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  1. <?xml version='1.0' encoding='UTF-8'?><?xml-stylesheet href="http://www.blogger.com/styles/atom.css" type="text/css"?><feed xmlns='http://www.w3.org/2005/Atom' xmlns:openSearch='http://a9.com/-/spec/opensearchrss/1.0/' xmlns:georss='http://www.georss.org/georss' xmlns:thr='http://purl.org/syndication/thread/1.0'><id>tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-6286755</id><updated>2010-04-26T20:24:17.579-07:00</updated><title type='text'>Free Online Chess</title><subtitle type='html'>Online chess community! Play chess online, free online chess games, tournaments,teams, chess clubs and more.</subtitle><link rel='self' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/posts/default'/><link rel='alternate' type='text/html' href='http://www.chessmaniac.com/index.php'/><link rel='hub' href='http://pubsubhubbub.appspot.com/'/><link rel='next' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/posts/default?start-index=26&amp;max-results=25'/><link rel='http://schemas.google.com/g/2005#feed' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.chessmaniac.com'/><author><name>ChessManiac.com Team Member</name><uri>http://www.blogger.com/profile/01328105597774582922</uri><email>[email protected]</email></author><generator version='7.00' uri='http://www.blogger.com'>Blogger</generator><openSearch:totalResults>367</openSearch:totalResults><openSearch:startIndex>1</openSearch:startIndex><openSearch:itemsPerPage>25</openSearch:itemsPerPage><entry><id>tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-6286755.post-2864455302734577531</id><published>2010-04-19T10:51:00.001-07:00</published><updated>2010-04-19T10:51:52.734-07:00</updated><title type='text'>Robochess a chess playing bot</title><content type='html'>Robochess is the name of this chess playing robot. This robot was created by a 17 year old Iranian Student, Ebrahim Jahandar. The robot can play chess against human and unlike other robots this one has a bulletin Chess Game Computer. Other robots must be connected to a Desktop Computer but this robot has one AVR 8-Bit microcontroller for recognizing opponent's moves, playing its moves and controling the robotic feature of moving the pieces on the board.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;This Robot only requires a power plug and nothing more. Just plug it in and play chess with him! Also, it can be connected to a battery which makes it portable!&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;The robot is very small, lite and it cost only $100!&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;This Robot Awarded 2nd in Young Kharazmi Festival, which is one of the most important innovation festivals in middleast!&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;For more information visit &lt;a href="http://www.jahandar.ir/Chess-Playing-Robot/"&gt;Robochess site&lt;/a&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;object width="425" height="344"&gt;&lt;param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/s22RuXNJyNY&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1&amp;"&gt;&lt;/param&gt;&lt;param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"&gt;&lt;/param&gt;&lt;param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"&gt;&lt;/param&gt;&lt;embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/s22RuXNJyNY&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1&amp;" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="425" height="344"&gt;&lt;/embed&gt;&lt;/object&gt;&lt;div class="blogger-post-footer"&gt;http://www.text-link-ads.com/xml_blogger.php?inventory_key=1RU9897F28IZR04WWKP8&amp;feed=1&lt;img width='1' height='1' src='https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/6286755-2864455302734577531?l=www.chessmaniac.com%2Findex.php' alt='' /&gt;&lt;/div&gt;</content><link rel='replies' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/2864455302734577531/comments/default' title='Post Comments'/><link rel='replies' type='text/html' href='https://www.blogger.com/comment.g?blogID=6286755&amp;postID=2864455302734577531' title='0 Comments'/><link rel='edit' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/posts/default/2864455302734577531'/><link rel='self' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/posts/default/2864455302734577531'/><link rel='alternate' type='text/html' href='http://www.chessmaniac.com/2010/04/robochess-chess-playing-bot.php' title='Robochess a chess playing bot'/><author><name>ChessManiac.com Team Member</name><uri>http://www.blogger.com/profile/01328105597774582922</uri><email>[email protected]</email><gd:extendedProperty xmlns:gd='http://schemas.google.com/g/2005' name='OpenSocialUserId' value='15357420108677844176'/></author><thr:total>0</thr:total></entry><entry><id>tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-6286755.post-5388987153420349352</id><published>2010-04-19T10:50:00.001-07:00</published><updated>2010-04-19T10:50:30.032-07:00</updated><title type='text'>Chess</title><content type='html'>Chess&lt;div class="blogger-post-footer"&gt;http://www.text-link-ads.com/xml_blogger.php?inventory_key=1RU9897F28IZR04WWKP8&amp;feed=1&lt;img width='1' height='1' src='https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/6286755-5388987153420349352?l=www.chessmaniac.com%2Findex.php' alt='' /&gt;&lt;/div&gt;</content><link rel='replies' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/5388987153420349352/comments/default' title='Post Comments'/><link rel='replies' type='text/html' href='https://www.blogger.com/comment.g?blogID=6286755&amp;postID=5388987153420349352' title='0 Comments'/><link rel='edit' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/posts/default/5388987153420349352'/><link rel='self' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/posts/default/5388987153420349352'/><link rel='alternate' type='text/html' href='http://www.chessmaniac.com/2010/04/chess.php' title='Chess'/><author><name>ChessManiac.com Team Member</name><uri>http://www.blogger.com/profile/01328105597774582922</uri><email>[email protected]</email><gd:extendedProperty xmlns:gd='http://schemas.google.com/g/2005' name='OpenSocialUserId' value='15357420108677844176'/></author><thr:total>0</thr:total></entry><entry><id>tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-6286755.post-7232062489664249436</id><published>2009-06-18T21:15:00.000-07:00</published><updated>2009-06-18T21:30:14.339-07:00</updated><title type='text'>Robochess a chess playing robot</title><content type='html'>Robochess is the name of this chess playing robot. This robot was created by a 17 year old Iranian Student, Ebrahim Jahandar. The robot can play chess against human and unlike other robots this one has a bulletin Chess Game Computer. Other robots must be connected to a Desktop Computer but this robot has one AVR 8-Bit microcontroller for recognizing opponent's moves, playing its moves and controling the robotic feature of moving the pieces on the board.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;This Robot only requires a power plug and nothing more. Just plug it in and play chess with him! Also, it can be connected to a battery which makes it portable!&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;The robot is very small, lite and it cost only $100!&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;This Robot Awarded 2nd in Young Kharazmi Festival, which is one of the most important innovation festivals in middleast!&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;For more information visit &lt;a href="http://www.jahandar.ir/Chess-Playing-Robot/"&gt;Robochess site&lt;/a&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;object width="425" height="344"&gt;&lt;param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/s22RuXNJyNY&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1&amp;"&gt;&lt;/param&gt;&lt;param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"&gt;&lt;/param&gt;&lt;param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"&gt;&lt;/param&gt;&lt;embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/s22RuXNJyNY&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1&amp;" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="425" height="344"&gt;&lt;/embed&gt;&lt;/object&gt;&lt;div class="blogger-post-footer"&gt;http://www.text-link-ads.com/xml_blogger.php?inventory_key=1RU9897F28IZR04WWKP8&amp;feed=1&lt;img width='1' height='1' src='https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/6286755-7232062489664249436?l=www.chessmaniac.com%2Findex.php' alt='' /&gt;&lt;/div&gt;</content><link rel='replies' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/7232062489664249436/comments/default' title='Post Comments'/><link rel='replies' type='text/html' href='https://www.blogger.com/comment.g?blogID=6286755&amp;postID=7232062489664249436' title='0 Comments'/><link rel='edit' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/posts/default/7232062489664249436'/><link rel='self' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/posts/default/7232062489664249436'/><link rel='alternate' type='text/html' href='http://www.chessmaniac.com/2009/06/robochess-chess-playing-robot.php' title='Robochess a chess playing robot'/><author><name>ChessManiac.com Team Member</name><uri>http://www.blogger.com/profile/01328105597774582922</uri><email>[email protected]</email><gd:extendedProperty xmlns:gd='http://schemas.google.com/g/2005' name='OpenSocialUserId' value='15357420108677844176'/></author><thr:total>0</thr:total></entry><entry><id>tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-6286755.post-8648748185411676241</id><published>2009-06-02T21:15:00.000-07:00</published><updated>2009-06-02T21:30:33.837-07:00</updated><title type='text'>Video Chess Analysis by Cousin Eddie</title><content type='html'>Analysis done by CousinEddie, captain of the Imm0rtal chess team on Chessmaniac.com  CousinEddie is now a captain on the team Fire, Ice and Immortality. The video was posted to YouTube by Dante88 who is a member of the team House of the Rising Sun.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;object width="425" height="344"&gt;&lt;param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/yu_0OX9WbjM&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1"&gt;&lt;/param&gt;&lt;param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"&gt;&lt;/param&gt;&lt;param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"&gt;&lt;/param&gt;&lt;embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/yu_0OX9WbjM&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="425" height="344"&gt;&lt;/embed&gt;&lt;/object&gt;&lt;div class="blogger-post-footer"&gt;http://www.text-link-ads.com/xml_blogger.php?inventory_key=1RU9897F28IZR04WWKP8&amp;feed=1&lt;img width='1' height='1' src='https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/6286755-8648748185411676241?l=www.chessmaniac.com%2Findex.php' alt='' /&gt;&lt;/div&gt;</content><link rel='replies' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/8648748185411676241/comments/default' title='Post Comments'/><link rel='replies' type='text/html' href='https://www.blogger.com/comment.g?blogID=6286755&amp;postID=8648748185411676241' title='0 Comments'/><link rel='edit' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/posts/default/8648748185411676241'/><link rel='self' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/posts/default/8648748185411676241'/><link rel='alternate' type='text/html' href='http://www.chessmaniac.com/2009/06/video-chess-analysis-by-cousin-eddie.php' title='Video Chess Analysis by Cousin Eddie'/><author><name>ChessManiac.com Team Member</name><uri>http://www.blogger.com/profile/01328105597774582922</uri><email>[email protected]</email><gd:extendedProperty xmlns:gd='http://schemas.google.com/g/2005' name='OpenSocialUserId' value='15357420108677844176'/></author><thr:total>0</thr:total></entry><entry><id>tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-6286755.post-6265628102241604068</id><published>2009-05-29T16:13:00.000-07:00</published><updated>2009-05-29T21:15:33.034-07:00</updated><title type='text'>Bobby Fischer Live Trailer</title><content type='html'>The film Bobby Fischer Live, a "bio picture about the controversial life of the most famous and best chess player who has ever lived," is due for release in the US on August 1st 2009. &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;object width="320" height="266" class="BLOG_video_class" id="BLOG_video-8299305f8f20bbf6" classid="clsid:D27CDB6E-AE6D-11cf-96B8-444553540000" codebase="http://download.macromedia.com/pub/shockwave/cabs/flash/swflash.cab#version=6,0,40,0"&gt;&lt;param name="movie" value="http://www.blogger.com/img/videoplayer.swf?videoUrl=http%3A%2F%2Fv13.nonxt3.googlevideo.com%2Fvideoplayback%3Fid%3D8299305f8f20bbf6%26itag%3D5%26begin%3D0%26len%3D86400000%26app%3Dblogger%26et%3Dplay%26el%3DEMBEDDED%26ip%3D0.0.0.0%26ipbits%3D0%26expire%3D1274486145%26sparams%3Did%252Citag%252Cip%252Cipbits%252Cexpire%26signature%3D4498806FBE4449D8A77C466ACEF431A18AD82979.20BADC32378E52A2E6A9D2DA281D4BAC2AA23E18%26key%3Dck1&amp;amp;thumbnailUrl=http%3A%2F%2Fvideo.google.com%2FThumbnailServer2%3Fapp%3Dblogger%26contentid%3D8299305f8f20bbf6%26offsetms%3D5000%26itag%3Dw320%26sigh%3DTxc5aCOWqsnG_77ZHD0Xj4MJS50&amp;amp;messagesUrl=video.google.com%2FFlashUiStrings.xlb%3Fframe%3Dflashstrings%26hl%3Den&amp;amp;nogvlm=1"&gt;&lt;param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF"&gt;&lt;embed width="320" height="266" src="http://www.blogger.com/img/videoplayer.swf?videoUrl=http%3A%2F%2Fv13.nonxt3.googlevideo.com%2Fvideoplayback%3Fid%3D8299305f8f20bbf6%26itag%3D5%26begin%3D0%26len%3D86400000%26app%3Dblogger%26et%3Dplay%26el%3DEMBEDDED%26ip%3D0.0.0.0%26ipbits%3D0%26expire%3D1274486145%26sparams%3Did%252Citag%252Cip%252Cipbits%252Cexpire%26signature%3D4498806FBE4449D8A77C466ACEF431A18AD82979.20BADC32378E52A2E6A9D2DA281D4BAC2AA23E18%26key%3Dck1&amp;amp;thumbnailUrl=http%3A%2F%2Fvideo.google.com%2FThumbnailServer2%3Fapp%3Dblogger%26contentid%3D8299305f8f20bbf6%26offsetms%3D5000%26itag%3Dw320%26sigh%3DTxc5aCOWqsnG_77ZHD0Xj4MJS50&amp;amp;messagesUrl=video.google.com%2FFlashUiStrings.xlb%3Fframe%3Dflashstrings%26hl%3Den&amp;amp;nogvlm=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash"&gt;&lt;/embed&gt;&lt;/object&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Robert James "Bobby" Fischer (March 9, 1943 – January 17, 2008) was an American chess Grandmaster, and the eleventh World Chess Champion. Later in life he renounced his US citizenship and became an Icelandic citizen.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;As a teenager, Fischer became famous as a chess prodigy. In 1972, he won the World Chess Championship, defeating defending champion Boris Spassky of the Soviet Union in a match held in Reykjavík, Iceland. The match was widely publicized as a Cold War battle. He is often referred to as one of the greatest chess players of all time.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;In 1975, Fischer did not defend his title when he could not come to agreement with the international chess federation FIDE over the conditions for the match. He became more reclusive and played no more competitive chess until 1992, when he won a rematch against Spassky. The competition was held in Yugoslavia, which was then under a strict United Nations embargo. This led to a conflict with the US government, and he never returned to his native country.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;In his later years, Fischer lived in Hungary, Germany, the Philippines, and Japan. During this time he made increasingly anti-American and anti-Semitic statements. During the 2004–2005 time period, after his U.S. passport was revoked, he was detained by Japanese authorities for nine months under threat of extradition. After Iceland granted him citizenship, the Japanese authorities released him to that country, where he lived until his death in 2008.&lt;div class="blogger-post-footer"&gt;http://www.text-link-ads.com/xml_blogger.php?inventory_key=1RU9897F28IZR04WWKP8&amp;feed=1&lt;img width='1' height='1' src='https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/6286755-6265628102241604068?l=www.chessmaniac.com%2Findex.php' alt='' /&gt;&lt;/div&gt;</content><link rel='enclosure' type='video/mp4' href='http://www.blogger.com/video-play.mp4?contentId=8299305f8f20bbf6&amp;type=video%2Fmp4' length='0'/><link rel='replies' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/6265628102241604068/comments/default' title='Post Comments'/><link rel='replies' type='text/html' href='https://www.blogger.com/comment.g?blogID=6286755&amp;postID=6265628102241604068' title='0 Comments'/><link rel='edit' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/posts/default/6265628102241604068'/><link rel='self' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/posts/default/6265628102241604068'/><link rel='alternate' type='text/html' href='http://www.chessmaniac.com/2009/05/bobby-fischer-live-trailer.php' title='Bobby Fischer Live Trailer'/><author><name>ChessManiac.com Team Member</name><uri>http://www.blogger.com/profile/01328105597774582922</uri><email>[email protected]</email><gd:extendedProperty xmlns:gd='http://schemas.google.com/g/2005' name='OpenSocialUserId' value='15357420108677844176'/></author><thr:total>0</thr:total></entry><entry><id>tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-6286755.post-3176479113244547070</id><published>2009-05-26T11:51:00.000-07:00</published><updated>2009-05-26T11:58:35.086-07:00</updated><title type='text'>BOBBY FISCHER’S CHESS LIBRARY, INCLUDING NOTEBOOKS PREPARED FOR THE 1972 WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP UP FOR AUCTION</title><content type='html'>&lt;a href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/papers-775808.bmp"&gt;&lt;img style="float:left; margin:0 10px 10px 0;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;width: 400px; height: 266px;" src="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/papers-775789.bmp" border="0" alt="" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt;&lt;br /&gt;FISCHER, ROBERT JAMES “BOBBY.” 1943-2008.&lt;br /&gt;BOBBY FISCHER’S CHESS LIBRARY, INCLUDING NOTEBOOKS PREPARED FOR THE 1972 WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP. &lt;br /&gt;Comprising: &lt;br /&gt;1. Approximately 320 volumes on chess including a few match results, various places and languages (including many Soviet imprints), 1889-1992, mostly 8vo, original bindings. Includes about a dozen presentation copies, inscribed by the authors for Fischer and two typed letters signed laid in. At least three volumes bear Fischer’s ownership signature and at least two with other notation by Fischer. &lt;br /&gt;2. Approximately 400 issues of chess-related periodicals, including runs of The Chess Player, Sahovski Informator, Overboard, Revista SAH, “Waxmatbl”, and “Magyar Sakkelet” among others, mostly 1960s-1980s, various sizes, original wrappers. &lt;br /&gt;3. Nine personal floppy disks (unexamined). &lt;br /&gt;4. Three sets of proofs for Fischer’s My 60 Memorable Games (published 1969), with the title in various stages (“My Memorable Games: 52 Tournament Games”, “My Life in Chess”) comprising a typescript with copious technical annotations, mostly printers notes, but also various changes to wording and corrections to the chess notation possibly made by Fischer, with a sketch of the title-page on drafting paper apparently in Fischer’s hand; a set of page proofs (loose, possibly in duplicate); and a partially annotated galley proof stamped June 1966. &lt;br /&gt;5. Four volumes of bound typescript detailing the match history of Boris Spassky from the 1950s to 1971 (two vols as white, two as black), apparently prepared by “RGW” and with some manuscript commentary. &lt;br /&gt;6. Fifteen volumes of ring- or string-bound manuscript notebooks with notation of the games of Mark Taimanov and Tigran Petrossian from the 1950s-1970, various hands. &lt;br /&gt;Condition varies, generally a bit musty and a few volumes water-damaged but otherwise good or better. &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Library of books and documents derived from the Pasadena storage unit where Fischer’s belongings were held after 1992. Fischer had defied the U.N. embargo against travel to Yugoslavia for his re-match against Boris Spassky and never again returned to the U.S. &lt;br /&gt;The manuscript material centers on Fischer’s preparation for his historic match with Boris Spassky in 1972, certainly the most exciting moment in the history of American chess. Fischer’s win in “The Match of the Century” ended 24 years of Soviet domination of the World Championship and was viewed with elation in the doldrums of the Cold War. A telling memo appears in one of the bound typescripts: “Spassky seems to adopt defences for Black after prolonged experience with the white pieces against a particular defence. I had a conversation with Korchnoi after Hastings (January) – he had not been informed that I was preparing files for you – in which he made some remark that a possible weakness of yours was the Bc4 lines as White against the Sicilian….” Among the printed volumes there is an annotated German edition of the match record for the 1971 World Championship, many games bear Fischer’s own notes as to how the games could have been won (“31…RF4! Wins easily / 21gF Rg6 wins / 20.QFl! ” etc.) &lt;a href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/Bobby_Fischer_1960_in_Leipzig-780682.jpg"&gt;&lt;img style="display:block; margin:0px auto 10px; text-align:center;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;width: 345px; height: 304px;" src="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/Bobby_Fischer_1960_in_Leipzig-780669.jpg" border="0" alt="" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Other highlights from the library include a copy of ANATOLY KARPOV'S Selected Chess Matches 1966-1977, Moscow, 1978 inscribed and signed by the author for Bobby Fischer, in Russian. Also an issue of Macedonian Checkmake (in Macedonian) which Fischer has signed in initials below a note, "Movies, television, tv, cassetes" from February 1972--Fischer apparently preparing for the world fame he was to attain a few months later. &lt;br /&gt;It is evident that Fischer’s thirst after chess knowledge knew no national boundaries. He possessed works in multiple languages, many published from behind the Iron Curtain. Several of the Soviet and Eastern European periodicals bear Fischer’s name in manuscript on the upper cover, but were first mailed to East Berlin. Present also is a copy of Bobby Fischer Teaches Chess with a note laid in seeming to indicate that Fischer planned on suing the publishers. The proofs of Fischer’s chess autobiography are heavily annotated and an interesting reminder of the amazing technical difficulty of publishing a work that can only be proofed by the author himself or a very few specialists. &lt;br /&gt;Every book in the library relates to the game of chess, with the exception of Fischer’s own ”I Was Tortured in the Pasadena Jailhouse!” of 1982. A fascinating look into Fischer’s absolute single-mindedness in becoming the world’s greatest chess player and more specifically in attaining victory over Boris Spassky. &lt;br /&gt;See illustration.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Estimate: $50,000 - 80,000 &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;a href="http://www.bonhams.com/cgi-bin/public.sh/pubweb/publicSite.r?sContinent=EUR&amp;screen=lotdetailsNoFlash&amp;iSaleItemNo=4282330&amp;iSaleNo=17109&amp;iSaleSectionNo=1#"&gt;View Auction&lt;/a&gt;&lt;div class="blogger-post-footer"&gt;http://www.text-link-ads.com/xml_blogger.php?inventory_key=1RU9897F28IZR04WWKP8&amp;feed=1&lt;img width='1' height='1' src='https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/6286755-3176479113244547070?l=www.chessmaniac.com%2Findex.php' alt='' /&gt;&lt;/div&gt;</content><link rel='replies' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/3176479113244547070/comments/default' title='Post Comments'/><link rel='replies' type='text/html' href='https://www.blogger.com/comment.g?blogID=6286755&amp;postID=3176479113244547070' title='0 Comments'/><link rel='edit' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/posts/default/3176479113244547070'/><link rel='self' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/posts/default/3176479113244547070'/><link rel='alternate' type='text/html' href='http://www.chessmaniac.com/2009/05/bobby-fischers-chess-library-including.php' title='BOBBY FISCHER’S CHESS LIBRARY, INCLUDING NOTEBOOKS PREPARED FOR THE 1972 WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP UP FOR AUCTION'/><author><name>ChessManiac.com Team Member</name><uri>http://www.blogger.com/profile/01328105597774582922</uri><email>[email protected]</email><gd:extendedProperty xmlns:gd='http://schemas.google.com/g/2005' name='OpenSocialUserId' value='15357420108677844176'/></author><thr:total>0</thr:total></entry><entry><id>tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-6286755.post-6169470216397555692</id><published>2008-12-26T22:06:00.000-08:00</published><updated>2008-12-26T22:16:26.623-08:00</updated><title type='text'>Fide Masters explain the "Two Knights Defense"</title><content type='html'>First recorded by Polerio (c.1550–c.1610) in the late 16th century, this line of the Italian Game was extensively developed in the 19th century. Black's third move is a more aggressive defense than the Giuoco Piano which would result from 3...Bc5. In fact, Bronstein suggested that the term "defense" does not fit, and that the name "Chigorin Counterattack" would be more appropriate. The Two Knights has been adopted as Black by many aggressive players including Chigorin and Keres, and World Champions Tal and Boris Spassky. The theory of this opening has been explored extensively in correspondence chess by players such as Berliner and Estrin.&lt;br /&gt;Watch Igor and Gleb, the two Fide Masters explain how to play the two knights opening.