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  11. <title>Wild About Utah</title>
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  13. <link>https://wildaboututah.org</link>
  14. <description>A Utah Public Radio production featuring contributors who share a love of nature, preservation and education</description>
  15. <lastBuildDate>Mon, 14 Jan 2019 14:41:14 +0000</lastBuildDate>
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  23. <title>Wild About Utah</title>
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  29. <title>The Henry Mountains’ Bison Herd</title>
  30. <link>https://wildaboututah.org/the-henry-mountains-bison-herd/</link>
  31. <pubDate>Mon, 14 Jan 2019 14:41:14 +0000</pubDate>
  32. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Josh Boling]]></dc:creator>
  33. <category><![CDATA[Mammals]]></category>
  34. <category><![CDATA[Vertebrates]]></category>
  35.  
  36. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://wildaboututah.org/?p=9356</guid>
  37. <description><![CDATA[<p>The Henry Mountains of southeast Utah are famous for being the last mountain range in the contiguous United States to have been officially mapped. Indeed, before they were mapped, they were often referred to as the “Unknown Mountains.” Another relative unknown detail about this range is that it harbors one of only five genetically pure, &#8230; </p>
  38. <p class="link-more"><a href="https://wildaboututah.org/the-henry-mountains-bison-herd/" class="more-link">Continue reading<span class="screen-reader-text"> "The Henry Mountains’ Bison Herd"</span></a></p>
  39. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://wildaboututah.org/the-henry-mountains-bison-herd/">The Henry Mountains’ Bison Herd</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://wildaboututah.org">Wild About Utah</a>.</p>
  40. ]]></description>
  41. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p><figure id="attachment_9367" style="width: 250px" class="wp-caption alignright"><a href="https://wildaboututah.org/wp-content/uploads/fws.moehring.bison_.png"><img src="https://wildaboututah.org/wp-content/uploads/fws.moehring.bison_.250x166.png" alt="American Bison Courtesy US FWS Ryan Moehring, Photographer" width="250" height="166" class="size-full wp-image-9367" /></a><figcaption class="wp-caption-text">American Bison<br />Courtesy US FWS<br />Ryan Moehring, Photographer</figcaption></figure>The Henry Mountains of southeast Utah are famous for being the last mountain range in the contiguous United States to have been officially mapped. Indeed, before they were mapped, they were often referred to as the “Unknown Mountains.” Another relative unknown detail about this range is that it harbors one of only five genetically pure, free roaming bison herds on North American public lands.</p>
  42. <p>In 1941, a seed herd of 18 American Plains Bison (B. b. bison) were transplanted from Yellowstone National Park to the arid desert of Utah’s Robbers Roost. A year later, five more bulls were introduced to the herd in hopes of sufficiently diversifying the gene pool and sustaining the herd. The bison must not have found Robbers Roost as appealing as Butch Cassidy had, though, because this new Wild Bunch set out for literal greener pastures that very same year. </p>
  43. <p>The small herd forded the Dirty Devil River and travelled southwest toward the Burr Desert. The herd stopped here for a while, enjoying their newfound buffet atop the Aquarius Plateau. 21 years later, though, in 1963, the still small herd grew tired of the desert and abandoned it altogether for the higher, more verdant snow fed meadows of the nearby Henry Mountains. Here, the herd thrived and quickly swelled in numbers.</p>
  44. <p>Today, the herd’s population is estimated to be between 300 and 400 animals, which ecologists and wildlife biologists regard as the maximum carrying capacity of their Henry Mountain range. The Utah Division of Wildlife Resources has responded accordingly. In an effort to perpetuate the health of the herd and their range, the DWR began issuing “Once-in-a-lifetime” permits to hunters hoping to fulfill not only a tag but also a burning sense of adventure. The Henry Mountains, after all, were mapped last for a reason. They remain one of the most rugged and remote places in a state known for its rugged and remote places. </p>
