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  11. <title>OurMedia</title>
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  14. <description>Stories are our DNA</description>
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  21. <title>Welcome to The Story</title>
  22. <link>http://ourmedia.org/welcome-to-the-story/</link>
  23. <comments>http://ourmedia.org/welcome-to-the-story/#comments</comments>
  24. <pubDate>Tue, 14 Mar 2017 17:55:42 +0000</pubDate>
  25. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Mitch Ratcliffe]]></dc:creator>
  26. <category><![CDATA[Stories]]></category>
  27. <category><![CDATA[Narrative]]></category>
  28. <category><![CDATA[Storytelling]]></category>
  29.  
  30. <guid isPermaLink="false">http://ourmedia.org/?p=2468</guid>
  31. <description><![CDATA[Welcome to OurMedia.org&#8217;s The Story Blog, the public record of narrative experimentation. We&#8217;ll post news summaries, commentary and creative contributors ideas and critiques of new digital storytelling technology, narrative thinking and strategy. Our members, master creatives and organizational leaders from a variety of industries, are actively assembling new projects and research topics to address the rapidly changing storytelling environment. We&#8217;ve learned from our work and history that stories change the world. Narrative, the context, values, and expectations on which stories are told, rewires expectation to create novel possibilities. In combination, story and narrative can reshape the future. Digital technology amplified each story’s reach, granting storytellers in every corner of the world new power to inspire, convince, and impel change. We believe that after a half-century of computational history only now is digital narrative emerging as an art form, an industry, and a tool for transformation. The Digital Narrative Alliance [&#8230;]]]></description>
  32. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Welcome to OurMedia.org&#8217;s The Story Blog, the public record of narrative experimentation. We&#8217;ll post news summaries, commentary and creative contributors ideas and critiques of new digital storytelling technology, narrative thinking and strategy. Our members, master creatives and organizational leaders from a variety of industries, are actively assembling new projects and research topics to address the rapidly changing storytelling environment.</p>
  33. <p><a href="http://ourmedia.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/image2.jpg"><img class="alignleft wp-image-1494" src="http://ourmedia.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/image2.jpg" alt="" width="437" height="246" srcset="http://ourmedia.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/image2.jpg 800w, http://ourmedia.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/image2-300x169.jpg 300w, http://ourmedia.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/image2-768x432.jpg 768w" sizes="(max-width: 437px) 100vw, 437px" /></a>We&#8217;ve learned from our work and history that stories change the world. Narrative, the context, values, and expectations on which stories are told, rewires expectation to create novel possibilities. In combination, story and narrative can reshape the future. Digital technology amplified each story’s reach, granting storytellers in every corner of the world new power to inspire, convince, and impel change. We believe that after a half-century of computational history only now is digital narrative emerging as an art form, an industry, and a tool for transformation.</p>
  34. <p>The Digital Narrative Alliance is a collaboration of master storytellers and organizational leaders. DNA members share experience and insights through online and physical gatherings, as well as participating in collaborative and for-profit projects. We create events, research programs and executive experiences that explore narrative’s power to inspire to companies, non-profits, and government, as well as to individuals who want to change their world. We build collaborative projects that members can join, and raise funding for project that provide powerful positive social outcomes.</p>
  35. <p>We help leaders understand and use media purposefully. Join us here on The Story to get a daily taste of the DNA experience. When you find inspiration here, we urge you to join the DNA and make that vision a reality. We&#8217;re on an exploratory journey, and we invite all of you along.</p>
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  41. <title>Embodied AI Characters for Emergent Narrative</title>
  42. <link>http://ourmedia.org/embodied-ai-characters-for-emergent-narrative/</link>
  43. <comments>http://ourmedia.org/embodied-ai-characters-for-emergent-narrative/#respond</comments>
  44. <pubDate>Sun, 12 Feb 2017 20:39:06 +0000</pubDate>
  45. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Mitch Ratcliffe]]></dc:creator>
  46. <category><![CDATA[Art]]></category>
  47. <category><![CDATA[Creative]]></category>
  48. <category><![CDATA[Ideas]]></category>
  49. <category><![CDATA[Interaction design]]></category>
  50. <category><![CDATA[embodied AI]]></category>
  51. <category><![CDATA[Jeffrey Ventrella]]></category>
  52. <category><![CDATA[self-animated characters]]></category>
  53.  
  54. <guid isPermaLink="false">http://ourmedia.org/?p=2346</guid>
  55. <description><![CDATA[How AI and augmented reality will issue forth a new genre of interactive character design by Jeffrey Ventrella, DNA Contributor Imagine yourself five years from now. Apple has come out with a new version of its augmented reality glasses. You have just purchased a pair. Stepping into a café, you order an espresso and sit down to open the shiny new box. After trying on the glasses – and with a bit of fumbling – you manage to get through the mile-long Apple terms and conditions without touching your computer. Instead, you scroll down to the bottom of the form by gesturing in the air with your index finger, making sure not to poke the eye of the person sitting across from you. You tap the air to indicate “Yes – I have read the terms and conditions”…which of course is a lie. Finally, just for kicks, you start [&#8230;]]]></description>
  56. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p><strong>How AI and augmented reality will issue forth a new genre of interactive character design</strong></p>
  57. <p>by <a href="http://www.ventrella.com/">Jeffrey Ventrella, </a>DNA Contributor</p>
  58. <p>Imagine yourself five years from now. Apple has come out with a new version of its augmented reality glasses. You have just purchased a pair. Stepping into a café, you order an espresso and sit down to open the shiny new box. After trying on the glasses – and with a bit of fumbling – you manage to get through the mile-long Apple terms and conditions without touching your computer. Instead, you scroll down to the bottom of the form by gesturing in the air with your index finger, making sure not to poke the eye of the person sitting across from you. You tap the air to indicate “Yes – I have read the terms and conditions”…which of course is a lie. Finally, just for kicks, you start running a cool-sounding app:  something about “an ongoing narrative with virtual characters”. Now you are ready go for a walk. You finish your espresso and head out into the street, wearing your new glasses.</p>
  59. <p><a href="http://ourmedia.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/AnimatedontheStreet.png"><img class="alignleft size-thumbnail wp-image-2347" src="http://ourmedia.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/AnimatedontheStreet-150x150.png" alt="" width="150" height="150" /></a>Once on the street, you immediately notice a couple of animated characters – emitting an eerie glow and slightly out of place – just outside of the café. They are deep in conversation. They are speaking in a strange accent. You stop and listen, and one of them glances over at you with a glare, annoyed that you are eavesdropping. This makes you a bit nervous and embarrassed.</p>
  60. <p>And that is strange, because you know that these are not real people: They are virtual characters in an ongoing story that is taking place among the streets of your town.</p>