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;object width="500" height="405"&gt;&lt;param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/hISvX7Hns8s&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1&amp;color1=0x234900&amp;color2=0x4e9e00&amp;border=1"&gt;&lt;/param&gt;&lt;param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"&gt;&lt;/param&gt;&lt;param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"&gt;&lt;/param&gt;&lt;embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/hISvX7Hns8s&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1&amp;color1=0x234900&amp;color2=0x4e9e00&amp;border=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="500" height="405"&gt;&lt;/embed&gt;&lt;/object&gt;&lt;div class="blogger-post-footer"&gt;http://www.text-link-ads.com/xml_blogger.php?inventory_key=1RU9897F28IZR04WWKP8&amp;feed=1&lt;img width='1' height='1' src='https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/6286755-6169470216397555692?l=www.chessmaniac.com%2Findex.php' alt='' /&gt;&lt;/div&gt;</content><link rel='replies' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/6169470216397555692/comments/default' title='Post Comments'/><link rel='replies' type='text/html' href='https://www.blogger.com/comment.g?blogID=6286755&amp;postID=6169470216397555692' title='0 Comments'/><link rel='edit' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/posts/default/6169470216397555692'/><link rel='self' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/posts/default/6169470216397555692'/><link rel='alternate' type='text/html' href='http://www.chessmaniac.com/2008/12/fide-masters-explain-two-knights.php' title='Fide Masters explain the &quot;Two Knights Defense&quot;'/><author><name>ChessManiac.com Team Member</name><uri>http://www.blogger.com/profile/01328105597774582922</uri><email>[email protected]</email><gd:extendedProperty xmlns:gd='http://schemas.google.com/g/2005' name='OpenSocialUserId' value='15357420108677844176'/></author><thr:total>0</thr:total></entry><entry><id>tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-6286755.post-4855068855733776409</id><published>2008-12-21T04:33:00.000-08:00</published><updated>2008-12-21T05:31:44.506-08:00</updated><title type='text'>Chess champion Josh Waitzkin visits Google's Mountain View, CA headquarters</title><content type='html'>Chess champion Josh Waitzkin visits Google's Mountain View, CA headquarters to discuss his book &lt;a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0743277457?ie=UTF8&amp;tag=chessmaniacco-20&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=0743277457"&gt;The Art of Learning: A Journey in the Pursuit of Excellence&lt;/a&gt;&lt;img src="http://www.assoc-amazon.com/e/ir?t=chessmaniacco-20&amp;l=as2&amp;o=1&amp;a=0743277457" width="1" height="1" border="0" alt="" style="border:none !important; margin:0px !important;" /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;object width="500" height="405"&gt;&lt;param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/gTZS3SqpT-o&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1&amp;color1=0x234900&amp;color2=0x4e9e00&amp;border=1"&gt;&lt;/param&gt;&lt;param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"&gt;&lt;/param&gt;&lt;param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"&gt;&lt;/param&gt;&lt;embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/gTZS3SqpT-o&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1&amp;color1=0x234900&amp;color2=0x4e9e00&amp;border=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="500" height="405"&gt;&lt;/embed&gt;&lt;/object&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Josh Waitzkin is an 8-time National Chess Champion, 13-time Tai Chi Chuan Push Hands National Champion, and Two-time Tai Chi Chuan Push Hands World Champion. In 1993 Paramount Pictures released the film Searching for Bobby Fischer, based on the highly acclaimed book of the same title written by Fred Waitzkin, documenting Josh's journey to winning his first National Championship.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;In addition to Josh's intense competitive life, he is a renowned writer and teacher in the fields of learning and performance psychology. Since 1997, Josh has been the spokesperson for Chessmaster, the largest computer chess program in the world, and a spokesperson for the fight against Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Over the past several years, Josh has appeared in all media venues from MTV, ESPN, and Today to People, Sports Illustrated, USA Today, The New York Times, Inside Kung Fu, and Kung Fu &amp; Tai Chi Magazine.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;The Art of Learning is an autobiographical discussion of the learning process and performance psychology, drawing from Josh's experiences in both chess and the martial arts. Interview by Peter Allen, director of Google University.&lt;div class="blogger-post-footer"&gt;http://www.text-link-ads.com/xml_blogger.php?inventory_key=1RU9897F28IZR04WWKP8&amp;feed=1&lt;img width='1' height='1' src='https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/6286755-4855068855733776409?l=www.chessmaniac.com%2Findex.php' alt='' /&gt;&lt;/div&gt;</content><link rel='replies' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/4855068855733776409/comments/default' title='Post Comments'/><link rel='replies' type='text/html' href='https://www.blogger.com/comment.g?blogID=6286755&amp;postID=4855068855733776409' title='0 Comments'/><link rel='edit' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/posts/default/4855068855733776409'/><link rel='self' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/posts/default/4855068855733776409'/><link rel='alternate' type='text/html' href='http://www.chessmaniac.com/2008/12/chess-champion-josh-waitzkin-visits.php' title='Chess champion Josh Waitzkin visits Google&apos;s Mountain View, CA headquarters'/><author><name>ChessManiac.com Team Member</name><uri>http://www.blogger.com/profile/01328105597774582922</uri><email>[email protected]</email><gd:extendedProperty xmlns:gd='http://schemas.google.com/g/2005' name='OpenSocialUserId' value='15357420108677844176'/></author><thr:total>0</thr:total></entry><entry><id>tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-6286755.post-7976542845274792339</id><published>2008-11-01T22:44:00.000-07:00</published><updated>2008-11-01T23:00:00.277-07:00</updated><title type='text'>CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT</title><content type='html'>The following thought is from my friend, Sam Maitz:&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;“There is no sudden leap to greatness.&lt;br /&gt;Your success lies in doing day by day.&lt;br /&gt;Your upward reach will come from working well and carefully.&lt;br /&gt; &lt;br /&gt;Good work done little by little becomes great work.&lt;br /&gt;The house of success is built brick by brick.&lt;br /&gt; &lt;br /&gt;Adopt the pace of nature.  The secret is patience.&lt;br /&gt;A bottle fills drop by drop.”&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;I offer the above in hopes that all players will recognize that, sooner or later, games get more difficult and the player reaches a level where the opponents are his/her equal.  At this time several things occur:&lt;br /&gt;First, the player’s elo bobs up and down within narrow limits,&lt;br /&gt;Second, the player experiences more drawn games.&lt;br /&gt;And, lastly, the player is taking as many losses as wins.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;This point of growth is the plateau.  This is a place where the player settles in and enjoys games with peers; with the hope that the experience will increase elo.  In fact, it does.  But only the right experience works, and, still, the gain is often agonizingly slow.  &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;When a stronger player with experience enters a new chess environment, there are usually early wins.  At first, the elo climbs quickly.  Then the plateau occurs.  The only way the player will move further upward is to improve his game, or play against lesser players.  But, the elo system is designed to keep the player on a plateau by the differentiation in elo points won and lost depending on the strength of the opponent.  Think of it as a thermostat.  If your win ratio gets too high the elo system brings you back!&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;A player needs to improve in order to permanently move to a higher plateau.  At this point, self-improvement is difficult.  The player seldom sees the thought behaviors that hold him to that level!  (O’ wha’ a gift the giftee gie us, to see oursels as others see us.” – Bobby Burns.)  Chess is a game of mental skills and aptitudes.  In chess memory is a primary aptitude, reason and logic are primary skills.  These are in the mind, and the mind expresses them in thoughts.  It is your thoughts, your thinking, that determine your degree of success.  Knowledge plays an elementary part, but it must be converted to skill, and knowledge can be converted only with practice.  The problem players face is that many practice the wrong thoughts!  Practice does not make perfect!  Practice makes permanent!  Only perfect practice will make perfect.  And, so, it is the quality of what you do with the board and pieces, on every occasion.  So, if you slack off with an inferior opponent, you have started a limiting habit.  Always play your best, regardless of who your opponent may be. &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;There are ways to find the limiting behaviors, of course.  All of the ways require one critical element:  Feedback!  Feedback can come from a number of sources, the true role of a coach is to provide feedback; to help the player see what is otherwise invisible to him.  &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;If a player seeks continuous improvement, feedback is not something that can successfully be turned off and on.  It must be constant.  A simple way to obtain feedback is to analyze your own games.  I believe it is most productive to analyze one’s losses.  A great post-game activity is analysis.  It requires an open mind, lest the true reason be dismissed too quickly.  &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;The task is complicated, because there are normally multiple errors in thinking.  When encountered, the coach must focus on only one!  A person can only give their focused attention to one thing at a time.  Here is an example of a player who needs multiple changes.  Let’s look and see how it should be handled.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;a href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/pictureParser-777350.png"&gt;&lt;img style="display:block; margin:0px auto 10px; text-align:center;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;width: 302px; height: 302px;" src="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/pictureParser-777348.png" border="0" alt="" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt; &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;White played: 10. c4&lt;br /&gt;This move is bad because it creates a black passed pawn on d4.  &lt;br /&gt;Black makes a note to help White with pawn play.  If White improves his pawn play appreciably, he will move to a higher plateau.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;A few moves later:&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;a href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/2-713027.png"&gt;&lt;img style="display:block; margin:0px auto 10px; text-align:center;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;width: 302px; height: 302px;" src="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/2-713025.png" border="0" alt="" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;14. … Bb7.     This move threatens 15. … Be4, winning the white queen!&lt;br /&gt;15. Qc2??        This bad move was made to save the queen.  It loses.  &lt;br /&gt;15. …   d3       And the fork is deadly!  &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;White needs help in tactical play.  Which should be addressed?  Both pawn play and tactics are core areas of the game.  The coach picks one and focuses on it, causing the player to focus.   The other is not mentioned until the first is secure.  The player cannot focus if there are two different issues.  In an initial game, I often see four or five issues!  I just pick one and let the others rest.  In this instance, either improved pawn play or improved tactical awareness will improve the players’ elo.  It will nudge him from the plateau.  Continuous improvement means just that:  Working on one thing with the entire mind until it is resolved, then moving to another issue. &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;The enemy of improvement is denial.  When looking at an exhibited error in thinking, many players rationalize or justify the move rather than looking for the thinking that caused it.  Much of the denial can be heard in the phrase: “Yes, but…“  Denial prevents gain.   &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;When a player is beginning, or who experiences a plateau at a low level, there are two dominant reasons for losing games.  The first is simply timeouts.  You can never win a game that has timed out.  Games time out for many ‘reasons’, but most of these are under the control of the player.  One of the primary reasons is that the player has no true desire to improve, he just enjoys the social aspect and the thrill of moving the pieces around until one player serendipitously gains an advantage.  &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;The second reason is blunders.  Blunders are not always easy to stop, they can result from the mind going on vacation (or, in my case: A senior moment) during the game, but they are caused by the player not seeing the position.  Seeing the board on every move is not as easy as it sounds.  A basic reason for a blunder is not taking time enough to study the position before moving.  Sometimes the time is limited by having too many games.  Patience is truly a virtue, in chess as in all else.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Once the time outs and blunders are under control, it is time to study candidates.  In any position there are multiple candidates for any move.  It is important to recognize probable successful candidates and look at their individual impacts on the position and on the plan.  To do this successfully, the player needs not only to see the board; but also to have a plan.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Here is an example of a player missing the right candidate, the game is a French Tarrash:&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;   White        Black&lt;br /&gt;1.   e4  e6&lt;br /&gt;2.   d4  d5&lt;br /&gt;3.   Nd2 c5&lt;br /&gt;4.   Ngf3 cxd4&lt;br /&gt;5.   Nxd4 …     &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;a href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/3-775955.png"&gt;&lt;img style="display:block; margin:0px auto 10px; text-align:center;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;width: 302px; height: 302px;" src="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/3-775951.png" border="0" alt="" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt; &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt; This is a common position in the Tarrasch.  There are a number of candidates for Black’s fifth move:  He must develop his minor pieces, he must respect b5, he must consider the center.  5. … Nc6 or Nd7 both keep the white pawn from advancing, and close the diagonal a4-e8.  5. … Nf6 challenges the pawn and can retake on e5, and can move to d4 if the white pawn comes forward.  5. … a6 holds b5.  Even 5. … dxe4 can be considered.  (The knight moves are probably the best candidates). &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;But Black “sees” a way to “attack” something:&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;5.   …  Qb6      This move is positionally bad.  White now has a distinct advantage.  5. … Bc5 is also bad, for the same reason.  Black cannot win a battle on d4!  He is not well enough developed.  The attack on b2 is an illusion.  His plan is bad, and so his candidates are weak.  &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;6.   c3  Bc5       Persisting, without counting.  (“Count who come for the broken meats before thou makest a feast.”- Kipling) &lt;br /&gt;7.   Ndb3   …       This move blocks b2 and protects d4, it also attacks c5.&lt;br /&gt;7.   …  Nc6            Still attacking d4.  (This move, however has some beneficial features in that it does block the a4-e8 diagonal, and it does contest the center.  But it comes too late.)&lt;br /&gt;8.   Nxc5          Qxc5        Black should have seen, by now, that he cannot successfully win d4. &lt;br /&gt;9.   Be3  Nxd4        Black is still focused on the exchange.  The Black queen cannot recapture on d4, so one defender is immobile.          &lt;br /&gt;10.  Bxd4      …         Now the flaw in exchanging on d4 is clear.  The bishop is well posted on d4, forking the Queen and the pawn on g7.&lt;br /&gt;11.  Qc6.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;a href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/4-705572.png"&gt;&lt;img style="display:block; margin:0px auto 10px; text-align:center;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;width: 302px; height: 302px;" src="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/4-705570.png" border="0" alt="" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Now, the hand of white leaps to the bishop!  He has won a rook!  Quickly, laughingly, seize the g7 pawn!  Bxg7!  And follow with the rook capture: Bxh8!!&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Right?&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;WRONG!  One of the ways we go wrong is when we see a winning move.  In this position, capturing the pawn will still win; but it is not the best move.  Engage brain before putting hand in gear…  Stay away from the bishop, don’t touch it.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Instead, make the zwischenzug: &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;11.  exd5 …      Now, with the queen threatened,  Black has Hobson’s choice:  Lose or move the queen, or take the pawn.  Either way, White still gets the rook, but now White also has an improved position.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;If you shrug it off by saying: “So what?, I still win.”  You will chose the inferior move at a time when you will not still win!!&lt;br /&gt;Remember: When you see a good move, always look for a better one.    Even a winning move can be a mistake!  We fail to make the best moves when we have tunnel vision, when we rush, when we are following a flawed plan, and when we fail to consider candidates.     &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;For players at this stage, I suggest the player start with simple plans and intense observation.  There are a couple of good ways to develop more powerful observation; one is simply to work chess problems every day!  It will be frustrating missing the solutions, at first; but by persevering the player will see the patterns in the solutions.  And the study will result in improved observation with a consequent improvement in the game.    &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;To improve planning skills, the player can start with simple plans and adhere to them.   Follow basic opening rules, make them the plan.  It can simply be:  I will occupy and fight for a place in the center, I will mobilize my minor pieces, I will get my rooks to open files, or those I believe will open.  I will avoid exposing my queen.  I will castle before the opponent can prevent it.  This simple plan will get a player through even complicated openings.  Plan to play an opening with which you are very familiar, so you know what the pawn structure will probably become, and you know which pieces are likely to be exchanged, and you know which lines will probably be open and which will probably be shut.  Keep in mind that if you do not know the next move in an opening, you are automatically in the middle game, whether you know it or not!  Whether you want to be or not!  If you truly know your opening you may still be in the opening when your opponent is facing emerging tactical and positional problems.   He may not see the right candidate!  I suspect that is exactly what happened in the game above.  White was not familiar with his own opening, perhaps being familiar only so far, or only on the main line.  You have a great advantage when you know the opening better than your opponent does, and you do not need a vast repertoire.  Start with one white opening, one black defense against e4 and one against e5.  Just learn these three one at a time.  Focus on your &lt;a href="http://www.studentchess.net"&gt;White opening&lt;/a&gt; first, then when you know that opening well and are consistently winning with it against equals, you are ready to add a Black defense to your repertoire.  Each time you truly learn one, your elo will move upward, this is continuous improvement.  No great leaps forward, just steady progress in one element of the game at a time.  &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Good chessing!  Al  (alfredjwood)&lt;div class="blogger-post-footer"&gt;http://www.text-link-ads.com/xml_blogger.php?inventory_key=1RU9897F28IZR04WWKP8&amp;feed=1&lt;img width='1' height='1' src='https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/6286755-7976542845274792339?l=www.chessmaniac.com%2Findex.php' alt='' /&gt;&lt;/div&gt;</content><link rel='replies' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/7976542845274792339/comments/default' title='Post Comments'/><link rel='replies' type='text/html' href='https://www.blogger.com/comment.g?blogID=6286755&amp;postID=7976542845274792339' title='0 Comments'/><link rel='edit' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/posts/default/7976542845274792339'/><link rel='self' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/posts/default/7976542845274792339'/><link rel='alternate' type='text/html' href='http://www.chessmaniac.com/2008/11/continuous-improvement.php' title='CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT'/><author><name>ChessManiac.com Team Member</name><uri>http://www.blogger.com/profile/01328105597774582922</uri><email>[email protected]</email><gd:extendedProperty xmlns:gd='http://schemas.google.com/g/2005' name='OpenSocialUserId' value='15357420108677844176'/></author><thr:total>0</thr:total></entry><entry><id>tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-6286755.post-2462358249454442429</id><published>2008-10-16T15:52:00.000-07:00</published><updated>2008-10-16T20:51:14.373-07:00</updated><category scheme='http://www.blogger.com/atom/ns#' term='Planning in Chess'/><category scheme='http://www.blogger.com/atom/ns#' term='Chess News'/><category scheme='http://www.blogger.com/atom/ns#' term='Playing Chess'/><category scheme='http://www.blogger.com/atom/ns#' term='Online Chess'/><category scheme='http://www.blogger.com/atom/ns#' term='Chess'/><category scheme='http://www.blogger.com/atom/ns#' term='free chess'/><category scheme='http://www.blogger.com/atom/ns#' term='play chess'/><category scheme='http://www.blogger.com/atom/ns#' term='Chess Openings'/><category scheme='http://www.blogger.com/atom/ns#' term='Chess Tactics'/><title type='text'>TRANSPOSITIONS!</title><content type='html'>When a new player begins &lt;a href="http://www.studentchess.net"&gt;chess openings&lt;/a&gt;, I recommend that whatever opening is chosen is one that the player will use every time!  I want the player to become accustomed to the positions this opening leads into.  My reasoning is that chess is learned in one of two ways:&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;First, we learn the placement of the pieces at the start of the game, then we learn the moves.  Teaching chess by moves is not difficult, and learning the moves themselves is not difficult.  This is what I think of as a scientific method.  It is the way games are recorded.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;But some players are blessed with a special talent; the ability to unify sensations into meaningful composites.  They see the patterns, not the moves.  This is more difficult to teach, it depends on the artistic or imaginative power of the player.  This is what I think of as the Artistic method.   &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;I believe it is necessary to begin with the first method, because there is lots of incidental learning that initially takes place, and because it can be digested by anyone.  Starting with the artistic method would quickly discourage someone without the imaginative ability.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;But, for those few who may have the talent for treating the game as an art, I believe that, as soon as the basics of the game are learned, the player can address pattern recognition.  Instead of memorizing the moves in the opening, the player simply has pictures in his/her mind of the positions created by the opening, and plays to and from these positions.  &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;If we know what we want from the opening in terms of these pictures, we can see the current picture and know whether we are on course, or whether we must change course to reach another familiar picture.  If the performer can “see” the positions in his/her mind, a library of still pictures is created.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Of course, if the player insists on experimenting with a number of openings, the task can be much more difficult, or impossible.  I believe it is easier to start with a solid “trunk” and add “branches” later.  That’s why I stress the One Opening idea.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;I offer this so that the reader can better understand the importance of playing by position, not by move.  Pattern recognition is the key.  If we were learning pattern recognition, we should start with pawn structures and build from that point.  Pawn patterns are easy to recognize and often control the course of the game.  The pawn structure is a key element in planning. &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Patterns exist in opening, middle game and endings.  However patterns are best learned in the endgame.  There are known results- win/loss/draw- with endgame patterns.  Think of an end game pattern as a “technique”.  When an author says: “The rest is a matter of technique.” He is saying that this is a well-known endgame pattern.  &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Studying endgames is done with patterns, and the student normally has to repeat the move sequence a number of times before the “pictures” of the pattern form.   When I began learning chess, I began with endgames.  I needed a partner in order to have some fun working the endgame from a given position until mate, over and over, until it was memorized.  Today, we have the computer as an opponent!  We can test our understanding of the endgame pattern against the computer, which never tires of repetition!&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;This leads us to transpositions.  Let’s look at transposing an opening.  When we&lt;br /&gt;are working to become expert in one opening, we may be able to play that opening with White only 20% of the time!  That means we may need five games to get one where we can use “our” opening.   (With Black, it gets easier; but I think that a White opening should be the first a player learns.)  