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  10. <title>Notes on Productivity</title>
  11. <description>www.NotesOnProductivity.com</description>
  12. <link>http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ica/nop.nsf/</link>
  13. <language>en-us</language>
  14. <lastBuildDate>Sun, 4 Jun 2017 11:53:15 -0700</lastBuildDate>
  15. <item>
  16. <title>Are you using IBM mail support for Microsoft Outlook?</title>
  17. <pubDate>Sun, 4 Jun 2017 11:53:15 -0700</pubDate>
  18. <description>
  19. <![CDATA[
  20. I am interested in the suitability of IMSMO in a < 10 user test environment in which the Notes client as well as the Outlook client will be used to manage Mail, Calendar and Tasks in a Mail file on the Domino Server. <br /> <br />I would like to connect with someone in the Yellowverse who has successfully deployed IMSMO. I need to test something and would value talking with a fellow peer, IBM Champion or IBM business partner. <br /> <br />I'd like to better understand the opportunities and caveats from those who have gone before. <br /> <br />I welcome your comments and feedback based on your experience. <br /> <br />Thanks. <br /> <br />Eric<br>[Originally posted on the Notes on Productivity web site. (http://www.NotesOnProductivity.com)]<br><br>Originally posted on <a href="http://www.NotesOnProductivity.com">Notes On Productivity</a>
  21. ]]>
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  23. <link>http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/are-you-using-ibm-mail-support-for-microsoft-outlook</link>
  24. <category>Email</category>
  25. <dc:creator>Eric Mack</dc:creator>
  26. <comments>http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/are-you-using-ibm-mail-support-for-microsoft-outlook?opendocument&amp;comments</comments>
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  28. <content:encoded><![CDATA[ I am interested in the suitability of IMSMO in a < 10 user test environment in which the Notes client as well as the Outlook client will be used to manage Mail, Calendar and Tasks in a Mail file on the Domino Server. &nbsp; <br /> <br />I would like to connect with someone in the Yellowverse who has successfully deployed IMSMO. I need to test something and would value talking with a fellow peer, IBM Champion or IBM business partner. <br /> <br />I'd like to better understand the opportunities and caveats from those who have gone before. <br /> <br />I welcome your comments and feedback based on your experience. <br /> <br />Thanks. <br /> <br />Eric<br><br>Originally posted on <a href="http://www.NotesOnProductivity.com">Notes On Productivity</a> ]]></content:encoded>
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  31. </item>
  32. <item>
  33. <title>How to migrate IBM Notes Notebook to Microsoft OneNote</title>
  34. <pubDate>Tue, 2 May 2017 20:55:34 -0700</pubDate>
  35. <description>
  36. <![CDATA[
  37. I have a question to ask and a tip to share <br /> <br /><strong>Background</strong> <br />I want to move some information contained in an IBM Lotus Notes Notebook (notebook.nsf or journal.nsf) into a Microsoft OneNote file. The documents in my Notebook.nsf contain rich text, attachments and embedded objects -- all of which I would like to preserve in OneNote. <br /> <br />The Notes to Office 365/Outlook migration tools I've found migrate mail/calendar/contacts and some do tasks, but none so far migrate notebook.nsf which is separate from my Notes mail file. <br /> <br /><strong>Question</strong> <br /><strong>Are you aware of a tool or method to migrate documents from a Lotus Notes Notebook into OneNote other than using "print to OneNote" or Copy/paste for each document?</strong> <br /> <br />I would appreciate any tips or recommendations you can share. <br /> <br /><strong>Tip</strong> <br />You may be able to convert documents in your Notebook.nsf into emails in the mail file. I recently helped a client who was migrating from Notes to Outlook accomplish this. The client had several eProductivity Reference Databases (essentially a GTD enabled notebook.nsf) to convert. I worked with a colleague to create a program to migrate documents from that file into the user's Lotus Notes Mail file as email messages. Our program did all of the conversion, making it a one click operation. When done, the client had a single email in his mail file for each source document in his notebook.nsf. This allowed him to migrate his emails and his Notebook.nsf documents into Outlook (all as emails). From there, the client will have to find a way to move his emails from Outlook into OneNote but I assume there is a path for that. <br /> <br />If you can help with the question above, I would appreciate it.<br>[Originally posted on the Notes on Productivity web site. (http://www.NotesOnProductivity.com)]<br><br>Originally posted on <a href="http://www.NotesOnProductivity.com">Notes On Productivity</a>
  38. ]]>
  39. </description>
  40. <link>http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/how-to-migrate-lotus-notes-notebookjournal-to-microsoft-onenote</link>
  41. <category>Notes</category>
  42. <dc:creator>Eric Mack</dc:creator>
  43. <comments>http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/how-to-migrate-lotus-notes-notebookjournal-to-microsoft-onenote?opendocument&amp;comments</comments>
  44. <guid isPermaLink="true">http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/how-to-migrate-lotus-notes-notebookjournal-to-microsoft-onenote</guid>
  45. <content:encoded><![CDATA[ I have a question to ask and a tip to share <br /> <br /><strong>Background</strong> <br />I want to move some information contained in an IBM Lotus Notes Notebook (notebook.nsf or journal.nsf) into a Microsoft OneNote file. The documents in my Notebook.nsf contain rich text, attachments and embedded objects -- all of which I would like to preserve in OneNote. <br /> <br />The Notes to Office 365/Outlook migration tools I've found migrate mail/calendar/contacts and some do tasks, but none so far migrate notebook.nsf which is separate from my Notes mail file. <br /> <br /><strong>Question</strong> <br /><strong>Are you aware of a tool or method to migrate documents from a Lotus Notes Notebook into OneNote other than using "print to OneNote" or Copy/paste for each document?</strong> <br /> <br />I would appreciate any tips or recommendations you can share.  <br /> <br /><strong>Tip</strong> <br />You may be able to convert documents in your Notebook.nsf into emails in the mail file. I recently helped a client who was migrating from Notes to Outlook accomplish this. The client had several eProductivity Reference Databases (essentially a GTD enabled notebook.nsf) to convert. I worked with a colleague to create a program to migrate documents from that file into the user's Lotus Notes Mail file as email messages. Our program did all of the conversion, making it a one click operation. When done, the client had a single email in his mail file for each source document in his notebook.nsf. This allowed him to migrate his emails and his Notebook.nsf documents into Outlook (all as emails). From there, the client will have to find a way to move his emails from Outlook into OneNote but I assume there is a path for that.  <br /> <br />If you can help with the question above, I would appreciate it.<br><br>Originally posted on <a href="http://www.NotesOnProductivity.com">Notes On Productivity</a> ]]></content:encoded>
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  48. </item>
  49. <item>
  50. <title>eProductivity V4</title>
  51. <pubDate>Fri, 23 Feb 2018 16:02:37 -0700</pubDate>
  52. <description>
  53. <![CDATA[
  54. After 10 years of development, eProductivity has proven to be a stable product; however, there's always room for improvement and the occasional fixes. :-) <br /> <br /> This release of eProductivity includes many new features to facilitate working with archives as well as various new productivity features. <br /> <br /> Here are a few highlights; for more details, see <a href="http://inside.eproductivity.com/dx/eproductivity-version-4-is-here">here</a>. <br /><strong><br /> Productivity Features Added</strong> <ul> <li>To speed up filing emails, the 'Send &amp; File' and 'Move to Folder' menus now display the last three folders you filed into (even if they are in another mail file or archive).</li></ul><strong><br /> Archiving Features Added</strong> <br /> These were created to make archiving easier, especially for users whose organizations use automatic archiving. These will help you better manage your information and protect your active work from being archived without your knowledge: <ul> <li>The Archiving view has been updated to make it even easier for you to see and archive completed items while protecting incomplete items. </li><li><strong>Easily archive and restore folders: </strong>New buttons in folders in Mail and Archives will allow you to:<strong><br /> MOVE</strong> the current folder (including subfolders) to an archive.<strong><br /> RESTORE</strong> a folder (including subfolders) from an archive back to the Mail file. </li></ul> <br />I use these feature daily to manage my mail file, by pruning inactive folders full of emails to my archive, yet knowing that if I ever want to restore that folder from my archive I can do so with a single click. This keeps Domino Administrators happy as users have small mail files, yet it keeps users happy because they can find with they want and have it where they want it. The <a href="http://www.eproductivity.com/help/(help)/How-to-use-the-Global-Search-Feature">eProductivity Global Search tool</a> also makes it<br>[Originally posted on the Notes on Productivity web site. (http://www.NotesOnProductivity.com)]<br><br>Originally posted on <a href="http://www.NotesOnProductivity.com">Notes On Productivity</a>
