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  8.    <title>TheArchitect.co.uk</title>
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  10.    <description><![CDATA[Enterprise technology for the real world - Jorgen Thelin&apos;s blog.]]></description>
  11.    <lastBuildDate>Wed, 04 Nov 2015 10:00:42 GMT</lastBuildDate>
  12.    <pubDate>Wed, 04 Nov 2015 10:00:00 GMT</pubDate>
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  14.    <copyright>Copyright (c) 2015 Jorgen Thelin. All rights reserved. - Weblog feed contents are licensed under CC-BY-NC license</copyright>
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  28.      <link>http://www.thearchitect.co.uk/weblog/archives/2015/11/distributed_transactions.html</link>
  29.      <pubDate>Wed, 04 Nov 2015 10:00:00 GMT</pubDate>
  30.      <guid isPermaLink="false">tag:www.thearchitect.co.uk,2015:/weblog//2.575</guid>
  31.  
  32.      <title>Distributed transactions with consistency, availability, and performance</title>
  33.  
  34.      <description>
  35.      Abstract: Transactions with strong consistency and high availability simplify building and reasoning about distributed systems. However, previous implementations performed poorly. This forced system designers to avoid transactions completely, to weaken consistency guarantees, or to provide single-machine transactions that require programmers to partition their data. In this paper, we show that there is no need to compromise in modern data centers. We show that a main memory distributed computing platform called FaRM can provide distributed transactions with strict serializability, high performance, durability, and high availability. FaRM achieves a peak throughput of 140 million TATP transactions per second on 90 machines with a 4.9 TB database, and it recovers from a failure in less than 50 ms. Key to achieving these results was the design of new transaction, replication, and recovery protocols from first principles to leverage commodity networks with RDMA and a new, inexpensive approach to providing non-volatile DRAM. SOSP 2015 - No compromises - distributed transactions with consistency, availability, and performance...
  36.      
  37.      Blog Post Copyright (c) 2015 Jorgen Thelin. All rights reserved.
  38.      </description>
  39.  
  40.      <category></category>
  41.  
  42.      <dc:creator>Jorgen Thelin</dc:creator>
  43.  
  44.      <content:encoded>
  45.      <![CDATA[
  46.        <p><b>Abstract:</b>
  47. Transactions with strong consistency and high availability simplify building and reasoning about distributed systems. However, previous implementations performed poorly. This forced system designers to avoid transactions completely, to weaken consistency guarantees, or to provide single-machine transactions that require programmers to partition their data. In this paper, we show that there is no need to compromise in modern data centers. We show that a main memory distributed computing platform called FaRM can provide distributed transactions with strict serializability, high performance, durability, and high availability. FaRM achieves a peak throughput of 140 million TATP transactions per second on 90 machines with a 4.9 TB database, and it recovers from a failure in less than 50 ms. Key to achieving these results was the design of new transaction, replication, and recovery protocols from first principles to leverage commodity networks with RDMA and a new, inexpensive approach to providing non-volatile DRAM.
  48. </p>
  49. <p>
  50. <a href="http://research.microsoft.com/apps/pubs/default.aspx?id=255848">
  51. SOSP 2015 - No compromises - distributed transactions with consistency, availability, and performance
  52. </a>
  53. </p>
  54.        
  55.        <p class="posted">
  56.        <span>Blog Post Copyright (c) 2015 Jorgen Thelin. All rights reserved.</span>
  57.        <span>
  58.        Original article location: <a href="http://www.thearchitect.co.uk/weblog/archives/2015/11/distributed_transactions.html">http://www.thearchitect.co.uk/weblog/archives/2015/11/distributed_transactions.html</a>
  59.        </span>
  60.        </p>
  61.      ]]>
  62.      </content:encoded>
  63.    </item>
  64.    <item>
  65.      <link>http://www.thearchitect.co.uk/weblog/archives/2015/11/ironfleet.html</link>
  66.      <pubDate>Tue, 03 Nov 2015 10:00:00 GMT</pubDate>
  67.      <guid isPermaLink="false">tag:www.thearchitect.co.uk,2015:/weblog//2.574</guid>
  68.  
  69.      <title>IronFleet - Proving Practical Distributed Systems Correct</title>
  70.  
  71.      <description>
  72.      Abstract: Distributed systems are notorious for harboring subtle bugs. Verification can, in principle, eliminate these bugs a priori, but verification has historically been difficult to apply at full-program scale, much less distributed-system scale. We describe a methodology for building practical and provably correct distributed systems based on a unique blend of TLA-style state-machine refinement and Hoare-logic verification. We demonstrate the methodology on a complex implementation of a Paxos-based replicated state machine library and a lease-based sharded key-value store. We prove that each obeys a concise safety specification, as well as desirable liveness requirements. Each implementation achieves performance competitive with a reference system. With our methodology and lessons learned, we aim to raise the standard for distributed systems from &quot;tested&quot; to &quot;correct.&quot; SOSP 2015 - IronFleet - Proving Practical Distributed Systems Correct...
  73.      
  74.      Blog Post Copyright (c) 2015 Jorgen Thelin. All rights reserved.
  75.      </description>
  76.  
  77.      <category>Cloud Services</category>
  78.  
  79.      <dc:creator>Jorgen Thelin</dc:creator>
  80.  
  81.      <content:encoded>
  82.      <![CDATA[
  83.        <p><b>Abstract:</b>
  84. Distributed systems are notorious for harboring subtle bugs. Verification can, in principle, eliminate these bugs a priori, but verification has historically been difficult to apply at full-program scale, much less distributed-system scale.