Fortunately, on Chessmaniac we can challenge with either Black or White and practice our white opening in every game where the opponent does not take us astray.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Now, if I am an inexperienced player and have put some time and effort into learning an opening, I have probably subconsciously developed a pattern recognition of this opening, which becomes greater, deeper and clearer as I continue to play this one opening.  When this occurs, my win/loss ratio should improve; after all, my opponent is playing MY opening.  &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Now, in our opening, many transpositional possibilities may be seen.   This is a game currently in progress on Chessmaniac, #6349512:&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;White        Black&lt;br /&gt;1.  e4           e5&lt;br /&gt;2.  Nf3         Nc6.     Black envisions a Berlin defense or a Two Knights, but there are many openings possible from these two opening moves.&lt;br /&gt;3.   d4          …         White announces his preference: The Scotch Game.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;a href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/1-751198.png"&gt;&lt;img style="display:block; margin:0px auto 10px; text-align:center;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;" src="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/1-751174.png" border="0" alt="" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;3.  …          exd4.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;This same position exists in the Scotch, in the Two Knights, in The Italian Game, in the Four Knights, and others.&lt;br /&gt;4.   Bc4        …          This position exists in all the above openings, plus the Evans Gambit!  (It is déjà vu all over again! – Yogi Berra)&lt;br /&gt;4.   …          Nf6         Black prefers the Two Knights Defense and assays a transposition.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;a href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/2-784196.png"&gt;&lt;img style="display:block; margin:0px auto 10px; text-align:center;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;" src="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/2-784192.png" border="0" alt="" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;5.   e5          d5            Still, this same position exists in all of the above openings, except that Black has ruled out the Evans Gambit.&lt;br /&gt;6.   Bb5        Ne4&lt;br /&gt;7.   Nxd4      Bc5        Now, this is also a position found in the Berlin Defense.  So, we have a common position in the Scotch, the Two Knights, the Two Knights Defense, and The Berlin Defense.  &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;a href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/3-729654.png"&gt;&lt;img style="display:block; margin:0px auto 10px; text-align:center;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;" src="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/3-729651.png" border="0" alt="" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;8.   Be3        Bd7        This position rules out all but the Scotch Game.  White held to his opening of choice.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Voila!  The Scotch Game! Here is the position that may have guided White:&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;a href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/4-751929.png"&gt;&lt;img style="display:block; margin:0px auto 10px; text-align:center;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;" src="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/4-751926.png" border="0" alt="" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;White was expert in his opening, or Black could have taken the game into another opening.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Is it easier to memorize (mentally picture) the positions than to try to construct from the moves?  Would you find it easier to memorize all of the first eight moves of all seven of these openings shown above, or would it be easier to remember not more than three significant positions?  If you work from mental pictures of the position, you will see the possibilities from that position in the opening.  &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;The endgame requires pattern recognition.  If you aspire to Expert or Master status, it is essential to be able to recognize positions in the end game, even if you cannot do it well, yet, in the opening.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;When you know your opening well, you can steer a transformation into a favorable position.  Here is an opportunity seized in the early opening of game #6001387, on Gameknot:&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;White     Black&lt;br /&gt;1.  e4       c4&lt;br /&gt;2.  d4       cxd4&lt;br /&gt;3.  c3        …          The first three moves of the Morra Gambit.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;a href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/5-794680.png"&gt;&lt;img style="display:block; margin:0px auto 10px; text-align:center;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;" src="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/5-794672.png" border="0" alt="" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;3.  …        g6          The Morra declined.  Black is transposing “out of the Morra” into a more familiar Sicilian, perhaps with the Dragon variation in mind.  &lt;br /&gt;4.  cxd4    …           Now, after … Bg7, White will have a familiar variation of the Alapin Sicilian. &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;a href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/6-739067.png"&gt;&lt;img style="display:block; margin:0px auto 10px; text-align:center;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;" src="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/6-739035.png" border="0" alt="" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Black has transformed into this Sicilian, although he may not have had the Alapin in mind.    &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;In his book: *”The Chess Advantage in Black and White”, Larry Kaufman gives a sample of avoiding transpositions in the Semi-Slav defense.  Here are some of his observations:&lt;br /&gt;“The first decision for Black is whether to play … c6 or … e6 first.”  “Playing  … c6 first avoids the Catalan and the Marshall Gambit.”  “Playing …e6 first avoids the Slav Exchange; as well as an early e3 without Nc3.”  &lt;br /&gt;Next, he shows how to avoid Black transpositions in the first four moves.  Then, he shows the nine plausible move orders to reach the Semi-Slav.  He explains that there are only four rules to follow to avoid the Queens Gambit Exchange version that favors White, to avoid allowing White to develop his bishop to g5 without paying a price, etc.  By following his rules, you keep your opponent from transposing in this opening.  You get to play your opening, not your opponents opening.  I cannot show too much of the book without the permission of the author (Plagiarism).  You’ll have to either get his book or look at my Black games where my opponent plays 1. e4, 1. c4, or 1. Nf3.  You will find that some of my games are the Semi-Slav, where I instinctively follow Kaufman’s rules.   Here is the starting position of the Semi-Slav:&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;a href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/7-776689.png"&gt;&lt;img style="display:block; margin:0px auto 10px; text-align:center;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;" src="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/7-776678.png" border="0" alt="" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;A good exercise is to see if you can find the nine plausible ways of reaching this position.  Here is the most direct route, where white has no preference beyond playing a queenside opening:&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;White     Black&lt;br /&gt;1.  d4       d5&lt;br /&gt;2.  c4        e6&lt;br /&gt;3.  Nc3     c6&lt;br /&gt;4.  Nf3     Nf6&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Now, let’s look at the first five moves of a game where I played Black, and White evidently had a move order, not a position, in mind.  I will transpose into the Semi-Slav:&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;White      Black&lt;br /&gt;1.  c4         …          White seems to be trying for an English, or a Reti, or a Catalan.&lt;br /&gt;1.  …         e6          We’re headed in White’s direction.  Or are we?&lt;br /&gt;2.  Nf3       Nf6        White can still get his English or Catalan, but now we see the possibility that Black is playing for a Queen’s Indian.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;a href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/8-719648.png"&gt;&lt;img style="display:block; margin:0px auto 10px; text-align:center;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;" src="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/8-719545.png" border="0" alt="" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;3.  d4         …           The Catalan still looks OK, but now there is a hint of a Queens’ Gambit.&lt;br /&gt;3. …          d5           We now have a Queens Gambit Declined, but it could be a Ragozin variation, a Tartakower system, a Semi-Tarrash, an Orthodox, or even a Semi-Slav.&lt;br /&gt;4.  Nc3       c6            We have definitely transposed to a Semi-Slav!&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;(We have reached the same position by a different move order.  Our moves were in concert with White’s moves, keeping him from [perhaps] his specific desired opening.)&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;a href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/9-794767.png"&gt;&lt;img style="display:block; margin:0px auto 10px; text-align:center;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;" src="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/9-794762.png" border="0" alt="" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;The next moves were:&lt;br /&gt;5.  e3          Nbd7.      And, suddenly White is playing Blacks’ Game!&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;When your opponent opens d4, c4, or Nf3; and you want a Semi-Slav, this is the picture you should have on the first move.  Notice that if I wanted a Queens Indian, I could have played for that on the third move, or for a number of different Queen’s Gambits on the following moves.  As you play, you will see yourself taken into strange territory a number of times.  When you analyze the game afterward, look at the key positions and put the pictures you want in your head.  Just be careful not to put in the pictures into your head that you DON’T want to create on the board!  &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;I believe that players that move too quickly cannot get the pictures into their heads unless it is done in post-game analysis.  I always analyze every loss, to try to find where I can improve.  &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;*(In his book, Kaufman does not speak of transpositions directly, the book is basically his personal repertoire.  He simply avoids transpositions in order to play his preferred openings.)&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Next, I will offer some of my thoughts on Continuous Improvement. &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Transposingly,  Al  (alfredjwood)&lt;div class="blogger-post-footer"&gt;http://www.text-link-ads.com/xml_blogger.php?inventory_key=1RU9897F28IZR04WWKP8&amp;feed=1&lt;img width='1' height='1' src='https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/6286755-2462358249454442429?l=www.chessmaniac.com%2Findex.php' alt='' /&gt;&lt;/div&gt;</content><link rel='replies' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/2462358249454442429/comments/default' title='Post Comments'/><link rel='replies' type='text/html' href='https://www.blogger.com/comment.g?blogID=6286755&amp;postID=2462358249454442429' title='1 Comments'/><link rel='edit' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/posts/default/2462358249454442429'/><link rel='self' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/posts/default/2462358249454442429'/><link rel='alternate' type='text/html' href='http://www.chessmaniac.com/2008/10/transpositions.php' title='TRANSPOSITIONS!'/><author><name>ChessManiac.com Team Member</name><uri>http://www.blogger.com/profile/01328105597774582922</uri><email>[email protected]</email><gd:extendedProperty xmlns:gd='http://schemas.google.com/g/2005' name='OpenSocialUserId' value='15357420108677844176'/></author><thr:total>1</thr:total></entry><entry><id>tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-6286755.post-3218901820888923147</id><published>2008-09-30T23:15:00.000-07:00</published><updated>2008-09-30T23:45:13.196-07:00</updated><title type='text'>The Fragile King II, Caught in the middle!</title><content type='html'>Attacks against the castled king have some different criteria than attacks while the king is still in the center of the board.  First, in the castled position, a defense already exists and the mobility of the king is constrained.  However before he castles, the King may attain good mobility; and a moving target is always more difficult to hit.  Second, the opponent can mobilize pieces more quickly to the center than to one side of the board.  Third, &lt;a href="http://www.studentchess.net/"&gt;pawn structure&lt;/a&gt; differs in that the center is usually demolished when the successful attack begins.  Fourth, the attacker needs a greater force in the attack and that force must be centralized.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Let’s look at these things individually:&lt;br /&gt;First, the question of King mobility.  Here is a well-known position used in teaching endgame play:&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;a href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/1-783981.png"&gt;&lt;img style="display:block; margin:0px auto 10px; text-align:center;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;" src="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/1-783980.png" border="0" alt="" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Queen and knight are often enough to succeed against the king in the castled position.  Here, it is Black to move, he is in check and his mobility is limited to one square, h8;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;1.Kh8      Nf7+     Again, the king has only one square.&lt;br /&gt;2.Kg8      Nh6+    Again, only one square.&lt;br /&gt;3.Kh8      Qg8+    Again, there is only one move.&lt;br /&gt;4.Rxg8  Nf7++ &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;a href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/2-743306.png"&gt;&lt;img style="display:block; margin:0px auto 10px; text-align:center;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;" src="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/2-743304.png" border="0" alt="" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;I learned this as the Closed Coffin mate, 63 years ago.  It has been around for centuries. &lt;br /&gt;Common themes against a castled king also include &lt;a href="http://www.studentchess.net/"&gt;back rank mates&lt;/a&gt;, where the back rank is insufficiently defended and the mobility of the king is limited, and Queen and pawn mates against a fianchettoed position where the defending bishop is missing.         &lt;br /&gt;All of these themes can be successful when the mobility of the attacked king is limited.        &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;In the foregoing,  two &lt;a href="http://www.studentchess.net/"&gt;tactical maneuvers&lt;/a&gt; resulted in mate: Discovered double attack and smothering.  This is most easily accomplished in the corner of the board.  But, in the center it is usually different. We will examine this in a moment, but first let’s look at pawn structure.  &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;For an attack one either wing, the attacker must keep the defender from launching an attack in the center.  This means keeping the defender from getting control of the center.  For an attack on the center, however, it is most easily accomplished when the pawn center is demolished.  This happens mostly in open games.  &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Now. Let’s look at how a little King mobility can effect a center attack.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;a href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/3-773718.png"&gt;&lt;img style="display:block; margin:0px auto 10px; text-align:center;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;" src="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/3-773716.png" border="0" alt="" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;This is a common position in the Berlin defense.  White sees an opportunity to keep the Black king in the center of the board, where it can be localized and attacked, and where it will interfere with connecting rooks.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;6.   Bxc6     dxc6&lt;br /&gt;7.  dxe5      Nf5&lt;br /&gt;8.Qxd8+  Kxd8&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;a href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/4-746816.png"&gt;&lt;img style="display:block; margin:0px auto 10px; text-align:center;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;" src="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/4-746814.png" border="0" alt="" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Whites’ wish is granted.  The black king is in the middle of the board, and can never castle.  The target is fixed.  White’s rooks can seize the center files.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;But!  “Count who come for the broken meats before thou makest a feast.”  The black king is in a better position for the endgame and will gain mobility with the movement of the bishops, black has the bishop pair, and the potential attacking force is diminished with the absence of queens and the exchanged bishop.  With the attack against his center, Black must stabilize and then attack the White King.   &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;The game Socko (2577) vs Krasenkow (2609), played in Poland in 2004 came out of the opening in this position:&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;a href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/5-778682.png"&gt;&lt;img style="display:block; margin:0px auto 10px; text-align:center;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;" src="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/5-778681.png" border="0" alt="" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;White will now seize the open d-file with Rfd1.  White looks better, yet the game is a draw.  Black will restrict the white pieces with his pawns, there is no target at the end of the d-file, and blacks pieces firmly hold d6, d7 and d8.  Black will attack on the kingside with a rook already in position.  The game was drawn after 22 moves.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Let’s look at a successful attack and see the differences.  This is a demonstrative game between Roselli and Tereshchencho by correspondence in 1972:&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;This is the position after 10 moves:&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;a href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/6-709051.png"&gt;&lt;img style="display:block; margin:0px auto 10px; text-align:center;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;" src="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/6-709048.png" border="0" alt="" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;In this position, white has fully developed his pieces toward the center, his rooks can enter an attack quickly, blacks’ king cannot immediately castle, white may be able to hold him in the center – in front of the locomotive.  Blacks’ knight on e5 is the one piece in position for defense.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;11.  Bxe5          So much for the defender!&lt;br /&gt;11.  dxe5  Opening the file for the White rook.&lt;br /&gt;12.  Bb5+         Kf8&lt;br /&gt;13.  Rac1         seizing the c-file.&lt;br /&gt;13.  axb5 accepting the sacrifice.&lt;br /&gt;It’s not the number of pieces you have, it’s the force of the pieces in action!  (liberally translated from: “It ain’t the size of the dog in the fight, it’s the size of the fight in the dog!”)&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;a href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/7-743801.png"&gt;&lt;img style="display:block; margin:0px auto 10px; text-align:center;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;" src="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/7-743799.png" border="0" alt="" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt; &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;The attacking potential is now very apparent.  The c3 knight comes into range with a discovered attack, onto a protected square:&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;14.  Nxb5     Qa5&lt;br /&gt;15  Rc7!         …     White threatens Qc4.  Notice that white’s moves are with threats, keeping black from continuing development of his pieces.&lt;br /&gt;15  …         b6&lt;br /&gt;16.  Nxe5     f6        This may not be the best move, but there is no adequate move.  The game is already lost.&lt;br /&gt;17.  Rd8+   …         Let’s look at the position, Black to move:&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;a href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/8-773418.png"&gt;&lt;img style="display:block; margin:0px auto 10px; text-align:center;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;" src="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/8-773415.png" border="0" alt="" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;The black king has limited mobility, the black pieces cannot come to his aid, White has used the highway c and d files, and has more than enough power concentrated in the attack.  The end comes quickly:&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;      17.  …     Bxd8&lt;br /&gt;18.Rf7+ Ke8&lt;br /&gt;19.Nd6++&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Next, I hope to share some ideas on transpositions.   A note to commenters:&lt;br /&gt;Thank you, I sincerely appreciate your comments, concepts, and ideas.  Unfortunately, I cannot reply to some because I need either your Chessmaniac name, or your email address.  I am unable to locate you by any other name. &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Good chessing!  Al&lt;br /&gt;alfredjwood&lt;div class="blogger-post-footer"&gt;http://www.text-link-ads.com/xml_blogger.php?inventory_key=1RU9897F28IZR04WWKP8&amp;feed=1&lt;img width='1' height='1' src='https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/6286755-3218901820888923147?l=www.chessmaniac.com%2Findex.php' alt='' /&gt;&lt;/div&gt;</content><link rel='replies' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/3218901820888923147/comments/default' title='Post Comments'/><link rel='replies' type='text/html' href='https://www.blogger.com/comment.g?blogID=6286755&amp;postID=3218901820888923147' title='0 Comments'/><link rel='edit' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/posts/default/3218901820888923147'/><link rel='self' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/posts/default/3218901820888923147'/><link rel='alternate' type='text/html' href='http://www.chessmaniac.com/2008/09/fragile-king-ii-caught-in-middle.php' title='The Fragile King II, Caught in the middle!'/><author><name>ChessManiac.com Team Member</name><uri>http://www.blogger.com/profile/01328105597774582922</uri><email>[email protected]</email><gd:extendedProperty xmlns:gd='http://schemas.google.com/g/2005' name='OpenSocialUserId' value='15357420108677844176'/></author><thr:total>0</thr:total></entry><entry><id>tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-6286755.post-4651320390095072598</id><published>2008-09-15T11:46:00.000-07:00</published><updated>2008-09-16T13:45:06.779-07:00</updated><title type='text'>The Fragile King I</title><content type='html'>Today we can explore mating attempts earlier than traditional endgames, and (perhaps) see the features of the board that allow the mating attack to be successful and the features that make it unsuccessful.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;There are two clues that the pawns give us.  First, the pawns tell us on which side of the board an attack is most likely to succeed.  Let’s look at an early sign.  Here is the position in the Steinitz variation of the French defense after White’s fourth move:&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;a href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/article1-772255.png"&gt;&lt;img style="display:block; margin:0px auto 10px; text-align:center;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;" src="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/article1-772252.png" border="0" alt="" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;In this position the pawns tell us that White will more easily attack on the kingside, and Black will more easily attack on the queenside.  This is determined by the side toward which the pawns “point”.  Simply look at the advanced pawns in echelon and consider them a pointer.  &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;The second clue the pawns give us is control of the center.  In this position, white has more space, but neither side controls the center.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;The center is a major consideration in an attack on a wing.  An attack on either wing must be met by an attack on the center.  In this position, if white begins a Kingside attack, Blacks’ best defense is an attack!  If Black has withdrawn his f6 Knight to d7, the center attack begins with c5.  &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;In a tertiary role a pawn is a lever, often employed on the a-file or the h-file to dislodge a defender.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Let’s take a moment and look at the effectiveness of the outside pawn in this role.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;This is from game #6160217, on chessmaniac, a Morra Gambit Declined:&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;a onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}" href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/pictureParser2-758443.png"&gt;&lt;img style="display:block; margin:0px auto 10px; text-align:center;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;" src="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/pictureParser2-758439.png" border="0" alt="" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;The conditions are right for an attack on Blacks’ castled position.  