  45. <p>Fittingly, quite unlike their more quintessential Plains Bison brethren, the Henry Mountains bison can be found almost anywhere in the Henrys between the desert lowlands and timberline. Apparently no one has told the herd that Plains Bison don’t typically like high elevations or steep mountain slopes. This unique proclivity of the Henry Mountains herd to cast off behavioral stereotypes works in their favor when hunting season rolls around and they abandon the high, open meadows for steep, wooded canyons and thick groves of aspen and evergreens. </p>
  46. <p>This highly adaptive nature unique to the Henry Mountains herd made it an obvious candidate to serve as a seed population in early 2010 when 39 individuals were transplanted from the Henry Mountains to the Book Cliffs along the Utah-Colorado border. These 39 animals were to serve as a genetic supplement to a relatively new herd first reintroduced to the Book Cliffs by the Ute Indian Tribe in 1986. The now 600-strong Book Cliffs herd is well on its way to reestablishing the American Plains Bison’s historic range in the Book Cliffs.</p>
  47. <p>The story of the Book Cliffs and Henry Mountains Bison give us reason to hope that one day soon, the American Bison might reclaim its territory, a historic range that once ran from Alaska through the Canadian territories and the Great Plains to the Eastern Seaboard and the Gulf of Mexico. And, if so, the role the Henry Mountains herd will play in that expansion may be a significant one. </p>
  48. <p>I’m Josh Boling, and I’m Wild About Utah.</p>
  49. <p><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 10pt;"><span style="color: #2a7f55; font-weight: bold;">Credits:</span></span></p>
  50. <p>Photos: Courtesy US FWS, Ryan Moehring, Photographer<br />
  51. Audio: Includes audio from <br />
  52. Text: Josh Boling, 2019</p>
  53. <p><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 10pt;"><span style="color: #2a7f55; font-weight: bold;">Sources &amp; Additional Reading</span></span></p>
  54. <p>Utah&#8217;s Book Cliffs Herd, Bison Bellows Series, National Park Service, June 30, 2016, <a href="https://www.nps.gov/articles/bison-bellows-6-30-16.htm" target="newWindow">https://www.nps.gov/articles/bison-bellows-6-30-16.htm</a></p>
  55. <p>How scientists brought bison back to Banff, National Public Radio, Feb 28, 2017, <a href="https://www.pbs.org/newshour/show/scientists-brought-bison-back-banff" target="newWindow">https://www.pbs.org/newshour/show/scientists-brought-bison-back-banff</a></p>
  56. <p>Buffalo (Bison) on the Henry Mountains, Capitol Reef Country, Wayne County Tourism, <a href="https://capitolreef.org/blog/buffalo-bison-on-the-henry-mountains/" target="newWindow">https://capitolreef.org/blog/buffalo-bison-on-the-henry-mountains/</a></p>
  57. <p>Henry Mountains, Utah.com, <a href="https://utah.com/henry-mountains" target="newWindow">https://utah.com/henry-mountains</a></p>
  58. <p>Bison Unit Management Plan, Unit #15 Henry Mountains, Utah Division of Wildlife Management, <a href="https://wildlife.utah.gov/hunting/biggame/pdf/bison_15.pdf" target="newWindow">https://wildlife.utah.gov/hunting/biggame/pdf/bison_15.pdf</a></p>
  59. <p>Gilman, Don, Rare, genetically-pure bison found in Utah’s Henry Mountains, St George News, Jan 12, 2016, <a href="https://www.stgeorgeutah.com/news/archive/2016/01/12/djg-genetically-pure-bison-found-in-utahs-henry-mountains/#.XB7nRs9KjfY" target="newWindow">https://www.stgeorgeutah.com/news/archive/2016/01/12/djg-genetically-pure-bison-found-in-utahs-henry-mountains/#.XB7nRs9KjfY</a></p>
  60. <p>Henry Mountain Outfitters, HuntersTrailhead, <a href="http://www.hunterstrailhead.com/index.php?ID=147" target="newWindow">http://www.hunterstrailhead.com/index.php?ID=147</a></p>
  61. <p>Brian, Jayden, Utah Henry Mountain Bison Hunts, Bull Mountain Outfitters, LLC, <a href="http://henrymtnbisonhunts.com/" target="newWindow">http://henrymtnbisonhunts.com/</a></p>
  62. <p>Henry Mountains bison herd, Wikipedia, <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Mountains_bison_herd" target="newWindow">https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Mountains_bison_herd</a></p>
  63. <p><a href="" target="newWindow"></a></p>
  64. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://wildaboututah.org/the-henry-mountains-bison-herd/">The Henry Mountains’ Bison Herd</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://wildaboututah.org">Wild About Utah</a>.</p>
  65. ]]></content:encoded>
  66. </item>
  67. <item>
  68. <title>Clark&#8217;s Nutcracker</title>
  69. <link>https://wildaboututah.org/clarks-nutcracker/</link>
  70. <pubDate>Mon, 07 Jan 2019 14:41:17 +0000</pubDate>
  71. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Jack Greene]]></dc:creator>
  72. <category><![CDATA[Birds]]></category>
  73.  