  61. <p>These characters, and several others, have been talking for several months now. They are debating the changes to society that have disrupted their lifestyles. Some of the characters are able to peer into the future and engage with us living here and now in the year 2017 – those of us who happen to have the augmented reality app.</p>
  62. <p>As we join in these virtual conversations, we become incorporated into the unfolding fiction that is playing out. It is an open-ended narrative, acted out by artificially-intelligent characters that are experienced only in augmented reality. Increasingly, we humans here in meatspace become intertwined in the narrative. The boundary between fiction and reality dissolves into a fractal curve. Our lives fuse with the narrative – the narrative fuses with our lives. And that takes some getting used to: the nature of narratives change as we become participants in them.</p>
  63. <p>This vignette that I have just described is just one possible future manifestation of a set of technologies that point toward a new genre where the boundary between reality and fiction is increasingly difficult to detect. And the key ingredient is a set of artificially-intelligent characters with <em>real embodiment</em>: They occupy real place and real time, via augmented reality, geolocation, computer vision, and other technologies that situate them in the physical world. This embodiment is critical to how their narratives play out.</p>
  64. <p><strong>Emergent Narratives vs. Branching Stories</strong></p>
  65. <p><em>&#8220;A story should have a beginning, a middle and an end, but not necessarily in that order.&#8221;<br />
  66. <strong>&#8211; Jean-Luc Godard</strong></em></p>
  67. <p>Our lives are awash in a sea of overlapping narratives. “Narrative” can be defined as “a spoken or written account of connected events” (Wikipedia). Although the term “story” is often included in this definition, it must be emphasized that a <em>story</em> is a fixed work of creation, which has a beginning, middle, and end. A story is contained, like a song.</p>
  68. <p>But consider Godard’s quote: the linearity of a story can be deconstructed in many ways. Branching storylines have been developed extensively in digital games in which the player has agency in the story, as well as with altered traditional literary media (i.e., the <em>Choose Your Own Adventure</em> book series). Branching stories are assembled from discrete building blocks. And while the ordering of these building blocks may be open-ended, the blocks themselves are fixed and static. The blocks fit together in various ways, but the story is still essentially set by the content of the various blocks.</p>
  69. <p>Can a building block be broken down into sub-chunks? Certainly. But beware. There is no logical end of this line of reasoning – one falls into a kind of Zeno’s Paradox. The smaller and more numerous the chunks, the harder it becomes to compose the glue that holds these chunks together to create meaning. After all, a story is more than just a sequence of events. So, if you want infinitely small, and infinitely many story “atoms”, you’ll be left with just glue…and a pile of atoms.</p>
  70. <p><strong>Simulation</strong></p>
  71. <p>But don’t despair, simulation can come to the rescue! We have only just begun to tap the vast potential of artificial intelligence and other technologies to design simulations that permit narratives to emerge from the very atoms of virtual reality. But while we are waiting for the technology to become advanced enough to make this viable, I would claim that we have a perfect shortcut: Us!</p>
  72. <p>It may be tempting to claim that a deep simulation using the power of Artificial Intelligence (AI), physics, behavioral psychology, and other basic laws of nature can be tuned just right to make spontaneous events happen in a virtual world that are “meaningful.” But that is a tall order, and some may even claim that it can never happen. This is why I am suggesting the inclusion of us – real people with already rich intertwined narratives – in the mix. Think of the simulation matrix as dead soil: Add water, microbes, and seeds, and something will start to grow. True AI doesn’t just work right out of the box – it has to grow, it has to learn – it needs fertile soil.</p>
  73. <p><a href="http://ourmedia.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/PeckPics.png"><img class="alignright wp-image-2348 size-full" src="http://ourmedia.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/PeckPics.png" width="1000" height="330" srcset="http://ourmedia.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/PeckPics.png 1000w, http://ourmedia.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/PeckPics-300x99.png 300w, http://ourmedia.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/PeckPics-768x253.png 768w" sizes="(max-width: 1000px) 100vw, 1000px" /></a>For this reason, I suggest that we <em>do not </em>need super-intelligent AI systems that emulate high-level human reasoning, emotion, and narrative intelligence. The AI can be <em>just smart enough</em>, and – more importantly – able to react to us and learn from us – to absorb our own meanings into the fabric of the simulation.</p>
  74. <p><strong>The Artificial Life Approach: Starting with a Primordial Soup</strong></p>
  75. <p>I have been developing a technology for several decades that I started while doing research at the MIT Media Lab in the early 90’s. It takes as inspiration the craft of artificial life: Designing virtual petri dishes from which lifelike behaviors emerge. Since that time, the toolset has exploded to include more sophisticated genetic algorithms, physics simulations, neural nets and much more. Concurrently, the rise of machine learning algorithms will help tap vast databases to extract something resembling meaning.</p>
  76. <p><a href="http://ourmedia.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Wiglets.png"><img class="alignleft size-full wp-image-2349" src="http://ourmedia.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Wiglets.png" alt="" width="1000" height="259" srcset="http://ourmedia.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Wiglets.png 1000w, http://ourmedia.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Wiglets-300x78.png 300w, http://ourmedia.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Wiglets-768x199.png 768w" sizes="(max-width: 1000px) 100vw, 1000px" /></a>But there is still something missing from this toolset: Virtual body language. In order for AI to be expressive, it needs some form of embodiment. For this reason, I’ve focused on cartoon-style characters – having just the right set of expressive affordances and the ability to learn adaptations to provide an affective dimension. These characters also have a degree of reactive agency, such that narrative-like moments can emerge spontaneously.</p>
  77. <p>With this simplified approach, one can avoid the uncanny valley as well as keep things real and actionable. We will eventually get to human-like intelligence, but I am in no rush. And besides, replicating ourselves accurately may not actually be what the future calls for.</p>
  78. <p>What the future may be calling for is an augmentation of our own narratives with highly-connected artificial agents which have emotional intelligence, expressive body language, access to the internet’s crowd-wisdom, and a strong association with time and place – being truly embodied and situated. Their responsiveness to us complex humans here in meatspace would give the characters endless fodder for generating continuous emergent narrative.</p>
  79. ]]></content:encoded>
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  81. <slash:comments>0</slash:comments>
  82. </item>
  83. <item>
  84. <title>Civil Conversations &#8211; OurMedia</title>
  85. <link>http://ourmedia.org/civil-conversations-ourmedia/</link>
  86. <comments>http://ourmedia.org/civil-conversations-ourmedia/#respond</comments>
  87. <pubDate>Tue, 31 Jan 2017 04:10:49 +0000</pubDate>
  88. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Dave Toole]]></dc:creator>
  89. <category><![CDATA[Stories]]></category>
  90.  