  55. ]]>
  56. </description>
  57. <link>http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/eproductivity-version-4</link>
  58. <category>eProductivity</category>
  59. <dc:creator>Eric Mack</dc:creator>
  60. <comments>http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/eproductivity-version-4?opendocument&amp;comments</comments>
  61. <guid isPermaLink="true">http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/eproductivity-version-4</guid>
  62. <content:encoded><![CDATA[ After 10 years of development, eProductivity has proven to be a stable product; however, there's always room for improvement and the occasional fixes. :-) <br /> <br /> This release of eProductivity includes many new features to facilitate working with archives as well as various new productivity features. <br /> <br /> Here are a few highlights; for more details, see <a href="http://inside.eproductivity.com/dx/eproductivity-version-4-is-here">here</a>. <br /><strong><br /> Productivity Features Added</strong>  <ul> <li>To speed up filing emails, the 'Send &amp; File' and 'Move to Folder' menus now display the last three folders you filed into (even if they are in another mail file or archive).</li></ul><strong><br /> Archiving Features Added</strong> <br /> These were created to make archiving easier, especially for users whose organizations use automatic archiving. These will help you better manage your information and protect your active work from being archived without your knowledge:  <ul> <li>The Archiving view has been updated to make it even easier for you to see and archive completed items while protecting incomplete items.  </li><li><strong>Easily archive and restore folders: </strong>New buttons in folders in Mail and Archives will allow you to:<strong><br /> MOVE</strong> the current folder (including subfolders) to an archive.<strong><br /> RESTORE</strong> a folder (including subfolders) from an archive back to the Mail file. </li></ul> <br />I use these feature daily to manage my mail file, by pruning inactive folders full of emails to my archive, yet knowing that if I ever want to restore that folder from my archive I can do so with a single click. This keeps Domino Administrators happy as users have small mail files, yet it keeps users happy because they can find with they want and have it where they want it. The <a href="http://www.eproductivity.com/help/(help)/How-to-use-the-Global-Search-Feature">eProductivity Global Search tool</a> also makes it easy to find messages, regardless of whether they are in the mail, archive or an external mail file. <br /><strong><br /> New features in eProductivity Reference</strong><br /> The latest version of eProductivity Reference has added two new features:  <ul> <li>The Timestamp feature makes it easy to timestamp any entry in the Reference DB. This is similar to the timestamp function in journal entries, but the new Timestamp can be applied to any document in the Reference DB. </li><li></li></ul>eProductivity is free for use on archive files and reference (Notebooks). A free essentials version is also available. <a href=http://www.eProductivity.com>Details</a><br><br>Originally posted on <a href="http://www.NotesOnProductivity.com">Notes On Productivity</a> ]]></content:encoded>
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  64. <wfw:comment> http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/eproductivity-version-4?opendocument&amp;comments</wfw:comment>
  65. </item>
  66. <item>
  67. <title>Domino Server on Raspberry Pi</title>
  68. <pubDate>Sat, 3 Oct 2015 22:50:30 -0700</pubDate>
  69. <description>
  70. <![CDATA[
  71. I have a Domino server which I've kept on the shelf for the past 10 years because it runs a legacy application that I use occasionally. It's been running just fine -- nonstop -- for more than a decade. It doesn't need much processing power nor does it need much disk space. I've thought about how I might preserve it and keep it running and I have considered using either a VM or a mini ATX server. <br /> <br /> Last year, Hackaday, one of my favorite hacking sites, had an article on how to load a limited version of Linux on a Linksys Router. That got me thinking that it would be cool to have a Domino server inside of a Linux router sitting on my bookshelf.<br /> <br /> That reminded me of a post by Daniel Nashed about <a href=http://www.nashcom.de/nshweb/pages/xbox.htm>running Domino an on Xbox</a>. <br /> Small computers have come a long way since then, so I've been thinking about what it would take to run a Domino server on a Raspberry Pi. <br /> <br /> Why would I want to do that? 1) Because it just well may be possible, and 2) to allow a seldom used dedicated Domino server app to continue its life in a low power machine. <br /> <br /> A quick Google search did not turn up anything but I'm sure someone much smarter than me has had this same idea. <br /> <br /> It's possible to mount a USB hard drive on a Raspberry Pi and even SD cards have plenty of storage so that shouldn't be an issue. <br /> <br /> I found this blog that documents <a href="http://danilodellaquila.com/blog/how-to-install-lotus-domino-8.5-on-ubuntu-part-i">how to install Lotus Domino 8.5 on Ubuntu</a> which may be helpful (or not). <br /> <br /> I'm not a Linux guy, but I did manage to set up Ubuntu once on an old ThinkPad. I'm not afraid of learning something new, though. No idea if I will build this but I might try, just to see what can be done. (If you have links to share, either on getting started with Linux or working with Domino on Linux, please share in the comments.) <br /> <br /> So, I p<br>[Originally posted on the Notes on Productivity web site. (http://www.NotesOnProductivity.com)]<br><br>Originally posted on <a href="http://www.NotesOnProductivity.com">Notes On Productivity</a>
  72. ]]>
  73. </description>
  74. <link>http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/domino-server-on-raspberry-pi</link>
  75. <category>Eric's Thoughts</category>
  76. <dc:creator>Eric Mack</dc:creator>
  77. <comments>http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/domino-server-on-raspberry-pi?opendocument&amp;comments</comments>
  78. <guid isPermaLink="true">http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/domino-server-on-raspberry-pi</guid>
  79. <content:encoded><![CDATA[ I have a Domino server which I've kept on the shelf for the past 10 years because it runs a legacy application that I use occasionally. It's been running just fine -- nonstop -- for more than a decade. It doesn't need much processing power nor does it need much disk space. I've thought about how I might preserve it and keep it running and I have considered using either a VM or a mini ATX server. <br /> <br /> Last year, Hackaday, one of my favorite hacking sites, had an article on how to load a limited version of Linux on a Linksys Router. That got me thinking that it would be cool to have a Domino server inside of a Linux router sitting on my bookshelf.<br /> <br /> That reminded me of a post by Daniel Nashed about <a href=http://www.nashcom.de/nshweb/pages/xbox.htm>running Domino an on Xbox</a>. <br /> Small computers have come a long way since then, so I've been thinking about what it would take to run a Domino server on a Raspberry Pi. <br /> <br /> Why would I want to do that? 1) Because it just well may be possible, and 2) to allow a seldom used dedicated Domino server app to continue its life in a low power machine. <br /> <br /> A quick Google search did not turn up anything but I'm sure someone much smarter than me has had this same idea. <br /> <br /> It's possible to mount a USB hard drive on a Raspberry Pi and even SD cards have plenty of storage so that shouldn't be an issue. <br /> <br /> I found this blog that documents <a href="http://danilodellaquila.com/blog/how-to-install-lotus-domino-8.5-on-ubuntu-part-i">how to install Lotus Domino 8.5 on Ubuntu</a> which may be helpful (or not). <br /> <br /> I'm not a Linux guy, but I did manage to set up Ubuntu once on an old ThinkPad. I'm not afraid of learning something new, though. No idea if I will build this but I might try, just to see what can be done. (If you have links to share, either on getting started with Linux or working with Domino on Linux, please share in the comments.) <br />  <br /> So, I post this idea to the YellowVerse to see what conversation or links it may generate. <br><br>Originally posted on <a href="http://www.NotesOnProductivity.com">Notes On Productivity</a> ]]></content:encoded>
  80. <wfw:commentRss> http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dxcomments/domino-server-on-raspberry-pi</wfw:commentRss>
  81. <wfw:comment> http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/domino-server-on-raspberry-pi?opendocument&amp;comments</wfw:comment>
  82. </item>
  83. <item>
  84. <title>Why should I invest in my people when they&#8217;ll leave anyway?</title>
  85. <pubDate>Sat, 29 Aug 2015 13:45:00 -0700</pubDate>
  86. <description>
  87. <![CDATA[