  74. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://wildaboututah.org/?p=9376</guid>
  75. <description><![CDATA[<p>Skiing a few miles into a lovely northern Utah canyon in frigid, single digit temperatures I was startled by an abrasive sound rolling down slope from a thick cover of conifers. A Clark’s nutcracker! My spirits were warmed by several degrees. Lewis and Clark have left their names on many plants and animals in our &#8230; </p>
  76. <p class="link-more"><a href="https://wildaboututah.org/clarks-nutcracker/" class="more-link">Continue reading<span class="screen-reader-text"> "Clark&#8217;s Nutcracker"</span></a></p>
  77. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://wildaboututah.org/clarks-nutcracker/">Clark&#8217;s Nutcracker</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://wildaboututah.org">Wild About Utah</a>.</p>
  78. ]]></description>
  79. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p><figure id="attachment_7482" style="width: 250px" class="wp-caption alignright"><a href="https://wildaboututah.org/wp-content/uploads/fws.menke_.clarks.nutcracker.jpg"><img src="https://wildaboututah.org/wp-content/uploads/fws.clarks.nutcracker.250x168.jpg" alt="Clark&#039;s Nutcracker Courtesy US Fish &amp; Wildlife Service Dave Menke, Photographer" width="250" height="168" class="size-full wp-image-7482" /></a><figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Clark&#8217;s Nutcracker<br />Courtesy US Fish &#038; Wildlife Service<br />Dave Menke, Photographer</figcaption></figure>Skiing a few miles into a lovely northern Utah canyon in frigid, single digit temperatures I was startled by an abrasive sound rolling down slope from a thick cover of conifers. A Clark’s nutcracker! My spirits were warmed by several degrees.</p>
  80. <p>Lewis and Clark have left their names on many plants and animals in our western mountains. The Clark’s Nutcracker, a member of the jay family, has a long list of special attributes well beyond the norm.</p>
  81. <p>This “forester bird” has planted countless millions of trees from Canada to Mexico, provided food for many other critters including the mighty grizzly bear, and has amazed animal behaviorists with their uncanny recall ability.<br />
  82. Nutcrackers often bury their seeds at the perfect depth for germination. They bury pine seeds in hidden caches in fall, then re-find them during winter, allowing them to nest in late winter, when the forest is still covered with snow. They bury clusters of four or five seeds per location caching up to 500 seeds per hour. They often hide seeds near the base of tree trunks, a tendency that may play an important role in their spatial memory system. Landmarks help nutcrackers remember the precise locations of caches.</p>
  83. <p>By the end of the fall, each nutcracker has stashed tens of thousands of seeds. Clark’s spend so much time hacking apart pinecones that sticky resin sometimes dyes their grey feathers a reddish-purple color. But the prize is worth the effort: Pine seeds are a nutritious food, packed with fats, proteins, and carbs.</p>
  84. <p>Crucially, the birds will hide seeds as far as 20 miles away from their source trees. In doing so, they help trees expand their territory into new areas. As development continues to fragment forests and climate change demands rapid migration, “animals that move between patches of habitat are increasing in importance.</p>
  85. <p>Other feeding habits include catches flying insects in the air, digging insect larvae out of wood, eating berries, insects, snails, eggs, carrion, and even young of other birds, which I observed directly near White Pine Lake in the Bear River range. Knowing them as a seed eater, I stunned to watch as a mixed flock of forest birds mobbed the Clarks who had a youngster in its beak it had plucked from its nest.</p>
