <p>Marketing and sales teams <b>join their forces</b> to improve sales.</p>
  47. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  48. <p><b>3- Gain ground = </b>Make progress</p>
  49. <p>His theories gradually <b>gained ground</b> among academics.</p>
  50. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  51. <p><b>4- Take the flak = </b>To be blamed for something</p>
  52. <p>Because we had to lay off 500 people, we’ve <b>taken a lot of flak</b> in the press.</p>
  53. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  54. <p><b>5- Keep your head down = </b>Just minding your own business.</p>
  55. <p>Just <b>keep your head down</b> for a few more days.</p>
  56. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  57. <p><b>6- Own worst enemy = </b>is the cause of his/her own problems.</p>
  58. <p>Carrie is <b>her own worst enemy</b>, she’s always arguing with people.</p>
  59. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  60. <p><b>7- Get on with something = </b>Continue doing something.</p>
  61. <p>Be positive about your future and <b>get on with</b> living a normal life.</p>
  62. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  63. <p><b>8- Set targets = </b>Set goals that will be pursued.</p>
  64. <p>The new company president has <b>set targets</b> for this year&#8217;s sales.</p>
  65. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  66. <p><b>9- Get the sack = </b>To be fired</p>
  67. <p>I’ll <b>get the sack</b> if I arrive at the office late!</p>
  68. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  69. <p><b>10- Set your sights on = </b>Focus with ambition on achieving something.</p>
  70. <p>Jenny has <b>set her sights on</b> winning the competition.</p>
  71. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  72. <h2>Next English Idiom Lesson</h2>
  73. <p>In our next English idiom lesson, we cover below:</p>
  74. <ul>
  75. <li>Idioms Related To Business is War</li>
  76. </ul>
  77. <h2 align="center"></h2>
  78. <h2>Related Idioms</h2>
  79. <p>Here is the list of idioms related to this lesson.</p>
  80. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  81. <h2>Idiom Part 1 Outline</h2>
  82. <p>If you wish to explore all lessons that are covered in <a href="/home">HiCafe</a> Idiom Part 1, you can visit the <a href="/learn-english/practice-english-skills/essential-and-popular-english-idioms-part-1/">Essential and Popular English idioms- Part 1</a> page.</p><p>The post <a href="https://hicafe.app/learn-english/words/essential-idioms-for-speaking-en/idiom-related-to-business-is-war/">Idioms Related To Business is War</a> first appeared on <a href="https://hicafe.app">HiCafe</a>.</p>]]></content:encoded>
  83. </item>
  84. <item>
  85. <title>Idioms Related To Time is Money</title>
  86. <link>https://hicafe.app/learn-english/words/essential-idioms-for-speaking-en/idiom-related-to-time-is-money/</link>
  87. <dc:creator><![CDATA[hcbMatt]]></dc:creator>
  88. <pubDate>Sun, 16 Jun 2024 09:42:05 +0000</pubDate>
  89. <category><![CDATA[Idioms]]></category>
  90. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://hicafe.app/?p=3218</guid>
  91.  
  92. <description><![CDATA[<p>This is lesson 1 from Idiom Part 1. Each idiom is followed by its definition and examples. After you learn them, you can use them in your daily conversation. &#160; 1- A waste of time (as noun) = A bad use of time or spending time on doing useless or unnecessary things 40 minutes waiting [&#8230;]</p>
  93. <p>The post <a href="https://hicafe.app/learn-english/words/essential-idioms-for-speaking-en/idiom-related-to-time-is-money/">Idioms Related To Time is Money</a> first appeared on <a href="https://hicafe.app">HiCafe</a>.</p>]]></description>
  94. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>This is lesson 1 from Idiom Part 1. Each idiom is followed by its definition and examples. After you learn them, you can use them in your daily conversation.</p>
  95. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  96. <p>1- <b>A waste of time (as noun) = </b>A bad use of time or <b>spending time </b>on doing useless or unnecessary things</p>
  97. <p>40 minutes waiting for a bus! What <b>a waste of time!</b></p>
  98. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  99. <p><b>2- Waste time (as verb) = </b>The same as #1</p>
  100. <p>Do not <b>waste time</b> on applying for this job, your chances are 1 to million.</p>
  101. <p>I wasted so much of my precious time on applying to the wrong jobs.</p>
  102. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  103. <p><b>3- Save time = </b>Reducing time needed for doing something</p>
  104. <p>In this rush hour, by using the subway, we can <b>save lots of time. </b></p>
  105. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  106. <p><b>4- Spend time = </b>Using time on doing something</p>
  107. <p>it is better to spend your time and energy on things that are aligned with your career goals.</p>
  108. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  109. <p><b>5- Make time for = </b>to set aside time for doing something</p>
  110. <p>We should make time for reading good books.</p>
  111. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  112. <p><b>6- Plenty of time = </b>A lot of time available</p>
  113. <p>No hurry, the bus leaves in 20 minutes. We have plenty of time at hand.</p>
  114. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  115. <p><b>7- Spare time (as noun) = </b>Free time or leisure time</p>
  116. <p>In my spare time, I read books on philosophy.</p>
  117. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  118. <p><b>8- Spare time (as verb) = </b>Asking for a short time break to do something quickly</p>
  119. <p>I like to discuss something important, can you spare 1 minute to talk about it.</p>
  120. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  121. <p><b>9- Ran out of time = </b>To have a lack or shortage of time for doing something</p>
  122. <p>In my final exam, I ran out of time and just could not answer 3 questions.</p>
  123. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  124. <p><b>10- Short of time = </b>lack of having enough time to finish something</p>
  125. <p>Due to the shortage of time, we have to cancel our next meeting.</p>
  126. <p>Though we have 20 days to finish this project, we are short of time, so we need to hurry.</p>
  127. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  128. <p><b>11- Afford time = </b>to have enough money or time for something</p>
  129. <p>Not anyone can afford the time to take a one month vacation.</p>
  130. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  131. <h2>Next English Idiom Lesson</h2>
  132. <p>In our next English idiom lesson, we cover below:</p>
  133. <ul>
  134. <li><a href="/learn-english/words/essential-idioms-for-speaking-en/idiom-related-to-business-is-war/"> Idioms Related To Business is War</a></li>
  135. </ul>
  136. <h2 align="center"></h2>
  137. <h2>Related Idioms</h2>
  138. <p>Here is the list of idioms related to this lesson.</p>
  139. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  140. <h2>Idiom Part 1 Outline</h2>
  141. <p>If you wish to explore all lessons that are covered in <a href="/home">HiCafe</a> Idiom Part 1, you can visit the <a href="/learn-english/practice-english-skills/essential-and-popular-english-idioms-part-1/">Essential and Popular English idioms- Part 1</a> page.</p><p>The post <a href="https://hicafe.app/learn-english/words/essential-idioms-for-speaking-en/idiom-related-to-time-is-money/">Idioms Related To Time is Money</a> first appeared on <a href="https://hicafe.app">HiCafe</a>.</p>]]></content:encoded>
  142. </item>
  143. <item>
  144. <title>American Slang Beginning with Z</title>
  145. <link>https://hicafe.app/learn-english/words/slang-a-to-z/american-slang-beginning-with-z/</link>
  146. <comments>https://hicafe.app/learn-english/words/slang-a-to-z/american-slang-beginning-with-z/#respond</comments>
  147. <dc:creator><![CDATA[hcbMatt]]></dc:creator>
  148. <pubDate>Sun, 09 Jun 2024 15:41:28 +0000</pubDate>
  149. <category><![CDATA[Slang]]></category>
  150. <category><![CDATA[American]]></category>
  151. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://hicafe.app/?p=1312</guid>
  152.  
  153. <description><![CDATA[<p>Slang Beginning with Z In this lesson, we cover essential American slang starting with letter Z with examples. In general, slang are used mostly in casual street talks among Americans such that even international (non-native) speakers living in the USA can not understand them. Thus, you may use slang in your daily casual conversations especially [&#8230;]</p>
  154. <p>The post <a href="https://hicafe.app/learn-english/words/slang-a-to-z/american-slang-beginning-with-z/">American Slang Beginning with Z</a> first appeared on <a href="https://hicafe.app">HiCafe</a>.</p>]]></description>
  155. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<h2>Slang Beginning with Z</h2>
  156. <p>In this lesson, we cover essential American slang starting with letter <b>Z</b> with examples. In general, slang are used mostly in casual street talks among Americans such that even international (non-native) speakers living in the USA can not understand them. Thus, you may use slang in your daily casual conversations especially with Americans. Just be careful and do NOT use slang in formal conversations like job interviews or business meetings.</p>
  157. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  158. <h2>Word of the Day: X, Y &amp; Z</h2>
  159. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  160. <p><strong>x-rated</strong>: sexually explicit; lewd behavior.</p>
  161. <p>She was paid a lot of money to appear in an x-rated movie.</p>
  162. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  163. <p><strong>Xmas</strong>: Christmas.</p>
  164. <p>We wish you a merry Xmas.</p>
  165. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  166. <p><strong>yack</strong>: talk nonstop.</p>
  167. <p>It’s hard to concentrate when someone’s yacking on their cell phone.</p>
  168. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  169. <p><strong>yes man</strong>: a person who always answers &#8220;yes&#8221; to his or her boss; a person who agrees with a supervisor.</p>
  170. <p>A strong leader is one who doesn’t surround himself with yes men.</p>
  171. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  172. <p><strong>yikes</strong>: wow! look out!</p>
  173. <p>Yikes! Look at our electric bill for the month!</p>
  174. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  175. <p><strong>you betcha:</strong> yes; that’s right; you’re welcome.</p>
  176. <p>A: Thanks for helping me.</p>
  177. <p>B: You betcha.</p>
  178. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  179. <p><strong>you-know-what:</strong> something you don’t want to say the name of; a substitute for a vulgar word.</p>
  180. <p>She was dancing when her you-know-whats popped out of her blouse .</p>
  181. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  182. <p><strong>yo-yo</strong>: a stupid person; someone who doesn’t know what he’s doing.</p>
  183. <p>The yo-yo who gave me my prescription made a mistake.</p>
  184. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  185. <p><strong>yuck</strong>: a word used to describe something that you really don’t like–similar to &#8220;ick.&#8221;</p>
  186. <p>A: Do you want some of this boiled spinach?</p>
  187. <p>B: Yuck! No thanks. I hate spinach.</p>
  188. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  189. <p><strong>yuppie</strong>: young urban professional; a young person who makes a lot of money and usually lives in the city.</p>
  190. <p>The Yuppies moving into our neighborhood are causing an increase in the cost to rent an apartment.</p>
  191. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  192. <p><strong>zilch</strong>: nothing; zero.</p>
  193. <p>Thelma thought she was going to get a good tip from the table she served, but they left her with zilch.</p>
  194. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  195. <p><strong>zit</strong>: a pimple of the face; a blemish.</p>
  196. <p>Joe decided not to go to school yesterday because a giant zit suddenly erupted on his nose.</p>
  197. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  198. <p><strong>zombie</strong>: a person who is incapable of concentration because of fatigue; a movie character who dies, comes back to life, and then tries to eat people.</p>
  199. <p>If I don’t get at least eight hours of sleep, I’m a zombie the next day.</p>
  200. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  201. <p><strong>zoned out</strong>: unable to concentrate.</p>
  202. <p>George zoned out through most of the meeting.</p>
  203. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  204. <p><strong>zonk out:</strong> to fall asleep; to go to sleep quickly and deeply.</p>
  205. <p>After 12 hours of work, Tina zonked out as soon as she got home.</p>
  206. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  207. <p><strong>zoo</strong>: a situation that is out of control; chaos.</p>
  208. <p>When the teacher left the classroom, it suddenly turned into a zoo.</p>
  209. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  210. <h2>Related Slang Lessons</h2>
  211. <p>None</p>
  212. <h2>English Slang Outline</h2>
  213. <p>If you wish to see all <a title="HiCafe Homepage" href="/home">HiCafe</a> lessons related to English slang, you can visit the <a title="English Slang" href="/learn-english/practice-english-skills/popular-and-practical-american-slang-words/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Popular and Practical American Slang</a> page.</p><p>The post <a href="https://hicafe.app/learn-english/words/slang-a-to-z/american-slang-beginning-with-z/">American Slang Beginning with Z</a> first appeared on <a href="https://hicafe.app">HiCafe</a>.</p>]]></content:encoded>
  214. <wfw:commentRss>https://hicafe.app/learn-english/words/slang-a-to-z/american-slang-beginning-with-z/feed/</wfw:commentRss>
  215. <slash:comments>0</slash:comments>
  216. </item>
  217. <item>
  218. <title>American Slang Beginning with Y</title>
  219. <link>https://hicafe.app/learn-english/words/slang-a-to-z/american-slang-beginning-with-y/</link>
  220. <comments>https://hicafe.app/learn-english/words/slang-a-to-z/american-slang-beginning-with-y/#respond</comments>
  221. <dc:creator><![CDATA[hcbMatt]]></dc:creator>
  222. <pubDate>Sun, 09 Jun 2024 15:40:12 +0000</pubDate>
  223. <category><![CDATA[Slang]]></category>
  224. <category><![CDATA[American]]></category>
  225. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://hicafe.app/?p=1311</guid>
  226.  