  91. <guid isPermaLink="false">http://ourmedia.org/?p=2302</guid>
  92. <description><![CDATA[I had the good fortune of viewing this conversation between two individuals that have most like opposing views but agree to speak about them in a civil way. Hey shook hands and hugged when the were through. Why can&#8217;t we find a way to OurMedia. A way to speak about issues not to speak on top of each other. We can learn and grow together. We can!]]></description>
  93. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>I had the good fortune of viewing this conversation between two individuals that have most like opposing views but agree to speak about them in a civil way. Hey shook hands and hugged when the were through. Why can&#8217;t we find a way to OurMedia. A way to speak about issues not to speak on top of each other. We can learn and grow together. We can!</p>
  94. <p><a href="http://ourmedia.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/IMG_0917.jpg"><img class="alignnone size-medium wp-image-2303" src="http://ourmedia.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/IMG_0917-225x300.jpg" alt="" width="225" height="300" srcset="http://ourmedia.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/IMG_0917-225x300.jpg 225w, http://ourmedia.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/IMG_0917.jpg 480w" sizes="(max-width: 225px) 100vw, 225px" /></a></p>
  95. ]]></content:encoded>
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  97. <slash:comments>0</slash:comments>
  98. </item>
  99. <item>
  100. <title>Digital Story Association</title>
  101. <link>http://ourmedia.org/digital-story-association/</link>
  102. <comments>http://ourmedia.org/digital-story-association/#respond</comments>
  103. <pubDate>Thu, 14 Jul 2016 21:54:03 +0000</pubDate>
  104. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Mitch Ratcliffe]]></dc:creator>
  105. <category><![CDATA[Stories]]></category>
  106.  
  107. <guid isPermaLink="false">http://ourmedia.org/?p=1508</guid>
  108. <description><![CDATA[April 8, 2016 Santa Clara Convention Center, Santa Clara, CA ATTENDEES Dave Toole- tech industry veteran; incubator founder; found of MediaMobz Laura Guzman &#8211; marketing / operations, business storytelling for getting everyone on the same page; agricultural &#38; science communications / PR / marketing Kendall Haven &#8211; environment &#38; science communications; science of storytelling Jennifer VanSile &#8211; film, screenwriting teacher; author of &#8220;Cinematic Storytelling&#8221; Jason Wilmot &#8211; communications for Stanford, MediaX U Richard Okumoto &#8211; teacher, pursuing doctorate in Digital Storytelling Lily Chung &#8211; engineer, consulting @ Deloitte, teach clients “art of storytelling” (2-day course) (“people remember how you make them feel, not what you tell them”) Pam Reed &#8211; former communications for Applied Materials; communications for Cisco Patty Zuboff &#8211; TV / video producer; former News Travel Network; Plutonic TV; interest in democratization of video Jay Durgan &#8211; MediaMobz; formal global entertainment marketing Raime Heineken &#8211; Symantec communications; [&#8230;]]]></description>
  109. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>April 8, 2016<br />
  110. Santa Clara Convention Center, Santa Clara, CA</p>
  111. <p><strong>ATTENDEES</strong><span id="more-1508"></span></p>
  112. <ul>
  113. <li>Dave Toole- tech industry veteran; incubator founder; found of MediaMobz</li>
  114. <li>Laura Guzman &#8211; marketing / operations, business storytelling for getting everyone on the same page; agricultural &amp; science communications / PR / marketing</li>
  115. <li>Kendall Haven &#8211; environment &amp; science communications; science of storytelling</li>
  116. <li>Jennifer VanSile &#8211; film, screenwriting teacher; author of &#8220;Cinematic Storytelling&#8221;</li>
  117. <li>Jason Wilmot &#8211; communications for Stanford, MediaX U</li>
  118. <li>Richard Okumoto &#8211; teacher, pursuing doctorate in Digital Storytelling</li>
  119. <li>Lily Chung &#8211; engineer, consulting @ Deloitte, teach clients “art of storytelling” (2-day course) (“people remember how you make them feel, not what you tell them”)</li>
  120. <li>Pam Reed &#8211; former communications for Applied Materials; communications for Cisco</li>
  121. <li>Patty Zuboff &#8211; TV / video producer; former News Travel Network; Plutonic TV; interest in democratization of video</li>
  122. <li>Jay Durgan &#8211; MediaMobz; formal global entertainment marketing</li>
  123. <li>Raime Heineken &#8211; Symantec communications; marketing for mobile app startup</li>
  124. <li>Dan Gato &#8211; MediaMobz; broadcast communications @ ESPN</li>
  125. <li>Neil Burns &#8211; faculty U of TX Austin and professor @ UCSF; former NASA research team; director of marketing at Honeywell; started ad agency</li>
  126. <li>King Guthro &#8211; attorney; Digital Ocean nonprofit</li>
  127. <li>Davis Maston &#8211; grew up in Studio City; chairman of Chuskin; science of communications; on board of Quantified Self Labs and Quantified Communications; project called “drop dead happy&#8221;</li>
  128. <li>Martha Russell &#8211; Exec Dir, Stanford U MediaX;</li>
  129. <li>Kelly Palmer &#8211; education technology masters; learning &amp; development for big companies; chief learning officer of LinkedIn; how learning can impact happiness at work and in life, and how to convey through storytelling</li>
  130. <li>Ryan Richardson &#8211; run training company, doing training in storytelling; storytelling curriculum for corporations</li>
  131. <li>Loreta Tarozaite &#8211; journalist, news anchor / reporter; video producer</li>
  132. <li>Benjamin Wong &#8211; venture capitalist, serial startup-ist; how to tell entrepreneurial stories; running consultancy for mobile apps, bio med sites, other products launching</li>
  133. <li>Miles Lee &#8211; MediaMobz, video editor; music production</li>
  134. <li>Angela Simoes &#8211; high tech PR, Autodesk; podcasts (including “From Quantified Self to Qualified Self”)</li>
  135. </ul>
  136. <p><strong>Breakout Session (hosted by Martha Russell)</strong></p>
  137. <p><strong> </strong></p>
  138. <p><strong>Team Breakout 1:</strong><strong> What were the elements (gold standards) of best story</strong> <strong>you ever heard?</strong></p>
  139. <ul>
  140. <li>emotion</li>
  141. <li>personal connection</li>
  142. <li>structure</li>
  143. </ul>
  144. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  145. <p><strong>Team Breakout 2:</strong> What are the gold standards of a digital story?</p>
  146. <ul>
  147. <li>same as story</li>
  148. <li>succinct</li>
  149. <li>shareable</li>
  150. </ul>
  151. <p><strong> </strong></p>
  152. <p><strong>Group Exercise 1 (post-its): What is it about digital that interests you? </strong></p>
  153. <p><img class="aligncenter size-full wp-image-1488" src="http://ourmedia.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/noname.png" alt="noname" width="474" height="285" srcset="http://ourmedia.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/noname.png 474w, http://ourmedia.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/noname-300x180.png 300w" sizes="(max-width: 474px) 100vw, 474px" /></p>