  86. <p>Nutcrackers have an especially close relationship with the whitebark pine. Unlike other pines, whitebark seeds don&#8217;t have &#8220;wings&#8221; that let them ride gusts of wind across the landscape. Instead, the seeds and cones seem optimized for a nutcracker&#8217;s bill, and as such, the trees rely on the birds’ forgetfulness to reproduce. It&#8217;s possible that the birds could play a part in helping the whitebark pine recover. Human foresters are now studying how to attract Clark&#8217;s Nutcrackers to aid in forest restoration.</p>
  87. <p>Climate change is forecast by Audubon’s climate model to decrease winter and summer range by roughly equal amounts—around 70 percent by 2080.  Tied as this species is to the high western coniferous forests, it seems unlikely it will be able to adapt to any new shifting climate space, as is true with another favorite subalpine resident- the pica, a miniature member of the rabbit family. </p>
  88. <p>Jack Greene, Getting wilder about Utah by the minute!  </p>
  89. <p><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 10pt;"><span style="color: #2a7f55; font-weight: bold;">Credits:</span></span></p>
  90. <p>Images:   Courtesy Jack Greene<br />
  91. Audio:    Contains Audio Courtesy and Copyright Kevin Colver<br />
  92. Text:     Jack Greene</p>
  93. <p><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 10pt;"><span style="color: #2a7f55; font-weight: bold;">Sources &amp; Additional Reading:</span><br />
  94. </span></p>
  95. <p>Kervin, Linda, Lewis and Clark’s Taxonomic Legacy, Wild About Utah, Nov 3, 2011, <a href="https://wildaboututah.org/lewis-and-clarks-taxonomic-legacy/" target="newWindow">https://wildaboututah.org/lewis-and-clarks-taxonomic-legacy/</a></p>
  96. <p>Strand, Holly, Cache and Retrieve, Wild About Utah, Jan 19, 2012, <a href="https://wildaboututah.org/cache-and-retrieve/" target="newWindow">https://wildaboututah.org/cache-and-retrieve/</a></p>
  97. <p>Larese-Casanova, Mark, Nutcrackers and Squirrels, Farmers of the Forests, Wild About Utah, Aug 26, 2013, <a href="https://wildaboututah.org/nutcrackers-squirrels-farmers-forests/" target="newWindow">https://wildaboututah.org/nutcrackers-squirrels-farmers-forests/</a></p>
  98. <p>Clark&#8217;s Nutcracker Identification, All About Birds, The Cornell Lab of Ornithology, <a href="https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Clarks_Nutcracker/id?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIoL3708zi3wIVCtNkCh2bVAg1EAAYASAAEgKk3vD_BwE" target="newWindow">https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Clarks_Nutcracker/id?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIoL3708zi3wIVCtNkCh2bVAg1EAAYASAAEgKk3vD_BwE</a></p>
  99. <p>Clark&#8217;s Nutcracker, Nucifraga columbiana, Audubon Field Guide, National Audubon Society, <a href="https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/clarks-nutcracker" target="newWindow">https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/clarks-nutcracker</a></p>
  100. <p>, <a href="" target="newWindow"></a></p>
  101. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://wildaboututah.org/clarks-nutcracker/">Clark&#8217;s Nutcracker</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://wildaboututah.org">Wild About Utah</a>.</p>
  102. ]]></content:encoded>
  103. </item>
  104. <item>
  105. <title>Winter Bird Feeding</title>
  106. <link>https://wildaboututah.org/winter-bird-feeding-2/</link>
  107. <pubDate>Mon, 31 Dec 2018 14:41:29 +0000</pubDate>
  108. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Shauna Leavitt]]></dc:creator>
  109. <category><![CDATA[Birds]]></category>
  110. <category><![CDATA[Citizen Science]]></category>
  111. <category><![CDATA[People]]></category>
  112. <category><![CDATA[Vertebrates]]></category>
  113.  