  227. <description><![CDATA[<p>Slang Beginning with Y In this lesson, we cover essential American slang starting with letter Y with examples. In general, slang are used mostly in casual street talks among Americans such that even international (non-native) speakers living in the USA can not understand them. Thus, you may use slang in your daily casual conversations especially [&#8230;]</p>
  228. <p>The post <a href="https://hicafe.app/learn-english/words/slang-a-to-z/american-slang-beginning-with-y/">American Slang Beginning with Y</a> first appeared on <a href="https://hicafe.app">HiCafe</a>.</p>]]></description>
  229. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<h2>Slang Beginning with Y</h2>
  230. <p>In this lesson, we cover essential American slang starting with letter <b>Y</b> with examples. In general, slang are used mostly in casual street talks among Americans such that even international (non-native) speakers living in the USA can not understand them. Thus, you may use slang in your daily casual conversations especially with Americans. Just be careful and do NOT use slang in formal conversations like job interviews or business meetings.</p>
  231. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  232. <h2>Word of the Day: X, Y &amp; Z</h2>
  233. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  234. <p><strong>x-rated</strong>: sexually explicit; lewd behavior.</p>
  235. <p>She was paid a lot of money to appear in an x-rated movie.</p>
  236. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  237. <p><strong>Xmas</strong>: Christmas.</p>
  238. <p>We wish you a merry Xmas.</p>
  239. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  240. <p><strong>yack</strong>: talk nonstop.</p>
  241. <p>It’s hard to concentrate when someone’s yacking on their cell phone.</p>
  242. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  243. <p><strong>yes man</strong>: a person who always answers &#8220;yes&#8221; to his or her boss; a person who agrees with a supervisor.</p>
  244. <p>A strong leader is one who doesn’t surround himself with yes men.</p>
  245. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  246. <p><strong>yikes</strong>: wow! look out!</p>
  247. <p>Yikes! Look at our electric bill for the month!</p>
  248. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  249. <p><strong>you betcha:</strong> yes; that’s right; you’re welcome.</p>
  250. <p>A: Thanks for helping me.</p>
  251. <p>B: You betcha.</p>
  252. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  253. <p><strong>you-know-what:</strong> something you don’t want to say the name of; a substitute for a vulgar word.</p>
  254. <p>She was dancing when her you-know-whats popped out of her blouse .</p>
  255. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  256. <p><strong>yo-yo</strong>: a stupid person; someone who doesn’t know what he’s doing.</p>
  257. <p>The yo-yo who gave me my prescription made a mistake.</p>
  258. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  259. <p><strong>yuck</strong>: a word used to describe something that you really don’t like–similar to &#8220;ick.&#8221;</p>
  260. <p>A: Do you want some of this boiled spinach?</p>
  261. <p>B: Yuck! No thanks. I hate spinach.</p>
  262. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  263. <p><strong>yuppie</strong>: young urban professional; a young person who makes a lot of money and usually lives in the city.</p>
  264. <p>The Yuppies moving into our neighborhood are causing an increase in the cost to rent an apartment.</p>
  265. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  266. <p><strong>zilch</strong>: nothing; zero.</p>
  267. <p>Thelma thought she was going to get a good tip from the table she served, but they left her with zilch.</p>
  268. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  269. <p><strong>zit</strong>: a pimple of the face; a blemish.</p>
  270. <p>Joe decided not to go to school yesterday because a giant zit suddenly erupted on his nose.</p>
  271. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  272. <p><strong>zombie</strong>: a person who is incapable of concentration because of fatigue; a movie character who dies, comes back to life, and then tries to eat people.</p>
  273. <p>If I don’t get at least eight hours of sleep, I’m a zombie the next day.</p>
  274. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  275. <p><strong>zoned out</strong>: unable to concentrate.</p>
  276. <p>George zoned out through most of the meeting.</p>
  277. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  278. <p><strong>zonk out:</strong> to fall asleep; to go to sleep quickly and deeply.</p>
  279. <p>After 12 hours of work, Tina zonked out as soon as she got home.</p>
  280. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  281. <p><strong>zoo</strong>: a situation that is out of control; chaos.</p>
  282. <p>When the teacher left the classroom, it suddenly turned into a zoo.</p>
  283. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  284. <h2>Related Slang Lessons</h2>
  285. <p>None</p>
  286. <h2>English Slang Outline</h2>
  287. <p>If you wish to see all <a title="HiCafe Homepage" href="/home">HiCafe</a> lessons related to English slang, you can visit the <a title="English Slang" href="/learn-english/practice-english-skills/popular-and-practical-american-slang-words/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Popular and Practical American Slang</a> page.</p><p>The post <a href="https://hicafe.app/learn-english/words/slang-a-to-z/american-slang-beginning-with-y/">American Slang Beginning with Y</a> first appeared on <a href="https://hicafe.app">HiCafe</a>.</p>]]></content:encoded>
  288. <wfw:commentRss>https://hicafe.app/learn-english/words/slang-a-to-z/american-slang-beginning-with-y/feed/</wfw:commentRss>
  289. <slash:comments>0</slash:comments>
  290. </item>
  291. <item>
  292. <title>American Slang Beginning with X</title>
  293. <link>https://hicafe.app/learn-english/words/slang-a-to-z/american-slang-beginning-with-x/</link>
  294. <comments>https://hicafe.app/learn-english/words/slang-a-to-z/american-slang-beginning-with-x/#respond</comments>
  295. <dc:creator><![CDATA[hcbMatt]]></dc:creator>
  296. <pubDate>Sun, 09 Jun 2024 15:39:02 +0000</pubDate>
  297. <category><![CDATA[Slang]]></category>
  298. <category><![CDATA[American]]></category>
  299. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://hicafe.app/?p=1309</guid>
  300.  
  301. <description><![CDATA[<p>Slang Beginning with X In this lesson, we cover essential American slang starting with letter X with examples. In general, slang are used mostly in casual street talks among Americans such that even international (non-native) speakers living in the USA can not understand them. Thus, you may use slang in your daily casual conversations especially [&#8230;]</p>
  302. <p>The post <a href="https://hicafe.app/learn-english/words/slang-a-to-z/american-slang-beginning-with-x/">American Slang Beginning with X</a> first appeared on <a href="https://hicafe.app">HiCafe</a>.</p>]]></description>
  303. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<h2>Slang Beginning with X</h2>
  304. <p>In this lesson, we cover essential American slang starting with letter <b>X</b> with examples. In general, slang are used mostly in casual street talks among Americans such that even international (non-native) speakers living in the USA can not understand them. Thus, you may use slang in your daily casual conversations especially with Americans. Just be careful and do NOT use slang in formal conversations like job interviews or business meetings.</p>
  305. <h2>Slang Recap</h2>
  306. <p>In our previous lesson, we covered <a title="English Slang" href="/learn-english/words/slang-a-to-z/american-slang-beginning-with-w/">American Slang Beginning with W</a>.</p>
  307. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  308. <h2>Word of the Day: X, Y &amp; Z</h2>
  309. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  310. <p><strong>x-rated</strong>: sexually explicit; lewd behavior.</p>
  311. <p>She was paid a lot of money to appear in an x-rated movie.</p>
  312. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  313. <p><strong>Xmas</strong>: Christmas.</p>
  314. <p>We wish you a merry Xmas.</p>
  315. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  316. <p><strong>yack</strong>: talk nonstop.</p>
  317. <p>It’s hard to concentrate when someone’s yacking on their cell phone.</p>
  318. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  319. <p><strong>yes man</strong>: a person who always answers &#8220;yes&#8221; to his or her boss; a person who agrees with a supervisor.</p>
  320. <p>A strong leader is one who doesn’t surround himself with yes men.</p>
  321. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  322. <p><strong>yikes</strong>: wow! look out!</p>
  323. <p>Yikes! Look at our electric bill for the month!</p>
  324. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  325. <p><strong>you betcha:</strong> yes; that’s right; you’re welcome.</p>
  326. <p>A: Thanks for helping me.</p>
  327. <p>B: You betcha.</p>
  328. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  329. <p><strong>you-know-what:</strong> something you don’t want to say the name of; a substitute for a vulgar word.</p>
  330. <p>She was dancing when her you-know-whats popped out of her blouse .</p>
  331. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  332. <p><strong>yo-yo</strong>: a stupid person; someone who doesn’t know what he’s doing.</p>
  333. <p>The yo-yo who gave me my prescription made a mistake.</p>
  334. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  335. <p><strong>yuck</strong>: a word used to describe something that you really don’t like–similar to &#8220;ick.&#8221;</p>
  336. <p>A: Do you want some of this boiled spinach?</p>
  337. <p>B: Yuck! No thanks. I hate spinach.</p>
  338. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  339. <p><strong>yuppie</strong>: young urban professional; a young person who makes a lot of money and usually lives in the city.</p>
  340. <p>The Yuppies moving into our neighborhood are causing an increase in the cost to rent an apartment.</p>
  341. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  342. <p><strong>zilch</strong>: nothing; zero.</p>
  343. <p>Thelma thought she was going to get a good tip from the table she served, but they left her with zilch.</p>
  344. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  345. <p><strong>zit</strong>: a pimple of the face; a blemish.</p>
  346. <p>Joe decided not to go to school yesterday because a giant zit suddenly erupted on his nose.</p>
  347. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  348. <p><strong>zombie</strong>: a person who is incapable of concentration because of fatigue; a movie character who dies, comes back to life, and then tries to eat people.</p>
  349. <p>If I don’t get at least eight hours of sleep, I’m a zombie the next day.</p>
  350. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  351. <p><strong>zoned out</strong>: unable to concentrate.</p>
  352. <p>George zoned out through most of the meeting.</p>
  353. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  354. <p><strong>zonk out:</strong> to fall asleep; to go to sleep quickly and deeply.</p>
  355. <p>After 12 hours of work, Tina zonked out as soon as she got home.</p>
  356. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  357. <p><strong>zoo</strong>: a situation that is out of control; chaos.</p>
  358. <p>When the teacher left the classroom, it suddenly turned into a zoo.</p>
  359. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  360. <h2>Related Slang Lessons</h2>
  361. <p>None</p>
  362. <h2>English Slang Outline</h2>
  363. <p>If you wish to see all <a title="HiCafe Homepage" href="/home">HiCafe</a> lessons related to English slang, you can visit the <a title="English Slang" href="/learn-english/practice-english-skills/popular-and-practical-american-slang-words/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Popular and Practical American Slang</a> page.</p><p>The post <a href="https://hicafe.app/learn-english/words/slang-a-to-z/american-slang-beginning-with-x/">American Slang Beginning with X</a> first appeared on <a href="https://hicafe.app">HiCafe</a>.</p>]]></content:encoded>
  364. <wfw:commentRss>https://hicafe.app/learn-english/words/slang-a-to-z/american-slang-beginning-with-x/feed/</wfw:commentRss>
  365. <slash:comments>0</slash:comments>
  366. </item>
  367. <item>
  368. <title>American Slang Beginning with W</title>
  369. <link>https://hicafe.app/learn-english/words/slang-a-to-z/american-slang-beginning-with-w/</link>
  370. <comments>https://hicafe.app/learn-english/words/slang-a-to-z/american-slang-beginning-with-w/#respond</comments>
  371. <dc:creator><![CDATA[hcbMatt]]></dc:creator>
  372. <pubDate>Sun, 09 Jun 2024 15:37:10 +0000</pubDate>
  373. <category><![CDATA[Slang]]></category>
  374. <category><![CDATA[American]]></category>
  375. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://hicafe.app/?p=1307</guid>
  376.  