  85. <br/>
  86. We describe a methodology for building practical and provably correct distributed systems based on a unique blend of TLA-style state-machine refinement and Hoare-logic verification. We demonstrate the methodology on a complex implementation of a Paxos-based replicated state machine library and a lease-based sharded key-value store. We prove that each obeys a concise safety specification, as well as desirable liveness requirements. Each implementation achieves performance competitive with a reference system. With our methodology and lessons learned, we aim to raise the standard for distributed systems from "tested" to "correct."
  87. </p>
  88. <p>
  89. <a href="http://research.microsoft.com/apps/pubs/default.aspx?id=255833">
  90. SOSP 2015 - IronFleet - Proving Practical Distributed Systems Correct
  91. </a>
  92. </p>
  93.        
  94.        <p class="posted">
  95.        <span>Blog Post Copyright (c) 2015 Jorgen Thelin. All rights reserved.</span>
  96.        <span>
  97.        Original article location: <a href="http://www.thearchitect.co.uk/weblog/archives/2015/11/ironfleet.html">http://www.thearchitect.co.uk/weblog/archives/2015/11/ironfleet.html</a>
  98.        </span>
  99.        </p>
  100.      ]]>
  101.      </content:encoded>
  102.    </item>
  103.    <item>
  104.      <link>http://www.thearchitect.co.uk/weblog/archives/2015/11/the_bones_of_the_system_a_study_of_logging_and_telemetry_at_1.html</link>
  105.      <pubDate>Mon, 02 Nov 2015 13:22:30 GMT</pubDate>
  106.      <guid isPermaLink="false">tag:www.thearchitect.co.uk,2015:/weblog//2.573</guid>
  107.  
  108.      <title>The Bones of the System - A Study of Logging and Telemetry at Microsoft</title>
  109.  
  110.      <description>
  111.      Abstract: Large software organizations are transitioning to event data platforms as they culturally shift to better support data-driven decision making. This paper offers a case study at Microsoft during such a transition. Through qualitative interviews of 28 participants, and a quantitative survey of 1,823 respondents, we catalog a diverse set of activities that leverage event data sources, identify challenges in conducting these activities, and describe tensions that emerge in data-driven cultures as event data flow through these activities within the organization. We find that the use of event data span every job role in our interviews and survey, that different perspectives on event data create tensions between roles or teams, and that professionals report social and technical challenges across activities. MSR-TR-2015-79 - The Bones of the System - A Study of Logging and Telemetry at Microsoft...
  112.      
  113.      Blog Post Copyright (c) 2015 Jorgen Thelin. All rights reserved.
  114.      </description>
  115.  
  116.      <category>Cloud Services</category>
  117.  
  118.      <dc:creator>Jorgen Thelin</dc:creator>
  119.  
  120.      <content:encoded>
  121.      <![CDATA[
  122.        <p><b>Abstract:</b>
  123. Large software organizations are transitioning to event data platforms as they culturally shift to better support data-driven decision making. This paper offers a case study at Microsoft during such a transition.
  124. Through qualitative interviews of 28 participants, and a quantitative survey of 1,823 respondents, we catalog a diverse set of activities that leverage event data sources, identify challenges in conducting these activities, and describe tensions that emerge in data-driven cultures as event data flow through these activities within the organization.
  125. We find that the use of event data span every job role in our interviews and survey, that different perspectives on event data create tensions between roles or teams, and that professionals report social and technical challenges across activities.
  126. </p>
  127. <p>
  128. <a href="http://research.microsoft.com/apps/pubs/default.aspx?id=257960">
  129. MSR-TR-2015-79 - The Bones of the System - A Study of Logging and Telemetry at Microsoft
  130. </a>
  131. </p>
  132.        
  133.        <p class="posted">
  134.        <span>Blog Post Copyright (c) 2015 Jorgen Thelin. All rights reserved.</span>
  135.        <span>
  136.        Original article location: <a href="http://www.thearchitect.co.uk/weblog/archives/2015/11/the_bones_of_the_system_a_study_of_logging_and_telemetry_at_1.html">http://www.thearchitect.co.uk/weblog/archives/2015/11/the_bones_of_the_system_a_study_of_logging_and_telemetry_at_1.html</a>
  137.        </span>
  138.        </p>
  139.      ]]>
  140.      </content:encoded>
  141.    </item>
  142.    <item>
  143.      <link>http://www.thearchitect.co.uk/weblog/archives/2015/04/mva_exploring_microservices_in_docker_and_microsoft_azure.html</link>
  144.      <pubDate>Sat, 25 Apr 2015 22:57:51 GMT</pubDate>
  145.      <guid isPermaLink="false">tag:www.thearchitect.co.uk,2015:/weblog//2.572</guid>
  146.  
  147.      <title>MVA - Exploring Microservices in Docker and Microsoft Azure</title>
  148.  
  149.      <description>
  150.       Microsoft Virtual Academy Live Event 05-May-2015 - Exploring Microservices in Docker and Microsoft Azure. http://www.microsoftvirtualacademy.com/liveevents/exploring-microservices-in-docker-and-microsoft-azure...
  151.            Read more -- "MVA - Exploring Microservices in Docker and Microsoft Azure"
  152.      
  153.      Blog Post Copyright (c) 2015 Jorgen Thelin. All rights reserved.
  154.      </description>
  155.  
  156.      <category>Cloud Services</category>
  157.  
  158.      <dc:creator>Jorgen Thelin</dc:creator>
  159.  