The white pawn formation is right and the center can be held.   The h-pawn is poised and White’s pieces all aim at the Kingside.  The strongest defender of a castled position is the Knight.  Here, Black has his knight in position, for the attack to succeed, White needs to remove the knight.&lt;br /&gt;  &lt;br /&gt;      White     Black&lt;br /&gt;15.  Nd5 Nxd5  White plays to remove the best defender of the black kingside, and to strengthen the pawn center.  Often it can cost a rook, but in this case White can exchange for a knight.  The knight is stronger in defense than in offense, so White happily exchanges.&lt;br /&gt;16.  exd5 Nb8  The pawns now show the direction of attack clearly.&lt;br /&gt;17.  Nd4 a6  a5 may be better for Black.  Black needs counterplay, and the center cannot be easily attacked, so he will go for a queenside attack.&lt;br /&gt;18.  a4 a5  White plays to hold b5, Black creates a home for his Knight on b4.&lt;br /&gt;19.  Rfe1 Na6  White’s rooks will participate in the attack on the Black king, the Black Knight comes to his home.&lt;br /&gt;20.  Bh6 Bf6  Now, White moves to remove another defender.  Black wants to free his position by recapturing with the e7 pawn. &lt;br /&gt;21.  Re3 Qb6  White brings his rook into the attack, overprotecting b3 to allow the knight to attack.  Black brings his Queen into the game, putting pressure on the queenside.  &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;As Whites’ kingside attack jells, Black’s inability to stir up an attack on the center forces queenside play, creating a distraction on the queenside for White.  Space and time are on the side of White.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;a onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}" href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/3-712346.png"&gt;&lt;img style="display:block; margin:0px auto 10px; text-align:center;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;" src="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/3-712344.png" border="0" alt="" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;22.  Nb5 Nc5  Blacks’ knight reaches his best post.&lt;br /&gt;23.  Bc2 Bxb5  White again overprotects b3, Black plays to reduce Whites’ forces.&lt;br /&gt;24.  axb5 Be5  Black threatens Bf4.&lt;br /&gt;25.  h4 Ra8  The time is right for White’s attack, Black persists on the queenside.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;a href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/articles2-718872.png"&gt;&lt;img style="display:block; margin:0px auto 10px; text-align:center;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;" src="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/articles2-718869.png" border="0" alt="" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;26.  h5 a4  Both attacks continue.&lt;br /&gt;27.  Rf3       Nxb3           &lt;br /&gt;28.  Qg5      Nd4   Forking Bishop and Rook.&lt;br /&gt;29.  Rxf7 Bf6  The rest is straight forward.  The Black King is fragile.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;a href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/articles3-767387.png"&gt;&lt;img style="display:block; margin:0px auto 10px; text-align:center;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;" src="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/articles3-767377.png" border="0" alt="" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;30.  Qg4 Kxf7&lt;br /&gt;31.  Bxg6 Kg8&lt;br /&gt;32.  Bb1+ Kf7&lt;br /&gt;33.  Rxd4 e5&lt;br /&gt;34.  Qf5 Ke7&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;a onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}" href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/6-723737.png"&gt;&lt;img style="display:block; margin:0px auto 10px; text-align:center;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;" src="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/6-723735.png" border="0" alt="" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;35.  Rg4 Kd8&lt;br /&gt;36.  Qxf6+ Kc8&lt;br /&gt;37.  Qf7 Rd8&lt;br /&gt;38.  Rg7 a3&lt;br /&gt;39.  Be3 resigns&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;a href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/articlelast-783011.png"&gt;&lt;img style="display:block; margin:0px auto 10px; text-align:center;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;" src="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/articlelast-783007.png" border="0" alt="" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;The conditions for an attack on the King were right:  White was developed, the attack would go to the side on which White had strength and mobility, the primary defender could be removed, and White could bring enough force to the attack to assure success.  In “The Fragile King II” we will look at attacks with the enemy king in the center.  Al (alfredjwood)&lt;div class="blogger-post-footer"&gt;http://www.text-link-ads.com/xml_blogger.php?inventory_key=1RU9897F28IZR04WWKP8&amp;feed=1&lt;img width='1' height='1' src='https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/6286755-4651320390095072598?l=www.chessmaniac.com%2Findex.php' alt='' /&gt;&lt;/div&gt;</content><link rel='replies' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/4651320390095072598/comments/default' title='Post Comments'/><link rel='replies' type='text/html' href='https://www.blogger.com/comment.g?blogID=6286755&amp;postID=4651320390095072598' title='0 Comments'/><link rel='edit' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/posts/default/4651320390095072598'/><link rel='self' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/posts/default/4651320390095072598'/><link rel='alternate' type='text/html' href='http://www.chessmaniac.com/2008/09/fragile-king-i.php' title='The Fragile King I'/><author><name>ChessManiac.com Team Member</name><uri>http://www.blogger.com/profile/01328105597774582922</uri><email>[email protected]</email><gd:extendedProperty xmlns:gd='http://schemas.google.com/g/2005' name='OpenSocialUserId' value='15357420108677844176'/></author><thr:total>0</thr:total></entry><entry><id>tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-6286755.post-9005447612555280557</id><published>2008-09-13T03:14:00.000-07:00</published><updated>2008-09-13T03:24:32.551-07:00</updated><title type='text'>Chess Grandmaster Alexandra Kosteniuk Video Annotations</title><content type='html'>&lt;a onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}" href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/th_img_0302kosteniuk-757976-759899.jpg"&gt;&lt;img style="float:left; margin:0 10px 10px 0;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;" src="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/th_img_0302kosteniuk-757976-759897.jpg" border="0" alt="" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt;Alexandra Kosteniuk, an International Woman Grandmaster (WGM) (1998) and an International Master among men (IM) (2000). During the FIDE Congress in Calvia (2004) awarded the title of Grandmaster (Men), becoming the 10th woman in the whole history of chess to get this title. Kosteniuk is the Women's Vice Champion of the World, a title earned at the World Championships in Moscow in December 2001. Kosteniuk earned the European Champion 2004 and Russian Champion 2005.&lt;br /&gt;Born in the Russian city of Perm on April 23, 1984. In July 2003 she graduated from the Russian State Academy of Physical Education and now is a certified professional chess trainer. In 1994 she became the European Champion among girls under the age of 10, and a month later shared first and second places at the World Championship under the age of 10. &lt;a href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/2006/03/online-chess-interview-with_06.php"&gt;Read ChessManiac.com interview with Alexandra.&lt;/a&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Chess Grandmaster Alexandra Kosteniuk comments her rapid game from Mainz against GM Hracek.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;object width="425" height="349"&gt;&lt;param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/1MwzHpVS6QE&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1&amp;rel=0&amp;color1=0x234900&amp;color2=0x4e9e00&amp;border=1"&gt;&lt;/param&gt;&lt;param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"&gt;&lt;/param&gt;&lt;embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/1MwzHpVS6QE&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1&amp;rel=0&amp;color1=0x234900&amp;color2=0x4e9e00&amp;border=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" width="425" height="349"&gt;&lt;/embed&gt;&lt;/object&gt;&lt;div class="blogger-post-footer"&gt;http://www.text-link-ads.com/xml_blogger.php?inventory_key=1RU9897F28IZR04WWKP8&amp;feed=1&lt;img width='1' height='1' src='https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/6286755-9005447612555280557?l=www.chessmaniac.com%2Findex.php' alt='' /&gt;&lt;/div&gt;</content><link rel='replies' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/9005447612555280557/comments/default' title='Post Comments'/><link rel='replies' type='text/html' href='https://www.blogger.com/comment.g?blogID=6286755&amp;postID=9005447612555280557' title='0 Comments'/><link rel='edit' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/posts/default/9005447612555280557'/><link rel='self' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/posts/default/9005447612555280557'/><link rel='alternate' type='text/html' href='http://www.chessmaniac.com/2008/09/chess-grandmaster-alexandra-kosteniuk.php' title='Chess Grandmaster Alexandra Kosteniuk Video Annotations'/><author><name>ChessManiac.com Team Member</name><uri>http://www.blogger.com/profile/01328105597774582922</uri><email>[email protected]</email><gd:extendedProperty xmlns:gd='http://schemas.google.com/g/2005' name='OpenSocialUserId' value='15357420108677844176'/></author><thr:total>0</thr:total></entry><entry><id>tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-6286755.post-2851536561620472982</id><published>2008-09-12T05:04:00.000-07:00</published><updated>2008-09-12T05:11:09.976-07:00</updated><title type='text'>Hip Hop Chess Federation</title><content type='html'>Founded by award wining Lecturer and Author, Adisa Banjoko, the HHCF is dedicated to providing an inclusive setting for individuals to interact, play and develop life strategy skills with people they perceive as mentors.&lt;br /&gt;"Despite the school system's best efforts and intentions, and the efforts of overworked parents, the past generations have suffered from lack of suitable education and essential resources required for a successful life," states co-founder Adisa Banjoko. "We recognize that chess, martial arts and hip-hop unify people from multiple cultural, religious and social backgrounds. These black and white squares do not care what color you are or if you are rich or poor. The only thing they ask is that you come with your strategy, your patience and your skills..." &lt;a href="http://www.hiphopchessfederation.org/"&gt;Hip-Hop Chess Federation&lt;/a&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Learn about this great federation that is helping bring to chess to more people.&lt;br /&gt;UPCOMING - &lt;a href="http://hiphopchessfederation.org/files/kingsproposal072508.pdf"&gt;ANNUAL CHESS KINGS &amp; SCHOLARSHIP INVITATIONAL&lt;/a&gt;&lt;br /&gt;October 11, 2008&lt;br /&gt;Galleria @ The San Francisco Design Center&lt;br /&gt;&lt;object width="425" height="349"&gt;&lt;param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/FaELfzitz1U&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1&amp;rel=0&amp;color1=0x234900&amp;color2=0x4e9e00&amp;border=1"&gt;&lt;/param&gt;&lt;param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"&gt;&lt;/param&gt;&lt;embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/FaELfzitz1U&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1&amp;rel=0&amp;color1=0x234900&amp;color2=0x4e9e00&amp;border=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" width="425" height="349"&gt;&lt;/embed&gt;&lt;/object&gt;&lt;div class="blogger-post-footer"&gt;http://www.text-link-ads.com/xml_blogger.php?inventory_key=1RU9897F28IZR04WWKP8&amp;feed=1&lt;img width='1' height='1' src='https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/6286755-2851536561620472982?l=www.chessmaniac.com%2Findex.php' alt='' /&gt;&lt;/div&gt;</content><link rel='replies' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/2851536561620472982/comments/default' title='Post Comments'/><link rel='replies' type='text/html' href='https://www.blogger.com/comment.g?blogID=6286755&amp;postID=2851536561620472982' title='0 Comments'/><link rel='edit' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/posts/default/2851536561620472982'/><link rel='self' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/posts/default/2851536561620472982'/><link rel='alternate' type='text/html' href='http://www.chessmaniac.com/2008/09/hip-hop-chess-federation.php' title='Hip Hop Chess Federation'/><author><name>ChessManiac.com Team Member</name><uri>http://www.blogger.com/profile/01328105597774582922</uri><email>[email protected]</email><gd:extendedProperty xmlns:gd='http://schemas.google.com/g/2005' name='OpenSocialUserId' value='15357420108677844176'/></author><thr:total>0</thr:total></entry><entry><id>tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-6286755.post-4629830185988074737</id><published>2008-09-12T04:53:00.000-07:00</published><updated>2008-09-12T05:04:22.807-07:00</updated><title type='text'>Chess Mistakes Garry Kasparov</title><content type='html'>Former world chess champion and outspoken Kremlin critic Garry Kasparov called for a monument in honour of the journalist Anna Politkovskaya and draw attention to what they claimed was a lack of freedom of speech that led to her death.  This video is not about Anna but rather about making mistakes in chess.  &lt;br /&gt;&lt;object width="425" height="349"&gt;&lt;param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/B2KKfOGaR_w&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1&amp;rel=0&amp;color1=0x234900&amp;color2=0x4e9e00&amp;border=1"&gt;&lt;/param&gt;&lt;param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"&gt;&lt;/param&gt;&lt;embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/B2KKfOGaR_w&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1&amp;rel=0&amp;color1=0x234900&amp;color2=0x4e9e00&amp;border=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" width="425" height="349"&gt;&lt;/embed&gt;&lt;/object&gt;&lt;div class="blogger-post-footer"&gt;http://www.text-link-ads.com/xml_blogger.php?inventory_key=1RU9897F28IZR04WWKP8&amp;feed=1&lt;img width='1' height='1' src='https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/6286755-4629830185988074737?l=www.chessmaniac.com%2Findex.php' alt='' /&gt;&lt;/div&gt;</content><link rel='replies' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/4629830185988074737/comments/default' title='Post Comments'/><link rel='replies' type='text/html' href='https://www.blogger.com/comment.g?blogID=6286755&amp;postID=4629830185988074737' title='0 Comments'/><link rel='edit' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/posts/default/4629830185988074737'/><link rel='self' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/posts/default/4629830185988074737'/><link rel='alternate' type='text/html' href='http://www.chessmaniac.com/2008/09/chess-mistakes-garry-kasparov.php' title='Chess Mistakes Garry Kasparov'/><author><name>ChessManiac.com Team Member</name><uri>http://www.blogger.com/profile/01328105597774582922</uri><email>[email protected]</email><gd:extendedProperty xmlns:gd='http://schemas.google.com/g/2005' name='OpenSocialUserId' value='15357420108677844176'/></author><thr:total>0</thr:total></entry><entry><id>tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-6286755.post-2419962762295975114</id><published>2008-09-12T04:41:00.000-07:00</published><updated>2008-09-12T04:48:12.136-07:00</updated><title type='text'>On the wire D tries to teach chess to Wallace and Bodie...</title><content type='html'>As we continue our chess video exploration we found this interesting chess video.  D from the HBO series Wire is teaching Wallace and Bodie about chess and how it relates to their world around them. "One of television's most critically acclaimed programs, the Peabody Award-winning drama series 'The Wire' continues to challenge viewers with a "cop show" unlike anything on air." HBO.com &lt;br /&gt;&lt;object width="425" height="349"&gt;&lt;param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/whwawZ1YoOc&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1&amp;rel=0&amp;color1=0x234900&amp;color2=0x4e9e00&amp;border=1"&gt;&lt;/param&gt;&lt;param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"&gt;&lt;/param&gt;&lt;embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/whwawZ1YoOc&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1&amp;rel=0&amp;color1=0x234900&amp;color2=0x4e9e00&amp;border=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" width="425" height="349"&gt;&lt;/embed&gt;&lt;/object&gt;&lt;div class="blogger-post-footer"&gt;http://www.text-link-ads.com/xml_blogger.php?inventory_key=1RU9897F28IZR04WWKP8&amp;feed=1&lt;img width='1' height='1' src='https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/6286755-2419962762295975114?l=www.chessmaniac.com%2Findex.php' alt='' /&gt;&lt;/div&gt;</content><link rel='replies' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/2419962762295975114/comments/default' title='Post Comments'/><link rel='replies' type='text/html' href='https://www.blogger.com/comment.g?blogID=6286755&amp;postID=2419962762295975114' title='0 Comments'/><link rel='edit' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/posts/default/2419962762295975114'/><link rel='self' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/posts/default/2419962762295975114'/><link rel='alternate' type='text/html' href='http://www.chessmaniac.com/2008/09/on-wire-d-tries-to-teach-chess-to.php' title='On the wire D tries to teach chess to Wallace and Bodie...'/><author><name>ChessManiac.com Team Member</name><uri>http://www.blogger.com/profile/01328105597774582922</uri><email>[email protected]</email><gd:extendedProperty xmlns:gd='http://schemas.google.com/g/2005' name='OpenSocialUserId' value='15357420108677844176'/></author><thr:total>0</thr:total></entry><entry><id>tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-6286755.post-8329238841981966523</id><published>2008-09-12T04:21:00.000-07:00</published><updated>2008-09-12T04:33:16.025-07:00</updated><category scheme='http://www.blogger.com/atom/ns#' term='Chess'/><category scheme='http://www.blogger.com/atom/ns#' term='Physics'/><title type='text'>Richard Phillips Feynman Laws of Physics and the Rules of Chess</title><content type='html'>Richard Phillips Feynman May 11, 1918 – February 15, 1988 was an American physicist known for the path integral formulation of quantum mechanics, the theory of quantum electrodynamics, the physics of the superfluidity of supercooled liquid helium, as well as work in particle physics (the parton model was proposed by him). For his contributions to the development of quantum electrodynamics, Feynman was a joint recipient of the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1965, together with Julian Schwinger and Sin-Itiro Tomonaga. Feynman developed a widely-used pictorial representation scheme for the mathematical expressions governing the behavior of subatomic particles, which later became known as Feynman diagrams.&lt;br /&gt;He assisted in the development of the atomic bomb and was a member of the panel that investigated the Space Shuttle Challenger disaster. In addition to his work in theoretical physics, Feynman has been credited with pioneering the field of quantum computing, and introducing the concept of nanotechnology (creation of devices at the molecular scale). He held the Richard Chace Tolman professorship in theoretical physics at Caltech.&lt;br /&gt;Feynman was a keen popularizer of physics in both his books and lectures, notably a 1959 talk on top-down nanotechnology called There's Plenty of Room at the Bottom, and The Feynman Lectures on Physics. Feynman is also known for his semi-autobiographical books Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman! and What Do You Care What Other People Think?, and through books about him, such as Tuva or Bust! He was also known as a prankster, juggler, a proud amateur painter, and a bongo player. Richard Feynman was regarded as an eccentric and a free spirit. He liked to pursue multiple seemingly independent paths, such as biology, art, percussion, Maya hieroglyphs, and lock picking.&lt;br /&gt;Richard Feynman's interest in biology was more than casual. He was a friend of Esther Lederberg, the geneticist and microbiologist who developed replica plating and discovered bacteriophage lambda (though often others received credit for her work). It is not surprising that both these engaging people should be friends, as they also shared other scientists as friends. These included physicists in nuclear research who for moral reasons switched to genetics (such as Leó Szilárd, Guido Pontecorvo, Aaron Novick, and Carl Sagan).&lt;br /&gt;Freeman Dyson once wrote that Feynman was "half-genius, half-buffoon", but later revised this to "all-genius, all-buffoon".  During his lifetime and after his death, Feynman became one of the most publicly known scientists in the world.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;In this video he relates the laws of physics with the rules of chess.  Give it a watch you should find very interesting.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;object width="425" height="349"&gt;&lt;param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/o1dgrvlWML4&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1&amp;rel=0&amp;color1=0x234900&amp;color2=0x4e9e00&amp;border=1"&gt;&lt;/param&gt;&lt;param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"&gt;&lt;/param&gt;&lt;embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/o1dgrvlWML4&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1&amp;rel=0&amp;color1=0x234900&amp;color2=0x4e9e00&amp;border=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" width="425" height="349"&gt;&lt;/embed&gt;&lt;/object&gt;&lt;div class="blogger-post-footer"&gt;http://www.text-link-ads.com/xml_blogger.php?inventory_key=1RU9897F28IZR04WWKP8&amp;feed=1&lt;img width='1' height='1' src='https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/6286755-8329238841981966523?l=www.chessmaniac.com%2Findex.php' alt='' /&gt;&lt;/div&gt;</content><link rel='replies' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/8329238841981966523/comments/default' title='Post Comments'/><link rel='replies' type='text/html' href='https://www.blogger.com/comment.g?blogID=6286755&amp;postID=8329238841981966523' title='0 Comments'/><link rel='edit' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/posts/default/8329238841981966523'/><link rel='self' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/posts/default/8329238841981966523'/><link rel='alternate' type='text/html' href='http://www.chessmaniac.com/2008/09/richard-phillips-feynman-may-11-1918.php' title='Richard Phillips Feynman Laws of Physics and the Rules of Chess'/><author><name>ChessManiac.com Team Member</name><uri>http://www.blogger.com/profile/01328105597774582922</uri><email>[email protected]</email><gd:extendedProperty xmlns:gd='http://schemas.google.com/g/2005' name='OpenSocialUserId' value='15357420108677844176'/></author><thr:total>0</thr:total></entry><entry><id>tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-6286755.post-7262312657844205737</id><published>2008-09-09T11:30:00.000-07:00</published><updated>2008-09-09T11:37:06.183-07:00</updated><category scheme='http://www.blogger.com/atom/ns#' term='Chess'/><category scheme='http://www.blogger.com/atom/ns#' term='Bobby Fischer'/><title type='text'>Bobby Fischer - ANYTHING to WIN The Mad Genius Of Bobby Fischer</title><content type='html'>Part 1&lt;br&gt;&lt;object width="425" height="344"&gt;&lt;param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/4o2o3In3g3U&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1"&gt;&lt;/param&gt;&lt;param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"&gt;&lt;/param&gt;&lt;embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/4o2o3In3g3U&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" width="425" height="344"&gt;&lt;/embed&gt;&lt;/object&gt;&lt;br&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Part 2&lt;br&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;object width="425" height="344"&gt;&lt;param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/yEKDPXAkKFc&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1"&gt;&lt;/param&gt;&lt;param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"&gt;&lt;/param&gt;&lt;embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/yEKDPXAkKFc&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" width="425" height="344"&gt;&lt;/embed&gt;&lt;/object&gt;&lt;br&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Part 3&lt;br&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;object width="425" height="344"&gt;&lt;param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/DUI2JoxWNeA&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1"&gt;&lt;/param&gt;&lt;param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"&gt;&lt;/param&gt;&lt;embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/DUI2JoxWNeA&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" width="425" height="344"&gt;&lt;/embed&gt;&lt;/object&gt;&lt;br&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Part 4&lt;br&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;object width="425" height="344"&gt;&lt;param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/pSfAP_E7yDc&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1"&gt;&lt;/param&gt;&lt;param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"&gt;&lt;/param&gt;&lt;embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/pSfAP_E7yDc&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" width="425" height="344"&gt;&lt;/embed&gt;&lt;/object&gt;&lt;br&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Part 5&lt;br&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;object width="425" height="344"&gt;&lt;param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/HLFDBJVZzS8&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1"&gt;&lt;/param&gt;&lt;param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"&gt;&lt;/param&gt;&lt;embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/HLFDBJVZzS8&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" width="425" height="344"&gt;&lt;/embed&gt;&lt;/object&gt;&lt;br&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Part 6&lt;br&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;object width="425" height="344"&gt;&lt;param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/UYXu617lkIw&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1"&gt;&lt;/param&gt;&lt;param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"&gt;&lt;/param&gt;&lt;embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/UYXu617lkIw&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" width="425" height="344"&gt;&lt;/embed&gt;&lt;/object&gt;&lt;div class="blogger-post-footer"&gt;http://www.text-link-ads.com/xml_blogger.php?inventory_key=1RU9897F28IZR04WWKP8&amp;feed=1&lt;img width='1' height='1' src='https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/6286755-7262312657844205737?l=www.chessmaniac.com%2Findex.php' alt='' /&gt;&lt;/div&gt;</content><link rel='replies' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/7262312657844205737/comments/default' title='Post Comments'/><link rel='replies' type='text/html' href='https://www.blogger.com/comment.g?blogID=6286755&amp;postID=7262312657844205737' title='0 Comments'/><link rel='edit' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/posts/default/7262312657844205737'/><link rel='self' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/posts/default/7262312657844205737'/><link rel='alternate' type='text/html' href='http://www.chessmaniac.com/2008/09/bobby-fischer-anything-to-win-mad.php' title='Bobby Fischer - ANYTHING to WIN The Mad Genius Of Bobby Fischer'/><author><name>ChessManiac.com Team Member</name><uri>http://www.blogger.com/profile/01328105597774582922</uri><email>[email protected]</email><gd:extendedProperty xmlns:gd='http://schemas.google.com/g/2005' name='OpenSocialUserId' value='15357420108677844176'/></author><thr:total>0</thr:total></entry><entry><id>tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-6286755.post-6070783648304578986</id><published>2008-08-25T17:25:00.000-07:00</published><updated>2008-08-25T17:36:45.344-07:00</updated><title type='text'>Things I have learned (By an old woodpusher)</title><content type='html'>&lt;a onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}" href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/al-716789-780457.jpg"&gt;&lt;img style="float:left; margin:0 10px 10px 0;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;" src="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/al-716789-780452.jpg" border="0" alt="" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt;Every Chess player has a story that explains his/her game.   