  88. Coaching my clients to new levels of workplace performance is my favorite thing about what I do. Sometimes it's hard, but hearing what they say afterward makes it all worth it: <em><br /> <br /> <blockquote>Clearly, I wasn't working as efficiently as I could have. Now, I'm creating greater results, with less effort</blockquote></em> <em><br /> <blockquote>I had no idea such basic shifts in the way that I think about my work and how I use my tools could have such a profound impact on my performance, and my life. Thank you!</blockquote></em> <em><br /> <blockquote>The last time my inbox was this empty was 5 years ago -- on my first day of work as CTO</blockquote></em> <em><br /> <blockquote>I feel so much better about my work.<br /> </blockquote></em> <br /> Sometimes, though, I run into something puzzling. After coaching a busy executive and hearing them express (over several weeks) the immense relief it's brought them, I'll bring up the subject of training the rest of their team. <br /> <br /> Sometimes, they'll hesitate, then say, <em>"I'm not sure they need this as much as I do . . ."</em><br /> <br /> This used to stump me. I've seen my client's teams, and usually they're just as overwhelmed as the executives they answer to. My clients have gotten clear, lasting relief, so bringing the same to their team seems like a no-brainer to me. Wouldn't it be wonderful if everyone were so effective? Why not train the rest of the team?<strong><br /> <br /> Building people instead of buying them</strong> <br /> Here's my philosophy on coaching: when I hire someone, I want to get their full value. To do that, they have to grow; to grow, they have to be fed. <br /> <br /> That's why it boggles my mind when companies invest in the latest systems and tools for their employees, then refuse to invest in training them. The team is left to flail about and figure it out for themselves, always struggling just to survive in their job: overwhelmed, over-stressed, overwrought, and overb<br>[Originally posted on the Notes on Productivity web site. (http://www.NotesOnProductivity.com)]<br><br>Originally posted on <a href="http://www.NotesOnProductivity.com">Notes On Productivity</a>
  89. ]]>
  90. </description>
  91. <link>http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/why-should-i-invest-in-my-people-they-will-leave</link>
  92. <category></category>
  93. <dc:creator>Eric Mack</dc:creator>
  94. <comments>http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/why-should-i-invest-in-my-people-they-will-leave?opendocument&amp;comments</comments>
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  96. <content:encoded><![CDATA[ Coaching my clients to new levels of workplace performance is my favorite thing about what I do. Sometimes it's hard, but hearing what they say afterward makes it all worth it: <em><br /> <br /> <blockquote>Clearly, I wasn't working as efficiently as I could have. &nbsp;Now, I'm creating greater results, with less effort</blockquote></em> <em><br /> <blockquote>I had no idea such basic shifts in the way that I think about my work and how I use my tools could have such a profound impact on my performance, and my life. Thank you!</blockquote></em> <em><br /> <blockquote>The last time my inbox was this empty was 5 years ago -- on my first day of work as CTO</blockquote></em> <em><br /> <blockquote>I feel so much better about my work.<br /> </blockquote></em> <br /> Sometimes, though, I run into something puzzling. After coaching a busy executive and hearing them express (over several weeks) the immense relief it's brought them, I'll bring up the subject of training the rest of their team. <br /> <br /> Sometimes, they'll hesitate, then say, <em>"I'm not sure they need this as much as I do . . ."</em><br /> <br /> This used to stump me. I've seen my client's teams, and usually they're just as overwhelmed as the executives they answer to. My clients have gotten clear, lasting relief, so bringing the same to their team seems like a no-brainer to me. Wouldn't it be wonderful if everyone were so effective? Why not train the rest of the team?<strong><br /> <br /> Building people instead of buying them</strong> <br /> Here's my philosophy on coaching: when I hire someone, I want to get their full value. To do that, they have to grow; to grow, they have to be fed. <br /> <br /> That's why it boggles my mind when companies invest in the latest systems and tools for their employees, then refuse to invest in training them. The team is left to flail about and figure it out for themselves, always struggling just to survive in their job: overwhelmed, over-stressed, overwrought, and overboard. <br /> <br /> As an employer, I don't want my people working that way. I want them to be effective, confident, executive, and efficient. Of course, I could simply hire someone with all the skills I want, but those tend to be very rare and <em>very</em> expensive; besides, they may still be unfamiliar with my tools and processes. <br /> <br /> Honestly, I'd rather build my people. <strong><br /> <br /> One employee, then and now</strong> <br /> A few years ago, I hired an intern, a recent college graduate new to the workplace. When I hired him, he knew relatively little about effective self-management and knowledge work. Most of his experience had been with someone else telling him what to do and how. He wasn't a "knowledge worker."<br /> <br /> Now, though, he is an executive: maybe not yet in title, but in what he's capable of achieving. <br /> <br /> He didn't get there by osmosis. I've trained him myself over time.<br /> <br /> I could have spent my time on other activities. I could have let him sit with his current skill set and simply answer emails and do clerk-work. I could have been content to not get <em>the full value of his potential</em>&#8212;but I wasn't. <br /> <br /> I chose to unleash his potential, for his benefit <em>and mine</em>, by investing in and training him. <br /> <br /> Has it been worth it? I'd certainly say so. <br /> <br /> This isn't my first time, either: I've repeated this many times, with many people over the past 30 years, and gotten tremendous value as a result.<strong><br /> <br /> Get the value</strong> <br /> Maybe that's an extreme example, but it illustrates the point. You hire someone to create value for you. Even if they come in with skills, at the minimum they need to learn how to work with you and your organization to create value. <br /> <br /> "Value" can be measured in a number of ways: <br /> - How quickly you get things done <br /> - How much of your effort is directed towards the <em>right</em> things to do <br /> - How confident and focused you are at work <br /> - The speed and precision of your decisions <br /> - Your ability to quickly process inputs and recalibrate <br /> <br /> The job of you and your team, together, is to create value (all of the above and more) for the organization. So the question again is: what if you grew value in them? <strong><br /> <br /> But what if you lose them?</strong> <br /> A senior manager once told Zig Ziglar that he didn't want to waste money training his people only to have them leave. Zig's response was, "The only thing worse than training someone and losing them, is <em>not</em> training them and keeping them." <br /> <br /> I take the same view. You can train your people and make them more effective, confident, executive, and efficient . . . or, you can simply stay at your current accomplishment level. Think about it. <br /> <br /> There's more to the story of the young intern I hired. I knew from the start that our time together was limited&#8212;a year or two, at best. So why would I invest so much in him? <br /> <br /> Again, because I wanted to build value in him, for as long as I have him. I know it's been better for him <em>and</em> me.<strong><br /> <br /> The bottom line</strong> <br /> The bottom line is that coaching and training work, and my clients and I have seen it work hundreds of times. This includes training I've given, received, and seen others give and receive. Some of my clients have even gone out of their way to measure how well it works (ask me for the impact report from PUMA). <br /> <br /> I've seen people become more confident, relaxed, de-stressed, in-control, effective, and efficient after only a few hours of training. I've even come back to those people weeks or months later and found they're <em>still</em> working effectively. In most cases, they've even built on what they've learned and moved beyond it! <br /> <br /> I've had the privilege of working with some forward-thinking managers and executives who've chosen to invest in their people. Because of that, they and their teams have gotten far more value out of their work. Most of them aren't using any more time or energy than they were before, but they're still getting much more done and much more effectively. <strong><br /> <br /> The client's decision . . . </strong><br /> To me, the decision to train people and build their value is unmistakably clear. It was clear for my client as well: once he saw the value, he decided to extend the training to other members of his team, and greatly appreciated the benefit of it. <strong><br /> <br /> . . . and yours</strong> <br /> So will you be the manager that doesn't invest in training their people, leaving them to work with their current skills until they leave you?&#8212;Or, will you invest in them and get the value of their full potential for as long as they stay? The choice is yours. <br /> <br /> When you're ready to invest in your people and get greater value in return, give me a call. I can help. <br><br>Originally posted on <a href="http://www.NotesOnProductivity.com">Notes On Productivity</a> ]]></content:encoded>
  97. <wfw:commentRss> http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dxcomments/why-should-i-invest-in-my-people-they-will-leave</wfw:commentRss>
  98. <wfw:comment> http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/why-should-i-invest-in-my-people-they-will-leave?opendocument&amp;comments</wfw:comment>
  99. </item>
  100. <item>
  101. <title>&quot;I&#8217;ve heard we&#8217;re switching to Outlook/Verse/something else, so why should I invest in eProductivity until then?&quot;</title>
  102. <pubDate>Fri, 28 Aug 2015 13:03:32 -0700</pubDate>
  103. <description>
  104. <![CDATA[