  154. <p><strong>Group Exercise 2: What concerns do you have? </strong></p>
  155. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  156. <ul>
  157. <li>volume</li>
  158. <li>overstimulation</li>
  159. <li>lack of control</li>
  160. <li>reduced impact</li>
  161. <li>longevity</li>
  162. <li>quality</li>
  163. <li>audience low expectations</li>
  164. <li>responsibility / ethics</li>
  165. <li>replacement of human self consciousness</li>
  166. <li>Machine intelligence</li>
  167. </ul>
  168. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  169. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  170. <p><strong>Group Exercise 3: What insights would you like to have that would help you with what you would like to do with story?</strong></p>
  171. <ul>
  172. <li>How do we source stories?</li>
  173. <li>Identify the elements of engagement &amp; empathy on the part of the audience &#8211; what works, what doesn’t, what makes a good story?</li>
  174. <li>What attention / retention hooks, what pulls people in and makes them hold onto it?</li>
  175. <li>What universal cultural symbols can we use?</li>
  176. <li>What is the business model?</li>
  177. <li>What distribution models?</li>
  178. <li>Effect of changes and expectations (generational?) or are our belief in changing expectations driving</li>
  179. <li>Influence of content</li>
  180. <li>What content is hard wired? (i.e., Cultural interests in specific genres? Religious / universal stories?)</li>
  181. <li>Are there any real negatives of digital storytelling? Or is just how / where you use it?</li>
  182. <li>Why do they want story? how did they get to the story?</li>
  183. <li>How to get funded?</li>
  184. <li>How to be better collaborators?</li>
  185. <li>Anticipating what’s next in storytelling? (i.e., what’s after VR…?)</li>
  186. <li>Replication of the story</li>
  187. <li>How to create ROI?</li>
  188. <li>AI &#8211; can it really have the</li>
  189. <li>Embedded systems + how embedded in us</li>
  190. <li>How we use digital storytelling to help people change their behavior, incite action, achieve different actions</li>
  191. <li>How do you get the data, data analytics</li>
  192. <li>How to get fUnded</li>
  193. <li>What’s most liked / shared / memorable? (leveraging data)</li>
  194. <li>What are exiting new ideas?</li>
  195. <li>Honest from the client</li>
  196. <li>How can my story stand above the rest?</li>
  197. <li>What is considered a great story?</li>
  198. <li>How do you get through anywhere?</li>
  199. <li>What is the impact of new tech for storytelling on learning / understanding, experiencing the story, contributing to the story, and inciting action?</li>
  200. <li>How can we centralize our stories?</li>
  201. <li>How can we generate action?</li>
  202. <li>Effect of delta in expectations</li>
  203. <li>Improved neural signature for story reactions</li>
  204. <li>East of engagement</li>
  205. <li>Dwell time</li>
  206. <li>Replication</li>
  207. <li>ROI</li>
  208. <li>Audience</li>
  209. <li>Source</li>
  210. <li>Purpose</li>
  211. <li>Connection</li>
  212. <li>Distribution</li>
  213. <li>Library of content</li>
  214. <li>How to change behavior</li>
  215. <li>How do you know / define success up front?</li>
  216. <li>Behavioral analytics</li>
  217. <li>Is it one-and-done? What’s the shelf life / longevity?</li>
  218. <li>How do I build / keep anticipation in very short stories?</li>
  219. <li>How much do words matter over visual / audio in order to resonate?</li>
  220. <li>Storytelling using technology</li>
  221. <li>Storytelling to help engineers / scientists communicate</li>
  222. <li>“Architecture” of storytelling</li>
  223. <li>Intercultural communications</li>
  224. <li>Competence</li>
  225. <li>Foundation for digital storytelling</li>
  226. <li>Universal cultural communication / symbols</li>
  227. <li>Direction of storytelling as a learning tool</li>
  228. <li>Best attention / retention hooks</li>
  229. <li>What is our purpose?</li>
  230. <li>Construct a body of knowledge (domain knowledge + domain network)</li>
  231. <li>Who downloaded / listened to / read</li>
  232. <li>Why did they want the story? (i.e., social networking, googled)</li>
  233. <li>Did they want to keep the story</li>
  234. <li>Storytelling structures</li>
  235. <li>Source of stories</li>
  236. <li>Identifying elements of engagement / empathy on the part of the audience</li>
  237. <li>Managing method of the telling itself</li>
  238. <li>Importance of purpose</li>
  239. <li>Retention, connectivity, duplication / disseminations</li>
  240. <li>Changes in expectations? Or is it our believe in the need to cater to their changes in expectation?</li>
  241. <li>Motivation &#8211; audience v. teller-driven</li>
  242. <li>Collaborative potential</li>
  243. <li>Durability</li>
  244. <li>Tell me where &amp; when and who the audience is</li>
  245. <li>What is the best channel to reach audience</li>
  246. <li>How can I scale?</li>
  247. <li>How can I tell a story interesting enough to capture attention and be memorable? Can I make them act?</li>
  248. <li>Source good, authentic stories</li>
  249. <li>Attention / retention hooks</li>
  250. <li>Why did they want story?</li>
  251. <li>Better collaboration</li>
  252. <li>Business model</li>
  253. <li>Changing belief of expectation</li>
  254. <li>Hardwired content</li>
  255. <li>What is the most important element in a digital story?</li>
  256. <li>how do you target an audience when you don’t have access to them?</li>
  257. <li>What are the negatives of digital storytelling?</li>
  258. <li>What is the true “importance” of quality of the media?</li>
  259. <li>Behavior not seen as learning</li>
  260. <li>Adopting new technologies (i.e., VR, drones)</li>
  261. <li>Helping tech businesses find their stories</li>
  262. <li>Within all the complexity, how do I keep it simple?</li>
  263. <li>How do we make science relevant?</li>
  264. <li>How do we help people discover the science all around them?</li>
  265. <li>How do we use digital storytelling to help people change their behavior?</li>
  266. <li>How do you identify the path to your audience?</li>
  267. <li>How do you build stories worthy of sharing?</li>
  268. <li>How do you surface stories with purpose?</li>
  269. </ul>
  270. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  271. <p><strong>Group Discussion:</strong><strong> What could a group of people like this do for digital storytelling that would be useful? </strong></p>
  272. <ul>
  273. <li>Having regular conversations like this (not online; presence / F2F important)
  274. <ul>
  275. <li>or telepresence &#8211; set up in centers so we can collaborate with people in other locations / countries, etc</li>
  276. </ul>
  277. </li>
  278. <li>Sharing best practices, collaborating on activities</li>
  279. <li>Should we construct a body of knowledge / library</li>
  280. <li>Form a domain network to accelerate all the work of the network
  281. <ul>
  282. <li>What skills do we need from people in the network?