My story can be expressed in things that I have learned about the game, and about the player.  There are no pictures or diagrams this time, my friends, just thoughts.  &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Here are some of the things that I learned since I began playing chess in 1943.  I have only played on the internet for a few years, so I have had new things to learn.  Feel free to disagree, but please tell me of your disagreement.  No two people see things exactly the same way, and I am sincerely interested in your thoughts.  You can send your thoughts to me by using the “comments” option, which appears after this article, near the bottom of this page.&lt;br /&gt; &lt;br /&gt;1.I learned to respect every opponent, as a person and as a worthy player.  I believe that courtesy is essential in engaging another person.  I consider every opponent as my equal.  I believe that by maintaining this respect, I will play my best game.  If I were to believe myself to be a superior player, I may take the game too lightly and subconsciously misposition my pieces; my game may become more reckless.  If I believe myself to be inferior to my opponent, I may play overcautiously, perhaps over-defensively, perhaps fearfully, missing more of the best moves.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;2.I learned that it is best to play by position, not by move.  The moves themselves can keep a player from seeing transpositions.  From the existing position, One can then create the aspired position.  I then try to see what my opponent is trying to create. The position-creating moves may take many more moves in the actual game as I, or my opponent, create obstacles or opportunities.  When it appears I may be drawn down another path, I believe it is important to determine if it is beneficial to me or if it is detrimental; when it seems detrimental I strive to find and remedy the potential flaw.  I believe that anyone’s greatest strength is their power of choice.  As much as we may prefer already known paths, we owe it to our game to choose our path wisely.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;3.I learned to strictly control my game load.  I do not think as quickly as when I was young, I need to focus and concentrate.  I am not a blitz player and I can no longer play and hope to win simultaneous games against strong opponents. (Can you?) Over the board, I have only one game on which to apply all of my skill and talent; in correspondence I have to divide my attention among several games, and to play a game I need to put all other games aside and internalize that single game.  I do this by a routine:  On each move of every correspondence game, I start from a previous move and scrutinize each of these previous moves, as if the game were completed and I was doing an in-depth analysis.  I believe that a big reason players in internet matches make wrong moves is that they are playing too many games and can’t remember the order or intentions of their previous moves, and they save all analysis for post-game.  I am also amazed at how many players lose games to time-out!  I’m sure that many time outs can be attributed to a game load that consumes too much time.  (In this regard:  Earlier this month my computer cable went down and I lost two important games to time-out before the cable came back.  I have a daughter and a daughter in-law who live in a different geographical area than I.  I spoke to both and asked them to put me on vacation on both sites should I lose electrical power or computer cable.  Toward this end, I emailed them instructions on how to access my account on each site.  I gave them my passwords to enter the account for the purpose of putting me on vacation.  I don’t want to lose more interesting games that I am enjoying because of nature, illness, act of god, or war.)  I believe we should enjoy and explore the positions, as if each were the only thing there is to do for the next ten or fifteen minutes.  Think of it as visiting a picture gallery: we must pause and appreciate each picture before moving on.  A player cannot improve when he does not learn from his games.  I analyze every game I do not win.  I look for commonalities in my losing games.  They are usually difficult to find, but they are there.  If they had been obvious I would not have made them, therefore they will be a challenge to find.  When I find a losing idea that I have been playing, I seek a better idea and experience a jump in performance, which I can see within six to ten games following the discovery!  I believe it is important for the enjoyment of the game to savor every move and every position, and to give my opponent my best moves.  Every time.  When I fail to do so, I fail myself.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;4.I believe I must always have an objective, and a plan to achieve it.  One of the things I hear regularly from players is that they enter a part of the game where they are suddenly unsure of what to do.  The time to plan is when there is no plan!  When you feel lost, ask yourself: “What am I trying to do?”  If there is no answer ask another question: “What should I be trying to do?”  The two things that seem to prevail at this time are absence of the initiative and decreased self-confidence.  I learned to value the initiative, and to play to gain it and play to retain it.  That is not to demean those stronger players who have wrested it from me! Sometimes the initiative seems to have evaporated, and when it does confidence can suddenly drop. The times I seemed to lose the initiative were times when I was blindly following a single objective without weighing it against what I was trading for it.  I learned that I could trade tit for tat, or for something else, perhaps something that was not visible to my opponent!  Chess is a game of trade: Trade, not give away.  I could and can interchangeably trade material, time, and space.  Time is the stuff the initiative is made of!  It is given away by unnecessary moves or by relaxing pressure. Purely preventive moves often yield tempo to the opponent.  Keeping some pressure on your opponent makes his game more interesting and encourages error.  The position itself beckons certain moves, such as a piece to a home, or to an outpost, or constraining an enemy piece, or giving a piece more space; but getting these things done takes time (moves).  I ask myself if pressure can be maintained by or during these moves.  I ask if the initiative can be maintained as the position is being altered.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;5.I learned that the position changes with every move!  I believe I must work to fully observe the position.  First, because all blunders are caused by lack of positional observation - better observation reduces blunders. ("The blunders are all there on the board, waiting to be made.")  Second, I know my own plan and intentions, but I must learn my opponents’ probable intentions, I must try to see the game from his perspective.  There is plenty of time “on the clock” in correspondence chess to look at the position several times, I learned to look at it four times on each half-move, until it became habit.  At first, I didn’t have this luxury in over the board games, where the clock sometimes hastened my move.  Once it became habit, however, I was able to do it very quickly and accurately.  Practice does not make perfect, practice makes permanent!  Only perfect practice makes perfect. And, Habit makes permanent!  And, The position changes with every move!  &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;6.I believe in always playing the best move I can find.  Even if I am far ahead, I play the best move, not just a winning move.  I believe: “When you see a good move, look for a better one.”&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;7.I learned to “Play” my opponents move!  It’s a natural consequence of considering his possible responses to a move I am about to make.  After I have made my move, I mentally “turn the board around” and  explore his probable move!  I believe it helps me to learn how he thinks when his actual move differs from the move I believed he would play.  It also shows up flaws in my move.  I learn from those times when my opponent deviates from what I perceived as best for him.  I try to understand why he played the move he did, rather than the move I believe to be best for him.   (I believe that if you do not currently do this, you can improve your game quickly by doing it for every move for just six complete games.)  I look at my opponents’ previous games before moving in my first game against him, to gain a sense of his preferences.  I then forecast his opening moves, based on these past games.  Sometimes his opening tells me that he has prepared for my expected opening.  Playing the actual moves repetitiously helps memory.  When my opponent moves, my memory clicks in most of the time and I either ‘smile’ when I have predicted it correctly, or I begin analyzing the reason he selected that particular move. &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;8.   Perhaps my most intense belief is that what holds a player back is simply some mental habit he has formed that is firmly implanted, and that is counter-productive.  Some of the non-productive and counter-productive things learned early stick with a player.  It is far easier to form a beneficial thought about the game than it is to change a habit of thought that has built up over time.  An inexperienced teacher or coach can unwittingly load the mind of a beginning player with thoughts that will limit growth.  I seek continuous improvement, and develop the thinking that facilitates continuous growth.  As I age, I feel the great effort required to alter habits of thinking.  I know that continuous change is necessary; life is change, anything living is constantly changing.  When we stop changing, we stop living.  The one observation that I believe is beneficial to share with any and everyone is that feedback is the essential to beneficial change.  (“Feedback is the breakfast of Champions.”)  When a player tells me that he knows what his problem is, I doubt it.  Introspection alone will probably not result in a correct finding; it takes feedback.  It seems absurd for a person to tell a doctor what medication to prescribe, yet that same person believes that he knows the medicine for his own chess development.  I believe that prescription without diagnosis is malpractice, we all need someone or something that willingly gives us feedback on our performance and our state of mind.  &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;9. I believe I must focus on staying disciplined.  There is no hurry, and we should do the things we know to be right, not the things that are easiest or the things that we “intuitively” know.  That is not to say that we should desert our intuition.  But we should consider it with all information on hand.  I play intuitive sacs, and intuitive combinations, but in correspondence, I still try them out on the practice board before the actual move.  I stayed with one opening until I know it at least eight moves in every variation.  Some of my stronger opponents will verify that I know our opening more than fifteen moves in the game I played against them.  This requires self-discipline and may seem to others that it keeps the fun out of the game, at first.  But, after we have learned a single opening well, as opposed to several or many openings that are only superficially known, the games are far more rewarding!  One great benefit is a deviation from a known line by my opponent.  That is a signal to study his intent, to learn if he has erred or found a new line.  I usually conclude that he has simply missed the move and I take time to learn how to take advantage of the misposition.  I believe in solving chess puzzles before playing games each day.  It may seem to be a downer or unnecessary delay, to those players rushing to get into their game; but solving problems before playing chess is like a physical warm up before an athletic competition. Where the physical calesthenics loosen and prepare our muscles, so working a problem prepares our mind.    &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;10.I believe that a player learns more, better and more quickly, playing over-the-board than playing on the net for three reasons:  First, as mentioned above, the one game is the only thing in the players’ life at that time; all of his talent and ability are directed to that one board.  Second, playing over the board, he watches his opponent think and move, then chooses his move, then thinks of what his opponents’ best move should be.  He can also observe the opponents’ neuro-linguistics, the ‘body language’.  He is totally immersed in that game.  Third, he kibitzes when others play.  The kibitzer normally sits at the side of the board and has a different view of the game; he anticipates each move!  He thinks of the right move for each player, not just the right move for one of them!  Kibitzers often see potentials and possibilities that one or both players miss.  These advantages are lost in correspondence chess, where we can only kibitz when the game ends.  I believe that it is important to find ways to keep these advantages alive in our games.  This is the prime reason that I set my games up on an actual board (even though I have good screen pictures.)  "All obvious moves look dubious in analysis after the game" - Korchnoi&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;I enjoy sitting for ten or fifteen minutes just focusing on one game and one move!  I reset the game and the position in my mind and treat it as a subject of analysis; as if it were the game of another player and I was critiquing it.  I have found that when I am rushed or pressured, I tend to make inferior moves.  “Move in haste, repent in leisure.”&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;There are other things that make up my beliefs, but these ten are those that are foremost in my mind.  Learning the game from the standpoint of pieces and moves can create a future plateau that can only be overcome by “forgetting” the things that hold players back. &lt;br /&gt;  &lt;br /&gt;On another subject: Please help me with feedback.  How many of these thoughts do you agree with?  Which ones seem most doubtful?  Can you think of one or more that I have missed that would benefit others?   Could I have worded one or more of these better, so it would be easier to understand or appreciate?  I will answer every communication I receive.  Al&lt;div class="blogger-post-footer"&gt;http://www.text-link-ads.com/xml_blogger.php?inventory_key=1RU9897F28IZR04WWKP8&amp;feed=1&lt;img width='1' height='1' src='https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/6286755-6070783648304578986?l=www.chessmaniac.com%2Findex.php' alt='' /&gt;&lt;/div&gt;</content><link rel='replies' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/6070783648304578986/comments/default' title='Post Comments'/><link rel='replies' type='text/html' href='https://www.blogger.com/comment.g?blogID=6286755&amp;postID=6070783648304578986' title='6 Comments'/><link rel='edit' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/posts/default/6070783648304578986'/><link rel='self' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/posts/default/6070783648304578986'/><link rel='alternate' type='text/html' href='http://www.chessmaniac.com/2008/08/things-i-have-learned-by-old-woodpusher.php' title='Things I have learned (By an old woodpusher)'/><author><name>ChessManiac.com Team Member</name><uri>http://www.blogger.com/profile/01328105597774582922</uri><email>[email protected]</email><gd:extendedProperty xmlns:gd='http://schemas.google.com/g/2005' name='OpenSocialUserId' value='15357420108677844176'/></author><thr:total>6</thr:total></entry><entry><id>tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-6286755.post-4659682871878765048</id><published>2008-08-06T08:46:00.000-07:00</published><updated>2008-08-06T12:17:01.020-07:00</updated><category scheme='http://www.blogger.com/atom/ns#' term='Chess News'/><category scheme='http://www.blogger.com/atom/ns#' term='Online Chess'/><category scheme='http://www.blogger.com/atom/ns#' term='Chess'/><category scheme='http://www.blogger.com/atom/ns#' term='play chess'/><category scheme='http://www.blogger.com/atom/ns#' term='Chess Openings'/><category scheme='http://www.blogger.com/atom/ns#' term='Chess Tactics'/><title type='text'>OVERLOOKING TACTICAL POTENTIAL AND POSSIBILITIES IN CHESS</title><content type='html'>Teichmann said that the Game of Chess is 90% tactics.  The middle game is rife with &lt;a href="http://www.studentchess.net/"&gt;tactical opportunities&lt;/a&gt; which only one player sees! The middle game is where observation becomes most important, where the player sees the potentials and possibilities overlooked by his opponent.  Tactical moves and combinations are even overlooked  by strong players as well as average players.  When more than one tactical move is made in the same series, it becomes a combination.  We must see the tactic before we can see the combination. &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;In the following examples, we will benefit from setting the position on a board, and examining our ability to see the potential and derive the tactics.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Some &lt;a href="http://www.studentchess.net/"&gt;combinations&lt;/a&gt; are simply the use of the same tactic more than once in the series.  Here is an example of a simple combination played by a young man against one of the strongest chessplayers in the world!&lt;br /&gt; &lt;br /&gt;&lt;a onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}" href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/1-775996.png"&gt;&lt;img style="display:block; margin:0px auto 10px; text-align:center;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;" src="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/1-775994.png" border="0" alt="" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;White to move.  Observe: The black queen and rook are on the same color.   White cannot take advantage with a knight fork, however, because the forking square (c5) is protected with a pawn.  If the Black King were on d7, the pawn would be pinned.  The White Queen, however, can fork the Black King and rook from c4, and the king cannot save the rook by moving to d7, because the protecting pawn is pinned!  So the combination is straight forward.  However it requires the observation right now, not in the postgame analysis!!  Black must see this on the previous move, he did not.  And, Black was one of the strongest Grandmasters in the world!  His youthful opponent, named Michael, does see it!!  Here are the moves he made:&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;1.  Qc4+ … This fork leaves black only one move to protect his rook.  It results in a self-pin:    &lt;br /&gt;1.  …  Kd4 Now, the defending pawn cannot capture. This move which ‘saves’ the rook also loses the Queen!&lt;br /&gt;2.  Nc5+ Resigns.  This second fork wins the queen.  The knight cannot be captured because the pawn is pinned.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Three tactics in two moves: fork, pin, fork.  You could see as much as Tal saw, if you looked at the board and not at the pieces.  Tals’ opponent, Konstantin Klaman, a Grand Master, and one of the strongest players in the world, did not fully observe the position!  Yet, you will observe it in any game you play; if you take your time and observe it now!!  Don’t just look at it.  Don’t just make the moves.  Do not look for moves!  Look for piece positioning.  Look at the board, and the placement of the pieces thereon.  Then, look for critical squares.  You should see the square that beckons to the knight, you should see the square that beckons to the queen.  When you see a good move, keep your hand off of the piece and find a better move!  You should see the immediate Queen fork, which also pins the pawn!!  You should see the problem you must solve, the neutralization of the pawn on d6!  Note that no pin is possible on the pawn from a diagonal because all squares available and leading to it on diagonals are protected.  Now, see that an attack on the rook may lure the king to the file, where the pawn will be pinned, and your opponent may not see the possibility.   Note that pieces can only be forked by a knight when they are on squares of the same color.  Also note that the defender may actually move his king into the pin!  Let’s look at how you can help your opponent walk into a pin:&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;This is from the game #6145807 here on Chessmaniac.  I played Black, my opponent is my friend Mark, playing as Boogiepants.  Here is the position after 21 moves: &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;a onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}" href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/2-728158.png"&gt;&lt;img style="display:block; margin:0px auto 10px; text-align:center;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;" src="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/2-728156.png" border="0" alt="" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;White to play.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Observe:&lt;br /&gt;1.Black’s position relative to white:  &lt;br /&gt;Black has a backward pawn on the half-open c-file (c6), which is a prime target for White!   Blacks’ rooks are both posted offensively on files that harbor white backward pawns.  Blacks’ bishop is on a good diagonal and, supported by the Black Queen, key squares are in his line of fire:  c1, d2, e3, f4!  The a-file is open and portends a rook confrontation, but one of the Black rooks is temporarily blocked from that file by the backward pawn on c6.  The h-file is also open, but only one of Black’s rooks can utilize it at the moment.  Black is currently vulnerable to a back-rank threat.&lt;br /&gt;2.White’s position relative to black:&lt;br /&gt;Whites’ rooks are connected. But they are both defending backward pawns!  His pawn weaknesses include: two backward pawns on half opened files, d3 and f3, an isolated pawn on b2, and doubled pawns on the g-file.  His King and Queen are on the same line (Second rank!) His knight has limited mobility!  His isolated pawn is protected only by his Queen!  Whites’ Queen is vulnerable to overload, she is currently needed to protect the b and d pawns.  His knight blocks the Black Queens’ attack on b2.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Reasoning (Open the door in the back of my head and walk inside for a moment – Al):&lt;br /&gt;Knights are strong in defensive mode.  Bishops and rooks are strong in offensive modes.  The imbalance in the position is that Black has the Bishop vs. White’s Knight.  The knight is the piece that can replace a white rook in defense of a backward or isolated pawn.  If the pawns can be protected by Queen and Knight, the White rooks can double on an open file!  Opening the pawn position is dangerous for White, but he can use an open file, if he can free up his rooks.  &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;22.  Nb1      b4!  The knight is restrained, he has only one square available, and he will block his queen from the b-pawn at that one square!  White probably envisions b3, Nd2, Nc4, which will improve the position of the knight.  But the knight is subject to pin on d2, so it must make the maneuver before Black can adequately respond.  However, the knight is now blocking the rook access to the a-file!  Better for White may have been f4 now, attacking on the kingside, opening the board with a latent hope of getting king or queen off of the second rank, bringing the knight to the kingside, and playing to get Black on the defensive..&lt;br /&gt;23.  b3           Ra8     This seems to be loss of a tempo. White did not need to move the b2 pawn, it is as weak on b3 as it is on b2.  