  377. <description><![CDATA[<p>Slang Beginning with W In this lesson, we cover essential American slang starting with letter W with examples. In general, slang are used mostly in casual street talks among Americans such that even international (non-native) speakers living in the USA can not understand them. Thus, you may use slang in your daily casual conversations especially [&#8230;]</p>
  378. <p>The post <a href="https://hicafe.app/learn-english/words/slang-a-to-z/american-slang-beginning-with-w/">American Slang Beginning with W</a> first appeared on <a href="https://hicafe.app">HiCafe</a>.</p>]]></description>
  379. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<h2>Slang Beginning with W</h2>
  380. <p>In this lesson, we cover essential American slang starting with letter <b>W</b> with examples. In general, slang are used mostly in casual street talks among Americans such that even international (non-native) speakers living in the USA can not understand them. Thus, you may use slang in your daily casual conversations especially with Americans. Just be careful and do NOT use slang in formal conversations like job interviews or business meetings.</p>
  381. <h2>Slang Recap</h2>
  382. <p>In our previous lesson, we covered <a title="English Slang" href="/learn-english/words/slang-a-to-z/american-slang-beginning-with-v/">American Slang Beginning with V</a>.</p>
  383. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  384. <h2>Word of the Day: W</h2>
  385. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  386. <p><strong>walk away</strong>: leave without buying anything.</p>
  387. <p>If a salesperson tries too hard to sell you something you aren’t ready to buy, it’s best just to walk away and say you’ll come back later.</p>
  388. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  389. <p><strong>walk out on</strong>: leave someone and end a relationship.</p>
  390. <p>Tanya was 14 years old when her father walked out on her family, and she hasn’t seen him since that time.</p>
  391. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  392. <p><strong>warm up</strong>: to practice or get ready for physical activity.</p>
  393. <p>I have to warm up for about ten or fifteen minutes before playing my guitar.</p>
  394. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  395. <p><strong>washed up</strong>: someone whose career or skill has passed from age or inability.</p>
  396. <p>Bush is a washed-up loser scumbag who will go down in history as one of the world’s worst criminals.</p>
  397. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  398. <p><strong>WASP</strong>: White Anglo Saxon Protestant.</p>
  399. <p>Barack Obama is the first non-WASP President we’ve had in the White House since John F. Kennedy.</p>
  400. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  401. <p><strong>way</strong>: very; yes.</p>
  402. <p>That SUV is way too big for our needs. Let’s get something that’s more sensible and better for the environment.</p>
  403. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  404. <p><strong>way to go</strong>: good job; good performance; congratulations.</p>
  405. <p>I heard you got a raise at work. Way to go!</p>
  406. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  407. <p><strong>weasel</strong>: a person who says or does anything in order to advance; someone who lies or cheats for personal gain.</p>
  408. <p>No one in the office likes Edward because he’s such a weasel, and he always sucks up to the boss.</p>
  409. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  410. <p><strong>weed</strong>: take out unnecessary things; pick out.</p>
  411. <p>It’s time to weed through my sock drawer and throw out the ones that are worn and have holes.</p>
  412. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  413. <p><strong>weigh in</strong>: to give an opinion in addition to opinions from other people.</p>
  414. <p><strong>weird</strong>: strange; unusual.</p>
  415. <p>Night of the Living Dead is a weird movie! It’s about people who come back to life from the dead and then try to eat people who are alive.</p>
  416. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  417. <p><strong>weirdo</strong>: a strange person.</p>
  418. <p>There’s this weirdo outside of the building giving away information about Scientology.</p>
  419. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  420. <p><strong>whack</strong>: to hit.</p>
  421. <p>If you want to open that jar, try whacking the lid with something hard.</p>
  422. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  423. <p><strong>whacky</strong>: crazy; comical; amusing; funny.</p>
  424. <p>Conan O’Brien is a whacky talk-show host whose comedy always surprises the audience.</p>
  425. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  426. <p><strong>wham</strong>: to hit; impact from an accident.</p>
  427. <p>A bird whammed into the window and died.</p>
  428. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  429. <p><strong>whatchamacallit</strong>: something you don’t know the name of (similar to thingamajig)</p>
  430. <p>You’re going to have to get another whatchamacallit for underneath the sink because it’s leaking.</p>
  431. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  432. <p><strong>what for:</strong> a reason for doing something; a negative consequence.</p>
  433. <p>The police gave that guy what for when he tried to take a swing at one of them. Now’s he all beat up and in jail.</p>
  434. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  435. <p><strong>what gives</strong>: why; what’s the reason</p>
  436. <p>You stopped coming to our meetings. What gives?</p>
  437. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  438. <p><strong>what’s happening / what’s shaking</strong>: hi; how’s it going?</p>
  439. <p>A: Hey, what happening?</p>
  440. <p>B: Oh, I’m just reading the paper and drinking some coffee.</p>
  441. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  442. <p><strong>what’s up</strong>: hello; how are you; what’s happening in your life?</p>
  443. <p>A: Hey, what’s up?</p>
  444. <p>B: Not much. What’s up with you?</p>
  445. <p>(Some young people say, &#8220;What up?&#8221; without the &#8220;s,&#8221; which reflects a more African-American vernacular.)</p>
  446. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  447. <p><strong>what’s with</strong>: what’s the reason; tell the cause for the problem.</p>
  448. <p>What’s with this refrigerator? Sometimes it’s too cold and other times it’s not cold enough.</p>
  449. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  450. <p><strong>wheel and deal</strong>: negotiate; buying and selling.</p>
  451. <p>George’s uncle likes to wheel and deal when he goes to antique shops. He can usually pay a lower price on things.</p>
  452. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  453. <p><strong>where it’s at</strong>: the essence of something; the truth.</p>
  454. <p>I love it when my religion teacher talks about Jesus and the New Testament. He really knows where it’s at.</p>
  455. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  456. <p><strong>whiff</strong>: to smell something.</p>
  457. <p>This perfume smells like oranges. Here, take a whiff.</p>
  458. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  459. <p><strong>wimp</strong>: a person who lacks courage or strength.</p>
  460. <p>Bill doesn’t want to take the dead mouse out of the mouse trap because he’s such a wimp, so he just throws out the whole trap instead of reusing it.</p>
  461. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  462. <p><strong>whiz</strong>: a smart person.</p>
  463. <p>Jennifer is a real math whiz. She’ll probably major in engineering in college.</p>
  464. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  465. <p><strong>(the) whole nine yards:</strong> everything; all of something.</p>
  466. <p>After Myrtle died, her children sold off everything in the house–the whole nine yards.</p>
  467. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  468. <p><strong>wicked</strong>: cool; very interesting and, perhaps, a little dangerous.</p>
  469. <p>That was a wicked turn we just took. Did you feel the car lifted a little on the passenger side.</p>
  470. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  471. <p><strong>widget</strong>: something small and useful; something on a computer that does a task.</p>
  472. <p>This little widget is good at estimating some of the costs for my business.</p>
  473. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  474. <p><strong>wig out</strong>: to suddenly feel fear; similar to freak out.</p>
  475. <p>Kevin wigged out and moved to California when he lost his job.</p>
  476. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  477. <p><strong>wing it</strong>: try to do something without preparation.</p>
  478. <p>Instead of using a written speech, the speaker tried to wing it, but he made a lot of mistakes, and a few times he forgot what he was trying to say.</p>
  479. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  480. <p><strong>wipe out</strong>: to fall over; to cause a loss of property.</p>
  481. <p>Huge medical bills wiped out all of their life savings. Now they don’t have any money left.</p>
  482. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  483. <p><strong>wired</strong>: 1. wide awake, usually from too much coffee; 2. technologically connected through the internet and mobile technology.</p>
  484. <p>1. I can’t go to sleep. I had five cups of coffee at Starbucks and feel totally wired.</p>
  485. <p>2. We have to get our computer wired to the internet.</p>
  486. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  487. <p><strong>wishy-washy</strong>: unable to take a clear position or make a decision.</p>
  488. <p>Diedre is kind of a wishy-washy boss. She’s never able to decide on which people to hire, so she relies on others to help her make hiring decisions.</p>
  489. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  490. <p><strong>with flying colors</strong>: to do something in a way that is great; to achieve success; to do well.</p>
  491. <p>She passed her driving test with flying colors.</p>
  492. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  493. <p><strong>with it</strong>: hip; able to understand what happening now; up-to-date.</p>
  494. <p>Our teacher thinks she’s really with it, but at the age of 62, it’s not easy to keep up with her young students.</p>
  495. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  496. <p><strong>wonk</strong>: a technocrat; a person who understands small details as an authority.</p>
  497. <p>The energy-policy wonks in Washington have some good ideas about how we can all save on home energy costs.</p>
  498. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  499. <p><strong>woozy</strong>: dizzy or tired; a side effect from some medicine.</p>
  500. <p>Laughing gas made Shawn feel a little woozy while the dentist worked on his teeth.</p>
  501. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  502. <p><strong>workaholic</strong>: a person who works all the time.</p>
  503. <p>If he weren’t such a workaholic, he’d have more time to spend with his kids.</p>
  504. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  505. <p><strong>work it in</strong>: to bring something into another thing; to incorporate; to make time available in a schedule.</p>
  506. <p>We don’t have a lot of extra time during the meeting, but if you want to talk about your project for a few minutes, it’s possible to work that in.</p>
  507. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  508. <p><strong>work out:</strong> make something possible; to improve a situation.</p>
  509. <p>Tom and Jennifer are have had some trouble with their marriage, but now they’re trying to work things out.</p>
  510. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  511. <p><strong>worry wart:</strong> a person who worries too much.</p>
  512. <p>Stop being such a worry wart. Your kids will be okay when they go on the trip.</p>
  513. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  514. <p><strong>wrap up</strong>: bring a project to a conclusion; finish.</p>
  515. <p>Let’s wrap things up here and go home.</p>
  516. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  517. <p><strong>wreck</strong>: a person or a thing in very bad condition.</p>
  518. <p>Diane is a wreck after getting only got two hours of sleep last night.</p>
  519. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  520. <p><strong>wussy</strong>: a person who is weak, fearful.</p>
  521. <p>My friend, Dan, is too much of a wussy to ask his hottie neighbor, Casandra, out on a date.</p>
  522. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  523. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  524. <p><strong>Attention</strong>: Some slang is inappropriate in certain situations. That’s why you see the word &#8220;caution&#8221; after some of these slang words. Some slang is considered to be vulgar.</p>
  525. <p>vulgar = impolite or considered a swear word. Don’t use it around your supervisor or someone who might be offended.</p>
  526. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  527. <h2>Next Slang Lesson</h2>
  528. <p>In our next lesson, we will cover <a title="English Slang" href="/learn-english/words/slang-a-to-z/american-slang-beginning-with-x/">American Slang Beginning with X</a>.</p>
  529. <h2>Related Slang Lessons</h2>
  530. <p>None</p>
  531. <h2>English Slang Outline</h2>
  532. <p>If you wish to see all <a title="HiCafe Homepage" href="/home">HiCafe</a> lessons related to English slang, you can visit the <a title="English Slang" href="/learn-english/practice-english-skills/popular-and-practical-american-slang-words/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Popular and Practical American Slang</a> page.</p><p>The post <a href="https://hicafe.app/learn-english/words/slang-a-to-z/american-slang-beginning-with-w/">American Slang Beginning with W</a> first appeared on <a href="https://hicafe.app">HiCafe</a>.</p>]]></content:encoded>
  533. <wfw:commentRss>https://hicafe.app/learn-english/words/slang-a-to-z/american-slang-beginning-with-w/feed/</wfw:commentRss>
  534. <slash:comments>0</slash:comments>
  535. </item>
  536. <item>
  537. <title>American Slang Beginning with V</title>
  538. <link>https://hicafe.app/learn-english/words/slang-a-to-z/american-slang-beginning-with-v/</link>
  539. <comments>https://hicafe.app/learn-english/words/slang-a-to-z/american-slang-beginning-with-v/#respond</comments>
  540. <dc:creator><![CDATA[hcbMatt]]></dc:creator>
  541. <pubDate>Sun, 09 Jun 2024 15:35:26 +0000</pubDate>
  542. <category><![CDATA[Slang]]></category>
  543. <category><![CDATA[American]]></category>
  544. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://hicafe.app/?p=1305</guid>
  545.  