  114. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://wildaboututah.org/?p=9291</guid>
  115. <description><![CDATA[<p>This time of year, we see a cast of characters flying among the trees and bushes as they search for food and a place to nestle to conserve warmth and energy. One of these characters is the Black-capped Chickadee a small bird with a black head, white cheeks and cream colored feathers under its grey &#8230; </p>
  116. <p class="link-more"><a href="https://wildaboututah.org/winter-bird-feeding-2/" class="more-link">Continue reading<span class="screen-reader-text"> "Winter Bird Feeding"</span></a></p>
  117. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://wildaboututah.org/winter-bird-feeding-2/">Winter Bird Feeding</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://wildaboututah.org">Wild About Utah</a>.</p>
  118. ]]></description>
  119. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p><figure id="attachment_9295" style="width: 250px" class="wp-caption alignright"><a href="https://wildaboututah.org/wp-content/uploads/ut.dnr_.red-breasted.nuthatch.jpg"><img src="https://wildaboututah.org/wp-content/uploads/ut.dnr_.red-breasted.nuthatch.250x145.jpg" alt="Red-breasted Nuthatch mining out the nest site Photo courtesy of Utah Division of Wildlife Resources" width="250" height="145" class="size-full wp-image-9295" /></a><figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Red-breasted Nuthatch mining out the nest site<br />Photo courtesy of Utah Division of Wildlife Resources</figcaption></figure>This time of year, we see a cast of characters flying among the trees and bushes as they search for food and a place to nestle to conserve warmth and energy. </p>
  120. <p><figure id="attachment_9330" style="width: 250px" class="wp-caption alignright"><a href="https://wildaboututah.org/wp-content/uploads/bcchickadee-1.jpg"><img src="https://wildaboututah.org/wp-content/uploads/bcchickadee.250x188.jpg" alt="Black-Capped Chickadee Copyright Stephen Peterson, Photographer" width="250" height="188" class="size-full wp-image-9330" /></a><figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Black-Capped Chickadee<br />Copyright Stephen Peterson, Photographer</figcaption></figure>One of these characters is the Black-capped Chickadee a small bird with a black head, white cheeks and cream colored feathers under its grey wings.  The Chickadees are found in all 29 Utah counties.</p>
  121. <p><figure id="attachment_9325" style="width: 250px" class="wp-caption alignright"><a href="https://wildaboututah.org/wp-content/uploads/odonnell.Junco8x10.jpg"><img src="https://wildaboututah.org/wp-content/uploads/odonnell.Junco8x10.250x200.jpg" alt="Dark-eyed &#039;Oregon&#039; Junco Male, Junco hyemalis montanus, Courtesy and copyright 2008 Ryan P. O&#039;Donnell, Phorographer" width="250" height="200" class="size-full wp-image-9325" /></a><figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Dark-eyed &#8216;Oregon&#8217; Junco Male, Junco hyemalis montanus, Courtesy and copyright 2008 Ryan P. O&#8217;Donnell, Phorographer</figcaption></figure>Another member of the cast is the Dark-eyed Junco, a medium-sized American sparrow with a neat-flashy look. It has solid slate-grey feathers over most of its body except for its pink sides and white underbody. The Junco is found throughout the United States, Canada and Mexico.</p>
  122. <p>The third cast member is the Red-breasted Nuthatch which has a pale red chest, grey wings and a black feathered head with stripes of white below and above the eyes.  Its tail is short, its bill is long and it’s one of the few birds that climbs headfirst down trees.</p>
  123. <p><figure id="attachment_9328" style="width: 250px" class="wp-caption alignright"><a href="https://wildaboututah.org/wp-content/uploads/fws.menke_.red-breasted.nuthatch.12851_full.jpg"><img src="https://wildaboututah.org/wp-content/uploads/fws.menke_.red-breasted.nuthatch.12851_full.250x168.jpg" alt="Red Breasted Nuthatch Courtesy US FWS Dave Menke, Photographer" width="250" height="168" class="size-full wp-image-9328" /></a><figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Red Breasted Nuthatch<br />Courtesy US FWS<br />Dave Menke, Photographer</figcaption></figure>All three birds find the majority of their winter nourishment from nuts and seeds, since most insects are hiding in dormancy or are dead. </p>
  124. <p>When a harsh winter hits and heavy snow fall covers their natural food source, the birds can rely on bird feeders to find nourishment. </p>