  160.      <content:encoded>
  161.      <![CDATA[
  162.        <p>
  163. Microsoft Virtual Academy Live Event 05-May-2015 - Exploring Microservices in Docker and Microsoft Azure.
  164. <br/>
  165. <a href="http://www.microsoftvirtualacademy.com/liveevents/exploring-microservices-in-docker-and-microsoft-azure">http://www.microsoftvirtualacademy.com/liveevents/exploring-microservices-in-docker-and-microsoft-azure</a>
  166. </p>
  167.                <span class="extended">
  168.        Read more -- "<a href="http://www.thearchitect.co.uk/weblog/archives/2015/04/mva_exploring_microservices_in_docker_and_microsoft_azure.html">MVA - Exploring Microservices in Docker and Microsoft Azure</a>"
  169.        </span>
  170.        
  171.        <p class="posted">
  172.        <span>Blog Post Copyright (c) 2015 Jorgen Thelin. All rights reserved.</span>
  173.        <span>
  174.        Original article location: <a href="http://www.thearchitect.co.uk/weblog/archives/2015/04/mva_exploring_microservices_in_docker_and_microsoft_azure.html">http://www.thearchitect.co.uk/weblog/archives/2015/04/mva_exploring_microservices_in_docker_and_microsoft_azure.html</a>
  175.        </span>
  176.        </p>
  177.      ]]>
  178.      </content:encoded>
  179.    </item>
  180.    <item>
  181.      <link>http://www.thearchitect.co.uk/weblog/archives/2014/12/find_and_fix_assembly_version_conflicts_msb3247.html</link>
  182.      <pubDate>Mon, 01 Dec 2014 15:28:08 GMT</pubDate>
  183.      <guid isPermaLink="false">tag:www.thearchitect.co.uk,2014:/weblog//2.571</guid>
  184.  
  185.      <title>Find and Fix Assembly Version Conflicts MSB3247</title>
  186.  
  187.      <description>
  188.       AsmSpy is a nice little tool to help locate and fix assembly version conflicts reported by the Visual Studio C# compiler error code MSB3247. http://mikehadlow.blogspot.co.uk/2011/02/asmspy-little-tool-to-help-fix-assembly.html...
  189.      
  190.      Blog Post Copyright (c) 2015 Jorgen Thelin. All rights reserved.
  191.      </description>
  192.  
  193.      <category>Dot NET</category>
  194.  
  195.      <dc:creator>Jorgen Thelin</dc:creator>
  196.  
  197.      <content:encoded>
  198.      <![CDATA[
  199.        <p>
  200. AsmSpy is a nice little tool to help locate and fix assembly version conflicts reported by the Visual Studio C#  compiler error code MSB3247.
  201.  
  202. <a href="http://mikehadlow.blogspot.co.uk/2011/02/asmspy-little-tool-to-help-fix-assembly.html">
  203. http://mikehadlow.blogspot.co.uk/2011/02/asmspy-little-tool-to-help-fix-assembly.html</a>
  204. </p>
  205.        
  206.        <p class="posted">
  207.        <span>Blog Post Copyright (c) 2015 Jorgen Thelin. All rights reserved.</span>
  208.        <span>
  209.        Original article location: <a href="http://www.thearchitect.co.uk/weblog/archives/2014/12/find_and_fix_assembly_version_conflicts_msb3247.html">http://www.thearchitect.co.uk/weblog/archives/2014/12/find_and_fix_assembly_version_conflicts_msb3247.html</a>
  210.        </span>
  211.        </p>
  212.      ]]>
  213.      </content:encoded>
  214.    </item>
  215.    <item>
  216.      <link>http://www.thearchitect.co.uk/weblog/archives/2014/06/the_internet_of_cars.html</link>
  217.      <pubDate>Tue, 03 Jun 2014 12:00:00 GMT</pubDate>
  218.      <guid isPermaLink="false">tag:www.thearchitect.co.uk,2014:/weblog//2.570</guid>
  219.  
  220.      <title>The Internet of Cars - Towards the Future of the Connected Car</title>
  221.  
  222.      <description>
  223.      http://www.slideshare.net/jthelin/the-internet-of-cars No doubt you have heard the phrase &quot;Internet of Things&quot; and the new buzzword &quot;IoT&quot; been used more and more these days, but what does that mean in practice? The Tesla Model S is probably the most well-connected car on the planet at the moment, and in this presentation we will use that vehicle as a case study of some practical usage of IoT concepts and technology that is already being applied to modern automobiles. How far away are we from a future &quot;Internet of Cars&quot; and what will be the social and privacy impacts of more connected-car scenarios?...
  224.      
  225.      Blog Post Copyright (c) 2015 Jorgen Thelin. All rights reserved.
  226.      </description>
  227.  
  228.      <category>Cloud Services</category>
  229.  
  230.      <dc:creator>Jorgen Thelin</dc:creator>
  231.  
  232.      <content:encoded>
  233.      <![CDATA[
  234.        <a href="http://www.slideshare.net/jthelin/the-internet-of-cars">http://www.slideshare.net/jthelin/the-internet-of-cars</a>
  235. <p>
  236. No doubt you have heard the phrase "Internet of Things" and the new buzzword "IoT" been used more and more these days, but what does that mean in practice? The Tesla Model S is probably the most well-connected car on the planet at the moment, and in this presentation we will use that vehicle as a case study of some practical usage of IoT concepts and technology that is already being applied to modern automobiles. How far away are we from a future "Internet of Cars" and what will be the social and privacy impacts of more connected-car scenarios?
  237. </p>
  238.  
  239.        