  283. <ul>
  284. <li>psychologists</li>
  285. <li>experts in story construction</li>
  286. <li>social / behavioralists</li>
  287. </ul>
  288. </li>
  289. <li>Clarification / contextualization
  290. <ul>
  291. <li>ID individual areas and dive into these areas</li>
  292. </ul>
  293. </li>
  294. <li>Support group &#8211; network to brainstorm with or go to with help</li>
  295. <li>Invite NGO’s or other organizations struggling with their message (1x/qtr come in and help)
  296. <ul>
  297. <li>develop pitches / stories</li>
  298. </ul>
  299. </li>
  300. <li>ID a cause or a specific problem to solve
  301. <ul>
  302. <li>e., how do we get more girls into STEM</li>
  303. </ul>
  304. </li>
  305. <li>What people are reading and seeing
  306. <ul>
  307. <li>get top 5 books, podcasts, videos, resources, etc</li>
  308. </ul>
  309. </li>
  310. <li>Share everyone’s contacts after</li>
  311. </ul>
  312. </li>
  313. </ul>
  314. <p><strong> </strong></p>
  315. <p><strong>Summary Thoughts: Martha</strong></p>
  316. <p>Enduring aspects we identified</p>
  317. <ul>
  318. <li>Engagement</li>
  319. <li>Retention</li>
  320. <li>Inspire to influence</li>
  321. </ul>
  322. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  323. <p>Novelty that digital brings</p>
  324. <ul>
  325. <li>Time</li>
  326. <li>Location</li>
  327. <li>multi sensory layering can create a difference sense of presence</li>
  328. </ul>
  329. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  330. <p>Uncharted territory</p>
  331. <ul>
  332. <li>Distribution</li>
  333. <li>Models</li>
  334. <li>Business models</li>
  335. <li>…and how all these will come together</li>
  336. </ul>
  337. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  338. <p>Standards that this group can develop</p>
  339. <ul>
  340. <li>The craft</li>
  341. <li>The control</li>
  342. <li>Desire for establishing a sense of excellence</li>
  343. <li>Share what we know</li>
  344. <li>Fill in the gaps</li>
  345. <li>Collaborate with one another</li>
  346. </ul>
  347. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  348. <p><strong>ADDITIONAL THREADS (DAVE TOOLE)</strong></p>
  349. <ul>
  350. <li>Millennials not in the room today, but need to be
  351. <ul>
  352. <li>they don’t consume media / messages / stories in the same way…how do we address this?</li>
  353. </ul>
  354. </li>
  355. <li>How do we tell stories with purpose?</li>
  356. <li>In the last 2 days there was more content created than in the history of the planet….how do you find stories that resonate btw all the noise?</li>
  357. <li>So many forms of storytelling…consider music</li>
  358. </ul>
  359. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  360. <p><strong>NEXT STEPS</strong></p>
  361. <ul>
  362. <li>Come back together in July</li>
  363. <li>Think about other people who might benefit from / contribute to this conversation</li>
  364. <li>Ponder the questions brought up today&#8230;
  365. <ul>
  366. <li>In 2020 what are the stories we will be telling?</li>
  367. <li>Do our stories have purpose?</li>
  368. <li>How can we shift the way we tell stories?</li>
  369. <li>What are the tools we can use?</li>
  370. </ul>
  371. </li>
  372. <li>Assemble a location to collaborate</li>
  373. <li>Post reading / viewing / content lists</li>
  374. </ul>
  375. <p><strong> </strong></p>
  376. ]]></content:encoded>
  377. <wfw:commentRss>http://ourmedia.org/digital-story-association/feed/</wfw:commentRss>
  378. <slash:comments>0</slash:comments>
  379. </item>
  380. <item>
  381. <title>“BEYOND THE SCRIPT” – A look at digital storytelling</title>
  382. <link>http://ourmedia.org/beyond-the-script-a-look-at-digital-storytelling/</link>
  383. <comments>http://ourmedia.org/beyond-the-script-a-look-at-digital-storytelling/#respond</comments>
  384. <pubDate>Thu, 07 Apr 2016 16:57:28 +0000</pubDate>
  385. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Mitch Ratcliffe]]></dc:creator>
  386. <category><![CDATA[Stories]]></category>
  387.  
  388. <guid isPermaLink="false">http://ourmedia.org/?p=1503</guid>
  389. <description><![CDATA[Story Written By: Jeff Clark, Videobot Getting back to my beginnings; 30 years ago when I was just getting started in this business, I came up with an idea to make a pair of documentary style videos for the home video market called “So You Wanna Be a Rockstar” and “So You Wanna Be an Actor”. I interviewed a lot of celebrities for those videos and there was one particular sound-bite that stood out to me more than all the others. I had the chance to interview Paul Reubens, most people know him as Pee-wee Herman. To end each of these videos we would conclude by asking each celebrity we interviewed “What advice would you give to young people just starting out in the business”. Pee-wee thought for a second and then answered with something like this; “Whatever creative work you aspire to do in life, whether it be [&#8230;]]]></description>
  390. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Story Written By: <a href="http://www.videobot.tv/"><strong>Jeff Clark, Videobot</strong></a></p>
  391. <p>Getting back to my beginnings; 30 years ago when I was just getting started in this business, I came up with an idea to make a pair of documentary style videos for the home video market called “So You Wanna Be a Rockstar” and “So You Wanna Be an Actor”. I interviewed a lot of celebrities for those videos and there was one particular sound-bite that stood out to me more than all the others.<span id="more-1503"></span> I had the chance to interview Paul Reubens, most people know him as Pee-wee Herman. To end each of these videos we would conclude by asking each celebrity we interviewed “What advice would you give to young people just starting out in the business”. Pee-wee thought for a second and then answered with something like this;</p>
  392. <p><strong>“Whatever creative work you aspire to do in life, whether it be an actor, writer, director, musician, if you’re getting leading roles in plays, working on your script every day, practicing your guitar til your fingers bleed, whatever your dream is…. If you simply just work on your craft every day, you are certain to be successful”.</strong></p>
  393. <p>That advice really stuck with me, and I’ve followed it to this day.</p>
  394. <p><strong>It takes years to become a good video storyteller.</strong> And there’s nothing like creating work in volumes to help you get there. When I received my first MTV Award, people would sometimes ask me how I did it. My answer was always: “10 year overnight success story”. It honestly took years of doing mediocre work and teaching myself how to make my work better before I arrived at where I am at today in my career.</p>
  395. <p><strong>Most importantly, it’s not the successes we learn from. It’s the failures.</strong> Without failure, how can we define success? I think failure plays the biggest role in understanding how to succeed. And unfortunately, you have to do it a lot.</p>
  396. <p>Let’s fast forward to today.</p>
  397. <p><strong><a href="https://vimeo.com/141765238">Videobot Promo</a></strong></p>
  398. <p>So that’s what I do today. I tell stories using video.<strong> </strong></p>
  399. <p><strong>But now anybody can make a video.</strong> It’s pretty easy for anyone to get their hands on a camera, they can even shoot a video with their cell phone, and they can readily distribute that video on the internet. With so much video out there it’s becoming increasingly difficult to break through the noise.</p>
  400. <p>The film and video business used to be somewhat exclusive to those who could afford the equipment. By dropping a few zeroes off of the price tags of video cameras, and the general cost of making videos, the playing field has opened up to a lot more filmmakers. In many ways that’s healthy. It creates competition and that keeps the bar high.</p>
  401. <p><strong>But just because everyone can make a video, should they?</strong> Or is filmmaking still an elitist endeavor? Sure, everybody has the right to be heard. Everybody has the right to create video if they want to. But does that mean everybody today is talented? Of course not.</p>
  402. <p>Do you think if any of today’s top filmmakers were young filmmakers today, and they put any of their early work online, would they be the filmmakers they are now? Would their work even get noticed in the thousands of videos that are uploaded daily on today’s web? I really doubt that too. I call it the “Sea of Mediocrity” and the bar seems to be getting lowered every day. So how do we stand out? How do we break through the noise?</p>