  546. <description><![CDATA[<p>Slang Beginning with V In this lesson, we cover essential American slang starting with letter V with examples. In general, slang are used mostly in casual street talks among Americans such that even international (non-native) speakers living in the USA can not understand them. Thus, you may use slang in your daily casual conversations especially [&#8230;]</p>
  547. <p>The post <a href="https://hicafe.app/learn-english/words/slang-a-to-z/american-slang-beginning-with-v/">American Slang Beginning with V</a> first appeared on <a href="https://hicafe.app">HiCafe</a>.</p>]]></description>
  548. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<h2>Slang Beginning with V</h2>
  549. <p>In this lesson, we cover essential American slang starting with letter <b>V</b> with examples. In general, slang are used mostly in casual street talks among Americans such that even international (non-native) speakers living in the USA can not understand them. Thus, you may use slang in your daily casual conversations especially with Americans. Just be careful and do NOT use slang in formal conversations like job interviews or business meetings.</p>
  550. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  551. <h2>Word of the Day: U &amp; V</h2>
  552. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  553. <p><strong>umpteen</strong>: an indefinite, large number. (also, umpteenth when used as an ordinal number)</p>
  554. <p>Please, for the umpteenth time–clean up after yourself!</p>
  555. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  556. <p><strong>Uncle Sam</strong>: the United States government.</p>
  557. <p>If you don’t pay taxes to Uncle Sam by April 15, you’ll have to pay a penalty.</p>
  558. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  559. <p><strong>underground</strong>: something unconventional or unknown to the general population.</p>
  560. <p>I listened to a lot of underground music when I was in my twenties.</p>
  561. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  562. <p><strong>unreal</strong>: hard to believe; something amazing.</p>
  563. <p>We got so much snow last night it’s unreal.</p>
  564. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  565. <p><strong>up against the wall</strong>: in a difficult situation.</p>
  566. <p>Melvin lost his job, and now he’s really up against the wall because he has to pay his rent and he doesn’t have any money.</p>
  567. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  568. <p><strong>up and up</strong>: honest; truthful.</p>
  569. <p>That salesperson doesn’t seem to be very up and up. We should go to a different car dealer.</p>
  570. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  571. <p><strong>up for grabs</strong>: available to the first person who wants it or tries to get it.</p>
  572. <p>There’s a bike down the street that’s up for grabs. It has a big sign on it that says, &#8220;free.&#8221;</p>
  573. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  574. <p><strong>up in the air</strong>: unknown; unplanned;</p>
  575. <p>Our plans for the weekend are still up in the air.</p>
  576. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  577. <p><strong>up to here</strong>: as much as one can tolerate; an expression of anger or unhappiness with a situation or a person.</p>
  578. <p>I’ve had it up to here with your complaining. Stop it!</p>
  579. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  580. <p><strong>up to speed</strong>: informed; knowledgeable; up to date.</p>
  581. <p>After a two-week vacation, it took Yolanda a few days to get back up to speed at work.</p>
  582. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  583. <p><strong>veg</strong>: to do nothing (related to the word &#8220;vegetable).</p>
  584. <p>All they want to do on the weekend is sit in front of the TV and veg.</p>
  585. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  586. <p><strong>veggie</strong>: vegetable.</p>
  587. <p>If you eat a lot of veggies, you’ll live a long healthy life.</p>
  588. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  589. <p><strong>vibe</strong>: an emotional feeling or reaction, usually from a person.</p>
  590. <p>Stay away from the boss today. He’s sending out a lot of bad vibes.</p>
  591. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  592. <p><strong>vid</strong>: video</p>
  593. <p>Nice vid! Did you do all the work on it yourself?</p>
  594. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  595. <p><strong>VIP</strong>: abbreviation for &#8220;very important person.&#8221;</p>
  596. <p>The VIPs were allowed to get into the nightclub first while everyone else had to wait and stand in line.</p>
  597. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  598. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  599. <h2>Next Slang Lesson</h2>
  600. <p>In our next lesson, we will cover <a title="English Slang" href="/learn-english/words/slang-a-to-z/american-slang-beginning-with-w/">American Slang Beginning with W</a>.</p>
  601. <h2>Related Slang Lessons</h2>
  602. <p>None</p>
  603. <h2>English Slang Outline</h2>
  604. <p>If you wish to see all <a title="HiCafe Homepage" href="/home">HiCafe</a> lessons related to English slang, you can visit the <a title="English Slang" href="/learn-english/practice-english-skills/popular-and-practical-american-slang-words/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Popular and Practical American Slang</a> page.</p><p>The post <a href="https://hicafe.app/learn-english/words/slang-a-to-z/american-slang-beginning-with-v/">American Slang Beginning with V</a> first appeared on <a href="https://hicafe.app">HiCafe</a>.</p>]]></content:encoded>
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  606. <slash:comments>0</slash:comments>
  607. </item>
  608. <item>
  609. <title>American Slang Beginning with U</title>
  610. <link>https://hicafe.app/learn-english/words/slang-a-to-z/american-slang-beginning-with-u/</link>
  611. <comments>https://hicafe.app/learn-english/words/slang-a-to-z/american-slang-beginning-with-u/#respond</comments>
  612. <dc:creator><![CDATA[hcbMatt]]></dc:creator>
  613. <pubDate>Sun, 09 Jun 2024 15:33:26 +0000</pubDate>
  614. <category><![CDATA[Slang]]></category>
  615. <category><![CDATA[American]]></category>
  616. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://hicafe.app/?p=1303</guid>
  617.  
  618. <description><![CDATA[<p>Slang Beginning with U In this lesson, we cover essential American slang starting with letter U with examples. In general, slang are used mostly in casual street talks among Americans such that even international (non-native) speakers living in the USA can not understand them. Thus, you may use slang in your daily casual conversations especially [&#8230;]</p>
  619. <p>The post <a href="https://hicafe.app/learn-english/words/slang-a-to-z/american-slang-beginning-with-u/">American Slang Beginning with U</a> first appeared on <a href="https://hicafe.app">HiCafe</a>.</p>]]></description>
  620. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<h2>Slang Beginning with U</h2>
  621. <p>In this lesson, we cover essential American slang starting with letter <b>U</b> with examples. In general, slang are used mostly in casual street talks among Americans such that even international (non-native) speakers living in the USA can not understand them. Thus, you may use slang in your daily casual conversations especially with Americans. Just be careful and do NOT use slang in formal conversations like job interviews or business meetings.</p>
  622. <h2>Slang Recap</h2>
  623. <p>In our previous lesson, we covered <a title="English Slang" href="/learn-english/words/slang-a-to-z/american-slang-beginning-with-t/">American Slang Beginning with T</a>.</p>
  624. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  625. <h2>Word of the Day: U &amp; V</h2>
  626. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  627. <p><strong>umpteen</strong>: an indefinite, large number. (also, umpteenth when used as an ordinal number)</p>
  628. <p>Please, for the umpteenth time–clean up after yourself!</p>
  629. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  630. <p><strong>Uncle Sam</strong>: the United States government.</p>
  631. <p>If you don’t pay taxes to Uncle Sam by April 15, you’ll have to pay a penalty.</p>
  632. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  633. <p><strong>underground</strong>: something unconventional or unknown to the general population.</p>
  634. <p>I listened to a lot of underground music when I was in my twenties.</p>
  635. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  636. <p><strong>unreal</strong>: hard to believe; something amazing.</p>
  637. <p>We got so much snow last night it’s unreal.</p>
  638. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  639. <p><strong>up against the wall</strong>: in a difficult situation.</p>
  640. <p>Melvin lost his job, and now he’s really up against the wall because he has to pay his rent and he doesn’t have any money.</p>
  641. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  642. <p><strong>up and up</strong>: honest; truthful.</p>
  643. <p>That salesperson doesn’t seem to be very up and up. We should go to a different car dealer.</p>
  644. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  645. <p><strong>up for grabs</strong>: available to the first person who wants it or tries to get it.</p>
  646. <p>There’s a bike down the street that’s up for grabs. It has a big sign on it that says, &#8220;free.&#8221;</p>
  647. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  648. <p><strong>up in the air</strong>: unknown; unplanned;</p>
  649. <p>Our plans for the weekend are still up in the air.</p>
  650. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  651. <p><strong>up to here</strong>: as much as one can tolerate; an expression of anger or unhappiness with a situation or a person.</p>
  652. <p>I’ve had it up to here with your complaining. Stop it!</p>
  653. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  654. <p><strong>up to speed</strong>: informed; knowledgeable; up to date.</p>
  655. <p>After a two-week vacation, it took Yolanda a few days to get back up to speed at work.</p>
  656. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  657. <p><strong>veg</strong>: to do nothing (related to the word &#8220;vegetable).</p>
  658. <p>All they want to do on the weekend is sit in front of the TV and veg.</p>
  659. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  660. <p><strong>veggie</strong>: vegetable.</p>
  661. <p>If you eat a lot of veggies, you’ll live a long healthy life.</p>
  662. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  663. <p><strong>vibe</strong>: an emotional feeling or reaction, usually from a person.</p>
  664. <p>Stay away from the boss today. He’s sending out a lot of bad vibes.</p>
  665. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  666. <p><strong>vid</strong>: video</p>
  667. <p>Nice vid! Did you do all the work on it yourself?</p>
  668. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  669. <p><strong>VIP</strong>: abbreviation for &#8220;very important person.&#8221;</p>
  670. <p>The VIPs were allowed to get into the nightclub first while everyone else had to wait and stand in line.</p>
  671. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  672. <h2>Related Slang Lessons</h2>
  673. <p>None</p>
  674. <h2>English Slang Outline</h2>
  675. <p>If you wish to see all <a title="HiCafe Homepage" href="/home">HiCafe</a> lessons related to English slang, you can visit the <a title="English Slang" href="/learn-english/practice-english-skills/popular-and-practical-american-slang-words/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Popular and Practical American Slang</a> page.</p><p>The post <a href="https://hicafe.app/learn-english/words/slang-a-to-z/american-slang-beginning-with-u/">American Slang Beginning with U</a> first appeared on <a href="https://hicafe.app">HiCafe</a>.</p>]]></content:encoded>
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  677. <slash:comments>0</slash:comments>
  678. </item>
  679. <item>
  680. <title>American Slang Beginning with T</title>
  681. <link>https://hicafe.app/learn-english/words/slang-a-to-z/american-slang-beginning-with-t/</link>
  682. <comments>https://hicafe.app/learn-english/words/slang-a-to-z/american-slang-beginning-with-t/#respond</comments>
  683. <dc:creator><![CDATA[hcbMatt]]></dc:creator>
  684. <pubDate>Sun, 09 Jun 2024 15:30:55 +0000</pubDate>
  685. <category><![CDATA[Slang]]></category>
  686. <category><![CDATA[American]]></category>
  687. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://hicafe.app/?p=1299</guid>
  688.  