  240.        <p class="posted">
  241.        <span>Blog Post Copyright (c) 2015 Jorgen Thelin. All rights reserved.</span>
  242.        <span>
  243.        Original article location: <a href="http://www.thearchitect.co.uk/weblog/archives/2014/06/the_internet_of_cars.html">http://www.thearchitect.co.uk/weblog/archives/2014/06/the_internet_of_cars.html</a>
  244.        </span>
  245.        </p>
  246.      ]]>
  247.      </content:encoded>
  248.    </item>
  249.    <item>
  250.      <link>http://www.thearchitect.co.uk/weblog/archives/2012/09/finding_app_deployment_directory_from_azure_webrole.html</link>
  251.      <pubDate>Wed, 12 Sep 2012 15:35:00 GMT</pubDate>
  252.      <guid isPermaLink="false">tag:www.thearchitect.co.uk,2012:/weblog//2.569</guid>
  253.  
  254.      <title>Finding App Deployment Directory from Azure WebRole</title>
  255.  
  256.      <description>
  257.      Finding which directory a Windows Azure application is deployed to is fairly straight forward for a WorkerRole, but for a WebRole hosted in IIS can be rather challenging! This issue particularly manifests itself when your WebRole deployment contains any &quot;data&quot; files (such as config files) which need to be accessed from your ASP.NET application code, but can potentially be an issue from role startup code too....
  258.            Read more -- "Finding App Deployment Directory from Azure WebRole"
  259.      
  260.      Blog Post Copyright (c) 2015 Jorgen Thelin. All rights reserved.
  261.      </description>
  262.  
  263.      <category>Cloud Services</category>
  264.  
  265.      <dc:creator>Jorgen Thelin</dc:creator>
  266.  
  267.      <content:encoded>
  268.      <![CDATA[
  269.        <p>Finding which directory a Windows Azure application is deployed to is fairly straight forward for a WorkerRole, but for a WebRole hosted in IIS can be rather challenging!</p>  <p>This issue particularly manifests itself when your WebRole deployment contains any "data" files (such as config files) which need to be accessed from your ASP.NET application code, but can potentially be an issue from role startup code too.</p>  
  270.                <span class="extended">
  271.        Read more -- "<a href="http://www.thearchitect.co.uk/weblog/archives/2012/09/finding_app_deployment_directory_from_azure_webrole.html">Finding App Deployment Directory from Azure WebRole</a>"
  272.        </span>
  273.        
  274.        <p class="posted">
  275.        <span>Blog Post Copyright (c) 2015 Jorgen Thelin. All rights reserved.</span>
  276.        <span>
  277.        Original article location: <a href="http://www.thearchitect.co.uk/weblog/archives/2012/09/finding_app_deployment_directory_from_azure_webrole.html">http://www.thearchitect.co.uk/weblog/archives/2012/09/finding_app_deployment_directory_from_azure_webrole.html</a>
  278.        </span>
  279.        </p>
  280.      ]]>
  281.      </content:encoded>
  282.    </item>
  283.    <item>
  284.      <link>http://www.thearchitect.co.uk/weblog/archives/2011/10/orleans_cloud_computing_for_everyone_acm_socc_2011.html</link>
  285.      <pubDate>Sat, 08 Oct 2011 11:08:08 GMT</pubDate>
  286.      <guid isPermaLink="false">tag:www.thearchitect.co.uk,2011:/weblog//2.568</guid>
  287.  
  288.      <title>Orleans - Cloud Computing for Everyone - ACM SOCC 2011</title>
  289.  
  290.      <description>
  291.      My team&apos;s latest technical paper has been accepted for the ACM Symposium on Cloud Computing (SOCC 2011) http://research.microsoft.com/apps/pubs/default.aspx?id=153347 Orleans: Cloud Computing for Everyone Cloud computing is a new computing paradigm, combining diverse client devices - PCs, smartphones, sensors, single-function, and embedded - with computation and data storage in the cloud. As with every advance in computing, programming is a fundamental challenge, as the cloud is a concurrent, distributed system running on unreliable hardware and networks. Orleans is a software framework for building reliable, scalable, and elastic cloud applications. Its programming model encourages the use of simple concurrency patterns that are easy to understand and employ correctly. It is based on distributed actor-like components called grains, which are isolated units of state and computation that communicate through asynchronous messages. Within a grain, promises are the mechanism for managing both asynchronous messages and local task-based concurrency. Isolated state and a constrained execution model allow Orleans to persist, migrate, replicate, and reconcile grain state. In addition, Orleans provides lightweight transactions that support a consistent view of state and provide a foundation for automatic error handling and failure recovery. We implemented several applications in Orleans, varying from a messaging-intensive social networking application to a data- and compute-intensive linear algebra computation. The programming model is a general one, as Orleans allows the communications to evolve dynamically at runtime. Orleans enables a developer to concentrate on application logic, while the Orleans runtime provides scalability, availability, and reliability....
  292.      
  293.      Blog Post Copyright (c) 2015 Jorgen Thelin. All rights reserved.
  294.      </description>
  295.  
  296.      <category>Cloud Services</category>
  297.  
  298.      <dc:creator>Jorgen Thelin</dc:creator>
  299.  