  105. I sometimes hear the question, "Why should I invest in the tools my people have? We're getting a shiny new tool in a year." To me, what they're really saying is: "Our people are using dull tools now, but that's ok, because in a year they're going to get another, shinier, set of tools, which may or may not be better." <br /> <br /> Here's a practical application: I was recently talking with a client about expanding eProductivity usage at his company. He wasn't sure he wanted to, because, he said, "I've heard our company is switching from Notes to Outlook in the next year." <br /> <br /> I responded, "Ok; let me ask you, then: would you like your people to get things done at their current level for that time, then reduce that level as you switch?&#8212; Or, would you rather get a proven productivity benefit within days, then enjoy that benefit for the next year, and give your people skills and habits to use with any tools?" <br /> <br /> Look at this way: if your employees' job was to cut boards, but they were using dull saws, would you leave them well enough alone for a year? <strong><br /> <br /> Carpe annum (seize the year)</strong> <br /> Whether you're going to be using your current tools (e.g., IBM Notes) for a short or long time, it's good to consider how much value you're getting from them. In most cases, it's not hard to sharpen the saw to get incredible value. <br /> <br /> "Value" can be measured in a number of ways: <br /> - How quickly you get things done <br /> - How much of your effort is directed towards the <em>right</em> things to get done <br /> - How confident and focused you are at work <br /> - The speed and precision of your decisions <br /> - Your ability to quickly process inputs and recalibrate <br /> <br /> The fact is, the jobs of you and your team are more complicated than cutting boards. Your job, together, is to create value (all of the above and more) for the organization. So the question again is: what if you could use a tool <em>now,</em> w<br>[Originally posted on the Notes on Productivity web site. (http://www.NotesOnProductivity.com)]<br><br>Originally posted on <a href="http://www.NotesOnProductivity.com">Notes On Productivity</a>
  106. ]]>
  107. </description>
  108. <link>http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/switching-to-outlook-in-a-year</link>
  109. <category>Eric's Thoughts</category>
  110. <dc:creator>Eric Mack</dc:creator>
  111. <comments>http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/switching-to-outlook-in-a-year?opendocument&amp;comments</comments>
  112. <guid isPermaLink="true">http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/switching-to-outlook-in-a-year</guid>
  113. <content:encoded><![CDATA[ I sometimes hear the question, "Why should I invest in the tools my people have? We're getting a shiny new tool in a year." To me, what they're really saying is: "Our people are using dull tools now, but that's ok, because in a year they're going to get another, shinier, set of tools, which may or may not be better." <br /> <br /> Here's a practical application: I was recently talking with a client about expanding eProductivity usage at his company. He wasn't sure he wanted to, because, he said, "I've heard our company is switching from Notes to Outlook in the next year." <br /> <br /> I responded, "Ok; let me ask you, then: would you like your people to get things done at their current level for that time, then reduce that level as you switch?&#8212; Or, would you rather get a proven productivity benefit within days, then enjoy that benefit for the next year, and give your people skills and habits to use with any tools?" <br /> <br /> Look at this way: if your employees' job was to cut boards, but they were using dull saws, would you leave them well enough alone for a year? <strong><br /> <br /> Carpe annum (seize the year)</strong> <br /> Whether you're going to be using your current tools (e.g., IBM Notes) for a short or long time, it's good to consider how much value you're getting from them. In most cases, it's not hard to sharpen the saw to get incredible value. <br /> <br /> "Value" can be measured in a number of ways: <br /> - How quickly you get things done <br /> - How much of your effort is directed towards the <em>right</em> things to get done <br /> - How confident and focused you are at work <br /> - The speed and precision of your decisions <br /> - Your ability to quickly process inputs and recalibrate <br /> <br /> The fact is, the jobs of you and your team are more complicated than cutting boards. Your job, together, is to create value (all of the above and more) for the organization. So the question again is: what if you could use a tool <em>now,</em> with minimal investment, that's designed to make all of this easier? <br /> <br /> what if you could make your current tools even easier to use and more productive with minimal investment and effort? <br /> what if you could use a tool that's designed to make all of this easier? <strong><br /> <br /> The only thing worse . . . </strong><br /> A senior manager once told Zig Ziglar that he didn't want to waste money training his people only to have them leave. Zig's response was, "The only thing worse than training someone and losing them, is <em>not</em> training them and keeping them." <br /> <br /> I take the same view on giving people good tools now. The only thing worse than giving them great tools and losing them, is <em>not</em> giving them great tools and keeping your current level of accomplishment. You can stay there, or get better. <strong><br /> <br /> The bottom line</strong> <br /> My clients and I have seen eProductivity work hundreds of times. Some of them have even gone out of their way to measure how well it works (ask me for the impact report from PUMA). <br /> <br /> I've seen people become more confident, relaxed, de-stressed, in-control, effective, and efficient after only a few weeks (or days) of using it. I've even come back to those people weeks or months later and found they're <em>still</em> working effectively. In some cases, they've even built on what they've learned and moved beyond it! <br /> <br /> I've had the privilege of working with some forward-thinking managers and executives who've chosen to help their people. Because of that, they and their teams have gotten more from their systems and learned to <em>think</em> differently about how they work&#8212; and they know that what they've learned can be applied to the future to create greater value, no matter what tools they're using. <strong><br /> <br /> The client's decision</strong> <br /> To me, the decision to give people great tools now and get the most from them is unmistakably clear. It was for my client as well: he decided to expand eProductivity among his people, and he considered it an investment. <br /> <br /> He knew it would immediately boost his team's productivity for as long as they were using it. He knew the switch to Outlook may or may not come, but he wasn't deterred from investing in his people by improving their toolkit and skills. <br /> <br /> His time, place, position, needs, and team were not unique, and this was his decision. What's yours? <br /> <br /> When you're ready to invest in your tools and get greater value in return, give me a call. I can help. <br /> <br /> <!-- "Edouard Detaille - Vive L'Empereur - Google Art Project" by Édouard Detaille - uQHHEYw3tHfkcw at Google Cultural Institute, zoom level maximum. Licensed under Public Domain via Commons - <a href="https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Edouard_Detaille_-_Vive_L%27Empereur_-_Google_Art_Project.jpg#/media/File:Edouard_Detaille_-_Vive_L%27Empereur_-_Google_Art_Project.jpg">https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Edouard_Detaille_-_Vive_L%27Empereur_-_Google_Art_Project.jpg#/media/File:Edouard_Detaille_-_Vive_L%27Empereur_-_Google_Art_Project.jpg</a> --> <br><br>Originally posted on <a href="http://www.NotesOnProductivity.com">Notes On Productivity</a> ]]></content:encoded>
  114. <wfw:commentRss> http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dxcomments/switching-to-outlook-in-a-year</wfw:commentRss>
  115. <wfw:comment> http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/switching-to-outlook-in-a-year?opendocument&amp;comments</wfw:comment>
  116. </item>
  117. <item>
  118. <title>Does your GTD toolkit have support for your cognitive artifacts?</title>
  119. <pubDate>Mon, 15 Jun 2015 17:15:00 -0700</pubDate>
  120. <description>
  121. <![CDATA[
  122. Recently, a coaching client asked me for some recommendations for paper-based resources that would help him implement "Getting Things Done." <br /> <br /> I coach executives and professionals who use a variety of systems and tools. No matter how elaborate your systems, I find it's always helpful to have at least a few physical tools: solid reminders of ideas and tasks can be extremely helpful. Plus, the physical act of writing can help your memory and creative thinking. <br /> <br /> In light of this, I recommended that he consider the following for his personal GTD system, all of which I've found helpful: <br /> <ul> <li><a href="https://gettingthingsdone.com/store/product.php?productid=16211&amp;cat=294&amp;page=">GTD system folders:</a> I use these as my filing system away from the office </li><li><a href="https://gettingthingsdone.com/store/product.php?productid=16621&amp;cat=294&amp;page=">Large zip pouch:</a> This helps keep the folders tidy </li><li><a href="https://gettingthingsdone.com/store/home.php?cat=273">Notetaker Wallet:</a> This lets me quickly and conveniently capture ideas anywhere. It's important to have this capability, whether you use the wallet or something else </li><li><a href="https://gettingthingsdone.com/store/home.php?cat=300">Paper organizer:</a> A PDF-format organizer that you can edit or print</li></ul> <br />Disclaimer: I don't benefit from the sales of these products: these links are provided solely as helpful resources for your consideration.<br>[Originally posted on the Notes on Productivity web site. (http://www.NotesOnProductivity.com)]<br><br>Originally posted on <a href="http://www.NotesOnProductivity.com">Notes On Productivity</a>