  125. <p>Although winter bird feeders are beneficial, some Utah residents may hesitate putting out nuts and seeds for the following reasons:</p>
  126. <p>One, they worry the birds may become dependent on the feeders.</p>
  127. <p>Clark Rushing, assistant professor in Department of Wildland Resources in the Quinney College of Natural Resources at USU explains, “In a typical winter these birds don’t need the extra food from a bird feeder to make it through the winter, but…when the snow covers up their [natural food source] they rely on the feeders which increase the birds’ survival rate over the winter.  When [snow] conditions [return to normal]… they go right back to feeding on natural sources.”</p>
  128. <p>Another concern some Utah residents have is if the feeders will impact the birds’ migratory behaviors.  They worry species who normally migrate might stick around for the winter because they found food.</p>
  129. <p>Rushing says, “This is not a huge concern because most of these bird species use photo period as a que to migrate, which means they start migrating in the Fall when the days start getting shorter and food is still relatively abundant &#8211; so food is not the que that these species use to migrate.”</p>
  130. <p>When starting the hobby of winter bird feeding, there are a few good tips to remember.</p>
  131. <p>First, is the importance of keeping your feeders clean.  Some diseases can be spread by bird feeders, so keeping them clean is essential.</p>
  132. <p>According to Rushing, “The recommendation is to take [a feeder] down every two weeks, empty it and give it a light cleaning.  [Avoid using] harsh detergents. If you see evidence of mildew or mold then a diluted bleach mixture, which you then rinse off, can be really beneficial.  Let the feeder completely dry before you put bird seed in it.  When [the feeder is wet] is when you have the most problems, so keep it dry.”</p>
  133. <p>Having a variety of feeders and foods is the best way to attract an assortment of birds to your yard during the winter months.</p>
  134. <p>Rushing adds, “The great thing about bird feeding is it connects people to wildlife.”  </p>
  135. <p>It’s one of the few ways you can enjoy watching wildlife out your own dining room window throughout the cold winter months. </p>
  136. <p>This is Shauna Leavitt and I&#8217;m Wild About Utah.</p>
  137. <p><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 10pt;"><span style="color: #2a7f55; font-weight: bold;">Credits:</span></span><br />
  138. Photos:<br />
  139. &nbsp;Red-Breasted Nuthatch, Courtesy Utah Division of Wildlife Resources<br />
  140. &nbsp;Red-Breasted Nuthatch, Courtesy US FWS, Dave Menke, Photographer<br />
  141. &nbsp;Black-Capped Chickadee, Courtesy and Copyright Stephen Peterson, Photographer<br />
  142. &nbsp;Junco, Courtesy and copyright 2008 Ryan P. O&#039;Donnell, Photographer<br />
  143. Audio: Includes audio courtesy and copyright Kevin Colver<br />
  144. Text: Shauna Leavitt, <a href="https://qcnr.usu.edu/research/centers/fish_wildlife_research">USGS Utah Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Quinney College of Natural Resources, Utah State University</a></p>
  145. <p><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 10pt;"><span style="color: #2a7f55; font-weight: bold;">Sources &amp; Additional Reading</span></span></p>
  146. <p>Dr Clark Rushing, Assistant Professor, Wildland Resources, USU S.J. &#038; Jessie E. Quinney College of Natural Resources, <a href="http://qcnr.usu.edu/directory/rushing_clark" target="newWindow">http://qcnr.usu.edu/directory/rushing_clark</a></p>
  147. <p>Red-Breasted Nuthatch, Utah Birds, <a href="http://www.utahbirds.org/birdsofutah/ProfilesL-R/RedBreastedNuthatch.htm" target="newWindow">http://www.utahbirds.org/birdsofutah/ProfilesL-R/RedBreastedNuthatch.htm</a></p>
  148. <p>Black-capped Chickadee, Utah Birds, <a href="http://www.utahbirds.org/birdsofutah/Profiles/BlackCapChickadee.htm" target="newWindow">http://www.utahbirds.org/birdsofutah/Profiles/BlackCapChickadee.htm</a></p>
  149. <p>Dark-Eyed Junco, Utah Birds, <a href="http://www.utahbirds.org/birdsofutah/ProfilesD-K/DarkEyedJunco.htm" target="newWindow">http://www.utahbirds.org/birdsofutah/ProfilesD-K/DarkEyedJunco.htm</a></p>
  150. <p>eBird, Cornell Lab of Ornithology, <a href="https://ebird.org/home" target="newWindow">https://ebird.org/home</a></p>
  151. <p>Project Feederwatch, Cornell Lab of Ornithology, <a href="https://feederwatch.org/">https://feederwatch.org/</a></p>