  403. <p><strong>This kind of craftsmanship is being lost</strong> in the masses of creators, but not due to technology. Even the best craftsmen demand the right tools. I think technology is great. We all benefit from it, and over the years I’ve seen what technology can really do for this industry. The quality of video and video cameras has improved greatly. I love that! There’s all kinds of new software that makes our lives easier for organizing shoots, in post-production, and even for review and approval processes. Maybe all this technology will allow us to spend more time on creative and storytelling.</p>
  404. <p>One thing I’ve noticed is that there is a cycle that occurs with technology and creativity. Within that cycle, technology typically serves a need or solves a problem, but then we take that technology and do something new with it, make it something creative.</p>
  405. <p>For instance; As speakers and entertainers grew their audiences, the need for amplifying the voice became more important. The technology followed with the invention of the microphone and then of course the loudspeaker to amplify that sound. Eventually music artists like the Beatles were able to take that technology to create and deliver songs to arena size levels, reaching bigger audiences.</p>
  406. <p>And again as the cycle of need/technology/and creative perpetuated, George Martin the producer for the Beatles took the tools of the recording studio; the tape machines, mixing boards, and created a whole new level of psychedelic sounds that we had never heard before.</p>
  407. <p>This happens all the time with technology. The technology is created out of a specific need, but then our creativity allows us to expand on it. It’s a cycle that has been repeated again and again throughout history in many forms. So one could assume that as long as this cycle of technology and creativity continues, the evolution of craft will follow as well. Or we would hope, right? I suppose that really depends on what we do with that technology.</p>
  408. <p><strong>In Television there are basically two types of shows,</strong> you have “Series” based shows, and then there’s “Procedural” style. In a series based show, the programming progresses in a linear fashion. Some examples of these could be Breaking Bad, How to Get Away With Murder, to name just a few. Procedural shows are more situational – Big Bang Theory, or Person of Interest. However, once we take television online there’s sort of a 3<sup>rd</sup> dimension that we can add: <strong>Interactivity.</strong></p>
  409. <p>I’m not talking about voting for your favorite singer or dancer, I really don’t consider that to be interactive television at all. It’s more reactive, than interactive. I’m talking about the type of interactivity that you experience in a multi-player video game you play online with your friends. What if we take it to that level? Let the audience write the stories? Let’s take a look at this video I created for Current TV back in 2009:</p>
  410. <p><strong><a href="https://vimeo.com/24599451">Creation Project</a></strong></p>
  411. <p><strong>As the internet and television continue to converge</strong>, the possibilities for interacting with your audience may open up a whole new level of interactivity in television. I believe that Virtual Reality is also going to play a part in the convergence of television and the internet. In fact, just a few weeks ago, Samsung and Vice’s new cable network Viceland, partnered up to create Virtual Reality programming that they intend to run throughout the year. These short VR films are already airing on the network, under the series titled – <strong>“Beyond the Frame</strong>”<br />
  412. <a href="https://www.viceland.com/en_us/video/beyond-the-frame-storytelling-in-virtual-reality/56f2d194e625f53222eea5ae"><strong>Viceland Promo</strong></a><br />
  413. <strong>So if that’s where we’re heading, what can we do about this today?</strong> What about the craftsmanship, and what about the art of the story? Audio, Color, and Editing all play important roles in this craft of visual storytelling. This is where I notice companies cutting costs first.</p>
  414. <p>When creating video for the web, people often ask me how long a video should be. My usual answer is “As long as it is compelling, surprising, relatable, and authentic”. I’d like to share some simple examples of how visual storytelling can be enhanced by factors beyond a good story or script and how that affects production values.</p>
  415. <p><strong>&#8211; B-ROLL</strong></p>
  416. <p>If you want your videos to be more memorable, create memorable imagery.</p>
  417. <p><strong><u><a href="https://vimeo.com/87255028">Musician’s Institute</a></u></strong></p>
  418. <p><strong>I like to think b-roll is the new A-roll.</strong> You can tell a great story visually with b-roll, but it’s much tougher to do the opposite. Try watching a talking head for ten minutes, or even 30 seconds. You’ll find it really doesn’t tell a story nearly as well as b-roll does. I know that sometimes you have to include some talking head footage to satisfy some corporate egos, but I often refuse to include too much of that footage for the sole reason that it’s just not very compelling.</p>
  419. <p><strong>&#8211; AUDIO</strong></p>
  420. <p>Audio is probably one of your most powerful tools. Sometimes, I use audio to help tell the story, and other times, the audio tells its own story.</p>
  421. <p><strong><u><a href="https://vimeo.com/122938417">N Sync</a></u></strong></p>
  422. <p>I’m sure you’re all familiar with this group, but what you don’t know is that nobody had heard of these guys when I was working on this little project. Their management company kept them a secret until the debut of this video on MTV in 1996. JT was only 16 years old at the time. Prior to the shoot, I had only seen a few choreography rehearsal tapes they provided to get me familiar with their dance moves. When we went into post-production on this video, I felt that the best way to really capture the feeling of their choreography in the edit was to avoid editing on a non-linear edit system as a tape-to-tape system would be a more physical process and would help me to feel the movements within the music more easily. Once I started editing, I quickly realized that it also made more sense to edit this video standing up. By the time I laid off the first cut, I was dancing every move right along with them. I had become immersed with the story. I was merely acting on instinct, but later I received a number of compliments on the editing of the choreography, and the video was eventually nominated for an MTV Video of the Year Award.</p>
  423. <p>Through my years of making music videos, those experiences helped me to create better music scores, and music edits in the web series videos I create today. I gained a lot of exposure to so many music styles and subgenres I’d have probably never known about if it weren’t for working with record labels in the Caribbean, making music videos for Calypso, Dancehall, Reggae, Ska, and Soca artists. Or in places like New Orleans I learned to appreciate Dixieland Jazz, Cajun, and Zydeco. This pattern was repeated wherever I filmed music videos throughout the world.</p>
  424. <p>I now look at editing a music video like I’m scoring a video, but in reverse, as you’re actually matching visual movements to music, rather than editing music to a visual. I like to think that has really helped me to have a better understanding for how music and video work together.</p>
  425. <p><strong>&#8211; MUSIC &amp; SOUND DESIGN</strong></p>
  426. <p>Music and Sound design can really help to tell your story in a variety of ways as well. It can help to establishing the tone, find the center of the video’s theme, or it can even be used to create disruption, drawing attention to the work. In this next spot, we used the sound of hairdryers, bicycle chains, ratchets, zippers, and music mix that embedded those sounds so organically that they feel completely natural when instinctively, they shouldn’t. That’s when you truly know your craft. Take a look.</p>
  427. <p><strong><u><a href="https://vimeo.com/89276092">Nissan Cube</a></u></strong></p>
  428. <p><strong>&#8211; LIGHTING</strong></p>