  300.      <content:encoded>
  301.      <![CDATA[
  302.        <p>My team's latest technical paper has been accepted for the <a href="http://socc2011.gsd.inesc-id.pt/" target="_blank">ACM Symposium on Cloud Computing</a> (SOCC 2011)</p>  <p><a title="http://research.microsoft.com/apps/pubs/default.aspx?id=153347" href="http://research.microsoft.com/apps/pubs/default.aspx?id=153347">http://research.microsoft.com/apps/pubs/default.aspx?id=153347</a></p>  <blockquote>   <p><strong>Orleans: Cloud Computing for Everyone</strong></p>    <p>Cloud computing is a new computing paradigm, combining diverse client devices - PCs, smartphones, sensors, single-function, and embedded - with computation and data storage in the cloud. As with every advance in computing, programming is a fundamental challenge, as the cloud is a concurrent, distributed system running on unreliable hardware and networks. </p>    <p>Orleans is a software framework for building reliable, scalable, and elastic cloud applications. Its programming model encourages the use of simple concurrency patterns that are easy to understand and employ correctly. It is based on distributed actor-like components called grains, which are isolated units of state and computation that communicate through asynchronous messages. Within a grain, promises are the mechanism for managing both asynchronous messages and local task-based concurrency. Isolated state and a constrained execution model allow Orleans to persist, migrate, replicate, and reconcile grain state. In addition, Orleans provides lightweight transactions that support a consistent view of state and provide a foundation for automatic error handling and failure recovery. </p>    <p>We implemented several applications in Orleans, varying from a messaging-intensive social networking application to a data- and compute-intensive linear algebra computation. The programming model is a general one, as Orleans allows the communications to evolve dynamically at runtime. Orleans enables a developer to concentrate on application logic, while the Orleans runtime provides scalability, availability, and reliability. </p></blockquote>
  303.        
  304.        <p class="posted">
  305.        <span>Blog Post Copyright (c) 2015 Jorgen Thelin. All rights reserved.</span>
  306.        <span>
  307.        Original article location: <a href="http://www.thearchitect.co.uk/weblog/archives/2011/10/orleans_cloud_computing_for_everyone_acm_socc_2011.html">http://www.thearchitect.co.uk/weblog/archives/2011/10/orleans_cloud_computing_for_everyone_acm_socc_2011.html</a>
  308.        </span>
  309.        </p>
  310.      ]]>
  311.      </content:encoded>
  312.    </item>
  313.    <item>
  314.      <link>http://www.thearchitect.co.uk/weblog/archives/2011/08/performance_datetimeutcnow_vs_datetimenow.html</link>
  315.      <pubDate>Mon, 29 Aug 2011 16:06:24 GMT</pubDate>
  316.      <guid isPermaLink="false">tag:www.thearchitect.co.uk,2011:/weblog//2.567</guid>
  317.  
  318.      <title>Performance - DateTime.UtcNow vs DateTime.Now</title>
  319.  
  320.      <description>
  321.       Did you know that in C# programming, using DateTime.UtcNow to get the current date/time is ~3.3x faster than DateTime.Now ?...
  322.      
  323.      Blog Post Copyright (c) 2015 Jorgen Thelin. All rights reserved.
  324.      </description>
  325.  
  326.      <category>Programming</category>
  327.  
  328.      <dc:creator>Jorgen Thelin</dc:creator>
  329.  
  330.      <content:encoded>
  331.      <![CDATA[
  332.        <p>
  333. Did you know that in C# programming, using <a href="http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.datetime.utcnow.aspx">DateTime.UtcNow</a> to get the current date/time is ~3.3x faster than <a href="http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.datetime.now.aspx">DateTime.Now</a> ?
  334. </p>
  335.        
  336.        <p class="posted">
  337.        <span>Blog Post Copyright (c) 2015 Jorgen Thelin. All rights reserved.</span>
  338.        <span>
  339.        Original article location: <a href="http://www.thearchitect.co.uk/weblog/archives/2011/08/performance_datetimeutcnow_vs_datetimenow.html">http://www.thearchitect.co.uk/weblog/archives/2011/08/performance_datetimeutcnow_vs_datetimenow.html</a>
  340.        </span>
  341.        </p>
  342.      ]]>
  343.      </content:encoded>
  344.    </item>
  345.    <item>
  346.      <link>http://www.thearchitect.co.uk/weblog/archives/2010/12/orleans_on_msdn_channel_9.html</link>
  347.      <pubDate>Thu, 02 Dec 2010 16:11:07 GMT</pubDate>
  348.      <guid isPermaLink="false">tag:www.thearchitect.co.uk,2010:/weblog//2.566</guid>
  349.  
  350.      <title>Orleans on MSDN Channel 9</title>
  351.  
  352.      <description>
  353.      Yesterday Charles Torre came round to our building to film a Channel 9 Going Deep session with the Orleans team, which has now been posted on MSDN. Project Orleans: A Framework for Scalable Distributed Computing (Client + Cloud) Orleans is a Microsoft Research (MSR) project and managed (.NET) software framework for building client + cloud applications. As outlined in the recently released paper on the topic: Orleans defines an actor-like model of isolated grains that communicate through asynchronous messages and manage asynchronous computations with promises. The isolated state and constrained execution model of grains allows the Orleans runtime to persist, migrate, replicate, and reconcile grain state without programmer intervention. Orleans also provides lightweight, optimistic, distributed transactions that provide predictable consistency and failure handling for distributed operations across multiple grains. Here, we meet the Orleans team -- Sergey Bykov, Alan Geller, Gabriel Kliot, James Larus, Ravi Pandya, and Jorgen Thelin -- as they introduce Orleans and provide insights into the rationale and design decisions behind the project and also spend a fair amount of time focusing on the basic unit of isolated computation in Orleans, the grain. Very interesting and promising research (pun intended)! I highly recommend that you read the paper -- it&apos;s very approachable and makes many aspects of Orleans crystal clear. In fact, that&apos;s the goal of the Orleans framework: to make reliable and scalable distributed concurrent computing easier for developers to program. As we all know, it&apos;s hard to effectively program scalable distributed concurrent systems reliably. Orleans&apos;s goal is to change this by exploring new approaches (grain-based programming) using novel combinations of time-tested programming models and technologies (actors, promises, transactions, C#, CLR, etc). Tune in. Enjoy....
  354.      
  355.      Blog Post Copyright (c) 2015 Jorgen Thelin. All rights reserved.
  356.      </description>
  357.  