  123. ]]>
  124. </description>
  125. <link>http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/does-your-gtd-toolkit-have-support-for-your-cognitive-artifacts</link>
  126. <category>Getting Things Done</category>
  127. <dc:creator>Eric Mack</dc:creator>
  128. <comments>http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/does-your-gtd-toolkit-have-support-for-your-cognitive-artifacts?opendocument&amp;comments</comments>
  129. <guid isPermaLink="true">http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/does-your-gtd-toolkit-have-support-for-your-cognitive-artifacts</guid>
  130. <content:encoded><![CDATA[ Recently, a coaching client asked me for some recommendations for paper-based resources that would help him implement "Getting Things Done." <br /> <br /> I coach executives and professionals who use a variety of systems and tools. No matter how elaborate your systems, I find it's always helpful to have at least a few physical tools: solid reminders of ideas and tasks can be extremely helpful. Plus, the physical act of writing can help your memory and creative thinking. <br /> <br /> In light of this, I recommended that he consider the following for his personal GTD system, all of which I've found helpful: <br />  <ul> <li><a href="https://gettingthingsdone.com/store/product.php?productid=16211&amp;cat=294&amp;page=">GTD system folders:</a> I use these as my filing system away from the office  </li><li><a href="https://gettingthingsdone.com/store/product.php?productid=16621&amp;cat=294&amp;page=">Large zip pouch:</a> This helps keep the folders tidy  </li><li><a href="https://gettingthingsdone.com/store/home.php?cat=273">Notetaker Wallet:</a> This lets me quickly and conveniently capture ideas anywhere. It's important to have this capability, whether you use the wallet or something else  </li><li><a href="https://gettingthingsdone.com/store/home.php?cat=300">Paper organizer:</a> A PDF-format organizer that you can edit or print</li></ul> <br />Disclaimer: I don't benefit from the sales of these products: these links are provided solely as helpful resources for your consideration. <br><br>Originally posted on <a href="http://www.NotesOnProductivity.com">Notes On Productivity</a> ]]></content:encoded>
  131. <wfw:commentRss> http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dxcomments/does-your-gtd-toolkit-have-support-for-your-cognitive-artifacts</wfw:commentRss>
  132. <wfw:comment> http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/does-your-gtd-toolkit-have-support-for-your-cognitive-artifacts?opendocument&amp;comments</wfw:comment>
  133. </item>
  134. <item>
  135. <title>So much for starting a job productively (or sanely)</title>
  136. <pubDate>Wed, 3 Jun 2015 09:12:00 -0700</pubDate>
  137. <description>
  138. <![CDATA[
  139. I was scanning the job board of a client that I serve and found this embedded in the description for an employment position: <br /> <br /> <br /> I would expect this in a job listing for a juggler at a circus, not for a desk job. This is a position for a knowledge worker&#8212;someone who "thinks" for a living. <br /> <br /> Thinking to create value requires concentration. Concentration requires focus. Both require minimizing distraction both from internal sources (e.g. multitasking) and external (interruptions, distractions). That's just how the mind works most effectively. <br /> <br /> In my personal knowledge and information management (PKIM) seminars and workshops, I teach that focus is what you shut in and concentration is what you shut out. These are essentials skills and powerful tools for any worker. <br /> <br /> So why would you set up a work environment that makes these things <em>more</em> difficult? <br /> <br /> I realize that the HR person who wrote (and misspelled) that description was probably only trying to cover themselves, but I see this all too often. It still makes me wonder: when will leadership and management get the fact that it takes concentration to create value?<br>[Originally posted on the Notes on Productivity web site. (http://www.NotesOnProductivity.com)]<br><br>Originally posted on <a href="http://www.NotesOnProductivity.com">Notes On Productivity</a>
  140. ]]>
  141. </description>
  142. <link>http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/so-much-for-starting-a-job-productively-or-sanely</link>
  143. <category>Knowledge Management</category>
  144. <dc:creator>Eric Mack</dc:creator>
  145. <comments>http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/so-much-for-starting-a-job-productively-or-sanely?opendocument&amp;comments</comments>
  146. <guid isPermaLink="true">http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/so-much-for-starting-a-job-productively-or-sanely</guid>
  147. <content:encoded><![CDATA[ I was scanning the job board of a client that I serve and found this embedded in the description for an employment position: <br />  <img  alt="Image:So much for starting a job productively (or sanely)" border="0" src="http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/so-much-for-starting-a-job-productively-or-sanely/content/M2?OpenElement">&nbsp;<br /> <br /> I would expect this in a job listing for a juggler at a circus, not for a desk job. This is a position for a knowledge worker&#8212;someone who "thinks" for a living. <br /> <br /> Thinking to create value requires concentration. Concentration requires focus. Both require minimizing distraction both from internal sources (e.g. multitasking) and external (interruptions, distractions). That's just how the mind works most effectively. <br /> <br /> In my personal knowledge and information management (PKIM) seminars and workshops, I teach that focus is what you shut in and concentration is what you shut out. These are essentials skills and powerful tools for any worker. <br /> <br /> So why would you set up a work environment that makes these things <em>more</em> difficult? <br /> <br /> I realize that the HR person who wrote (and misspelled) that description was probably only trying to cover themselves, but I see this all too often. &nbsp;It still makes me wonder: when will leadership and management get the fact that it takes concentration to create value?<br><br>Originally posted on <a href="http://www.NotesOnProductivity.com">Notes On Productivity</a> ]]></content:encoded>
  148. <wfw:commentRss> http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dxcomments/so-much-for-starting-a-job-productively-or-sanely</wfw:commentRss>
  149. <wfw:comment> http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/so-much-for-starting-a-job-productively-or-sanely?opendocument&amp;comments</wfw:comment>
  150. </item>
  151. <item>
  152. <title>IBMers sound off on ways to work, new and old</title>
  153. <pubDate>Wed, 27 May 2015 13:10:00 -0700</pubDate>
  154. <description>
  155. <![CDATA[
  156. I recently found two especially interesting things in my feed reader. One was Volker Weber's post on "<a href=http://vowe.net/archives/015031.html#comments>How to empty the Trash in IBMverse.com</a>" (especially the comments on it). The other was Nathan Paul's post on IBMers who are concerned about being switched to Verse and losing their current way to work &#8212; saying things like "it would be catastrophic." <br /> <br /> It's been very interesting, watching the reactions to the "new way to work" unfold. <br /> <br /> Read Nathan's post <a href="http://inside.eproductivity.com/dx/ibmers-speak-up-about-eproductivity-and-verse">here</a>. <br /> <br /> I'm curious: for you, what would truly constitute a "new way to work?" What would be the result of it? What would a product have to do or be to enable a truly new way to work?<br>[Originally posted on the Notes on Productivity web site. (http://www.NotesOnProductivity.com)]<br><br>Originally posted on <a href="http://www.NotesOnProductivity.com">Notes On Productivity</a>
  157. ]]>
  158. </description>
  159. <link>http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/ibmers-sound-off-on-ways-to-work-new-and-old</link>
  160. <category>Collaborative Tech</category>
  161. <dc:creator>Eric Mack</dc:creator>
  162. <comments>http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/ibmers-sound-off-on-ways-to-work-new-and-old?opendocument&amp;comments</comments>
  163. <guid isPermaLink="true">http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/ibmers-sound-off-on-ways-to-work-new-and-old</guid>
  164. <content:encoded><![CDATA[ I recently found two especially interesting things in my feed reader. One was Volker Weber's post on "<a href=http://vowe.net/archives/015031.html#comments>How to empty the Trash in IBMverse.com</a>" (especially the comments on it). The other was Nathan Paul's post on IBMers who are concerned about being switched to Verse and losing their current way to work &#8212; saying things like "it would be catastrophic." <br /> <br /> It's been very interesting, watching the reactions to the "new way to work" unfold. <br /> <br /> Read Nathan's post <a href="http://inside.eproductivity.com/dx/ibmers-speak-up-about-eproductivity-and-verse">here</a>. <br /> <br /> I'm curious: for you, what would truly constitute a "new way to work?" What would be the result of it? What would a product have to do or be to enable a truly new way to work? <br><br>Originally posted on <a href="http://www.NotesOnProductivity.com">Notes On Productivity</a> ]]></content:encoded>