  152. <p><a href="https://www.allaboutbirds.org/" target="newWindow">https://www.allaboutbirds.org/</a></p>
  153. <p>Hellstern, Ron, Bird Feeding in Winter, Wild About Utah, Nov 26, 2018, <a href="https://wildaboututah.org/bird-feeding-in-winter/" target="newWindow">https://wildaboututah.org/bird-feeding-in-winter/</a></p>
  154. <p>Hellstern, Ron, Project Feederwatch, Wild About Utah, Feb 26, 2018, <a href="https://wildaboututah.org/project-feederwatch/" target="newWindow">https://wildaboututah.org/project-feederwatch/</a></p>
  155. <p>Hellstern, Ron, Winter Bird Feeding, Wild About Utah, Dec 4, 2017, <a href="https://wildaboututah.org/winter-bird-feeding/" target="newWindow">https://wildaboututah.org/winter-bird-feeding/</a></p>
  156. <p>Kervin, Linda, Bird Feeding, Wild About Utah, Nov 25, 2008, <a href="https://wildaboututah.org/bird-feeding/" target="newWindow">https://wildaboututah.org/bird-feeding/</a></p>
  157. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://wildaboututah.org/winter-bird-feeding-2/">Winter Bird Feeding</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://wildaboututah.org">Wild About Utah</a>.</p>
  158. ]]></content:encoded>
  159. </item>
  160. <item>
  161. <title>Ron Imagines a World Without Trees</title>
  162. <link>https://wildaboututah.org/ron-imagines-a-world-without-trees/</link>
  163. <pubDate>Mon, 24 Dec 2018 14:41:39 +0000</pubDate>
  164. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Ron Hellstern]]></dc:creator>
  165. <category><![CDATA[Birds]]></category>
  166.  
  167. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://wildaboututah.org/?p=9335</guid>
  168. <description><![CDATA[<p>Whether you live in a desert, a city, a suburb or a farm, your life would change if you lived in a world without trees. You may be a person who appreciates their ecological connections, or have complete disregard for them. As William Blake said, “The tree, which moves some to tears of joy, is &#8230; </p>
  169. <p class="link-more"><a href="https://wildaboututah.org/ron-imagines-a-world-without-trees/" class="more-link">Continue reading<span class="screen-reader-text"> "Ron Imagines a World Without Trees"</span></a></p>
  170. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://wildaboututah.org/ron-imagines-a-world-without-trees/">Ron Imagines a World Without Trees</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://wildaboututah.org">Wild About Utah</a>.</p>
  171. ]]></description>
  172. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Whether you live in a desert, a city, a suburb or a farm, your life would change if you lived in a world without trees.  You may be a person who appreciates their ecological connections, or have complete disregard for them.  As William Blake said, “The tree, which moves some to tears of joy, is in the eyes of others only a green thing which stands in the way.<sup>1</sup>”</p>
  173. <p>So, take a moment and consider the way the world would look, and function, without trees.  Currently, forests cover about 30% of the Earth’s land surface.  But that’s a loss of 1/3 of all trees just since the beginning of the industrial era.  The top five largest forests are located in  Russia, Brazil, Canada, the U.S., and China.<br />
  174. Whether you think climate change is natural or human-caused, it affects forests by altering the intensity of fires, creating windstorms, changing precipitation, and enabling introduced species to invade.  And the World Resources Institute estimates that tens of thousands of forested acres are destroyed every day.</p>
  175. <p>Sometimes even fragmenting forests can produce harmful results as die-backs occur along the edges, and certain wildlife species will not breed unless they live in large tracts of forested areas.  It has been said that roads, which are a cause of fragmentation, are the pathways to forest destruction.</p>
  176. <p>Most people know that trees take in Carbon Dioxide for growth, and release Oxygen via photosynthesis.  But trees also remove many air pollutants, provide cooling shade and protection from wind and the sun’s harmful Utra-Violet rays.  They can be used as privacy screens, they prevent soil erosion, and are the foundation of wildlife habitat on land. Some provide food, can provide serenity and solitude, and have been proven to reduce stress levels.  Their fallen leaves decompose into valuable soil.  They reduce the Heat-Island Effect in cities, and are more resistant to climate change impacts.  Research has shown they improve retail shopping areas, and speed recovery time for those in health care centers.</p>