  689. <description><![CDATA[<p>Slang Beginning with T In this lesson, we cover essential American slang starting with letter T with examples. In general, slang are used mostly in casual street talks among Americans such that even international (non-native) speakers living in the USA can not understand them. Thus, you may use slang in your daily casual conversations especially [&#8230;]</p>
  690. <p>The post <a href="https://hicafe.app/learn-english/words/slang-a-to-z/american-slang-beginning-with-t/">American Slang Beginning with T</a> first appeared on <a href="https://hicafe.app">HiCafe</a>.</p>]]></description>
  691. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<h2>Slang Beginning with T</h2>
  692. <p>In this lesson, we cover essential American slang starting with letter <b>T</b> with examples. In general, slang are used mostly in casual street talks among Americans such that even international (non-native) speakers living in the USA can not understand them. Thus, you may use slang in your daily casual conversations especially with Americans. Just be careful and do NOT use slang in formal conversations like job interviews or business meetings.</p>
  693. <h2>Slang Recap</h2>
  694. <p>In our previous lesson, we covered <a title="English Slang" href="/learn-english/words/slang-a-to-z/american-slang-beginning-with-s/">American Slang Beginning with S</a>.</p>
  695. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  696. <h2>Word of the Day: T</h2>
  697. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  698. <p><strong>tag</strong>: the spraying of paint in public areas; the application of graffiti to mark territory.</p>
  699. <p>The gang kids in the Phillips neighborhood were caught tagging by the police and now they have to clean it all up.</p>
  700. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  701. <p><strong>tailgate</strong>: to follow someone too closely in a car.</p>
  702. <p>An accident on the highway was caused by some jerk tailgating someone he thought was driving too slowly.</p>
  703. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  704. <p><strong>take</strong>: opinion; idea.</p>
  705. <p>What’s your take on the economy?</p>
  706. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  707. <p><strong>take it</strong>: tolerate; withstand difficulty.</p>
  708. <p>Go ahead and tell me what you really think. I can take it.</p>
  709. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  710. <p><strong>take it easy</strong>: relax.</p>
  711. <p>Most people hope to take it easy on the weekends and do as little work as possible.</p>
  712. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  713. <p><strong>take off</strong>: leave; go.</p>
  714. <p>Are you ready to take off? The movie starts in 20 minutes.</p>
  715. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  716. <p><strong>take on</strong>: 1. to do some work; to take responsibility; 2. to fight someone.</p>
  717. <p>1. Harold is willing to take on a second job in order to make some extra money.</p>
  718. <p>2. If you think you can take on someone twice your size, you must be a good fighter.</p>
  719. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  720. <p><strong>tank</strong>: to decrease quickly in value or quality.</p>
  721. <p>A lot of investors tried to pull their money out of the stock market when it tanked in 2008.</p>
  722. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  723. <p><strong>teaser</strong>: a person who likes to play games with other people in kind of a mean way; a person who says he or she will provide something and then not do it.</p>
  724. <p>Jill told Mark she would go out with him but then changed her mind at the last minute. She’s nothing but a teaser.</p>
  725. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  726. <p><strong>tech</strong>: short for &#8220;technology,&#8221; usually used with reference to computers.</p>
  727. <p>We need to hire a new tech person at our company because the one we have now isn’t very good at working with Apple computers.</p>
  728. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  729. <p><strong>teen</strong>: someone who’s between the ages of 13 and 19.</p>
  730. <p>During his teen years in high school, Barry wasn’t very popular, but then things changed for the better during college.</p>
  731. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  732. <p><strong>teeny</strong>: very small. (sometimes teeny-weeny)</p>
  733. <p>The diamond in that ring is so teeny that you can barely see it.</p>
  734. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  735. <p><strong>tell off</strong>: to get mad at someone and say whatever is on one’s mind; to get angry and talk directly to a person.</p>
  736. <p>When Rupert told Magda that he wanted to go out with other girls, she told him off in front of everyone at the party.</p>
  737. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  738. <p><strong>thingamajig</strong>: anything that you don’t know the name of; same as &#8220;thing.&#8221; (You can use the word &#8220;thing&#8221; for anything you don’t know the name of.)</p>
  739. <p>There’s this thingamajig I need to get for my car which costs over $300.</p>
  740. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  741. <p><strong>thingy</strong>: anything. Similar to thingamajig.</p>
  742. <p>What’s that thingy sitting on top of the TV set? Is that for your Wii?</p>
  743. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  744. <p><strong>throw</strong>: give up a competition; to willingly concede defeat for monetary gain.</p>
  745. <p>When it was discovered that Louis threw the boxing match, he was banned from all future competition.</p>
  746. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  747. <p><strong>tied up</strong>: busy.</p>
  748. <p>I’m sorry I can’t come to your art exhibition. I’ll be all tied up tomorrow with meetings.</p>
  749. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  750. <p><strong>toast</strong>: to raise one’s glass during a celebration and drink; a formal custom before a eating and drinking at a party.</p>
  751. <p>Before everyone started eating at the reception, Matt made a toast to the bride and the groom.</p>
  752. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  753. <p><strong>tool</strong>: a foolish person; someone who is under the command of another person.</p>
  754. <p>Tom the Plumber is a tool for the Republican Party, and the funny thing is he knows absolutely nothing about politics and democracy.</p>
  755. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  756. <p><strong>top dog</strong>: a person who is the leader of an organization; the person at the top.</p>
  757. <p>Barack Obama is now top dog of the Democratic Party in the United States.</p>
  758. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  759. <p><strong>topless</strong>: no shirt, usually used for women.</p>
  760. <p>Even thought it’s more expensive, Bobby and Al don’t mind paying extra for drinks at the topless bars downtown.</p>
  761. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  762. <p><strong>totally</strong>: very</p>
  763. <p>His reaction to the situation was totally uncalled for. Totally.</p>
  764. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  765. <p><strong>tourist trap</strong>: a place tourists are attracted to and spend a lot of money.</p>
  766. <p>From the highway, it looked like an interesting museum, but it turned out to be just another tourist trap selling postcards and t-shirts.</p>
  767. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  768. <p><strong>track</strong>: song on a CD, album, or on an iPod.</p>
  769. <p>I love this CD, but the there’s something wrong with the fourth track.</p>
  770. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  771. <p><strong>trendy</strong>: something popular; a fad.</p>
  772. <p>The color black was kind of trendy 20 years ago, but now it just looks ridiculous on people who wear it to every social occasion.</p>
  773. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  774. <p><strong>trip</strong>: something amusing, interesting.</p>
  775. <p>This nightclub is a trip. Look! There’s an aquarium underneath the dance floor.</p>
  776. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  777. <p><strong>turf</strong>: territory; a neighborhood; a place claimed as one’s own.</p>
  778. <p>If another salesperson ever tries to invade Bill’s turf, he immediately calls him on the phone and tells him to stay away.</p>
  779. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  780. <p><strong>turn on</strong>: to like, especially sexually.</p>
  781. <p>The pink sweater that she’s wearing always turns on her boyfriend husband.</p>
  782. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  783. <p><strong>turn off:</strong> to dislike something; something that makes you feel a little disgusted.</p>
  784. <p>Alice picked her nose in front of her boyfriend, and it turned him off so much, he decided to stop seeing her.</p>
  785. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  786. <p><strong>tux</strong>: short for &#8220;tuxedo.&#8221;</p>
  787. <p>A friend of mine is getting married, so I have to rent a tux for the wedding.</p>
  788. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  789. <p><strong>twerp</strong>: a name given to someone who’s small or insignificant; similar to &#8220;shrimp.&#8221;</p>
  790. <p>When Joey called his younger brother &#8220;a little twerp,&#8221; his brother got mad and broke one of Joey’s trophies.</p>
  791. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  792. <p><strong>two cents</strong>: an opinion; to express one’s ideas.</p>
  793. <p>Well, don’t get mad at me for thinking it’s wrong to deny health care coverage people who need it. I’m just offering you my two cents.</p>
  794. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  795. <p><strong>two-way street</strong>: a situation that requires cooperation; two people or groups who help each other out.</p>
  796. <p>Mutual respect is a two-way street.</p>
  797. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  798. <h2>Next Slang Lesson</h2>
  799. <p>In our next lesson, we will cover <a title="English Slang" href="/learn-english/words/slang-a-to-z/american-slang-beginning-with-u/">American Slang Beginning with U</a>.</p>
  800. <h2>Related Slang Lessons</h2>
  801. <p>None</p>
  802. <h2>English Slang Outline</h2>
  803. <p>If you wish to see all <a title="HiCafe Homepage" href="/home">HiCafe</a> lessons related to English slang, you can visit the <a title="English Slang" href="/learn-english/practice-english-skills/popular-and-practical-american-slang-words/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Popular and Practical American Slang</a> page.</p><p>The post <a href="https://hicafe.app/learn-english/words/slang-a-to-z/american-slang-beginning-with-t/">American Slang Beginning with T</a> first appeared on <a href="https://hicafe.app">HiCafe</a>.</p>]]></content:encoded>
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  805. <slash:comments>0</slash:comments>
  806. </item>
  807. <item>
  808. <title>American Slang Beginning with S</title>
  809. <link>https://hicafe.app/learn-english/words/slang-a-to-z/american-slang-beginning-with-s/</link>
  810. <comments>https://hicafe.app/learn-english/words/slang-a-to-z/american-slang-beginning-with-s/#respond</comments>
  811. <dc:creator><![CDATA[hcbMatt]]></dc:creator>
  812. <pubDate>Sun, 09 Jun 2024 15:29:09 +0000</pubDate>
  813. <category><![CDATA[Slang]]></category>
  814. <category><![CDATA[American]]></category>
  815. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://hicafe.app/?p=1297</guid>
  816.  