  165. <wfw:commentRss> http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dxcomments/ibmers-sound-off-on-ways-to-work-new-and-old</wfw:commentRss>
  166. <wfw:comment> http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/ibmers-sound-off-on-ways-to-work-new-and-old?opendocument&amp;comments</wfw:comment>
  167. </item>
  168. <item>
  169. <title>IBM Verse: the challenge and opportunity</title>
  170. <pubDate>Thu, 21 May 2015 21:15:00 -0700</pubDate>
  171. <description>
  172. <![CDATA[
  173. Nathan, my manager of client services has been looking at two questions around IBM Verse: <br />1. How will IBM Verse make people more productive? <br />2. Can we help make people more productive with Verse? <br /> <br />For all I can see, both of these questions are still unclear, but Nathan's just posted <a href="http://inside.eproductivity.com/dx/verse-for-productivity">some great thoughts</a> about them. <br /> <br /><a href="http://inside.eproductivity.com/dx/verse-for-productivity"></a><br>[Originally posted on the Notes on Productivity web site. (http://www.NotesOnProductivity.com)]<br><br>Originally posted on <a href="http://www.NotesOnProductivity.com">Notes On Productivity</a>
  174. ]]>
  175. </description>
  176. <link>http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/ibm-verse-the-challenge-and-opportunity</link>
  177. <category>Collaborative Tech</category>
  178. <dc:creator>Eric Mack</dc:creator>
  179. <comments>http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/ibm-verse-the-challenge-and-opportunity?opendocument&amp;comments</comments>
  180. <guid isPermaLink="true">http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/ibm-verse-the-challenge-and-opportunity</guid>
  181. <content:encoded><![CDATA[ Nathan, my manager of client services has been looking at two questions around IBM Verse: <br />1. How will IBM Verse make people more productive?  <br />2. Can we help make people more productive with Verse? <br /> <br />For all I can see, both of these questions are still unclear, but Nathan's just posted <a href="http://inside.eproductivity.com/dx/verse-for-productivity">some great thoughts</a> about them.  <br /> <br /><a href="http://inside.eproductivity.com/dx/verse-for-productivity"><img  class="img-center" src="http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/20150521 - vProductivity NOP.jpg/$file/20150521 - vProductivity NOP.jpg" alt="20150521 - vProductivity NOP.jpg"/></a><br><br>Originally posted on <a href="http://www.NotesOnProductivity.com">Notes On Productivity</a> ]]></content:encoded>
  182. <wfw:commentRss> http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dxcomments/ibm-verse-the-challenge-and-opportunity</wfw:commentRss>
  183. <wfw:comment> http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/ibm-verse-the-challenge-and-opportunity?opendocument&amp;comments</wfw:comment>
  184. </item>
  185. <item>
  186. <title>How IBM Verse works (based on their marketing video)</title>
  187. <pubDate>Wed, 20 May 2015 10:24:00 -0700</pubDate>
  188. <description>
  189. <![CDATA[
  190. :: Abstract not available ::
  191. ]]>
  192. </description>
  193. <link>http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/how-ibm-verse-works-marketing-video</link>
  194. <category>Collaborative Tech</category>
  195. <dc:creator>Eric Mack</dc:creator>
  196. <comments>http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/how-ibm-verse-works-marketing-video?opendocument&amp;comments</comments>
  197. <guid isPermaLink="true">http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/how-ibm-verse-works-marketing-video</guid>
  198. <content:encoded><![CDATA[ <br><br>Originally posted on <a href="http://www.NotesOnProductivity.com">Notes On Productivity</a> ]]></content:encoded>
  199. <wfw:commentRss> http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dxcomments/how-ibm-verse-works-marketing-video</wfw:commentRss>
  200. <wfw:comment> http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/how-ibm-verse-works-marketing-video?opendocument&amp;comments</wfw:comment>
  201. </item>
  202. <item>
  203. <title>Will IBM Verse make you more productive than before?</title>
  204. <pubDate>Tue, 12 May 2015 15:44:03 -0700</pubDate>
  205. <description>
  206. <![CDATA[
  207. My team and I have been asked a lot recently: will eProductivity work with IBM Verse? Most of the people who ask are IBMers afraid of losing eProductivity and becoming less productive as a result. <br /> <br />If you use eProductivity or have some interest in it, head over to Inside.eProductivity for the details: <a href="http://inside.eproductivity.com/dx/will-eproductivity-work-with-ibm-verse">click here</a>.<br>[Originally posted on the Notes on Productivity web site. (http://www.NotesOnProductivity.com)]<br><br>Originally posted on <a href="http://www.NotesOnProductivity.com">Notes On Productivity</a>
  208. ]]>
  209. </description>
  210. <link>http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/will-ibm-verse-make-you-more-productive-than-before</link>
  211. <category>eProductivity</category>
  212. <dc:creator>Eric Mack</dc:creator>
  213. <comments>http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/will-ibm-verse-make-you-more-productive-than-before?opendocument&amp;comments</comments>
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  215. <content:encoded><![CDATA[ My team and I have been asked a lot recently: will eProductivity work with IBM Verse? Most of the people who ask are IBMers afraid of losing eProductivity and becoming less productive as a result. <br /> <br />If you use eProductivity or have some interest in it, head over to Inside.eProductivity for the details: <a href="http://inside.eproductivity.com/dx/will-eproductivity-work-with-ibm-verse">click here</a>. <br><br>Originally posted on <a href="http://www.NotesOnProductivity.com">Notes On Productivity</a> ]]></content:encoded>
  216. <wfw:commentRss> http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dxcomments/will-ibm-verse-make-you-more-productive-than-before</wfw:commentRss>
  217. <wfw:comment> http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/will-ibm-verse-make-you-more-productive-than-before?opendocument&amp;comments</wfw:comment>
  218. </item>
  219. <item>
  220. <title>A new way to work that&#8217;s over 10 years old</title>
  221. <pubDate>Mon, 11 May 2015 12:38:04 -0700</pubDate>
  222. <description>
  223. <![CDATA[
  224. I get 3-6 emails every day from some vendor telling me about a "new way to work" and how it's the greatest workplace innovation since the typewriter. I've looked into what they have to offer, but frankly, I haven't seen a real new way to work since David Allen's <em>Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-Free Productivity </em>was published in 2001. <br /> <br />A few years later, I came out with eProductivity, which has been introducing IBM software users to David's "GTD" methods ever since. For typical professionals who are stressed out, overloaded, and dominated by the latest and loudest thing in their inbox, eProductivity is a fantastic new way to work. <br /> <br />You might say, "10 years old? That's ancient for software!" Remember, Microsoft Word came out in 1989. <br /> <br />What's more, eProductivity is a proven way to work, which is more than can be said for all the advertising fluff floating around. <br /> <br />I know that sounds like I'm bragging, but I don't have to say a thing about eProductivity. People who use it say these things for me. For example, one of my managers just posted <a href="http://inside.eproductivity.com/dx/fantastic-eproductivity-story-michael-cheatham-ibm">this fantastic customer story</a> from an IBMer on Inside.eProductivity. <br /> <br />Here are a few choice quotes: <br /><blockquote>I have now been using eProductivity for almost three years. When I first installed eProductivity, I had approximately 700 emails in my in-box . . . I now rarely have more than 6-10 emails in my in-box, and I am almost always able to end the day with none. <br /> <br />I am also able to view, in a simple and intuitive way, all of the actions I need to take and the individuals that I waiting to provide me with information. <br /> <br />With eProductivity, I feel that I am always on top of my emails, actions, requests for information, and calendar. As mentioned above, my in-box is almost always at zero, while at the same time I know I have every<br>[Originally posted on the Notes on Productivity web site. (http://www.NotesOnProductivity.com)]<br><br>Originally posted on <a href="http://www.NotesOnProductivity.com">Notes On Productivity</a>
  225. ]]>
  226. </description>
  227. <link>http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/a-new-way-to-work-over-10-years-old</link>
  228. <category>eProductivity</category>
  229. <dc:creator>Eric Mack</dc:creator>
  230. <comments>http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/a-new-way-to-work-over-10-years-old?opendocument&amp;comments</comments>