  429. <p>Lighting is another aspect of filmmaking that is also quickly being forgotten. Many of today’s video cameras are so light sensitive that lighting isn’t really needed to get a good exposure so it’s often overlooked when budgets are low. However, lighting is used for much more than exposing your image. It’s used for drama, and effect. It can be harsh, or soft, it can set a mood, create a sense for temperature, or establish the time of day in a scene. Many of today’s less professional videos simply either get lucky or live with what they get. This is a huge disservice to the craftsmanship I’m referencing.</p>
  430. <p><strong>&#8211; GRAPHICS</strong></p>
  431. <p>Graphics can also communicate so many things. Graphics can be edgy, polished, cartoonish, static or animated. There are so many ways to influence the look and feel of a piece using graphics that may be a subject for a bigger conversation. It certainly bares mentioning though.</p>
  432. <p><strong>&#8211; COLOR</strong><br />
  433. Color also plays a very important role in storytelling. It can set the mood, establish design or brand sensibilities, or even become a part of the story as it did in this clip.</p>
  434. <p><strong><u><a href="https://vimeo.com/97076358">Dolce &amp; Gabbana</a></u></strong></p>
  435. <p>When we were asked to create a series for Dolce &amp; Gabbana Eyewear, we thought how can we capture the point of view of the audience in a way that not only looks striking, but visually captures the feeling of wearing the product. We had toyed around with Infrared in the past and thought we could use this concept to tell the story with color, or in this case, the lack of color. BTW – If you haven’t worked with Infrared photography, it’s a bit tricky. The model in the video was actually wearing a red dress, and her hair was black. We also had to coat her in sunblock so we wouldn’t see her veins or she would have looked more like a vampire.</p>
  436. <p><strong>&#8211; THE EDIT</strong></p>
  437. <p>In 2002, my business partner and I co-founded the Music Video Commercial Institute, the world’s first film school with an all music video and commercial based curriculum. It was a great way to revisit all of the things we had learned over the years and put them to use teaching others. One of the things I enjoyed teaching was editing. We had 10 video editing workstations, and one of my favorite editing exercises was to take a series of b-roll shots from a music video and provide each students with these same random shots on their edit systems. We’d then have them select a piece of music and as an assignment they were required to edit a story any way they liked. It was really amazing how many different ways the students chose to edit that same footage. There were always 10 very unique edits.</p>
  438. <p>Our school held a fairly hands-on approach to filmmaking and we often put students to work on real music video and commercial projects. We decided to employ this concept on a trailer for a music film and let the record label decide which they liked best. I edited a version, my partner edited one, and a handful of our students edited their own versions as well.</p>
  439. <p><strong><u><a href="https://vimeo.com/92488873">Jonsi – “Go Quiet”</a></u></strong></p>
  440. <p>The record label picked their two favorites from the numerous edits and the two they liked most were created by students, one of which you just watched here.</p>
  441. <p>Back in 2005, while working at Current TV, I had the great fortune to work on a project that included an <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=loxJ3FtCJJA&amp;list=PLVAKRvcPbG6u5Phaz5PyBZdlU6k3sJ4IS">on-camera interview with Ira Glass on storytelling</a>. It’s too long to show you the whole interview here, but I want to give you a taste of his approach to storytelling, as it’s quite compelling.</p>
  442. <p><strong><u><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=loxJ3FtCJJA">Ira Glass on Storytelling</a></u></strong></p>
  443. <p>Personally, I had a lot of great takeaways from this interview and would highly recommend you check out the full 20 minutes on YouTube when you get home.<br />
  444. I believe Ira is one of the best storytellers of our time.<br />
  445. Another tip Ira focuses on in this interview is what he refers to as <strong>“Killing your baby”.</strong> Anyone who has tried their hand at editing would agree, is that all video production is trying to be bad, and it’s the editor’s job to get rid of everything that’s bad. Deep down, you know what’s bad, so you have to be willing to “Kill your baby” by throwing out all the bad stuff, that way you’re allowing all the good stuff to shine that much more. When you watch a video that is telling a great story, it’s great because the editor knew how to get rid of everything that wasn’t good about it. He simply “Killed his baby”.</p>
  446. <p>That’s not always so easy to do if the editor is also the person who shot it or directed it. As the price of video production continues to drop and teams get smaller, the director or camera operator is far more likely to also become the editor. It becomes increasingly difficult to be objective when you’ve fallen in love with your own footage. And this is rarely a great approach to good filmmaking.</p>
  447. <p><strong>So is this the dumbing down of art and culture as we know it?</strong> Will there be a cultural backlash against the large amounts of crappy content we see on the internet and television, or will we become more and more accepting of the every-day mediocrity and eventually succumb to this level ourselves? Will we hit bottom before some of these newer technologies become part of our everyday experiences? And if so, when do you believe that will happen? In a month? In a year? 10 years?</p>
  448. <p><strong>Or is cheaper really better? </strong>A few months ago, I had several meetings with a potential client that needed 200 videos for their YouTube Channel. They were highly interested in the high level of work that I had created for other brands. Prior to these meetings, I had learned that they had hired somebody with less experience, and had produced a handful of videos that didn’t meet their expectations. They let that person go, and were seeking a better solution to their problem.</p>
  449. <p>I offered them a better solution, and they were very excited to work with me, but after learning that to get the production values they were after they would have to pay for things such as color correction, graphics, and an audio mix. Anyway, they quickly went back to their original low-budget approach and continue to put out less than satisfactory work.</p>
  450. <p>So apparently, they weren’t quite willing to pay for the quality my expertise provides. That’s not the first time that has happened. It seems that clients are the first to say, it doesn’t make a difference. I like to think it still does.</p>
  451. <p><strong>&#8211; CONCLUSION</strong></p>
  452. <p>So there are some real challenges coming as we adopt new technologies and attempt to streamline the process of video storytelling while still holding on to the attributes of great craftsmanship and strong storytelling. I hope we’re able to continue finding the ways to preserve the level of storytelling for those of us who truly appreciate it.</p>
  453. <p>I just want to say this &#8211; We don’t make videos to tell stories that are mediocre, that’s not why we get into this business. I’d like to think that most of us got into this business to tell stories that are memorable and special. I’ll continue to strive for that and I hope you do as well.</p>
  454. <p>I’d like to conclude with an example I think demonstrates a lot of concepts I’ve discussed today. We’ve use a combination of sound design, lots of b-roll of course, and an edit that really embraces the music’s pace and buildup to create an emotional connection with the audience.</p>
  455. <p>I hope you enjoy the video. And keep working on your craft.</p>
  456. <p><a href="https://vimeo.com/95940213"><strong>Heima Trailer</strong></a></p>
  457. ]]></content:encoded>
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  459. <slash:comments>0</slash:comments>
  460. </item>
  461. <item>
  462. <title>Stories Happen in the Mind of the Receiver</title>
  463. <link>http://ourmedia.org/cool-and-interesting-stuff-that-we-found-on-facebook-5/</link>
  464. <comments>http://ourmedia.org/cool-and-interesting-stuff-that-we-found-on-facebook-5/#respond</comments>
  465. <pubDate>Thu, 25 Feb 2016 11:43:20 +0000</pubDate>
  466. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Mitch Ratcliffe]]></dc:creator>
  467. <category><![CDATA[Stories]]></category>
  468.  