  177. <p>For the budget-conscious folks, a mature tree can raise home-property values by as much as $5000.  And think about those beautiful Autumn colors.</p>
  178. <p><figure id="attachment_8520" style="width: 250px" class="wp-caption alignright"><a href="https://wildaboututah.org/wp-content/uploads/PIA08067.jpg"><img src="https://wildaboututah.org/wp-content/uploads/PIA08067.250x187.jpg" alt="Ron Imagines a World Without Trees: View of Argyre Basin on Mars Courtesy NASA/JPL Caltech https://wildaboututah.org/wp-admin/upload.php?item=8521" width="250" height="187" class="size-full wp-image-8520" /></a><figcaption class="wp-caption-text">View of Argyre Basin on Mars<br />Courtesy NASA/JPL Caltech<br />Composed from images taken by the Mars Color Imager (MARCI) camera on NASA&#8217;s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter</figcaption></figure>Although there seems to be a number of humans who would volunteer to live on planet Mars, would we really want planet Earth to mirror that treeless image?</p>
  179. <p>Perhaps a re-evaluation of trees is warranted.  Ponder these imaginative thoughts penned by well-known writers:<br />
  180. Ralph Waldo Emerson: At the gates of the forest, the surprised man of the world is forced to leave his city estimates of great and small, wise and foolish.  The knapsack of custom falls off his back. </p>
  181. <p>William Henry Hudson: When one turned from the lawns and gardens into the wood it was like passing from the open sunlit air to the twilight and still atmosphere of a cathedral interior. </p>
  182. <p>Stephanie June Sorrrell: Let me stand in the heart of a beech tree, with great boughs all sinewed and whorled about me.  And, just for a moment, catch a glimpse of primeval time that breathes forgotten within this busy hurrying world.</p>
  183. <p>One way for us to resolve tree issues, is to plant them.  And the best time to plant a tree was twenty years ago.  But the next best time to plant them is today.</p>
  184. <p>“Silence alone is worthy to be heard.” – Henry David Thoreau</p>
  185. <p>This is Ron Hellstern, and I am Wild About Utah.</p>
  186. <p><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 10pt;"><span style="color: #2a7f55; font-weight: bold;">Credits:</span></span><br />
  187. Images:  CourtesyCourtesy NASA/JPL Caltech<br />
  188. Audio: Contains audio courtesy and copyright Friend Feller, Utah Public Radio, UPR.org<br />
  189. Text:    Ron Hellstern, Cache Valley Wildlife Association</p>
  190. <p><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 10pt;"><span style="color: #2a7f55; font-weight: bold;">Additional Reading</span></span></p>
  191. <p>Upton, John, Could Common Earthly Organisms Thrive on Mars?, Pacific Standard, May 21, 2014, <a href="https://psmag.com/environment/mars-81952" target="newWindow">https://psmag.com/environment/mars-81952</a></p>
  192. <p>Voak, Hannah, A World Without Trees, Science in School, <a href="http://www.scienceinschool.org/content/world-without-trees:>http://www.scienceinschool.org/content/world-without-trees</a></p>
  193. <p>[email protected]<br />
  194. https://marsoweb.nas.nasa.gov/HiRISE/<br />
  195. https://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/guidelines/index.html<br />
  196. https://www.lpl.arizona.edu/faculty/mcewen<br />
  197. https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/spaceimages/details.php?id=PIA11777</p>
  198. <p>1 Blake, William, Marriage of Heaven and Hell, <a href="https://books.google.com/books/about/The_Marriage_of_Heaven_and_Hell.html?id=YUa8AQAAQBAJ" target="newWindow">https://books.google.com/books/about/The_Marriage_of_Heaven_and_Hell.html?id=YUa8AQAAQBAJ</a></p>
  199. <p>Hudson, William Henry, The Book of a Naturalist, p4, <a href="https://books.google.com/books?id=NA4KAAAAMAAJ&#038;pg=PA4&#038;lpg#v=onepage&#038;q&#038;f=false" target="newWindow">https://books.google.com/books?id=NA4KAAAAMAAJ&#038;pg=PA4&#038;lpg#v=onepage&#038;q&#038;f=false</a></p>
  200. <p><a href="https://forestry.usu.edu/" target="newWindow">https://forestry.usu.edu/</a></p>
  201. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://wildaboututah.org/ron-imagines-a-world-without-trees/">Ron Imagines a World Without Trees</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://wildaboututah.org">Wild About Utah</a>.</p>
  202. ]]></content:encoded>
  203. </item>
  204. </channel>
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  206.  

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