The kingside attack was still available.  White can try to exchange Queens, attempting to reposition the Black Queen to support the kingside attack.   &lt;br /&gt;24.  Nd2        Ra2    The Knight is pinned. Moving the Knight results in disaster. Whites’ d-pawn loses one defender; the defending rook is blocked!  &lt;br /&gt;25.  Rh1         Qc3    Attacking the pinned knight and holding a rook to the defense!&lt;br /&gt;26.  f4            …     This is probably best.  The game continues with White attempting to find play on the Kingside.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;The position has changed dramatically!  Black has a strong attack, and Whites’ pieces have limited scope and mobility.  White’s pawn weaknesses are being exploited.   &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Sometimes both players see the tactic, but only one sees the combination!!  This is from ERNST-LOOSE, Hamburg, 1946. Black to move:&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;a onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}" href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/3-726990.png"&gt;&lt;img style="display:block; margin:0px auto 10px; text-align:center;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;" src="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/3-726987.png" border="0" alt="" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Black to move.&lt;br /&gt;Observe!:  There is a potential fork, which Black sees as winning. &lt;br /&gt;1.  …    Rxb2 Removing support of the white knight, to be followed by Bxc3, pinning the White Queen.  &lt;br /&gt;2.  Qxb2 Bxc3+  Did you see this as the reason for Black playing Rxb2?&lt;br /&gt;3.  Bd2! … Interposing a counter-pin!  Black missed this move, maybe White saw the position one move further!.&lt;br /&gt;3.  …              Resigns.  &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;A combination sometimes arises when an obstruction must be removed.  Here is a case in point:&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;a onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}" href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/4-702857.png"&gt;&lt;img style="display:block; margin:0px auto 10px; text-align:center;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;" src="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/4-702853.png" border="0" alt="" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt;&lt;br /&gt; &lt;br /&gt;White to move.&lt;br /&gt;Observe:  White sees that if it were not for the blocking pawn on b7 he would mate with Ra8++.  This results in a four-move, forcing combination, removing the pawn from b7 and mating without giving Black any discretionary moves:&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;1.  Nc7+ Ka7     Forced.&lt;br /&gt;2.  Qxa6+ bxa6 Forced.  The queen “sacrifice” removes the pawn from b7!&lt;br /&gt;3.  Nb5+ Ka8 Forced.  This discovery returns to the starting position minus the blocking pawn!&lt;br /&gt;4.  Ra7++                    Voila!&lt;br /&gt;  &lt;br /&gt; What can we, Chessmaniac players, not being Grandmasters, hope to see on the board?&lt;br /&gt;Actually we can see as much as anyone, if we train ourselves to look at the board and not at the pieces.  Here is an example from a game I played in 2006, as Black:  The opening was a Queens Indian.  This is the position after White has made his 26th move:&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;a onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}" href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/5-790995.png"&gt;&lt;img style="display:block; margin:0px auto 10px; text-align:center;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;" src="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/5-790994.png" border="0" alt="" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Black to move.&lt;br /&gt;Observe:  The White queen cannot easily get to the defense of the kingside. She can serve best by attacking from the queenside or exchanging for the opposing queen.  If black needs more force in the attack, it can only come from the c file rook, which must enter by way of the 4th or 5th rank.  The rook cannot leave the 8th rank, however, as long as the White queen is attacking the e1 rook.  The queen will have to be deflected to keep her from the kingside and to allow the c rook to attack.  The white queen is currently unprotected, if not for the white bishop on c3, Black could capture Nxf6 and the white bishop on e4 would be pinned.  However, now the c3 bishop could capture Bxe5, attacking the queen and if Qxe5 the pin is gone and Bxf3 is possible.  The rook cannot take c3 to eliminate that possibility until the diagonal is blocked.  &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;The way is clear, first before moving the knight, which currently guards b5, we must block the queen’s attack on the rook.  The attack will deflect her from the fourth rank.  Then the knight can begin the attack:&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt; 26.  … b5! The beginning of a long combination.   First, the queen will move from the fourth rank.  (First tactic, piece deflection.)&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;27.  Qxa5 Nxf3 (Second tactic, Discovered attack.)&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;28.  Bxf3 Qg5+ (Third tactic, Zwischenzug.)&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;29.  Kh3 Bxc3 (Fourth tactic, Fork.)  The reason for the zwischenzug now becomes apparent: b5 is defended!&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;30.  Qb6 Rc4 If Qxb5 had been permitted, this move would not be possible.&lt;br /&gt;White resigns.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;This combination was made possible by one inaccuracy by White.  The deflection,  26. b5 makes little sense unless the player sees the tactical potential.  &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Many tactical opportunities are lost because of lack of observation.  To improve our own powers of observation, we begin by observing each new position on the board.  Whenever a piece moves, we have a new position!  Keep in mind that whenever we play, we and our opponent both miss possibilities due to a form of ‘blindness.”  &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Here is what Tony miles said of one of his games:  “I thought I was playing the World Champion, not some 27-eyed monster who sees everything in all positions.”  First,  we must become a two-eyed monster, then we keep increasing our vision until Tony can say that about each of us!  &lt;br /&gt;Al&lt;br /&gt;.  &lt;br /&gt;Play &lt;a href="http://www.chessmaniac.com"&gt;Online Chess&lt;/a&gt; Now!&lt;div class="blogger-post-footer"&gt;http://www.text-link-ads.com/xml_blogger.php?inventory_key=1RU9897F28IZR04WWKP8&amp;feed=1&lt;img width='1' height='1' src='https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/6286755-4659682871878765048?l=www.chessmaniac.com%2Findex.php' alt='' /&gt;&lt;/div&gt;</content><link rel='replies' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/4659682871878765048/comments/default' title='Post Comments'/><link rel='replies' type='text/html' href='https://www.blogger.com/comment.g?blogID=6286755&amp;postID=4659682871878765048' title='0 Comments'/><link rel='edit' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/posts/default/4659682871878765048'/><link rel='self' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/posts/default/4659682871878765048'/><link rel='alternate' type='text/html' href='http://www.chessmaniac.com/2008/08/overlooking-tactical-potential-and.php' title='OVERLOOKING TACTICAL POTENTIAL AND POSSIBILITIES IN CHESS'/><author><name>ChessManiac.com Team Member</name><uri>http://www.blogger.com/profile/01328105597774582922</uri><email>[email protected]</email><gd:extendedProperty xmlns:gd='http://schemas.google.com/g/2005' name='OpenSocialUserId' value='15357420108677844176'/></author><thr:total>0</thr:total></entry><entry><id>tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-6286755.post-2174409119223894167</id><published>2008-07-10T22:51:00.000-07:00</published><updated>2008-07-18T23:05:45.785-07:00</updated><category scheme='http://www.blogger.com/atom/ns#' term='Chess News'/><category scheme='http://www.blogger.com/atom/ns#' term='Playing Chess'/><category scheme='http://www.blogger.com/atom/ns#' term='Online Chess'/><category scheme='http://www.blogger.com/atom/ns#' term='Chess'/><category scheme='http://www.blogger.com/atom/ns#' term='free chess'/><category scheme='http://www.blogger.com/atom/ns#' term='play chess'/><category scheme='http://www.blogger.com/atom/ns#' term='Chess Openings'/><category scheme='http://www.blogger.com/atom/ns#' term='Chess Tactics'/><title type='text'>Queen Hunt</title><content type='html'>&lt;a onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}" href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/al-716790.jpg"&gt;&lt;img style="float:left; margin:0 10px 10px 0;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;" src="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/al-716789.jpg" border="0" alt="" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt;In my games on &lt;a href="http://www.chessmaniac.com"&gt;ChessManiac.com&lt;/a&gt;, I have been engaged in four Queen Hunts in just the past two months.  I want to show how players give up their queens in hopes that this will be useful to ChessManiac.com players.   &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;One of these games is the most interesting game that I have played in years.  In this game BOTH of the players were on a queen hunt!  My opponent was my Aussie friend, Gasparking.  Here is the description of these simultaneous hunts:&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Chessmaniac Game #6013336, &lt;br /&gt;Gasparking vs. alfredjwood&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;White  Black&lt;br /&gt;1.   d4  d5&lt;br /&gt;2.   c4  e6&lt;br /&gt;3.   a3  … Best here is probably 3. Nc3; White seems concerned with preventing Blacks occupation of b4.  However, this ‘preventive’ move concedes Black a tempo.&lt;br /&gt;3.   …  c6 The usual move is Nf6, but Black hesitated to make that move before White played Nf3.  Two other moves, however, are both better: c5 or Nd7.  (Given the position again, I would play Nd7.  Al) As a result of the next few moves, an unusual pawn structure creates an unusual game.   &lt;br /&gt;4.   c5  … Preparation for a queenside attack.  &lt;br /&gt;4.   …  e5 beginning an attack on the center.&lt;br /&gt;5.   e3  Be6   This is in contravention of Capablancas’ advice to capture with the Kings Pawn at every opportunity.  (This is the first time I remember ignoring that advice.  I was over-concerned with getting my Queens Knight into play without blocking in the Bishop. Al)  These two (c6 and Be6) mispositions were instrumental in the pawn formation developed.&lt;br /&gt;6.   Nc3 Nd7 Still ignoring the pawn capture.&lt;br /&gt;7.   b4   … Preparing the queenside attack.&lt;br /&gt;7.   …  g6 The Kings Knight needs e7, so the bishop will have to come out via the fianchetto.&lt;br /&gt;8.   Bd3 e4 Now, the pawns are locked!&lt;br /&gt;9.   Be2 … &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;a onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}" href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/pic1-782546.png"&gt;&lt;img style="display:block; margin:0px auto 10px; text-align:center;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;" src="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/pic1-782545.png" border="0" alt="" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Here is the point at which planning is essential.  Looking at the board, the diagonal pawn lock is the dominant feature.  White has control of the Queenside.  His pieces will experience difficulty in getting to the Kingside.  Black has control of the Kingside, his pieces will have difficulty in getting to the Queenside.  In the absence of levers, only a sacrifice will open any of the central files. White must attack on the a- and b- files, creating a pass on the seventh and eighth ranks thru which he can flow to the Kingside.  Black must attack on the f-, g- and h- files.  Both sides must strike at the opponents pawn base (f2 and b7).  Until some lines are opened, the bad White  Bishop and the Rooks will be virtually unusable.  &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;9.    …  Bg7&lt;br /&gt;10.  Bg4 … This move exchanges whites good bishop; it also provokes Black’s next move.&lt;br /&gt;10.  …  Qg5 &lt;br /&gt;11.  Bxe6 Qxg2&lt;br /&gt;12.  Bxd7 Kxd7&lt;br /&gt;13.  h3  Qxh1&lt;br /&gt;14.  Kf1 …  The Black Queen has no escape square!  Black has won the exchange and a pawn, but his queen is now consigned to inactivity.  He must get some help to her.  Both kings are out of position, White’s King should have been castled to the Queenside, and Black’s King should be in a protected position on the Kingside.  &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;14.  …  Ne7&lt;br /&gt;15.  Qg4+ …  &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;a onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}" href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/pic2-741584.png"&gt;&lt;img style="display:block; margin:0px auto 10px; text-align:center;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;" src="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/pic2-741576.png" border="0" alt="" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;White has his queen in play, and the Black King is alone in the middle of the board.  Whites problem is in getting help to his Queen.  Meanwhile, the Black Queen is still in jail.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;15.  …  Nf5 Although this move appears to be defensive; the Knight is on his way to rescue the maiden from the tower.  &lt;br /&gt;16.  Qf4 … Visions of sugarplums dance in her head.  White transitions to a queen sortie!  He sees Qd6.  However, the Black Queen cannot be interned indefinitely, White needs to get the Queens Knight into the attack on the Black Queen: Ne7-g6.&lt;br /&gt;16.  …  h5 Now the hunt for the White Queen gets underway.&lt;br /&gt;17.  b5  … White begins the Queenside attack, belatedly.  He may have too many goals now: nullifying the Black Queen, preserving his own Queen, and attacking on the other side of the board.  The queenside attack and rescue of his own Queen may be seen as a single effort, but not enough time exists to also attack the enemy Queen because the free Knight is the only piece available for the job.   &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;17.  …  Bh6&lt;br /&gt;18.  Qe5   … This is the only square available to the Queen!  Both Queens are being hunted, but the pressure is lessening on the Black Queen.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;a onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}" href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/pic3-782786.png"&gt;&lt;img style="display:block; margin:0px auto 10px; text-align:center;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;" src="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/pic3-782784.png" border="0" alt="" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;18.  …  Rae8&lt;br /&gt;19.  Qf6 Rhf8   The door slams shut on the Queen.&lt;br /&gt;20.  Nxe5 … Banzai!  The gallant knight rides to the rescue, but it simply delays the inevitable.&lt;br /&gt;20.  …  cxd5&lt;br /&gt;21.  c6+ Kc7&lt;br /&gt;22.  Bd2 … Can White wriggle out?&lt;br /&gt;22.  …  Re6 Another door slams shut!&lt;br /&gt;23.  b6+ axb6&lt;br /&gt;24.  Qxe6 Ng3+!&lt;br /&gt;25.  fxg3 fxe6+&lt;br /&gt;26.  Ke2 Qg2+ The former prisoner is now the attacker.  White resigned.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Many Queen hunts begin early in the game, when the Queen comes down the board too early.  I liken the Queen to an aircraft carrier.  She is the most powerful weapon in the fleet.  When the aircraft carrier goes into enemy waters, she always goes with escorts!  Destroyer escorts engage enemy forces targeting the carrier.  The queen, too, needs the protection of the minor pieces when she sallies forth.  Here are the first moves of a recent game on &lt;a href="http://www.chessmaniac.com"&gt;ChessManiac.com&lt;/a&gt;, where the Queen comes out too soon, and escorts are left in port:&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;White  Black&lt;br /&gt;1.   e4  e6&lt;br /&gt;2.   d4  Qh4 There are many good moves for Black, 2. …  d5 is the most frequently played, but this Queen sortie is a major mistake.  White begins the hunt, now, on only the third move of the game!  &lt;br /&gt;3.   Nf3 Qxe4+  &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;a onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}" href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/pic4-787102.png"&gt;&lt;img style="display:block; margin:0px auto 10px; text-align:center;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;" src="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/pic4-787100.png" border="0" alt="" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;This is what Black wanted from the sortie; a pawn with check and with a possible attack on the rook.  But White has a knight on the field, and now a bishop will come into play.&lt;br /&gt;4.   Be2 f6 &lt;br /&gt;5.   Nc3 Qg4&lt;br /&gt;6.   0-0  Bd6&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;a onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}" href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/pic5-727205.png"&gt;&lt;img style="display:block; margin:0px auto 10px; text-align:center;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;" src="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/pic5-727193.png" border="0" alt="" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;At last, the Black escort appears; but it is already too late.  White’s pieces control the field of play.  The Black Queen moves that are used to capture a pawn and to evade capture result in a great advantage in development for White, because of tempo gain.&lt;br /&gt;7.   Ng5 Qh4&lt;br /&gt;8.   g3  Qh6 The lady is running out of space.&lt;br /&gt;9.   Bh5 g6&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;a onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}" href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/pic6-771659.png"&gt;&lt;img style="display:block; margin:0px auto 10px; text-align:center;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;" src="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/pic6-771657.png" border="0" alt="" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;The Queen is lost.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;10. Nxe6 dxe6&lt;br /&gt;11. Bxh6  &lt;br /&gt;White loses two minor pieces in the skirmish, but ends up with the Queen and a winning position.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Sometimes the Queen hunt begins deep in the middle game; and sometimes saving the queen requires giving up material, space and time!  Here is an excerpt from another recent &lt;a href="http://www.chessmaniac.com"&gt;ChessManiac.com&lt;/a&gt; game, this is the position after move 26:&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;a onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}" href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/pic7-706441.png"&gt;&lt;img style="display:block; margin:0px auto 10px; text-align:center;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;" src="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/pic7-706434.png" border="0" alt="" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;White  Black&lt;br /&gt;27.  Rh4 … White attacks.  But d6 needs more protection, or the queen needs some escape.&lt;br /&gt;27.  …  Bd3&lt;br /&gt;28.  Bc2 Rfd8 Blacks rooks support an attack on the queen by supporting c6, c7 and d6   &lt;br /&gt;29.  Bxd3 Nxd3 &lt;br /&gt;White can temporarily save the queen by giving up a rook and allowing a strong attack by white by playing 29. … Rxd3, but he goes down swinging:&lt;br /&gt;30.  Rg3? Rc1+&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;a onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}" href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/pic8-749716.png"&gt;&lt;img style="display:block; margin:0px auto 10px; text-align:center;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;" src="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/pic8-749714.png" border="0" alt="" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;The Queen is lost.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Today’s moral is: Treat your Queen with loving care, or she will elope with your rival!  And be alert for a trapping opportunity if Her Majesty is separated from her escort; The Queen hunt forces the opponent to focus on saving the Queen, and you can exact tribute, in the form of development, tempo and sometimes material, for any attempted rescue.  Al&lt;div class="blogger-post-footer"&gt;http://www.text-link-ads.com/xml_blogger.php?inventory_key=1RU9897F28IZR04WWKP8&amp;feed=1&lt;img width='1' height='1' src='https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/6286755-2174409119223894167?l=www.chessmaniac.com%2Findex.php' alt='' /&gt;&lt;/div&gt;</content><link rel='replies' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/2174409119223894167/comments/default' title='Post Comments'/><link rel='replies' type='text/html' href='https://www.blogger.com/comment.g?blogID=6286755&amp;postID=2174409119223894167' title='1 Comments'/><link rel='edit' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/posts/default/2174409119223894167'/><link rel='self' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/posts/default/2174409119223894167'/><link rel='alternate' type='text/html' href='http://www.chessmaniac.com/2008/07/queen-hunt.php' title='Queen Hunt'/><author><name>ChessManiac.com Team Member</name><uri>http://www.blogger.com/profile/01328105597774582922</uri><email>[email protected]</email><gd:extendedProperty xmlns:gd='http://schemas.google.com/g/2005' name='OpenSocialUserId' value='15357420108677844176'/></author><thr:total>1</thr:total></entry><entry><id>tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-6286755.post-2105978066778779987</id><published>2008-07-09T10:38:00.000-07:00</published><updated>2008-07-13T07:37:55.848-07:00</updated><title type='text'>Ron Paul March On July 12th Is Ron Paul's Next Chess Move</title><content type='html'>The Ron Paul movement is making their next chess move.  After playing a rather quiet opening the movement is revealing that it has $4.7 million in power from donations received during the primaries.  MTV will be covering the &lt;a href="http://www.revolutionmarch.com/"&gt;Ron Paul March&lt;/a&gt; and Aimee Allen will attend.  She recently released the Ron Paul Anthem video...&lt;br /&gt; &lt;br /&gt;&lt;object width="425" height="344"&gt;&lt;param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/QiKh9Ko3mw4&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1"&gt;&lt;/param&gt;&lt;param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"&gt;&lt;/param&gt;&lt;embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/QiKh9Ko3mw4&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" width="425" height="344"&gt;&lt;/embed&gt;&lt;/object&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;As written on 12/07...&lt;br /&gt;&lt;span style="font-style:italic;"&gt;&lt;a href="http://www.ronpaul2008.com"&gt;Ron Paul&lt;/a&gt; a political underdog has been gaining support across the country.  Paul's political chess opening is compared to that of the "Giuoco Piano" which is Italian for "quiet game" or the Giuoco Pianissimo which is Italian for "quietest game"&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Paul favors a slow strategical grass roots battle by gradually building up tactical opportunities which explodes later into the political middle game and finally winning the endgame.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Paul aims for a slow buildup deferring his major thrust until it can be prepared. By avoiding an immediate confrontation in the center Paul prevents the early release of tension with a solid consistent message of liberty and freedom. Entering a political positional maneuvering middle game which could propel him to the Republican nomination and finally President of the United States.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;According to James Buchanan, "if this were a chess game, the Neoncons have just put our king in check."&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;The Neocons are against Ron Paul's foreign policy of non intervention.  Neocons favor empire and nation building rather than freedom and acceptance.  &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;span style="font-style:italic;"&gt;"Neocons believe that the United States should not be ashamed to use its unrivaled power – forcefully if necessary – to promote its values around the world. Some even speak of the need to cultivate a US empire. Neoconservatives believe modern threats facing the US can no longer be reliably contained and therefore must be prevented, sometimes through preemptive military action." &lt;/span&gt;&lt;a href="http://www.csmonitor.com/specials/neocon/neocon101.html"&gt;The Christan Science Monitor.&lt;/a&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Beating the Neocons at their chess game will be a hard battle for the Ron Paul campaign.  However, at this time his internet popularity is growing exponentially. He has raised almost 20 million dollars in the 4th quarter which gives him the needed funds to wage the battle to the endgame. He has received more donations from active duty military than any other candidate running including democrats.  His meet ups across the country out number other candidates(&lt;a href="http://www.infiniteronpaul.com/meetupmaps/"&gt;see meet up maps&lt;/a&gt;).  This is not just a campaign it is a movement that has traction.  Ron Paul states that he is a champion of the constitution.