  817. <description><![CDATA[<p>Slang Beginning with S In this lesson, we cover essential American slang starting with letter S with examples. In general, slang are used mostly in casual street talks among Americans such that even international (non-native) speakers living in the USA can not understand them. Thus, you may use slang in your daily casual conversations especially [&#8230;]</p>
  818. <p>The post <a href="https://hicafe.app/learn-english/words/slang-a-to-z/american-slang-beginning-with-s/">American Slang Beginning with S</a> first appeared on <a href="https://hicafe.app">HiCafe</a>.</p>]]></description>
  819. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<h2>Slang Beginning with S</h2>
  820. <p>In this lesson, we cover essential American slang starting with letter <b>S</b> with examples. In general, slang are used mostly in casual street talks among Americans such that even international (non-native) speakers living in the USA can not understand them. Thus, you may use slang in your daily casual conversations especially with Americans. Just be careful and do NOT use slang in formal conversations like job interviews or business meetings.</p>
  821. <h2>Slang Recap</h2>
  822. <p>In our previous lesson, we covered <a title="English Slang" href="/learn-english/words/slang-a-to-z/american-slang-beginning-with-r/">American Slang Beginning with R</a>.</p>
  823. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  824. <h2>Word of the Day: S</h2>
  825. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  826. <p><strong>sack</strong>: fire someone from a job.</p>
  827. <p>The president of the company sacked half of his office staff because the company was losing money.</p>
  828. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  829. <p>sap: a stupid person; someone who is naive.</p>
  830. <p>If Nelson wasn’t such a sap, he’d realize that his old girlfriend doesn’t want him to call anymore.</p>
  831. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  832. <p><strong>Say what?</strong>: What did you say?</p>
  833. <p>Says who?: according to what authority? Who are you to tell me I can’t do this?</p>
  834. <p>A: You can’t park here.</p>
  835. <p>B: Oh yeah? Says who?</p>
  836. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  837. <p><strong>scaredy cat</strong>: someone who is afraid (commonly used by children, but adults might use it, too)</p>
  838. <p>You can’t go to sleep without a nightlight? Don’t be such a scaredy cat!</p>
  839. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  840. <p><strong>scatterbrain</strong>: a person who can’t concentrate or remember things well.</p>
  841. <p>Our teacher was a real scatterbrain today. She couldn’t remember which homework assignment she gave us.</p>
  842. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  843. <p><strong>schmooze</strong>: to socialize; to go to a party and talk, especially when related to business.</p>
  844. <p>If you want to get ahead in the company you work for, sometimes you have to schmooze with people you don’t like very much.</p>
  845. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  846. <p><strong>score</strong>: to get something good.</p>
  847. <p>Tito scored front row tickets to a U2 concert.</p>
  848. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  849. <p><strong>screw</strong>: to cheat or put someone in a bad position.</p>
  850. <p>Helen got screwed by a car dealer when she traded in her old car. (caution: sometimes this word is a little vulgar.)</p>
  851. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  852. <p><strong>screw around</strong>: play around; to do things without seriousness.</p>
  853. <p>You’d better stop screwing around and get your homework done.</p>
  854. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  855. <p><strong>screw up</strong>: to make a big mistake.</p>
  856. <p>Many Americans are very mad at rich people and Republicans who screwed up the economy.</p>
  857. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  858. <p><strong>scrounge</strong>: to try to find something; to scavenge.</p>
  859. <p>Every morning Justin scrounges around his room looking for clean clothes to wear.</p>
  860. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  861. <p><strong>scuz bag:</strong> a dirty person; physically or morally unclean.</p>
  862. <p>The scuz bag who lives down the street was caught peeking into his neighbors’ house.</p>
  863. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  864. <p><strong>scuzzy</strong>: the quality of dirtiness.</p>
  865. <p>Don’t you feel kind of scuzzy if you go more than two days without taking a shower?</p>
  866. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  867. <p><strong>see-through</strong>: transparent; something light; easy to see through and see behind something.</p>
  868. <p>A lovely woman in a see-through blouse caught the attention of everyone at the party.</p>
  869. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  870. <p><strong>selfie</strong> – a photo that a person takes of oneself.</p>
  871. <p>I took this selfie while standing the elevator.</p>
  872. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  873. <p><strong> sell out:</strong> to trade popularity or skill for money; to create art or entertainment that appeals to a large audience.</p>
  874. <p>This was a great band until they sold out. Now they’re music is really boring.</p>
  875. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  876. <p><strong>set (one) back</strong>: to cost</p>
  877. <p>How much is a new Apple computer going to set me back?</p>
  878. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  879. <p><strong>set of wheels</strong>: a car</p>
  880. <p>Jason got a new set of wheels with money he saved over the last two summers.</p>
  881. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  882. <p><strong>settle for</strong>: to take something that is less than satisfying.</p>
  883. <p>When Wendy was told she didn’t get into her first choice of a college, she settled for her second choice.</p>
  884. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  885. <p><strong>shades</strong>: sunglasses</p>
  886. <p>Nice pair of shades! Where did you get them?</p>
  887. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  888. <p><strong>shaft</strong>: putting someone in a bad position.</p>
  889. <p>The coach gave Ed the shaft by pulling him out of the game and making him sit on the bench.</p>
  890. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  891. <p><strong>shake it</strong>: hurry up</p>
  892. <p>Hey, the movie starts in ten minutes. Let’s shake it!</p>
  893. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  894. <p><strong>shape up</strong>: improve your behavior; try to do better.</p>
  895. <p>Tony’s behavior at school had better shape up or else he’s going to lose his parents’ respect.</p>
  896. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  897. <p><strong>sharp</strong>: stylish; well-groomed. (often used for men, but possible to use with women)</p>
  898. <p>Duane looks really sharp in that jacket.</p>
  899. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  900. <p><strong>shebang</strong>: the whole thing; all of it; everything.</p>
  901. <p>Tina and Mark paid for their daughter’s wedding. The whole shebang cost them $10,000.</p>
  902. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  903. <p><strong>shlep</strong>: carry something heavy.</p>
  904. <p>Our building doesn’t have an elevator, so we have to shlep everything up three flights of stairs.</p>
  905. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  906. <p><strong>schmuck</strong>: a stupid person; a name given to a person for foolishness or insensitivity.</p>
  907. <p>Brad feels like a schmuck because he forgot today was his girlfriend’s birthday and he didn’t buy her anything.</p>
  908. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  909. <p><strong>short</strong>: not having enough money.</p>
  910. <p>The tickets are $30 a piece, but if you’re short, I’ll lend you some cash.</p>
  911. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  912. <p><strong>shot</strong>: in bad condition.</p>
  913. <p>The tires on that car look like they’re shot. They’ll have to be replaced really soon.</p>
  914. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  915. <p><strong>shout out</strong>: to say &#8220;hi&#8221; in a public place; to promote a group or an individual through public recognition.</p>
  916. <p>I just want to give a big shout out to all my friends in Mumbai.</p>
  917. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  918. <p><strong>show-biz</strong>: the entertainment industry; the business of entertainment.</p>
  919. <p>Instead of going to college, Sandra moved to Los Angeles and tried getting into show-biz.</p>
  920. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  921. <p><strong>shush</strong>: be quiet.</p>
  922. <p>A couple of students were talking while everyone was taking a test, so the teacher told them to shush.</p>
  923. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  924. <p><strong>shut up</strong>: stop talking</p>
  925. <p>Shut up! I can’t think!</p>
  926. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  927. <p><strong>sick</strong>: cool; interesting (this slang is very new, so not everyone will recognize it. Popular among very young people.)</p>
  928. <p>Oh, man, that’s sick. (That’s really great!)</p>
  929. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  930. <p><strong>sign on</strong>: to go onto a website or provide a password for entry.</p>
  931. <p>Do you remember what your password is? If not, you won’t be able to sign on.</p>
  932. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  933. <p><strong>sign up</strong>: to agree to become part of something; to join a group or a team.</p>
  934. <p>It’s really easy to sign up as a member to this website.</p>
  935. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  936. <p><strong>sissy</strong>: a man whose behavior is unmanly; a man or boy who behaves like a girl or a woman.</p>
  937. <p>Two fifth-grade boys who called Robert a sissy on the playground were told to apologize to him.</p>
  938. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  939. <p><strong>sit tight</strong>: wait</p>
  940. <p>Just try to sit tight until dinner is ready. Then you can eat.</p>
  941. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  942. <p><strong>sitting pretty:</strong> in a good position; in a good economic situation.</p>
  943. <p>My husband and I are sitting pretty now that we both have jobs.</p>
  944. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  945. <p><strong>skip</strong>: miss; don’t go to something.</p>
  946. <p>It’s not a good idea to skip a lot of meetings if you want to get ahead in the company you work for.</p>
  947. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  948. <p><strong>slang</strong>: words and expressions that are popular among native speakers of the language; language used and created by younger people.</p>
  949. <p>It’s hard to understand some Americans when they speak because they use so much slang.</p>
  950. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  951. <p><strong>sleaze</strong>: something dirty; a person whose behavior is offensive and immoral. (use as a noun)</p>
  952. <p>The guy who works at that liquor store is kind of a sleaze. He’s always looking at dirty magazines.</p>
  953. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  954. <p><strong>sleazy</strong>: something or someone dirty and immoral (use as an adjective)</p>
  955. <p>Tanya doesn’t like to watch sleazy movies but her boyfriend does.</p>
  956. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  957. <p><strong>sleeper</strong>: a person whose activities and beliefs are secret ; something that is unknown suddenly becomes known.</p>
  958. <p>Tom was a sleeper agent until he was found to be carrying some important documents. The government put him in jail.</p>
  959. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  960. <p><strong>sleep with</strong>: have sex with.</p>
  961. <p>Vietnamese women never sleep with men who aren’t their husbands. They’re very faithful.</p>
  962. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  963. <p><strong>slick</strong>: cool; stylish.</p>
  964. <p>That’s a pretty slick trick. How did you do that?</p>
  965. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  966. <p><strong>slo-mo</strong>: short for &#8220;slow motion.&#8221;</p>
  967. <p>After the referees watched the play slo-mo, frame by frame, they changed their call.</p>
  968. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  969. <p><strong>slowpoke</strong>: a person who moves, walks, or drives slowly.</p>
  970. <p>The guy driving ahead of me is such a slowpoke. It looks like he’s a really elderly driver.</p>
  971. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  972. <p><strong>slug it out</strong>: fight</p>
  973. <p>Everyday Democrats and Republicans slug it out in Congress when making new laws.</p>
  974. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  975. <p><strong>slurp</strong>: to make noise while drinking or eating something that is wet, like soup.</p>
  976. <p>In some countries it’s okay to slurp your soup, but not in the United States.</p>
  977. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  978. <p><strong>smack</strong>: hit</p>
  979. <p>Amanda got tired of getting smacked by her boyfriend, so she left him.</p>
  980. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  981. <p><strong>small fry</strong>: someone who doesn’t have power or influence.</p>
  982. <p>The police usually don’t go after the small-fry drug dealers. Instead, they try to catch the big-time smugglers who bring drugs in from overseas.</p>
  983. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  984. <p><strong>small time</strong>: not important. (often used in reference to illegal activity, similar to small fry.)</p>
  985. <p>My uncle is a small-time gambler, but last week he went to Vegas and won over a $100,000.</p>
  986. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  987. <p><strong>smart-ass</strong>: a person who isn’t very respectful and speaks with disrespect.</p>
  988. <p>If you weren’t such a smart-ass, maybe you’d have more friends. (caution: some people are offended by the word &#8220;ass.&#8221;)</p>
  989. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  990. <p><strong>smarty pants</strong>: a person who tries to be really smart; a smart person.</p>
  991. <p>The smarty pants who sits in the front of the classroom wastes everyone’s time by asking the teacher a lot of questions.</p>
  992. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  993. <p><strong>smooch</strong>: kiss.</p>
  994. <p>Ed and Hilda were caught at work smooching in the copier room, and now everyone in the office knows about it.</p>
  995. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  996. <p><strong>snap</strong>: something easy and fast.</p>
  997. <p>This recipe is a snap. It’ll only take about ten minutes to make.</p>
  998. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  999. <p><strong>snatch</strong>: to take something quickly; to take by force.</p>
  1000. <p>A young teenager snatched a purse out of the hands of an elderly lady walking down the street.</p>
  1001. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1002. <p><strong>snazzy</strong>: nice; stylish; cool; something fashionable that looks good.</p>
  1003. <p>That’s a really snazzy tie you have on. Where did you get it?</p>
  1004. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1005. <p><strong>snooze</strong>: sleep; nap.</p>
  1006. <p>I usually try to catch a snooze in the afternoon before going out to teach at night.</p>
  1007. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1008. <p><strong>soak</strong>: 1. to put something in water for a long time; 2. to cheat someone.</p>
  1009. <p>1. If you soak that in soap and water for a couple of hours, the stain should come out.</p>
  1010. <p>2. Tyrone took his kids to a baseball game and got soaked on over-priced hot dogs and beer.</p>
  1011. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1012. <p><strong>softy</strong>: someone who agrees easily to a request.</p>
  1013. <p>The teacher is too much of a softy to ever give detentions to students, so they take advantage of him and don’t behave properly in class.</p>
  1014. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1015. <p><strong>somebody</strong>: a person who is famous, rich, or powerful.</p>
  1016. <p>A: Who’s that woman in the dark sunglasses?</p>
  1017. <p>B: I don’t know. She must be a somebody because everyone is pointing at her and staring.</p>
  1018. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1019. <p><strong>space out</strong>: lack concentration; to forget easily.</p>
  1020. <p>Today was my wife’s birthday, but I totally spaced it out until she reminded me.</p>
  1021. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1022. <p><strong>spam</strong>: unwanted email (can be used as a verb or as a noun)</p>
  1023. <p>There’s so much spam in my in box, I can’t tell which messages are good and which messages are bad.</p>
  1024. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1025. <p><strong>stats</strong>: numbers and percentages, often used to make comparisons–short for &#8220;statistics&#8221;</p>
  1026. <p>Jose Fernandez is a great baseball player, but his stats don’t look too good this season.</p>
  1027. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1028. <p><strong>step off</strong>: get away; back away; don’t get too close to me (often used in confrontations).</p>
  1029. <p>If you don’t step off, I’m going to hurt you!</p>
  1030. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1031. <p><strong>stick around</strong>: stay; don’t go anywhere.</p>
  1032. <p>A: How long can you stick around today?</p>
  1033. <p>B: I can stay here until 4:00.</p>
  1034. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1035. <p><strong>straight</strong>: okay; even.</p>
  1036. <p>You don’t have to give me any money. We’re straight.</p>
  1037. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1038. <p><strong>street people</strong>: people who spend a lot of time walking around city streets; people who hustle or live on the street.</p>
  1039. <p>The street people in downtown Minneapolis are sometimes noisy and rude.</p>
  1040. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1041. <p><strong>street smarts:</strong> an understanding of life in a big city; the ability to survive in a tough area of a city.</p>
  1042. <p>Tony doesn’t have a lot of street smarts. That’s why he always gets robbed when he goes downtown.</p>
  1043. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1044. <p><strong>strike it rich</strong>: make a lot of money.</p>
  1045. <p>A group of factory workers got together to buy some lottery tickets and struck it rich when one of their tickets won the lottery.</p>
  1046. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1047. <p><strong>stoked</strong>: to be excited about something.</p>
  1048. <p>This weekend is going to be great! I’m pretty stoked about it.</p>
  1049. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1050. <p><strong>suck</strong>: to be of bad quality; to say a situation is bad.</p>
  1051. <p>This movie really sucks!</p>
  1052. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1053. <p><strong>sure thing:</strong> something that is very likely to happen; a high possibility.</p>
  1054. <p>Now that Juan’s loan application has been approved, it’s almost a sure thing that he’s going to get a new car.</p>
  1055. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1056. <p><strong>sweat</strong>: worry; show concern.</p>
  1057. <p>Try not to sweat the small stuff; focus on things that are really important.</p>
  1058. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1059. <p><strong>sweat it out:</strong> to worry; to work hard.</p>
  1060. <p>It looks like we’re going to have to sweat out another downturn in the economy.</p>
  1061. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1062. <p><strong>sweet</strong>: really good; cool. (This is a very popular word among young people.)</p>
  1063. <p>That’s a sweet guitar.</p>
  1064. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1065. <p><strong>sweet-talk:</strong> complimentary language.</p>
  1066. <p>It’s amazing how a little sweet-talk increased his sales figures for the month.</p>
  1067. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1068. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1069. <p>Attention: Some slang is inappropriate in certain situations. That’s why you see the word &#8220;caution&#8221; after some of these slang words. Some slang is considered to be vulgar.</p>
  1070. <p>vulgar = impolite or considered a swear word. Don’t use it around your supervisor or someone who might be offended.</p>
  1071. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1072. <h2>Next Slang Lesson</h2>
  1073. <p>In our next lesson, we will cover <a title="English Slang" href="/learn-english/words/slang-a-to-z/american-slang-beginning-with-t/">American Slang Beginning with T</a>.</p>
  1074. <h2>Related Slang Lessons</h2>
  1075. <p>None</p>
  1076. <h2>English Slang Outline</h2>
  1077. <p>If you wish to see all <a title="HiCafe Homepage" href="/home">HiCafe</a> lessons related to English slang, you can visit the <a title="English Slang" href="/learn-english/practice-english-skills/popular-and-practical-american-slang-words/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Popular and Practical American Slang</a> page.</p><p>The post <a href="https://hicafe.app/learn-english/words/slang-a-to-z/american-slang-beginning-with-s/">American Slang Beginning with S</a> first appeared on <a href="https://hicafe.app">HiCafe</a>.</p>]]></content:encoded>
  1078. <wfw:commentRss>https://hicafe.app/learn-english/words/slang-a-to-z/american-slang-beginning-with-s/feed/</wfw:commentRss>
  1079. <slash:comments>0</slash:comments>
  1080. </item>
  1081. <item>
  1082. <title>American Slang Beginning with R</title>
  1083. <link>https://hicafe.app/learn-english/words/slang-a-to-z/american-slang-beginning-with-r/</link>
  1084. <comments>https://hicafe.app/learn-english/words/slang-a-to-z/american-slang-beginning-with-r/#respond</comments>
  1085. <dc:creator><![CDATA[hcbMatt]]></dc:creator>
  1086. <pubDate>Sun, 09 Jun 2024 15:28:37 +0000</pubDate>
  1087. <category><![CDATA[Slang]]></category>
  1088. <category><![CDATA[American]]></category>
  1089. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://hicafe.app/?p=1295</guid>
  1090.  