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  232. <content:encoded><![CDATA[ I get 3-6 emails every day from some vendor telling me about a "new way to work" and how it's the greatest workplace innovation since the typewriter. I've looked into what they have to offer, but frankly, I haven't seen a real new way to work since David Allen's <em>Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-Free Productivity </em>was published in 2001.  <br /> <br />A few years later, I came out with eProductivity, which has been introducing IBM software users to David's "GTD" methods ever since. For typical professionals who are stressed out, overloaded, and dominated by the latest and loudest thing in their inbox, eProductivity is a fantastic new way to work. <br /> <br />You might say, "10 years old? That's ancient for software!" Remember, Microsoft Word came out in 1989. <br /> <br />What's more, eProductivity is a proven way to work, which is more than can be said for all the advertising fluff floating around.  <br /> <br />I know that sounds like I'm bragging, but I don't have to say a thing about eProductivity. People who use it say these things for me. For example, one of my managers just posted <a href="http://inside.eproductivity.com/dx/fantastic-eproductivity-story-michael-cheatham-ibm">this fantastic customer story</a> from an IBMer on Inside.eProductivity.  <br /> <br />Here are a few choice quotes: <br /><blockquote>I have now been using eProductivity for almost three years. When I first installed eProductivity, I had approximately 700 emails in my in-box . . . I now rarely have more than 6-10 emails in my in-box, and I am almost always able to end the day with none. <br /> <br />I am also able to view, in a simple and intuitive way, all of the actions I need to take and the individuals that I waiting to provide me with information. <br /> <br />With eProductivity, I feel that I am always on top of my emails, actions, requests for information, and calendar. As mentioned above, my in-box is almost always at zero, while at the same time I know I have every required action covered that was initiated by an email. It allows me to feel like I am in control of my time.&nbsp;</blockquote> <br /> <br />"I am in control of my time." Mission accomplished. I created eProductivity in the course of my consulting work to help frustrated users of IBM software achieve this exact thing. <br /> <br />Do you feel in control of your time, using whatever tools you have, working however you work? <br /> <br /><strong>GTD: the secret sauce of eProductivity</strong> <br />"Getting Things Done," is a personal productivity method used by millions of people around the world (including me) to gain clarity and focus in their work. It's based on the principles from the international bestseller, <em>Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-Free Productivity</em>, by my colleague David Allen.  <br /> <br />This set of habits and practices, known as GTD for short, helps people: <ul> <li>Process all their inputs in a way that make sense. This includes, email, voicemail, snail mail, idea, notes, conversations, articles -- any source of information that means something to you. </li><li>Get a clear view of what they need to do </li><li>Decide what's most important to do </li><li>Do it </li><li>Review what they've done and need to do, to make sure nothing slips through the cracks</li></ul> <br />For more about GTD, <a href="http://www.eproductivity.com/dx/gtd-overview">see here</a>.  <br /> <br />The power of GTD is built into eProductivity from the ground up: eProductivity is designed to support, facilitate, enable, and (to a certain extent) teach the habits and practices of GTD.  <br /> <br />I've personally been using GTD for over 20 years, and it's been enormously effective in my life and work. I originally designed eProductivity to help bring this power to my consulting clients. <br /> <br /><strong>Getting Things Done with eProductivity is a real, proven, new way to work</strong> <br />The methods of GTD are simple, intuitive, incredibly powerful, and radically different from how most people work, and it's been catching on since 2001. All it takes is learning to <em>think</em> about your work in a new way. <br /> <br />Let me make that clear: a real new way to work starts with how you <em>think</em> about your work, not with a fancy new piece of software. So even though GTD may not have been born yesterday (or even this year), it's still very new to the hundreds of people discovering it every day.  <br /> <br />In the same way, eProductivity has the power to take frustrated, overloaded IBM software users and introduce them to a whole new way to get clarity and focus. Prompts are built into the program to get professionals to <em>think</em> differently about their work, which includes their to-do lists, supporting information, and waves of "stuff" coming at them every day.  <br /> <br />I have no plans to stop using eProductivity. All the shiny new programs I've tried that promise a new way to work have turned out to be simple email clients with a few bells and whistles thrown in, plus the promise to serve up only what's important to you so you can ignore everything else. So far, that hasn't panned out. Even if it did, these programs still don't give me the tools I need and want to get clarity and focus in the midst of information overwhelm. <br /> <br />The new players are still unknown (and based on what I've seen so far, my hopes are not high). What <em>is</em> known is that many, many people have been successfully getting things done with eProductivity for over a decade.  <br /> <br />I'll keep introducing people to a new way to work for as long as I can, which I hope will be for some time. <br /> <br />More about GTD: <br /><a href="http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2012/11/busy-and-busier/309111/">The Atlantic: Busy and Busier: Productivity expert David Allen talks with James Fallows about the future of getting things done</a> <br /><a href="http://www.thenational.ae/business/the-life/free-the-mind-to-get-things-done">That National: Freeing Your Mind to Get Things Done</a><br><br>Originally posted on <a href="http://www.NotesOnProductivity.com">Notes On Productivity</a> ]]></content:encoded>
  233. <wfw:commentRss> http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dxcomments/a-new-way-to-work-over-10-years-old</wfw:commentRss>
  234. <wfw:comment> http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/a-new-way-to-work-over-10-years-old?opendocument&amp;comments</wfw:comment>
  235. </item>
  236. <item>
  237. <title>Best Practices for Robotics Competitions, Work, and Life in General</title>
  238. <pubDate>Wed, 6 May 2015 15:29:00 -0700</pubDate>
  239. <description>
  240. <![CDATA[
  241. I really enjoy consulting and coaching executives and other professionals, because it allows me to make a difference in the lives of others. There's nothing like that moment when their eyes widen and they say "I get it!" or "That's cool!" <br /> <br /> I also get to experience this same thing with students in my <a href=http://www.masters.edu/Robotics>Intro to Robotics</a> course. This course isn't just a bunch of computer science geeks doing geeky things: I use it to prepare my students to work well, both in their personal and professional lives, by teaching them essential life skills. <br /> <br /> I know teaching life skills through robotics sounds far-fetched, so I'm going to prove it below.<br /> <br /> <a href="http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/Robotics life lessons full size.jpg/$file/Robotics life lessons full size.jpg" rel="lightbox" alt="Robotics life lessons full size.jpg"/></a>In this course, one of the exercises I teach is the After-Action Review. This consists of five questions: <br /> <br /> 1. <strong>What was supposed to happen?</strong> <br /> 2. <strong>What actually happened?</strong> <br /> 3. <strong>Why did it happen?</strong> <br /> 4. <strong>What did we learn?</strong><br /> 5. <strong>How can we do better next time?</strong> <br /> <br /> On Monday, as I lead them through an After-Action Review, I wrote the answers to the final question on the board (as you can see on the left). The action under review was the students' preparation for their final in-class competition (which involved designing and building a robot in teams), but the answers they came up with also translate to work and life in general. <br /> <br /> Note that these are <strong>not</strong> in order of importance or priority. They're all lessons learned. Here's what my students had to sayplus applies to best practices for life:<br /><br>[Originally posted on the Notes on Productivity web site. (http://www.NotesOnProductivity.com)]<br><br>Originally posted on <a href="http://www.NotesOnProductivity.com">Notes On Productivity</a>
  242. ]]>
  243. </description>
  244. <link>http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/best-practices-for-robotics-competition-work-and-life-in-general</link>
  245. <category>Knowledge Management</category>
  246. <dc:creator>Eric Mack</dc:creator>
  247. <comments>http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/best-practices-for-robotics-competition-work-and-life-in-general?opendocument&amp;comments</comments>
  248. <guid isPermaLink="true">http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/best-practices-for-robotics-competition-work-and-life-in-general</guid>