&lt;/span&gt;  &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;object width="425" height="344"&gt;&lt;param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/kOBsXHxzwKw&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1"&gt;&lt;/param&gt;&lt;param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"&gt;&lt;/param&gt;&lt;embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/kOBsXHxzwKw&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" width="425" height="344"&gt;&lt;/embed&gt;&lt;/object&gt;&lt;div class="blogger-post-footer"&gt;http://www.text-link-ads.com/xml_blogger.php?inventory_key=1RU9897F28IZR04WWKP8&amp;feed=1&lt;img width='1' height='1' src='https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/6286755-2105978066778779987?l=www.chessmaniac.com%2Findex.php' alt='' /&gt;&lt;/div&gt;</content><link rel='replies' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/2105978066778779987/comments/default' title='Post Comments'/><link rel='replies' type='text/html' href='https://www.blogger.com/comment.g?blogID=6286755&amp;postID=2105978066778779987' title='0 Comments'/><link rel='edit' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/posts/default/2105978066778779987'/><link rel='self' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/posts/default/2105978066778779987'/><link rel='alternate' type='text/html' href='http://www.chessmaniac.com/2008/07/ron-paul-march-on-july-12th-is-ron.php' title='Ron Paul March On July 12th Is Ron Paul&apos;s Next Chess Move'/><author><name>ChessManiac.com Team Member</name><uri>http://www.blogger.com/profile/01328105597774582922</uri><email>[email protected]</email><gd:extendedProperty xmlns:gd='http://schemas.google.com/g/2005' name='OpenSocialUserId' value='15357420108677844176'/></author><thr:total>0</thr:total></entry><entry><id>tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-6286755.post-4004079231325200551</id><published>2008-06-16T11:11:00.000-07:00</published><updated>2008-06-17T00:30:48.264-07:00</updated><category scheme='http://www.blogger.com/atom/ns#' term='Planning in Chess'/><category scheme='http://www.blogger.com/atom/ns#' term='Chess News'/><category scheme='http://www.blogger.com/atom/ns#' term='Playing Chess'/><category scheme='http://www.blogger.com/atom/ns#' term='Online Chess'/><category scheme='http://www.blogger.com/atom/ns#' term='Chess'/><category scheme='http://www.blogger.com/atom/ns#' term='Chess Openings'/><category scheme='http://www.blogger.com/atom/ns#' term='Chess Tactics'/><title type='text'>The Ideal Square In Chess</title><content type='html'>In his book; &lt;a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0938650777?ie=UTF8&amp;tag=chessmaniacco-20&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=0938650777"&gt;Guide to Good Chess: First Steps to Fine Points (Purdy Series)&lt;/a&gt;&lt;img src="http://www.assoc-amazon.com/e/ir?t=chessmaniacco-20&amp;l=as2&amp;o=1&amp;a=0938650777" width="1" height="1" border="0" alt="" style="border:none !important; margin:0px !important;" /&gt;, J.S. Purdy offers four points for placing a piece on it’s “ideal square” in the opening: &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;1.The piece can go there in one move.  Quick development is important.  The first object of development is to clear your back line in as few moves as possible so you can get your rooks active.  “The absurdity of these huge pieces locked away in corners never seems to strike the average player.”&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;2.The piece will be effectively posted there.  “Effectively” initially  means the piece will be bearing on the center, directly or indirectly. &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;3.The piece will not suffer from exposure.  The most common exposure is moving your queen out too early.  Generally move the queen only one square, to free the rooks.  Generally, move the rooks to open files, or files likely to be opened, but keep them on the back rank in the opening.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;4.The piece will not unduly obstruct any of its own forces.  The most common example of this is  playing d3 (…d6) before developing the f bishop and to avoid playing  e3 (…e6) before developing the c bishop. It is usually wise to reserve c3 and f3 for the knights. &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Purdy says that #3 is the most important.  Exposed pieces on the chessboard allow the other side to attack those pieces while developing his own.  Moves are used up protecting and retreating the exposed piece.   &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Here is an example of the third point in relation to the queen:&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;White  Black&lt;br /&gt;1.  e4  e5&lt;br /&gt;2.  Qh5  …  This is in violation of  point 3.  It is played by beginners, who envision a fast attack.  They envision 2.g6 and the fork Qxe5+, winning a rook; and so they begin this attack on f7. &lt;br /&gt;3.  …  Nc3  This is the antidote.  Black secures e5.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;a onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}" href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/pic1-796217.png"&gt;&lt;img style="float:center; margin:0 10px 10px 0;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;" src="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/pic1-796215.png" border="0" alt="" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;4.  Bc4  …  Persisting in the attack on f7.&lt;br /&gt;4.   …              g6  Now this move is effective, the Queen cannot take e5.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;a onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}" href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/pic2-762353.png"&gt;&lt;img style="float:center; margin:0 10px 10px 0;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;" src="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/pic2-762351.png" border="0" alt="" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;5.  Qf3            …  Still persisting on an “attack” on f7, White occupies f3 with his queen, denying the square to his knight!.  He is now violating point four.&lt;br /&gt;5.  …  Nf6  Blocking the Queen, developing a piece, preparing for castling, attacking e4 and supporting d5.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;a onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}" href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/pic3-710600.png"&gt;&lt;img style="float:center; margin:0 10px 10px 0;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;" src="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/pic3-710596.png" border="0" alt="" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;In five moves, Black has taken over.  He has the initiative and a better position on the chessboard.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;In this position, White cannot develop the Kings Knight to it’s best square (f3) without using an extra tempo.  His center is under attack.  Black is developing in accordance with points 1 and 2.   Here we see White occupying the wrong square with his queen.  Meanwhile, Black is occupying the ideal squares with his pieces.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Players encounter difficulties when they play randomly in the opening.  The chess opening determines the later game, you don’t want to go into the middle or end game in poor positions.  The problem is compounded when inexperienced players ‘try’ new chess openings.&lt;br /&gt;They begin building a bad habit of never playing an opening often enough to fully understand it.  Ideally, a player should play only one opening for a consecutive hundred games or so.  In that time that player will learn many things, including:&lt;br /&gt;1.What middle game and end games does this opening lead to?  Are they satisfactory for me?&lt;br /&gt;2.What is the defense played most often against this opening.  Is this satisfactory, or should I avoid it?  &lt;br /&gt;3.What ‘chess traps’ exist in this chess opening?  Are they favorable to me?&lt;br /&gt;4.How difficult is it to learn all of the lines I may play against using this chess opening?&lt;br /&gt;5.Can this chess opening be easily thwarted?  If it is thwarted can I, or need I transform?  &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;When playing the chosen opening with the White pieces, It will take many chess games in order to grasp the flow of the game.  First, a player should not try an opening with the thought of ‘winning’ with it!  Remember, you are learning and you will make errors.  The number of errors you make is unimportant.  What is important is MAKING EACH ERROR ONLY ONCE!  Learn from your mistakes.  In time, you will be familiar with every error that could be made, and you will no longer make them.  You will be on your way to becoming expert in that opening.  To find your glaring errors, simply analyze each game you lose.  To find smaller errors, get someone to analyze the game for you!  &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;I suggest picking only one chess opening to play with White.  Observe the chessboard closely on every move of that opening, the chess opening is like a puppy; it will do strange things from time to time – but you must accept ownership of it.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;The problem will be handling all of the most probable defenses.  As you play your opening, you will encounter and learn them all.  FIND THE ONE THAT GIVES YOU THE MOST TROUBLE AND STUDY IT!   Make this opening the first opening you play with Black, and play it with black at every opportunity.  You may see ways of improving your game with White when you play against it, and you will have a synergistic situation.   &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;As an example, if you chose 1. e4 because you enjoy tactical play, (and there are fewer difficult lines than with d4/Nc3/c4;) you will need to know how to play against a number of different responses.  At first, you need only look at two major responses (which you may find in 80% of your games!  They are e5 and c5.  There are many good chess openings you can play after 1. e4  e5, so you should pick an objective:  Perhaps the &lt;a href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/2007/10/ruy-lopez-chess-opening.php"&gt;Ruy Lopez&lt;/a&gt; (Spanish Game), or the &lt;a href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/2006/04/logical-online-chess-for-beginner.php"&gt;Giuoco Piano&lt;/a&gt;, or a gambit.  &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;However, after 1. e4  c5 you will face the &lt;a href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/2006/01/sicilian-defence.php"&gt;Sicilian Defense&lt;/a&gt;.  You must have a plan for that contingency.  I chose the &lt;a href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/2008/03/in-online-chess-you-must-plan-your-play_24.php"&gt;Morra Gambit&lt;/a&gt; because it avoided all of the deep analysis of other lines, and it gave me the open, tactical game I enjoyed.  &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;The defense that gave me the most difficulty when I began was the &lt;a href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/2008/04/importance-of-initiative-in-chess.php"&gt;Berlin Defense&lt;/a&gt;.  I made the Berlin my Black defense against e4. (If you can’t beat ‘em, join ‘em).  As I played it my White game improved, as I played the Ruy against the Berlin, my black game improved.  The Berlin can transform into the &lt;a href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/2007/06/art-of-attack-on-chessmaniac-1.php"&gt;Two Knights&lt;/a&gt; in some cases.  Since the Two Knights is a very effective defense against the Giuoco, I took this as my second defense against e4.    &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;This is the way a successful repertoire is built, not by trying out the latest fads, but by persisting in improving your existing opening.  You can be a jack of all and master of none, or you can be an expert at the few you will need.   I always recommend that a player firm his white opening before looking at any black opening.  Here on &lt;a href="http://www.chessmaniac.com"&gt;Chessmaniac&lt;/a&gt;, you can look for regular games where you only play white.  Later, when your white opening is such that you can keep the most favorable lines for more than five moves, you can just play Black for a while with your chosen Black opening.  In all, your starting repertoire should consist of one white opening and two black openings, one against e4 and one against d4/c4/Nf3.  &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;My repertoire began with only three openings, one playing white and two playing black. I recommend the method.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Persistence is the great conqueror.  At first, you learn the opening for five to eight moves in all major variations, then you begin to learn deeper.  I can go ten to fifteen moves with familiarity in my openings. A Master may go twenty or more moves with familiarity of all variations and deviations to that point.  I cannot do it with EVERY opening!  Only with MY openings.  Don’t play a different chess opening just because Anand wins with it.  You are NOT Anand!   He doesn’t win because he has a superior opening.  He wins because he is Anand.     &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Case in point:  Bogolyubov famously said: “I win with White because I am White.  I win with Black because I am Bogolyubov!”&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Your confidence will increase as you win with YOUR opening.  Do not be discouraged by your early losses when trying your opening.  Losses are normal with unfamiliar material.  Your winning percentage will increase as the depth of knowledge of your opening increases.   There is a natural tendency to abandon an opening because of poor results; the poor results are not because of the opening, they are because of habits that you have that you must overcome.  Do you think that great bowlers kept changing lanes in order to score better?  Do you think that they kept changing balls?  Or, do you think they threw their share of gutter balls at first, and gradually picked up some spares and strikes as they built their habits.  It is practice that builds skill.  You can master nothing without practice.  Babe Ruth struck out more than 3000 times, but he never stopped swinging. &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;In general, I have learned these things about openings:&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;1.It is best to get a pawn into the center in order to begin control of the center and to open lines by providing one of the bishops and the queen good lines on which to come into play.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;2.A second pawn will need to be moved somewhere in the opening, in order to get the second bishop into play, but it can usually wait until the knights are developed.  Avoid too many pawn moves; pawn move effect future positions.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;3.The knights usually belong on f3/f6 and c3/c6.  If you develop the protecting knight, or attacking knight when a pawn is in the center, you may save tempo.  Keep the knights off the edge of the board; “a knight on the rim is dim.”&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;4.The first three pieces developed are normally the knights and the king’s bishop.  &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;5.Remember that once a pawn is moved, it cannot go back.  The pawns are initially needed for protection of the planned kings position, for preparing to control the center, and for clearing lines for the line-going pieces (particularly the rooks.)  Also consider their positioning for an endgame.  It’s easy for a pawn to be moved to a bad square, one that hurts your position. &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;6.In the opening, rooks remain on the rear rank.  It is important to connect them by getting the other pieces out of their way.  The rooks will go to an open file, so be patient until you know which files are likely to open; you want to avoid moving a rook twice to get it on the right file.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;7.In general, the queen should only be developed to the second rank in the opening.  Taking her downfield too soon can result in losses of tempo and sometimes material.  e2 and c2 are the squares that are normally friendly to the queen and give her some range. &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;8.When you select an opening, note which pieces are important to the position that will be reached, and what the pawn structure should look like.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;9.Every tactical opportunity should be considered in light of the value of the pieces in that opening.  As you gain experience in an opening you will see the traps and the combinations that come from the positioning of pieces and pawns.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;10.The greatest value in knowing the opening better than the opponent is that your opponent may trade a valuable piece that he will need later for attack or defense.  You will not make that mistake.  He may place a pawn in a position that hinders his later play.  You will not make that mistake, either.  &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;11.I think of the beginning of the middle game as the real opening.  I see the opening as an opportunity to position pawns and pieces for a strong tactical middle game.  When you know your opening really well, you can visualize the position that will transit to the middle game.  &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;12.You may still be in your opening when your opponent gets into his middle game.  You are out of the opening when a deviation from your known lines occurs.  At first, this can happen on the second , third, or fourth move!  As you learn the opening through the eighth move in all variations, your opponent may run out of opening on the fourth move and must now begin a middle game.  Obviously, it is better to know what is happening than to it is to wonder what is happening.   REMEMBER: When you do not know the next move in an opening, you are then in the middle game! &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;13.When you know your opening, you will expect certain moves by your opponent.  When the opponent deviates from your expectation, you must pause and see if it is a solid line or if he has made an error.  Even a slight mispositioning can create later difficulties.  A deviation from expectation is an alarm!  Take time considering your response.  Most deviations in the opening result in inaccurate positioning.  &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;14.Keep in mind that there are three elements in the opening, as in the body of the game: Material Force, Time (tempo), and Space.  Do not give up any part of these three without good compensation.   &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Here is an illustrative example of a middle game position reached from a given opening.  Examine the Force, the Time, and the Space of the two sides.  These were gained or relinquished in the opening.  This is a &lt;a href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/2006/01/unrivaled-performances-by-paul-morphy_15.php"&gt;Morphy&lt;/a&gt; variation of the Ruy Lopez.  Here is the position after White’s sixteenth move:&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;a onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}" href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/pic4-701001.png"&gt;&lt;img style="display:block; margin:0px auto 10px; text-align:center;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;" src="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/pic4-700998.png" border="0" alt="" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Do you think that both players are happy with their positions?&lt;br /&gt;Do you feel that White is comfortable and may have foreseen this position?&lt;br /&gt;Do you feel that Black is comfortable and may have foreseen this middlegame position?&lt;br /&gt;Material is almost even, White has an extra pawn.&lt;br /&gt;White has more space.  His pawns do not block his bishop and there are holes in blacks pawn structure that will allow white’s bishop great mobility.  &lt;br /&gt;The Black bishop is restricted by the White pawns and the black piece placement.&lt;br /&gt;There is only one open file, and Black has a rook at the base. Whites rooks can more easily bring their combined force onto a single file.   &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Here is the rest of the game, if you have an interest.  The middle game is very short. So is the endgame.:&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;16. …  Nd7   Heading to e5?&lt;br /&gt;17. Bg5 … Attacking the Black rook on d8, who is a virtual prisoner of his own pieces, he has less space than any of his pawns.  His value would be negligible, if the file were not so important.  &lt;br /&gt;17  …  Nf6 Back to his previous square, entering a self-pin in order to block the bishops’ diagonal.&lt;br /&gt;18. c4  h6&lt;br /&gt;19. Bd2 Nd7 The knight movement has created tempo for White, who already has the initiative, the space and the force advantages.&lt;br /&gt;20. Bc3 Ne5 At last, the knight reaches his desired square.&lt;br /&gt;21. Red1 Nxd3 Certainly Black needs to reduce the power directed at his position.  Ideally, the knight would rather be traded for White’s bishop; but the bishop is too mobile to be caught by the knight.&lt;br /&gt;22. Rxd3 g6&lt;br /&gt;23. Rad1 … White wants to control the square d5,  with a subsequent breakthrough.&lt;br /&gt;23 …  Kc7 Holding d6&lt;br /&gt;24. c5   Black resigns.  &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Here we could see the good bishop vs. the bad bishop, the pawn structure resulting from this opening, black’s lack of space, and his gifts of tempo.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Invest now in your game.  Choose a single white opening and play it every time!  Analyze each of your losses to see where you can improve the next time you face that position.  Once you know your white opening for five or more moves in every major variation, you can start on your two black defenses.  You can keep your repertoire short while improving your game dramatically.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Choose your openings carefully, you want an opening you can continue to play with for a long time.  Good Chessing!  Al &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;a href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/webchess/newuser.php"&gt;Play chess for free!&lt;/a&gt;&lt;div class="blogger-post-footer"&gt;http://www.text-link-ads.com/xml_blogger.php?inventory_key=1RU9897F28IZR04WWKP8&amp;feed=1&lt;img width='1' height='1' src='https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/6286755-4004079231325200551?l=www.chessmaniac.com%2Findex.php' alt='' /&gt;&lt;/div&gt;</content><link rel='replies' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/4004079231325200551/comments/default' title='Post Comments'/><link rel='replies' type='text/html' href='https://www.blogger.com/comment.g?blogID=6286755&amp;postID=4004079231325200551' title='0 Comments'/><link rel='edit' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/posts/default/4004079231325200551'/><link rel='self' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/posts/default/4004079231325200551'/><link rel='alternate' type='text/html' href='http://www.chessmaniac.com/2008/06/ideal-square-in-chess.php' title='The Ideal Square In Chess'/><author><name>ChessManiac.com Team Member</name><uri>http://www.blogger.com/profile/01328105597774582922</uri><email>[email protected]</email><gd:extendedProperty xmlns:gd='http://schemas.google.com/g/2005' name='OpenSocialUserId' value='15357420108677844176'/></author><thr:total>0</thr:total></entry><entry><id>tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-6286755.post-3107573680150595616</id><published>2008-05-30T22:35:00.000-07:00</published><updated>2008-05-31T19:14:28.580-07:00</updated><title type='text'>Power and Force in chess: the Value of a piece.</title><content type='html'>&lt;a href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/al-769387.jpg"&gt;&lt;img style="float:left; margin:0 10px 10px 0;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;" src="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/al-769385.jpg" border="0" alt="" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt;When we first &lt;a href="http://www.chessmaniac.com"&gt;play chess&lt;/a&gt;, we learn the “value” of the pieces.  We learn that a pawn=1, a bishop or knight = 3, a rook =5, etc.  On &lt;a href="http://www.chessmaniac.com"&gt;the chess site&lt;/a&gt;, in our games, these values are assigned for pieces captured.  &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;This ‘value’ must be properly understood.  It sometimes takes a while to gain an understanding of the true value of each of the pieces.   Understanding the true and current value of a piece helps us to make wise choices in selecting winning lines and moves.  So, let’s begin by discriminating between the value of the piece, the power of a piece and the force that a piece can exert in the game.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;The value of a piece is based on a generalization.  It can be likened to the number of squares a piece can control when on an empty chessboard.  A rook will always survey fourteen squares on an empty board, seven on the rank and seven on the file, regardless of where it is placed.  A bishop can control as few as seven and as many as thirteen, depending on where it is placed on the chessboard.  &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;So, our first clue to the difference is to recognize that the placement on the chessboard is also a determining factor.  The same must be considered in placement of the queen and the knight.  On a corner square, a knight can only move to two other squares, but placed on it’s home square it can move to three, and as it advances toward the center of the chessboard, it surveys four, six, and finally eight squares (when  placed on one of the center sixteen squares).  So, a modifying factor to value is placement on the empty chessboard.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;But, the chessboard is not empty during a game.  The rook on its home squares protects the pawn directly in front and the neighboring knight, but has no other moves immediate prospects.  At this time, every pawn exerts more force than either rook!  The rook has little current value until it can exert its force on an open file.  The rook in the corner has a potential force but an immediate negligible force.  The value of the rook lies in the future in this instance.   (Castling, usually thought to be a defensive measure, is an effective offensive measure to increase force by bringing the rook toward an open file.)  The same is basically true of queen and bishops.  These pieces need open lines in order to dominate; locked in behind pawns they still have their potential power, but they lack immediate force.  So, with pieces and particularly pawns on the chessboard, the value of the piece depends on the positioning of other friendly and opposing pieces and pawns.  &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;So, I offer you some differentiation of value:  The value of a chess piece depends on its position on the chessboard and on the avenues open to movement.  In general the value of a piece increases as it approaches the center of the board, and as that piece is able to use more lines and squares.  &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;The opponents immediate position alters the value of our chess pieces.  Only one of our bishops can take advantage of a hole or an outpost, and pieces attacking or restraining the opponent are momentarily increased in value.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;But, that is not the whole story.  The placement of the pawns strongly influences the value of any piece.  The story of the ‘bad’ or ‘good’ bishop is an example.  In addition, knights are controlled by pawn placement and lines are blocked or cleared by pawn placement.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Here is an example of a ‘good’ bishop against a constrained knight.  The position is from a game Fisher-Taimanov, 1972:&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;a href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/pic1-739429.png"&gt;&lt;img style="display:block; margin:0px auto 10px; text-align:center;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;" src="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/pic1-739424.png" border="0" alt="" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;White’s bishop is ‘good’ because it is not blocked by it’s own pawns, it has two fine diagonals and is now able to move to any of 11 squares.  The knight is restrained by the white pawns and can only move to four squares, all to the rear.  However, if the knight were on d6, it would be best placed.  The white rook occupies a fine file, while the black rook is momentarily less active.  Black would like to exchange rooks and bring his knight to d6, where it will complete a blockade by keeping the White king from advancing to c4.  White is willing to swap rooks, but must first he needs to prevent the knight maneuver to d6.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Fisher  Taimanov&lt;br /&gt;1.  Bb5  Rd6&lt;br /&gt;2.  Ke2! … White wants to retake with the king on d3, after the rook exchange. 2.  …  Kd8 Unpinning the knight.&lt;br /&gt;3.  Rd3  Kc7&lt;br /&gt;4.  Rxd6 Kxd6&lt;br /&gt;5.  Kd3  … If White can now exchange bishop for knight he will have a winning pawn endgame.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;a href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/pic2-714081.png"&gt;&lt;img style="display:block; margin:0px auto 10px; text-align:center;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;" src="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/pic2-714067.png" border="0" alt="" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;5.  …  Ne7&lt;br /&gt;6.  Be8  … Starting a sequence where the bishop ties the knight to defense of pawns, while forcing the Black king backward so that the White king can advance.&lt;br /&gt;6.   …  Kd5  &lt;br /&gt;7.  Bf7+ … Driving the king back so that White’s king can go to c4.&lt;br /&gt;7.  …  Kd6&lt;br /&gt;8.  Kc4  Kc6&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;It is apparent that White has an advantage for two reasons:  The bishop is stronger than the knight, and white has two waiting moves available in the b2 and c3 pawns.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;a href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/pic3-741222.png"&gt;&lt;img style="display:block; margin:0px auto 10px; text-align:center;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;" src="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/pic3-741219.png" border="0" alt="" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;9.  Be8+           … The bishop is handling both the King and the Knight!  Notice that black’s king is pushed backward, so that the White king can further penetrate the position via b5. &lt;br /&gt;9.   …  Kb7  &lt;br /&gt;10. Kb5 Nc8&lt;br /&gt;11. Bc6+! … A player could easily lose the chess game if playing hastily here; if 11. Bxg6??  Nd6++&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;a href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/pic4-794656.png"&gt;&lt;img style="display:block; margin:0px auto 10px; text-align:center;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;" src="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/pic4-794653.png" border="0" alt="" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;The black king must give up either a6 or c6.&lt;br /&gt;11.  …  Kc7&lt;br /&gt;12. Bd5 Ne7&lt;br /&gt;13. Bf7 Kb7&lt;br /&gt;14. Bb3 Ka7&lt;br /&gt;15. Bd1  Kb7&lt;br /&gt;16. Bf3+ Kc7&lt;br /&gt;17. Ka6 &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;a href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/pic5-750931.png"&gt;&lt;img style="display:block; margin:0px auto 10px; text-align:center;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;" src="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/pic5-750929.png" border="0" alt="" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt; &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;The White king has penetrated!, now to get the bishop to f7 or e8 to restrain the knight.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;17. …  Nc8&lt;br /&gt;18. Bd5 Ne7&lt;br /&gt;19. Bc4! … The bishop gains tempo enroute to f7&lt;br /&gt;19. …  Nc6&lt;br /&gt;20. Bf7 Ne7 &lt;br /&gt;21. Be8 … Zugzwang!&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;a href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/pic6-717596.png"&gt;&lt;img style="display:block; margin:0px auto 10px; text-align:center;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;" src="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/pic6-717591.png" border="0" alt="" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;21.  …  Kd8 Black has no other move…..&lt;br /&gt;  &lt;br /&gt;White went on to win the game.  This bishop was remarkably powerful, certainly worth much more than the knight.  If you look at real value, the position of the chessboard reduced the value of the knight and increased the value of the bishop.  The bishop effectively dominated the chessboard.  &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;So, let’s develop a convention for valuing any piece:  The Value of a Piece can be expressed in a potential power, a latent power, which we can conveniently call the Power of the piece.  This power becomes a kinetic factor as the chessboard empties.  That is, this potential is normally reached as the chessboard changes in favor of the piece.  &lt;br /&gt;This Value of a Piece can also be expressed in kinetic power, the power of the piece at the moment, in this position.  We can differentiate value by calling this condition Force.  It is the immediate value of the piece.  Power can be compared to a battery which has energy stored, and Force can be applied to the immediate application, such as turning on a flashlight, which puts the potential to immediate use.  &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;This understanding is critical in determining the value of an exchange, we may exchange a potential power for an opposing force.  Let’s look at an example:   &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Although a rook always has more power than a knight, here is an instance when a knight exerts more force than a rook, and a rook was given (“Sacrificed”?) to keep the knight.   &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;This game was played in April 2006.  Playing Black, I defended against a Reti Opening.  &lt;br /&gt;Here is the position after the 51st move:&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;a href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/pic7-785641.png"&gt;&lt;img style="display:block; margin:0px auto 10px; text-align:center;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;" src="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/pic7-785640.png" border="0" alt="" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt; &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Although the game has remained in the balance for the first fifty moves,  Black has managed to limit one of White’s rooks with a pawn cage.  &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;On  move 52 white forks rook and knight.  If the rook moves the bishop could be exchanged for an important knight, or white could play to free the caged rook and take a pawn in the process.  This would leave white with the initiative and an impending attack.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Black observed:  &lt;br /&gt;Black had a better pawn position with an extra pawn and a passed a-pawn along with a potential advanced passed d-pawn.  It was logical to play for an endgame where one of these pawns proved decisive.  &lt;br /&gt;One white rook was currently out of action, but both of black’s rooks were restrained.  The rook is an offensive piece, and lines would have to be opened before either black rook could exert force.&lt;br /&gt;The attacking white bishop had left the defense of the white king, and only knight and queen were left to defend the position against an attack by the Black queen, knight and bishop, while the rooks and bishop would be the attackers to support the white c-pawn to a queening.  First, the Black b-pawn would have to fall.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Blacks plan, then, was to trade a rook for the attacking bishop, hold the pawn, trade black bishop for white knight and attack the white king while advancing the d-pawn.  This line of play would give white a material advantage of rook against knight if the Black attack failed.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;This is an example of a knight being worth more than a rook in a given position.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt; Here is the position after the 51st move:&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;a href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/pic8-729231.png"&gt;&lt;img style="display:block; margin:0px auto 10px; text-align:center;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;" src="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/pic8-729224.png" border="0" alt="" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt; &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;White  Black&lt;br /&gt;1.  Be6  …  Forking knight and rook.  When/If the rook moves to avoid capture, the attacking knight will be removed by the bishop, giving White a queenside initiative. .&lt;br /&gt;1.  …  Rxe6! The rook gives his life for the knight.&lt;br /&gt;2.  Rxe6 … “Winning” the exchange.&lt;br /&gt;2.  …   Nd2 Beginning execution of the plan.  The valuable knight will support his queen in an attack.&lt;br /&gt;3.  Qc1  … White would now like to exchange pieces and get to an endgame with rook vs. knight.&lt;br /&gt;3.  …  Bxd3 Removing an important pawn.  The d-pawn is now passed!&lt;br /&gt;4.  exd3 Qxd3 Now, the d pawn has become dangerous, PERHAPS DECISIVE..&lt;br /&gt;5.  Ra3  Qe2 &lt;br /&gt;6 . Rb6 … White resigns, the Black d-pawn will queen. &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;a href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/pic9-786050.png"&gt;&lt;img style="display:block; margin:0px auto 10px; text-align:center;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;" src="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/pic9-786048.png" border="0" alt="" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Note that Blacks plan was carried out in only five moves.   The valuable knight was much more useful than the constrained rook.  A knight works very well with the queen in an attack, &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;The fact that the rook normally has a ‘value’ of five while the knight has only a ‘value’ of three was strongly modified by the position itself.  The knight could exert more force more quickly than either Black rook.  The mobile, attacking knight was, in fact, much more effective than either white rook.  &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;To empower our pieces, to make them more valuable, and more effective, we cause them to develop force.  We do this in the opening by quickly providing good lines for our line-going pieces, giving the bishops strong diagonals and using our pawns to deprive our opponent of best lines, while using our rooks on open files, and assuring mobility of our pieces by controlling the center of the board to the best of our abilities.  In the chess middle game, we look for the development of pivot points through the center for our pieces, and for outposts for our minor pieces, particularly our knights.  We block opponents lines and leverage lines open for our pieces. Throughout we want to maintain an initiative, forcing our opponent to defend against our threats rather than mobilize his pieces for attack.  We should play to continuously increase the force of each of our pieces, on every move.   Al &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;a href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/webchess/newuser.php"&gt;Play Free Online Chess NOW!&lt;/a&gt;&lt;div class="blogger-post-footer"&gt;http://www.text-link-ads.com/xml_blogger.php?inventory_key=1RU9897F28IZR04WWKP8&amp;feed=1&lt;img width='1' height='1' src='https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/6286755-3107573680150595616?l=www.chessmaniac.com%2Findex.php' alt='' /&gt;&lt;/div&gt;</content><link rel='replies' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/3107573680150595616/comments/default' title='Post Comments'/><link rel='replies' type='text/html' href='https://www.blogger.com/comment.g?blogID=6286755&amp;postID=3107573680150595616' title='2 Comments'/><link rel='edit' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/posts/default/3107573680150595616'/><link rel='self' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/posts/default/3107573680150595616'/><link rel='alternate' type='text/html' href='http://www.chessmaniac.com/2008/05/power-and-force-in-chess-value-of-piece.php' title='Power and Force in chess: the Value of a piece.'/><author><name>ChessManiac.com Team Member</name><uri>http://www.blogger.com/profile/01328105597774582922</uri><email>[email protected]</email><gd:extendedProperty xmlns:gd='http://schemas.google.com/g/2005' name='OpenSocialUserId' value='15357420108677844176'/></author><thr:total>2</thr:total></entry><entry><id>tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-6286755.post-3254477604283649143</id><published>2008-05-15T21:08:00.001-07:00</published><updated>2008-05-16T22:44:05.294-07:00</updated><category scheme='http://www.blogger.com/atom/ns#' term='Planning in Chess'/><category scheme='http://www.blogger.com/atom/ns#' term='Chess News'/><category scheme='http://www.blogger.com/atom/ns#' term='Playing Chess'/><category scheme='http://www.blogger.com/atom/ns#' term='Online Chess'/><category scheme='http://www.blogger.com/atom/ns#' term='Chess'/><category scheme='http://www.blogger.com/atom/ns#' term='Chess Openings'/><category scheme='http://www.blogger.com/atom/ns#' term='Chess Tactics'/><title type='text'>Playing the board, not the piece.  An example of playing the lines and squares.</title><content type='html'>&lt;a href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/Chess-3-740756.jpg"&gt;&lt;img style="float:left; margin:0 10px 10px 0;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;" src="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/Chess-3-740423.jpg" border="0" alt="" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt;In my first &lt;a href="http://www.chessmaniac.com"&gt;games on Chessmaniac&lt;/a&gt; I played against some fine new players.  Here is a player whose elo was listed as 13xx, but he played at a much higher level!  &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;The Game is a Morra Gambit, accepted.  When I first played chess I preferred open games, so I played 1. e4.  I was usually met with e5.  In time, as my level grew and my opponents became stronger, I began to increasingly meet 1. e4  with c5, the Sicilian.  Soon, the &lt;a href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/2007/11/sicilian-defence-online-chess-opening.php"&gt;Sicilian&lt;/a&gt; was being played against me in more than 50% of my games.  The problem I faced was in trying to learn all of the lines and variations.  The Sicilian has more lines and variations than any other &lt;a href="http://www.studentchess.net"&gt;chess opening&lt;/a&gt; I know!  I felt it would take me years to learn to play against it effectively.  I eventually learned that this is typical, and it caused me to develop a particular repertoire in order to continue my growth as a player.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt; In developing that repertoire, I needed a weapon against the Sicilian, something to take Black out of his favorite variations and into a line with which he may not be at home. I found the Morra. (It was originally called the Morphy Gambit!)  I liked it because it gave me a lasting initiative, it took my opponent out of his pet line, it was a violently attacking offense, and it was not known well by most players.  I call the Morra the “Anti-Sicilian”, and play it routinely against the Sicilian, as you can see from my games.  It normally generates a fine queenside attack, with open lines.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Playing white in the Morra, it is essential to focus on certain lines and squares.  I will help focus on them during this discussion of the game. &lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Now, to the game, keep your eye on the board, not on the pieces.  Note that the emphasis is not on moves, it is on maintaining an initiative and improving the board in favor of White:&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;White   Black&lt;br /&gt;alfredjwood               deep56&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;1. e4   c5  The Sicilian!  A fine defense!&lt;br /&gt;2. d4   …  The Morra Gambit.&lt;br /&gt;2. …   cxd4  The Morra Gambit Accepted.&lt;br /&gt;3. c3   dxc3&lt;br /&gt;4. Nxc3  …  Let’s take our first look at the situation:  White has a knight developed, and open lines for his two bishops and queen.  Black has a pawn.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;a href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/1-714732.png"&gt;&lt;img  style="display:block; margin:0px auto 10px; text-align:center;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;" src="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/1-714729.png" border="0" alt="" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;4. …   e6  The two major continuations for black are e6 or d6, e6 is played most often.  &lt;br /&gt;5. Nf3   Nc6  Normal.&lt;br /&gt;6. Bc4   …&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Let’s look at this, a typical position: &lt;br /&gt; &lt;br /&gt;&lt;a href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/2-702042.JPG"&gt;&lt;img style="display:block; margin:0px auto 10px; text-align:center;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;" src="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/2-702039.JPG" border="0" alt="" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;White has developed both knights and a bishop, his remaining bishop and his queen can develop in one move each.  He holds d5!  d5 is one of the critical squares in this opening.  Black’s d-pawn is backward, allowing d5 as an outpost or pivot point for white.  Black has developed one knight.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;6. …   a6  This is a necessary move, but it is premature.  Black is behind in development and should attend to his development first.   In the Morra the key squares are usually on the queenside:  d5, b5, and e5.  Other squares which become important with normal development are b6 and c7.  White will be playing to control the key squares.  This move, a6, disputes the key square b5, but it may be premature.&lt;br /&gt;7. Qe2   …  The queen must come to e2 or c2 in order to vacate d1 for the occupation of the kings rook after castling.  White’s two rooks will play to control the open c and d files.  In similar positions, Qe2 is correct unless there is good reason for Qc2.  &lt;br /&gt;7. …   d6  This is a typical position in this opening.  Black is playing the opening well.&lt;br /&gt;8. 0-0   …  The first step in bringing the rook to the important e-file, where it will pin the black e-pawn against the black queen.&lt;br /&gt;8. …   Be7  A developing move, but perhaps Nf6 is stronger, disputing d5 and attacking e4.&lt;br /&gt;9. Rd1   …  The rook seizes the d-file, pinning the black d-pawn against his queen.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;a href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/4-762575.JPG"&gt;&lt;img style="display:block; margin:0px auto 10px; text-align:center;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;" src="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/4-762564.JPG" border="0" alt="" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;9. …   b5  This is the first inaccuracy by black.  Still, it is often played by strong players.  White now has a target on the key square b5.&lt;br /&gt;10. Bb3   Qc7  This is a good square for the black queen.  The pin on the d-file is relieved and the queen is developed.&lt;br /&gt;11. Bf4   …  This develops the bishop, and pins the black d-pawn against the queen on the b8-h2 diagonal!&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;a href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/3-756461.JPG"&gt;&lt;img style="display:block; margin:0px auto 10px; text-align:center;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;" src="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/3-756457.JPG" border="0" alt="" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;11. …   Bb7  Black brings the queens bishop into play, striking at d5 should the c6 knight move.  In the game Whitby vs. Basman in 1962 (Whitby was the Under-18 British champion), Black played Ne5 and subsequently lost the game.  The square d5 must be contested because of its importance.  &lt;br /&gt;12. Rac1   …  This is a typical position of the white pieces in this opening.  Let’s look at it:&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;a href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/5-702812.JPG"&gt;&lt;img style="display:block; margin:0px auto 10px; text-align:center;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;" src="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/5-702810.JPG" border="0" alt="" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;Whites pieces are all active.  The rooks hold the c and d files, bishop, knight, rook and pawn hold d5, bishop and knight dispute e5. Queen and knight dispute b5.    All critical squares are covered by white.  Black’s position looks solid, but appearances are deceiving.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;12. …   e5 A typical move.  Black must try to gain some center.  Unfortunately, it results in a backward pawn on d6, and removes a defender from e5!  &lt;br /&gt;13. Nd5   … With this move, white occupies the outpost d5.   This occupation restricts blacks options, and the knight strikes at important squares in the black position.  Except as a defender of the castled position, a knight is normally offensively weaker than a bishop when it is on the first three ranks, but a knight becomes stronger than a bishop when it reaches the fifth rank!  An outpost for the knight on the fifth or sixth ranks is highly desirable. &lt;br /&gt;13. …   Qd8 The queen returns to the home square.   White has gained tempo from this double Queen move.&lt;br /&gt;14. Be3   … Joining the knight on the strike on b6.&lt;br /&gt;14. …   Rc8 Disputing the c-file.&lt;br /&gt;15. a4   … Beginning an attack on b5.  Remember, this is a critical square in this opening.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;15. …   Nf6 The knight comes into play, disputing d5 and attacking e4.&lt;br /&gt;16. axb5   … Beginning the attack on the queenside with the assault on the key square.&lt;br /&gt;16. …   Na5&lt;br /&gt;17. bxa6   … Continuing the assault.&lt;br /&gt;17. …   Nxb3&lt;br /&gt;18. Qb5+   … The beginning of the end.  White controls the critical lines and squares.  Let’s look at the position:&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;a href="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/6-705809.JPG"&gt;&lt;img style="display:block; margin:0px auto 10px; text-align:center;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;" src="http://www.chessmaniac.com/uploaded_images/6-705807.JPG" border="0" alt="" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;18. …   Qd7&lt;br /&gt;19. axb7   Nxc1&lt;br /&gt;20. Nxf6   Bxf6&lt;br /&gt;21. bxc8(Q)+&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;An example of the need to see the board, not the piece: to play the board, not the piece.  &lt;br /&gt;My compliments and appreciation to Deep56 for an interesting and enjoyable game!&lt;br /&gt;Al &lt;br /&gt;&lt;a href="http://www.chessmaniac.com"&gt;Play Free Online Chess&lt;/a&gt;&lt;div class="blogger-post-footer"&gt;http://www.text-link-ads.com/xml_blogger.php?inventory_key=1RU9897F28IZR04WWKP8&amp;feed=1&lt;img width='1' height='1' src='https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/6286755-3254477604283649143?l=www.chessmaniac.com%2Findex.php' alt='' /&gt;&lt;/div&gt;</content><link rel='replies' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/3254477604283649143/comments/default' title='Post Comments'/><link rel='replies' type='text/html' href='https://www.blogger.com/comment.g?blogID=6286755&amp;postID=3254477604283649143' title='1 Comments'/><link rel='edit' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/posts/default/3254477604283649143'/><link rel='self' type='application/atom+xml' href='http://www.blogger.com/feeds/6286755/posts/default/3254477604283649143'/><link rel='alternate' type='text/html' href='http://www.chessmaniac.com/2008/05/playing-board-not-piece-example-of.php' title='Playing the board, not the piece.  An example of playing the lines and squares.'/><author><name>ChessManiac.com Team Member</name><uri>http://www.blogger.com/profile/01328105597774582922</uri><email>[email protected]</email><gd:extendedProperty xmlns:gd='http://schemas.google.com/g/2005' name='OpenSocialUserId' value='15357420108677844176'/></author><thr:total>1</thr:total></entry></feed>

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