  1091. <description><![CDATA[<p>Slang Beginning with R In this lesson, we cover essential American slang starting with letter R with examples. In general, slang are used mostly in casual street talks among Americans such that even international (non-native) speakers living in the USA can not understand them. Thus, you may use slang in your daily casual conversations especially [&#8230;]</p>
  1092. <p>The post <a href="https://hicafe.app/learn-english/words/slang-a-to-z/american-slang-beginning-with-r/">American Slang Beginning with R</a> first appeared on <a href="https://hicafe.app">HiCafe</a>.</p>]]></description>
  1093. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<h2>Slang Beginning with R</h2>
  1094. <p>In this lesson, we cover essential American slang starting with letter <b>R</b> with examples. In general, slang are used mostly in casual street talks among Americans such that even international (non-native) speakers living in the USA can not understand them. Thus, you may use slang in your daily casual conversations especially with Americans. Just be careful and do NOT use slang in formal conversations like job interviews or business meetings.</p>
  1095. <h2>Slang Recap</h2>
  1096. <p>In our previous lesson, we covered <a title="English Slang" href="/learn-english/words/slang-a-to-z/american-slang-beginning-with-p/">American Slang Beginning with P</a>.</p>
  1097. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1098. <h2>Word of the Day: R</h2>
  1099. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1100. <p><strong>rack up</strong>: 1. to accumulate over time; 2. to win or lose something again.</p>
  1101. <p>1. It’s easy to rack up a lot of personal debt when you use credit cards.</p>
  1102. <p>2. The team racked up their fifth loss of the season with last night’s defeat.</p>
  1103. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1104. <p><strong>rag</strong>: to complain; to say negative things.</p>
  1105. <p>My girlfriend keeps ragging about her roommate. She should just find another place to live.</p>
  1106. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1107. <p><strong>rap</strong>: a style of modern music rooted in African American culture, now prevalent around the world.</p>
  1108. <p>Juan’s father hates the sound of rap. He prefers more traditional music.</p>
  1109. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1110. <p><strong>rapper</strong>: a performer of rap music. (also, rap star)</p>
  1111. <p>Biggie Smalls is a rapper whose life is portrayed in Notorious, a recently released film biography of his life.</p>
  1112. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1113. <p><strong>rat race</strong>: competition in the world of work; competition in business.</p>
  1114. <p>Since joining the rat race, Tony has aged very quickly from all the stress he experiences at work.</p>
  1115. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1116. <p><strong>raunchy</strong>: usually entertainment that is a little dirty, a little vulgar.</p>
  1117. <p>Madonna is a talented performer, but some of her videos are a little too raunchy for the tastes of some people.</p>
  1118. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1119. <p><strong>raw</strong>: unpracticed; without covering.</p>
  1120. <p>This band has a great, raw sound, but they need to practice a little more before they perform in public.</p>
  1121. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1122. <p><strong>raw deal</strong>: a bad situation; unfairness.</p>
  1123. <p>African Americans got a raw deal when they were brought to the United States from Africa as slaves.</p>
  1124. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1125. <p><strong>razzle-dazzle</strong>: flashy style.</p>
  1126. <p>She’s a very good singer, but I can do without all the razzle-dazzle that goes on behind her.</p>
  1127. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1128. <p><strong>read</strong>: to understand.</p>
  1129. <p>It’s hard to get a good read on the new boss. His mood doesn’t change very much.</p>
  1130. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1131. <p><strong>red-hot</strong>: popular; something everyone wants to buy.</p>
  1132. <p>Those t-shirts are so red-hot, they’re sold off the shelves as soon as they arrive in the stores.</p>
  1133. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1134. <p><strong>red tape</strong>: government paperwork; bureaucracy.</p>
  1135. <p>Starting a business is difficult enough without all the red-tape a person has to go through to get it started.</p>
  1136. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1137. <p><strong>rep</strong>: short for &#8220;representative&#8221; or &#8220;reputation.&#8221;</p>
  1138. <p>Tom said she didn’t want to go out with Tad because it would give her a bad rep.</p>
  1139. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1140. <p><strong>repo</strong>: short for &#8220;repossession.&#8221;</p>
  1141. <p>Our neighbors had their car taken in the middle of the night by a repo man.</p>
  1142. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1143. <p><strong>retro</strong>: something kind of old, at least 20 or 30 years.</p>
  1144. <p>Retro styles of the 1970s are still popular these days.</p>
  1145. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1146. <p><strong>revolving door</strong>: a situation in which people come and go very quickly.</p>
  1147. <p>The job was so difficult, it quickly became known as a revolving door at that company, and no one wanted to go through it.</p>
  1148. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1149. <p><strong>right on</strong>: hat’s good; that’s correct; yes. (used to express agreement or happiness)</p>
  1150. <p>A: It looks like we’re going to get a raise this year.</p>
  1151. <p>B: Yeah! Right on!</p>
  1152. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1153. <p><strong>rights</strong>: your protection under the law; in the United States, protection under the U.S. Constitution–the law of the land.</p>
  1154. <p>Did you say the police just came into your house without permission from a judge? They can’t do that. You should know your rights.</p>
  1155. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1156. <p><strong>rinky dink</strong>: something of poor quality.</p>
  1157. <p>Joan wants to leave her rinky-dink apartment and find something bigger.</p>
  1158. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1159. <p><strong>rip off:</strong> cheat; to trick a consumer into making a bad purchase.</p>
  1160. <p>I feel like I got ripped off when I bought these shoes, so I’m going to take them back.</p>
  1161. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1162. <p><strong>rip on</strong>: to criticize; to say bad things about someone or something.</p>
  1163. <p>Nelson has to stop ripping on his kids.</p>
  1164. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1165. <p>rob the cradle: to marry or have a relationship with a person who is much younger.</p>
  1166. <p>Terry likes his new girlfriend, but with a 20-year difference in age, he’s really robbing the cradle. It makes him a little uncomfortable</p>
  1167. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1168. <p><strong>rocky</strong>: difficult; a situation with a lot of problems.</p>
  1169. <p>Their marriage entered a rocky period, but they worked through their problems and decided to stay together.</p>
  1170. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1171. <p><strong>roll</strong>: go; leave.</p>
  1172. <p>Is everyone ready to roll? Yes? Okay, let’s roll.</p>
  1173. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1174. <p><strong>rookie</strong>: a person who is a new member of a sports team or other organization.</p>
  1175. <p>A rookie cop shot and killed someone who turned out to be completely innocent of any wrong-doing.</p>
  1176. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1177. <p><strong>root for:</strong> to support; to cheer for.</p>
  1178. <p>A: Which soccer team are you rooting for?</p>
  1179. <p>B: Manchester United.</p>
  1180. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1181. <p><strong>rubber</strong>: prophylactic protection for sexual activity; also called a &#8220;condom.&#8221;</p>
  1182. <p>Tom keeps a rubber in his wallet just in case he gets lucky, but he never does.</p>
  1183. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1184. <p>rug rats: small children, usually under the age of three or four. Called &#8220;rug rats&#8221; because they crawl a lot on soft carpeted surfaces.</p>
  1185. <p>With four rug rats at home, Kurt sometimes doesn’t mind spending a few extra hours at work.</p>
  1186. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1187. <p><strong>run</strong>: to leave quickly.</p>
  1188. <p>Oh no! Look at the time! I’ve got to run.</p>
  1189. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1190. <p><strong>runaround</strong>: to avoid a subject; to be indirect.</p>
  1191. <p>When the president of the company was asked in a TV interview about the pollution created by his factory, he gave the interviewer the runaround and then quickly left the TV studio.</p>
  1192. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1193. <p>Attention: Some slang is inappropriate in certain situations. That’s why you see the word &#8220;caution&#8221; after some of these slang words. Some slang is considered to be vulgar.</p>
  1194. <p>vulgar = impolite or considered a swear word. Don’t use it around your supervisor or someone who might be offended.</p>
  1195. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1196. <h2>Next Slang Lesson</h2>
  1197. <p>In our next lesson, we will cover <a title="English Slang" href="/learn-english/words/slang-a-to-z/american-slang-beginning-with-s/">American Slang Beginning with S</a>.</p>
  1198. <h2>Related Slang Lessons</h2>
  1199. <p>None</p>
  1200. <h2>English Slang Outline</h2>
  1201. <p>If you wish to see all <a title="HiCafe Homepage" href="/home">HiCafe</a> lessons related to English slang, you can visit the <a title="English Slang" href="/learn-english/practice-english-skills/popular-and-practical-american-slang-words/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Popular and Practical American Slang</a> page.</p><p>The post <a href="https://hicafe.app/learn-english/words/slang-a-to-z/american-slang-beginning-with-r/">American Slang Beginning with R</a> first appeared on <a href="https://hicafe.app">HiCafe</a>.</p>]]></content:encoded>
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  1203. <slash:comments>0</slash:comments>
  1204. </item>
  1205. <item>
  1206. <title>American Slang Beginning with P</title>
  1207. <link>https://hicafe.app/learn-english/words/slang-a-to-z/american-slang-beginning-with-p/</link>
  1208. <comments>https://hicafe.app/learn-english/words/slang-a-to-z/american-slang-beginning-with-p/#respond</comments>
  1209. <dc:creator><![CDATA[hcbMatt]]></dc:creator>
  1210. <pubDate>Sun, 09 Jun 2024 15:27:20 +0000</pubDate>
  1211. <category><![CDATA[Slang]]></category>
  1212. <category><![CDATA[American]]></category>
  1213. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://hicafe.app/?p=1291</guid>
  1214.  