  358.      <category>Cloud Services</category>
  359.  
  360.      <dc:creator>Jorgen Thelin</dc:creator>
  361.  
  362.      <content:encoded>
  363.      <![CDATA[
  364.        <p>Yesterday Charles Torre came round to our building to film a Channel 9 Going Deep session with the Orleans team, which has now been <a href="http://channel9.msdn.com/Shows/Going+Deep/Project-Orleans-A-Cloud-Computing-Framework">posted</a> on MSDN.</p>  <h3><a href="http://channel9.msdn.com/Shows/Going+Deep/Project-Orleans-A-Cloud-Computing-Framework">Project Orleans: A Framework for Scalable Distributed Computing (Client + Cloud)</a></h3>  <blockquote>   <p><strong><a href="http://research.microsoft.com/en-us/projects/orleans/">Orleans</a></strong> is a <a href="http://research.microsoft.com">Microsoft Research (MSR)</a> project and managed (.NET) software framework for building client + cloud applications. As outlined in the recently released <a href="http://research.microsoft.com/apps/pubs/?id=141999">paper</a> on the topic: </p>    <blockquote>     <p><em>Orleans defines an actor-like model of isolated grains that communicate through asynchronous messages and manage asynchronous computations with promises. The isolated state and constrained execution model of grains allows the Orleans runtime to persist, migrate, replicate, and reconcile grain state without programmer intervention. Orleans also provides lightweight, optimistic, distributed transactions that provide predictable consistency and failure handling for distributed operations across multiple grains.</em> </p>   </blockquote>    <p>Here, we meet the Orleans team -- Sergey Bykov, Alan Geller, Gabriel Kliot, James Larus, Ravi Pandya, and Jorgen Thelin -- as they introduce Orleans and provide insights into the rationale and design decisions behind the project and also spend a fair amount of time focusing on the basic unit of <em>isolated computation</em> in Orleans, the <em>grain</em>. Very interesting and <em>promising</em> research (pun intended)! </p>    <p>I highly recommend that you <a href="http://research.microsoft.com/apps/pubs/?id=141999">read the paper</a> -- it's very approachable and makes many aspects of Orleans crystal clear. In fact, that's the goal of the Orleans framework: to make reliable and <em>scalable</em> distributed concurrent computing easier for developers to program. As we all know, it's hard to effectively program scalable distributed concurrent systems reliably. Orleans's goal is to change this by exploring new approaches (grain-based programming) using novel combinations of time-tested programming models and technologies (actors, promises, transactions, C#, CLR, etc). </p>    <p>Tune in. Enjoy.</p></blockquote>
  365.        
  366.        <p class="posted">
  367.        <span>Blog Post Copyright (c) 2015 Jorgen Thelin. All rights reserved.</span>
  368.        <span>
  369.        Original article location: <a href="http://www.thearchitect.co.uk/weblog/archives/2010/12/orleans_on_msdn_channel_9.html">http://www.thearchitect.co.uk/weblog/archives/2010/12/orleans_on_msdn_channel_9.html</a>
  370.        </span>
  371.        </p>
  372.      ]]>
  373.      </content:encoded>
  374.    </item>
  375.    <item>
  376.      <link>http://www.thearchitect.co.uk/weblog/archives/2010/11/msr_tech_report_orleans_a_framework_for_cloud_computing_msrt.html</link>
  377.      <pubDate>Tue, 30 Nov 2010 09:43:53 GMT</pubDate>
  378.      <guid isPermaLink="false">tag:www.thearchitect.co.uk,2010:/weblog//2.565</guid>
  379.  
  380.      <title>MSR Tech Report - Orleans: A Framework for Cloud Computing - MSR-TR-2010-159</title>
  381.  
  382.      <description>
  383.      Technical report MSR-TR-2010-159 about our team&apos;s Orleans project is now available on the Microsoft Research website. Orleans: A Framework for Cloud Computing Sergey Bykov, Alan Geller, Gabriel Kliot, James Larus, Ravi Pandya, and Jorgen Thelin 30 November 2010 Client + cloud computing is a disruptive, new computing platform, combining diverse client devices -- PCs, smartphones, sensors, and single-function and embedded devices -- with the unlimited, on-demand computation and data storage offered by cloud computing services such as Amazon&apos;s AWS or Microsoft&apos;s Windows Azure. As with every advance in computing, programming is a fundamental challenge as client + cloud computing combines many difficult aspects of software development. Orleans is a software framework for building client + cloud applications. Orleans encourages use of simple concurrency patterns that are easy to understand and implement correctly, building on an actor-like model with declarative specification of persistence, replication, and consistency and using lightweight transactions to support the development of reliable and scalable client + cloud software....
  384.      
  385.      Blog Post Copyright (c) 2015 Jorgen Thelin. All rights reserved.
  386.      </description>
  387.  
  388.      <category>Cloud Services</category>
  389.  
  390.      <dc:creator>Jorgen Thelin</dc:creator>
  391.  