  469. <guid isPermaLink="false">http://demo.carinatheme.com/magazine/?p=543</guid>
  470. <description><![CDATA[Story Written By: Loreta Tarozaite The title is a quote by Kendall Haven that I heard at the Digital Story Association’s (DSA) inaugural conference April 8th, 2016. Kendall is the author of 34 books in which he writes about research on the power of storytelling. He went along saying that it depends how we personally interpret the stories we hear because we associate them with our personal experiences at the moment we hear the story. Cannot agree more with that. If we all read the same article, or a book, or watched the same movie or a video online, we’ll all come out with different takeaways, different favorite characters, different understanding of the same story. You can hear a short sound bite from Kendall in the video on the bottom of this post. The participants with backgrounds ranging from former engineers to producers and film makers, from communication managers [&#8230;]]]></description>
  471. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Story Written By: <a href="http://www.loretatv.com/"><strong>Loreta Tarozaite</strong></a></p>
  472. <p>The title is a quote by Kendall Haven that I heard at the Digital Story Association’s (DSA) inaugural conference April 8th, 2016. Kendall is the author of 34 books in which he writes about research on the power of storytelling. He went along saying that it depends how we personally interpret the stories we hear because we associate them with our personal experiences at the moment we hear the story. Cannot agree more with that. If we all read the same article, or a book, or watched the same movie or a video online, we’ll all come out with different takeaways, different favorite characters, different understanding of the same story. You can hear a short sound bite from Kendall in the video on the bottom of this post.<span id="more-543"></span></p>
  473. <p><img class="aligncenter size-full wp-image-1492" src="http://ourmedia.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/image.jpg" alt="image" width="800" height="450" srcset="http://ourmedia.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/image.jpg 800w, http://ourmedia.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/image-300x169.jpg 300w, http://ourmedia.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/image-768x432.jpg 768w" sizes="(max-width: 800px) 100vw, 800px" /></p>
  474. <p>The participants with backgrounds ranging from former engineers to producers and film makers, from communication managers to attorneys discussed digital storytelling gold standards and how we should find the connection with the audience when we are overcrowded with information. For me personally, human side of things and emotional connection with the audience globally are one of the strongest requirements for brand/business/people storytelling.</p>
  475. <p>So what is a digital story? Does it have to have a linear way of telling it: beginning, middle, and ending? Can we disrupt this path in order to grasp somebody’s attention? How come that we are constantly saying that online videos/stories need to be as short as possible to deal with the attention span, but yet the same audience has no problem watching 2 hour long movies? Are we training our audiences to have shorter attention spans? Great point on that was made by Kendall that I never thought about.</p>
  476. <p>According to recent (and yet unpublished) research at Stanford University screen switching (PAUSING) amongst college students, even when on task, occurs more than once a minute on average. Martha Russell, Executive Director, MediaX, Stanford, pointed that maybe we, as storytellers and video producers, need to figure out how to accommodate those PAUSE moments in digital storytelling, through the way we engage a viewer/reader. Interesting and logical idea, isn’t it?</p>
  477. <p><img class="aligncenter size-full wp-image-1494" src="http://ourmedia.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/image2.jpg" alt="image2" width="800" height="450" srcset="http://ourmedia.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/image2.jpg 800w, http://ourmedia.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/image2-300x169.jpg 300w, http://ourmedia.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/image2-768x432.jpg 768w" sizes="(max-width: 800px) 100vw, 800px" /></p>
  478. <p>In his keynote presentation Jeff Clark, founder of Videobot and long- time storyteller addressed issues such as production value of the story. It is not enough just to take out a mobile device, shoot a video and post it on social media platforms. Although that is exactly what I did at the end of the event <img src="https://s.w.org/images/core/emoji/2.3/72x72/1f642.png" alt="&#x1f642;" class="wp-smiley" style="height: 1em; max-height: 1em;" /> , but I have scaled down visual quality requirements for my posts since I am not carrying a camera with me the whole time and I am a journalist by nature &#8211; I need to report on what I heard or learned :).</p>
  479. <p>Jeff talked about what makes the story good. And it’s all the elements together:</p>
  480. <ul>
  481. <li>Mood and emotion build up</li>
  482. <li>Choice of color tone</li>
  483. <li>Sound design</li>
  484. <li>B-roll</li>
  485. <li>Lighting</li>
  486. </ul>
  487. <p>Sigur Ros band videos (referenced by Jeff) seem to be very powerful and have all the elements that he mentioned and definitely takes the viewer through the journey.</p>
  488. <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Oc6zXSdYXm8" width="560" height="315" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></p>
  489. <p>A lot of discussions happened around what a digital story is in general. Is it the just the platforms we use to distribute content? Is it online video? Is a newspaper that is layered with additional information upon the click and takes the reader through informative elements of the story?</p>
  490. <p>The goal of this DSA is to help identify all of it and be a guiding force in Silicon Valley, leading the way to how we will be telling stories in 2020. Seems that a lot of people resonated with the thought that sometimes the digital distribution platforms (YouTube, Instagram, Facebook, and others) have diluted the ability to find good stories and have paved the way to self-promotion and vanity.</p>
  491. <p>As Dave Toole, one of the co-founders of the Association noted, we have a great opportunity to help shift the gears and improve the way we tell the stories so that we don’t use the platforms for the wrong reasons, but rather make an imprint in the history for the generations to refer back to and learn what Silicon Valley was about through content that is rich, educational and human. I definitely look forward to those discussions in the near future.</p>
  492. <p>Below is a short video interview with Jeff, Kendall, and David about storytelling in the digital world. Enjoy and please share. Let’s make your story happen!</p>
  493. <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/cepW5kFQY0E" width="560" height="315" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></p>
  494. ]]></content:encoded>
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