  1215. <description><![CDATA[<p>Slang Beginning with P In this lesson, we cover essential American slang starting with letter P with examples. In general, slang are used mostly in casual street talks among Americans such that even international (non-native) speakers living in the USA can not understand them. Thus, you may use slang in your daily casual conversations especially [&#8230;]</p>
  1216. <p>The post <a href="https://hicafe.app/learn-english/words/slang-a-to-z/american-slang-beginning-with-p/">American Slang Beginning with P</a> first appeared on <a href="https://hicafe.app">HiCafe</a>.</p>]]></description>
  1217. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<h2>Slang Beginning with P</h2>
  1218. <p>In this lesson, we cover essential American slang starting with letter <b>P</b> with examples. In general, slang are used mostly in casual street talks among Americans such that even international (non-native) speakers living in the USA can not understand them. Thus, you may use slang in your daily casual conversations especially with Americans. Just be careful and do NOT use slang in formal conversations like job interviews or business meetings.</p>
  1219. <h2>Slang Recap</h2>
  1220. <p>In our previous lesson, we covered <a title="English Slang" href="/learn-english/words/slang-a-to-z/american-slang-beginning-with-q/">American Slang Beginning with Q</a>.</p>
  1221. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1222. <h2>Word of the Day: P</h2>
  1223. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1224. <p><strong>panic attack</strong>: sudden concern; a feeling of doom.</p>
  1225. <p>Vernon experienced a panic attack when a police car parked in front of his house and walked up to his front door.</p>
  1226. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1227. <p><strong>pan out:</strong> happen; go as planned.</p>
  1228. <p>Our plans for a trip to Florida didn’t pan out this year.</p>
  1229. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1230. <p><strong>park</strong>: to put something or someone in a place; to sit down.</p>
  1231. <p>Park yourself anywhere.</p>
  1232. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1233. <p><strong>pass out:</strong> to lose consciousness.</p>
  1234. <p>A couple of young women passed out on Cedric’s couch during the party. They had too much to drink.</p>
  1235. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1236. <p><strong>pay dirt</strong>: a large amount of money.</p>
  1237. <p>After striking pay dirt with some good stock investments, the Tom took their profits and retired in Arizona.</p>
  1238. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1239. <p><strong>pay (one’s) dues</strong>: to work hard for little or no compensation, early in one’s life or at the beginning of a career.</p>
  1240. <p>Because Maurice paid his dues in the 1980s, he doesn’t believe he has to work on the weekends as the new employees are doing now.</p>
  1241. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1242. <p><strong>payoff</strong>: to benefit with money or a good result.</p>
  1243. <p>Once 12 years in college and medical school are over, Angela is expecting a big payoff in the form of doctor’s salary.</p>
  1244. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1245. <p><strong>peach</strong>: a nice person; an attractive woman</p>
  1246. <p>Thanks for helping me with that project. You’re a peach.</p>
  1247. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1248. <p><strong>pee</strong>: urinate; go to the bathroom. (not always appropriate)</p>
  1249. <p>Someone peed all of the floor in the men’s bathroom.</p>
  1250. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1251. <p><strong>peppy</strong>: full of energy.</p>
  1252. <p>You don’t look too peppy today. Did you stay up all night?</p>
  1253. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1254. <p><strong>pet peeve</strong>: something that bothers you more than other things.</p>
  1255. <p>Old chewing gum under desks and tables is our teacher’s pet peeve, so she doesn’t allow gum in the classroom.</p>
  1256. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1257. <p><strong>pic</strong>: picture, usually digital.</p>
  1258. <p>Hey, send those pics you took at the concert last night to my email.</p>
  1259. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1260. <p><strong>pick-up</strong>: to attract someone romantically and form a relationship, usually a short relationship.</p>
  1261. <p>The girls that Todd and Matt picked up at the bar last night turned out to be married women.</p>
  1262. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1263. <p><strong>pick up on</strong>: understand; come to recognition or understanding. (sometimes said with sarcasm)</p>
  1264. <p>A: It looks like unemployment is going to get worse in the United States this year.</p>
  1265. <p>B: Yeah, I’ve picked up on that.</p>
  1266. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1267. <p><strong>piece of cake</strong>: something that is easy.</p>
  1268. <p>That test was a piece of cake. I finished it ten minutes early.</p>
  1269. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1270. <p><strong>pig</strong>: someone who eats or drinks large amounts of food and drink.</p>
  1271. <p>Never try to share a pizza with Roger. He’s such a pig, he’ll try to eat most of it as quickly as possible.</p>
  1272. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1273. <p><strong>pig out</strong>: eat a lot of food.</p>
  1274. <p>A day before the big race, the contestants went to an Italian restaurant and pigged out on pasta and pizza.</p>
  1275. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1276. <p><strong>pin down</strong>: to identify; to make a choice.</p>
  1277. <p>We’re trying to pin down a date to have a neighborhood party this summer.</p>
  1278. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1279. <p><strong>pink slip</strong>: notification of the loss of one’s employment; to lose a job.</p>
  1280. <p>Most of the workers at the clothing factory received their pink slips last week, and now they have to find new jobs.</p>
  1281. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1282. <p><strong>pipe down</strong>: be quiet; talk more quietly.</p>
  1283. <p>If you kids don’t pipe down, and I’m going to have to ask you to leave the library.</p>
  1284. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1285. <p><strong>pizzaz</strong>: energy; style; modern; new.</p>
  1286. <p>This is a good restaurant, and the food is good, but I wish we had gone somewhere that had a little more pizzaz.</p>
  1287. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1288. <p><strong>play along</strong>: to make someone believe that you don’t know something is happening or something is true. Similar to &#8220;play dumb.&#8221;</p>
  1289. <p>Cindy knew that a surprise party had been planned for her birthday, but when it came time for the surprise, she just played along with it.</p>
  1290. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1291. <p><strong>player</strong>: a person, usually a man, who is available to women romantically. (You can also say &#8220;playboy,&#8221; but it sounds a little old fashioned; however, &#8220;playboy&#8221; also indicates that a man is rich.)</p>
  1292. <p>She’d consider marrying him if he wasn’t such a player.</p>
  1293. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1294. <p><strong>play ball</strong>: play a game; cooperate with other people; do things without litigation.</p>
  1295. <p>It was hard to get the other side to play ball with us, so we just took them to court.</p>
  1296. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1297. <p><strong>play games</strong>: to do something without seriousness; to make life difficult for another person; to make stupid decisions without understanding how it will affect others.</p>
  1298. <p>We made a good offer on the house that we wanted to buy, but the sellers decided to play games with an unreasonable counter-offer.</p>
  1299. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1300. <p><strong>plug</strong>: to give an endorsement for commercial gain.</p>
  1301. <p>Do you mind if I plug my latest CD when I appear on your webcast?</p>
  1302. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1303. <p><strong>poke fun</strong>: to make fun of or laugh at someone; to say things that aren’t nice about someone or something.</p>
  1304. <p>You shouldn’t poke fun at people who have physical or mental disabilities.</p>
  1305. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1306. <p><strong>poop</strong>: excrement from an animal or a human being.</p>
  1307. <p>Yuck! I just stepped in dog poop and it’s all over the bottom of my shoes.</p>
  1308. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1309. <p><strong>pop</strong>: carbonated beverage; Coke, Pepsi, 7-Up.</p>
  1310. <p>Let’s stop at that gas station to get some pop.</p>
  1311. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1312. <p><strong>pop for</strong>: pay for another person’s expenses.</p>
  1313. <p>The boss is going to pop for a company party this summer at an expensive restaurant.</p>
  1314. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1315. <p><strong>pop up</strong>: something happens suddenly or wthout prior notice; a surprise.</p>
  1316. <p>I’m sorry I can’t go to your birthday party this weekend. Something just popped up and now it’s impossible to for me to get there.</p>
  1317. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1318. <p><strong>pork</strong>: excessive government spending; spending projects that favor particular cities, states, and businesses.</p>
  1319. <p>The U.S. government intends to do good things for its citizens, but sometimes it’s criticized for putting too much pork into its budgets.</p>
  1320. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1321. <p><strong>pot</strong>: marijuana; (also known as dope, grass, weed, reefer)</p>
  1322. <p>The police found pot in the glove compartment of a couple of teenagers that they stopped along the highway.</p>
  1323. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1324. <p><strong>PR</strong>: public relations; publicity; television coverage.</p>
  1325. <p>A new PR campaign is going to start this year which warns Americans of the dangers of smoking.</p>
  1326. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1327. <p><strong>pressure cooker</strong>: a situation in which someone feels a lot of pressure and stress.</p>
  1328. <p>Bob couldn’t continue to work as a stockbroker. It was a real pressure cooker to handle such large amounts of money.</p>
  1329. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1330. <p><strong>psyched</strong>: excited to do something. (the &#8220;p&#8221; is silent)</p>
  1331. <p>Julie is really pysched about her new job. She can’t wait to start.</p>
  1332. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1333. <p><strong>puke</strong>: throw up; vomit.</p>
  1334. <p>Someone puked in the girl’s bathroom and left a big mess.</p>
  1335. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1336. <p><strong>pull (something) off</strong>: to get done something that is difficult; to succeed.</p>
  1337. <p>The soccer team pulled off a win despite the odds against them.</p>
  1338. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1339. <p><strong>pull (one’s) leg:</strong> to joke with someone.</p>
  1340. <p>Did he tell you he won the lottery? I think he’s pulling your leg.</p>
  1341. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1342. <p><strong>pull the plug</strong>: put an end to something; stop a program.</p>
  1343. <p>There was a great Chinese restaurant on this street until the city pulled the plug for food safety violations.</p>
  1344. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1345. <p><strong>pump up:</strong> to say good things about someone; to flatter and complement.</p>
  1346. <p>That girl really knows how to pump up her friends.</p>
  1347. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1348. <p><strong>punt</strong>: to pass a problem on to another person.</p>
  1349. <p>After wrecking the American economy, George Bush is going to punt the mess to his successor, Barack Obama.</p>
  1350. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1351. <p><strong>pushover</strong>: a person who is easy to persuade; a person who does what he or she is asked–without question.</p>
  1352. <p>Our teacher is a pushover. We asked if we could have more time to finish our assignment, and she said yes.</p>
  1353. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1354. <p><strong>put away</strong>: eat a lot.</p>
  1355. <p>The football team quickly put away an order of 30 pizzas.</p>
  1356. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1357. <p><strong>put down</strong>: insult (use as a verb or as a noun)</p>
  1358. <p>Helena put down her boyfriend so often, he finally decided to break up with her.</p>
  1359. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1360. <p><strong>put (something) on the line</strong>: gamble; risk.</p>
  1361. <p>Deidra is putting her reputation on the line by providing legal services for that gun shop.</p>
  1362. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1363. <p><strong>put up</strong>: to contribute money; to put money down on a bet when gambling on an event.</p>
  1364. <p>Put up or shut up!</p>
  1365. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1366. <p><strong>put (someone) up</strong>: allow someone to stay at your home.</p>
  1367. <p>Thanks to a friend who put us up for a few days, we saved a lot of money on hotel expenses.</p>
  1368. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1369. <p><strong>putz</strong>: a dumb person.</p>
  1370. <p>The putz in front of me is driving with his hazard lights on.</p>
  1371. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  1372. <h2>Next Slang Lesson</h2>
  1373. <p>In our next lesson, we will cover <a title="English Slang" href="/learn-english/words/slang-a-to-z/american-slang-beginning-with-r/">American Slang Beginning with R</a>.</p>
  1374. <h2>Related Slang Lessons</h2>
  1375. <p>None</p>
  1376. <h2>English Slang Outline</h2>
  1377. <p>If you wish to see all <a title="HiCafe Homepage" href="/home">HiCafe</a> lessons related to English slang, you can visit the <a title="English Slang" href="/learn-english/practice-english-skills/popular-and-practical-american-slang-words/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Popular and Practical American Slang</a> page.</p><p>The post <a href="https://hicafe.app/learn-english/words/slang-a-to-z/american-slang-beginning-with-p/">American Slang Beginning with P</a> first appeared on <a href="https://hicafe.app">HiCafe</a>.</p>]]></content:encoded>
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  1379. <slash:comments>0</slash:comments>
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