  392.      <content:encoded>
  393.      <![CDATA[
  394.        <p>Technical report MSR-TR-2010-159 about our team's <a href="http://www.thearchitect.co.uk/weblog/archives/2010/10/current_projects_orleans_and_large_distributed_graphs.html">Orleans</a> project is now available on the Microsoft Research website.</p>  <p><a href="http://research.microsoft.com/apps/pubs/?id=141999"><font size="3"><strong>Orleans: A Framework for Cloud Computing</strong></font></a></p>  <p>Sergey Bykov, Alan Geller, Gabriel Kliot, <a href="http://research.microsoft.com/en-us/people/larus/">James Larus</a>, Ravi Pandya, and <a href="http://research.microsoft.com/en-us/people/jthelin/">Jorgen Thelin</a>     <br />30 November 2010</p>  <blockquote>   <p>Client + cloud computing is a disruptive, new computing platform, combining diverse client devices -- PCs, smartphones, sensors, and single-function and embedded devices -- with the unlimited, on-demand computation and data storage offered by cloud computing services such as Amazon's AWS or Microsoft's Windows Azure. As with every advance in computing, programming is a fundamental challenge as client + cloud computing combines many difficult aspects of software development. </p>    <p>Orleans is a software framework for building client + cloud applications. Orleans encourages use of simple concurrency patterns that are easy to understand and implement correctly, building on an actor-like model with declarative specification of persistence, replication, and consistency and using lightweight transactions to support the development of reliable and scalable client + cloud software. </p></blockquote>
  395.        
  396.        <p class="posted">
  397.        <span>Blog Post Copyright (c) 2015 Jorgen Thelin. All rights reserved.</span>
  398.        <span>
  399.        Original article location: <a href="http://www.thearchitect.co.uk/weblog/archives/2010/11/msr_tech_report_orleans_a_framework_for_cloud_computing_msrt.html">http://www.thearchitect.co.uk/weblog/archives/2010/11/msr_tech_report_orleans_a_framework_for_cloud_computing_msrt.html</a>
  400.        </span>
  401.        </p>
  402.      ]]>
  403.      </content:encoded>
  404.    </item>
  405.    <item>
  406.      <link>http://www.thearchitect.co.uk/weblog/archives/2010/10/current_projects_orleans_and_large_distributed_graphs.html</link>
  407.      <pubDate>Thu, 28 Oct 2010 07:42:43 GMT</pubDate>
  408.      <guid isPermaLink="false">tag:www.thearchitect.co.uk,2010:/weblog//2.564</guid>
  409.  
  410.      <title>Current Projects - Orleans and Large Distributed Graphs</title>
  411.  
  412.      <description>
  413.      This week, our team has published a few pages on the Microsoft Research web site covering what we are currently working: Orleans - A Platform for Cloud Computing - Microsoft Research Querying Large Distributed Graphs - Microsoft Research Enjoy....
  414.      
  415.      Blog Post Copyright (c) 2015 Jorgen Thelin. All rights reserved.
  416.      </description>
  417.  
  418.      <category>Microsoft</category>
  419.  
  420.      <dc:creator>Jorgen Thelin</dc:creator>
  421.  
  422.      <content:encoded>
  423.      <![CDATA[
  424.        <p>This week, our team has published a few pages on the Microsoft Research web site covering what we are currently working:</p>  <ul>   <li><a title="Orleans - A Platform for Cloud Computing - Microsoft Research" href="http://research.microsoft.com/en-us/projects/orleans/">Orleans - A Platform for Cloud Computing - Microsoft Research</a> </li>    <li><a title="Querying Large Distributed Graphs - Microsoft Research" href="http://research.microsoft.com/en-us/projects/ldg/">Querying Large Distributed Graphs - Microsoft Research</a> </li> </ul>  <p>Enjoy.</p>
  425.        
  426.        <p class="posted">
  427.        <span>Blog Post Copyright (c) 2015 Jorgen Thelin. All rights reserved.</span>
  428.        <span>
  429.        Original article location: <a href="http://www.thearchitect.co.uk/weblog/archives/2010/10/current_projects_orleans_and_large_distributed_graphs.html">http://www.thearchitect.co.uk/weblog/archives/2010/10/current_projects_orleans_and_large_distributed_graphs.html</a>
  430.        </span>
  431.        </p>
  432.      ]]>
  433.      </content:encoded>
  434.    </item>
  435.    <item>
  436.      <link>http://www.thearchitect.co.uk/weblog/archives/2010/10/powershell_which_version_of_windows_are_we_running_on.html</link>
  437.      <pubDate>Fri, 22 Oct 2010 09:54:57 GMT</pubDate>
  438.      <guid isPermaLink="false">tag:www.thearchitect.co.uk,2010:/weblog//2.563</guid>
  439.  
  440.      <title>PowerShell - Which version of Windows are we running on?</title>
  441.  
  442.      <description>
  443.      In PowerShell, how can you find out which version of Windows are we running on? Solution: Start a PowerShell window and type Get-WMIObject Win32_OperatingSystem Output should say something like: SystemDirectory : C:\Windows\system32 Organization&amp;#160;&amp;#160;&amp;#160; : XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX BuildNumber&amp;#160;&amp;#160;&amp;#160;&amp;#160; : 7600 RegisteredUser&amp;#160; : XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX SerialNumber&amp;#160;&amp;#160;&amp;#160; : XXXXX-XXX-XXXXXXX-XXXXX Version&amp;#160;&amp;#160;&amp;#160;&amp;#160;&amp;#160;&amp;#160;&amp;#160;&amp;#160; : 6.1.7600...
  444.      
  445.      Blog Post Copyright (c) 2015 Jorgen Thelin. All rights reserved.
  446.      </description>
  447.  
  448.      <category>Programming</category>
  449.  
  450.      <dc:creator>Jorgen Thelin</dc:creator>
  451.  
  452.      <content:encoded>
  453.      <![CDATA[
  454.        <p>In PowerShell, how can you find out which version of Windows are we running on?</p>  <p>Solution: </p>  <p>Start a PowerShell window and type <strong><font color="#ff0000" face="Courier New">Get-WMIObject Win32_OperatingSystem </font></strong></p>  <p>Output should say something like:</p>  <blockquote>   <p><font face="Courier New">SystemDirectory : C:\Windows\system32       <br />Organization&#160;&#160;&#160; : XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX        <br />BuildNumber&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160; : 7600        <br />RegisteredUser&#160; : XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX        <br />SerialNumber&#160;&#160;&#160; : XXXXX-XXX-XXXXXXX-XXXXX        <br /><font color="#ff0000">Version&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160; : 6.1.7600</font></font></p></blockquote>
  455.        
  456.        <p class="posted">
  457.        <span>Blog Post Copyright (c) 2015 Jorgen Thelin. All rights reserved.</span>
  458.        <span>
  459.        Original article location: <a href="http://www.thearchitect.co.uk/weblog/archives/2010/10/powershell_which_version_of_windows_are_we_running_on.html">http://www.thearchitect.co.uk/weblog/archives/2010/10/powershell_which_version_of_windows_are_we_running_on.html</a>
  460.        </span>
  461.        </p>
  462.      ]]>
  463.      </content:encoded>
  464.    </item>
  465.    <item>
  466.      <link>http://www.thearchitect.co.uk/weblog/archives/2010/10/which_version_of_powershell_is_installed.html</link>
  467.      <pubDate>Fri, 22 Oct 2010 08:32:41 GMT</pubDate>
  468.      <guid isPermaLink="false">tag:www.thearchitect.co.uk,2010:/weblog//2.562</guid>
  469.  
  470.      <title>PowerShell - Which version of PowerShell are we running?</title>
  471.  
  472.      <description>
  473.      How can you find out which version of PowerShell is installed on your PC? Solution: Start a PowerShell window and type Get-Host Output should say something like: Name&amp;#160;&amp;#160;&amp;#160;&amp;#160;&amp;#160;&amp;#160;&amp;#160;&amp;#160;&amp;#160;&amp;#160;&amp;#160;&amp;#160; : ConsoleHost Version&amp;#160;&amp;#160;&amp;#160;&amp;#160;&amp;#160;&amp;#160;&amp;#160;&amp;#160;&amp;#160; : 2.0...
  474.      
  475.      Blog Post Copyright (c) 2015 Jorgen Thelin. All rights reserved.
  476.      </description>
  477.  
  478.      <category>Programming</category>
  479.  
  480.      <dc:creator>Jorgen Thelin</dc:creator>
  481.  
  482.      <content:encoded>
  483.      <![CDATA[
  484.        <p>How can you find out which version of PowerShell is installed on your PC?</p>  <p>Solution: </p>  <p>Start a PowerShell window and type <strong><font color="#ff0000" face="Courier New">Get-Host        <br /></font></strong>Output should say something like:</p>  <blockquote>   <p><font face="Courier New">Name&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160; : ConsoleHost        <br /><strong>Version&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160; : <font color="#ff0000">2.0</font></strong></font></p></blockquote>
  485.        
  486.        <p class="posted">
  487.        <span>Blog Post Copyright (c) 2015 Jorgen Thelin. All rights reserved.</span>
  488.        <span>
  489.        Original article location: <a href="http://www.thearchitect.co.uk/weblog/archives/2010/10/which_version_of_powershell_is_installed.html">http://www.thearchitect.co.uk/weblog/archives/2010/10/which_version_of_powershell_is_installed.html</a>
  490.        </span>
  491.        </p>
  492.      ]]>
  493.      </content:encoded>
  494.    </item>
  495.    <item>
  496.      <link>http://www.thearchitect.co.uk/weblog/archives/2010/08/windows_azure_security_overview_white_paper.html</link>
  497.      <pubDate>Tue, 10 Aug 2010 13:18:39 GMT</pubDate>
  498.      <guid isPermaLink="false">tag:www.thearchitect.co.uk,2010:/weblog//2.561</guid>
  499.  
  500.      <title>Windows Azure Security Overview White Paper</title>
  501.  
  502.      <description>
  503.      <![CDATA[A new white paper &quot;Windows Azure Security Overview&quot; has just been released that provides a comprehensive look at the broad range of security features and functionality available with Windows Azure. The paper describes the array of controls that Windows Azure customers can use to achieve their required level of security, control and compliance most suitable for their unique requirements. http://go.microsoft.com/?linkid=9740388...]]>
  504.      
  505.      Blog Post Copyright (c) 2015 Jorgen Thelin. All rights reserved.
  506.      </description>
  507.  
  508.      <category>Cloud Services</category>
  509.  
  510.      <dc:creator>Jorgen Thelin</dc:creator>
  511.  
  512.      <content:encoded>
  513.      <![CDATA[
  514.        <p>A new white paper <a href="http://go.microsoft.com/?linkid=9740388">&quot;Windows Azure Security Overview&quot;</a> has just been released that provides a comprehensive look at the broad range of security features and functionality available with Windows Azure. </p>  <p>The paper describes the array of controls that Windows Azure customers can use to achieve their required level of security, control and compliance most suitable for their unique requirements.</p>  <p><a href="http://go.microsoft.com/?linkid=9740388" target="_blank">http://go.microsoft.com/?linkid=9740388</a></p>
  515.        
  516.        <p class="posted">
  517.        <span>Blog Post Copyright (c) 2015 Jorgen Thelin. All rights reserved.</span>
  518.        <span>
  519.        Original article location: <a href="http://www.thearchitect.co.uk/weblog/archives/2010/08/windows_azure_security_overview_white_paper.html">http://www.thearchitect.co.uk/weblog/archives/2010/08/windows_azure_security_overview_white_paper.html</a>
  520.        </span>
  521.        </p>
  522.      ]]>
  523.      </content:encoded>
  524.    </item>
  525.  
  526.  
  527.  </channel>
  528. </rss>
  529.  

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