  249. <content:encoded><![CDATA[ <img  class="left" src="http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/Robot hand I.eP.jpg/$file/Robot hand I.eP.jpg" alt="Robot hand I.eP.jpg"/>I really enjoy consulting and coaching executives and other professionals, because it allows me to make a difference in the lives of others. There's nothing like that moment when their eyes widen and they say "I get it!" or "That's cool!" <br /> <br /> I also get to experience this same thing with students in my <a href=http://www.masters.edu/Robotics>Intro to Robotics</a> course. This course isn't just a bunch of computer science geeks doing geeky things: I use it to prepare my students to work well, both in their personal and professional lives, by teaching them essential life skills. <br /> <br /> I know teaching life skills through robotics sounds far-fetched, so I'm going to prove it below.<br /> <br /> <a href="http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/Robotics life lessons full size.jpg/$file/Robotics life lessons full size.jpg" rel="lightbox" alt="Robotics life lessons full size.jpg"/><img  class="right" src="http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/Robotics life lessons thumbnail.jpg/$file/Robotics life lessons thumbnail.jpg" alt="Robotics life lessons thumbnail.jpg" class="dropshadow"/></a>In this course, one of the exercises I teach is the After-Action Review. This consists of five questions: <br /> <br /> 1. &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;<strong>What was supposed to happen?</strong> <br /> 2. &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;<strong>What actually happened?</strong> <br /> 3. &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;<strong>Why did it happen?</strong> <br /> 4. &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;<strong>What did we learn?</strong><br /> 5. &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;<strong>How can we do better next time?</strong> <br /> <br /> On Monday, as I lead them through an After-Action Review, I wrote the answers to the final question on the board (as you can see on the left). The action under review was the students' preparation for their final in-class competition (which involved designing and building a robot in teams), but the answers they came up with also translate to work and life in general. <br /> <br /> Note that these are <strong>not</strong> in order of importance or priority. They're all lessons learned. Here's what my students had to sayplus applies to best practices for life:<br /> <strong><br /> 1. Decide what you want to build beforehand</strong> <br /> Before you start, ask "what's the successful outcome?" What would "done" look like? If you don't have this clear from the start, especially on a major project (like building a robot), you'll waste a lot of time and effort. <strong><br /> <br /> 2. Know your tools</strong> <br /> For my students, this meant knowing the computers and robot parts they had to work with. <br /> <br /> For you and me, this translates to knowing what you have to work with and how to use it. That's part of the K (Knowledge) in my <a href="http://notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/heres-why-you-dont-have-time-to-save-time">V=KMT equation</a>. <br /> <br /> Whatever tools, systems, and resources you use, there are ways to learn how to use them better. This might be as simple as Googling "Microsoft Excel tutorial" or asking a senior coworker for some pointers.<strong><br /> <br /> 3. Iterate and experiment with options</strong> <img  class="right" src="http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/GTD 2015 200x270px.png/$file/GTD 2015 200x270px.png" alt="GTD 2015 400x541px.png" /> <br /> My colleague David Allen published his international bestseller <em>Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-Free Productivity</em> over 12 years ago. Since then, he's continued to experiment with ways to tweak and improve his methodology (in fact, as you can see here, he's recently published a new edition).<br /> <br /> In other words, never stop improving!<strong><br /> <br /> 4. Record, review, revise, recalibrate</strong> <br /> I think it's funny that one of my students' answers to the After-Action Review was essentially "do After-Action Reviews." They got it! Always be willing to examine and change how you do things. <strong><br /> <br /> 5. Know what's in your kit</strong> <br /> Know what you have to work with:  <ul> <li>Tools, machines, programs  </li><li>The knowledge you can access: what you know, who you know ,and what they know</li></ul>If you need to do something and there doesn't seem to be a tool or process for it, it's always worth asking a coworker whether one exists. <strong><br /> <br /> 6. Keep it simple and appropriate</strong> <br /> "More complex" doesn't always mean "better." <a href="http://dilbert.com/strip/2015-04-20">This Dilbert strip</a> makes a great illustration.<strong><br /> <br /> 7. Pace yourself</strong> <br /> Working longer can actually make you <em>less</em> productive. <a href="http://notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/why-your-late-night-emails-are-hurting-your-team">Resting is an important part</a> of doing valuable, effective work. <strong><br /> <br /> 8. Study the problem</strong> <br /> A little thinking ahead saves a lot of effort. <strong><br /> <br /> 9. Save your fine-tuning for when you have a working solution</strong> <br /> If you obsess with getting it right on the first draft, it'll take you much longer to get anything done. This would fall under the Method (M) of my V=KMT equation &#8212; that is, your practices and procedures for how you do things. <strong><br /> <br /> 10. Use version control</strong> <br /> My students would save each version of their robots' programming. That way, if a new version didn't work or had some serious flaw, they could go back to the previous version. <br /> <br /> For you and me, this could be as simple as saving different versions of a Word document instead of continually overwriting the old one, and backing up the copies in different locations.. This way, when (not if) your computer crashes, you can go back to the last version instead of starting all over.<strong><br /> <br /> 11. Keep a journal</strong> <img  class="left" src="http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/Journal.png/$file/Journal.png" alt="Journal.png"/><br /> It helps to record what you're building and changing and why. This way, if you come back to something months or years later and wonder, "Why did I do it this way," you can look it up in your journal. If you don't have this, you<strong> </strong>may end up learning the hard way. <br /> <br /> It's especially helpful on long, complex projects to be able to go back and find what you and your team decided and agreed on. <br /> <br /> For things like this, I use the automatic journaling feature in the <a href=http://www.eproductivity.com/dx/reference>eProductivity Reference Database</a>.<strong><br /> <br /> 12. Don't lose sight of the problem you are trying to solve</strong> <br /> I'm amazed how many consulting problems are solved by the question "What are you trying to accomplish here?" Usually, everyone on the team has a different answer <br /> <br /> That's the point that I'm able to guide my clients into figuring out a solution. Once we know what they're aiming for, we can figure out what needs to be done and make a plan.<strong><br /> <br /> 13. Communication is key!</strong> <img  class="right" src="http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/Speech bubbles small.png/$file/Speech bubbles small.png" alt="Speech bubbles small.png"/> <br /> Don't assume that everyone on your team is on the same page. All of you should clearly know A) what you're all trying to achieve and B) who's responsible for what. <br /> <br /> You've probably been in this situation: a meeting ends with everyone agreeing that we need to do Thing X. By the next meeting, Thing X hasn't been done, because it was never stated or agreed <em>who was responsible for it. </em>This leads to "I thought you were going to do it!"<strong><br /> <br /> 14. Think outside the box</strong> <br /> Of course, the hardest parts of this are usually 1) realizing there is a box and 2) figuring out where its walls are. <strong><br /> <br /> 15. Reuse proven code (don't reinvent)</strong> <br /> I've been using some of the same tools and content for many years, not because I'm too lazy or afraid to innovate, but because it still works. Knowing your proven solutions is key -- and not only that, but storing them in such a way that, even if you don't look at them for months or years, you easily find and use them again. <br /> <br /> For example, if you get a certain question from customers every few weeks (or even every few months), there's no need to reinvent the wheel every time you answer it. You might keep responses to recurring questions in email folders and simply forward the same response every time you get the question.<br /> <br /> Organizing your knowledge for quick and easy retrieval is also part of the "Knowledge" component of <a href="http://notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/heres-why-you-dont-have-time-to-save-time">V=KMT</a>. <strong><br /> <br /> 16. If it ain't broke, don't fix it!</strong> <br /> This is closely related to 15 above. Keeping a healthy tension between conserving what works and innovating new solutions can be an interesting balance. <br /> <br /> Here's a piece of advice: if you're going to fix what ain't broke, use version control (#10). That way, if you break what was working, you'll have a working version to go back to. <strong><br /> <br /> Learning robotics, preparing for life</strong> <br /> Not only does teaching robotics let me invest in young people at my alma mater, it's also a great way for me to sharpen my consulting skills. With a little thought, the lessons my students learn in class translate directly to real life at home and at work. <br /> <br /> <br /> <span style="font-size: 12px;">Image credits: <br /> Robot hand image by Richard Greenhill and Hugo Elias &#91;CC BY-SA 3.0 (<a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/">http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/</a>)&#93;, via Wikimedia Commons. <br /> Speech bubble icon: free from <a href="http://www.clipartbest.com/clipart-eiMABpKin">ClipArt Best</a> <br /> Journal icon: public domain from <a href="http://pixabay.com/en/ring-binder-loose-leaf-diary-blank-150583/">Pixabay</a>. <br /> </span> <br><br>Originally posted on <a href="http://www.NotesOnProductivity.com">Notes On Productivity</a> ]]></content:encoded>
  250. <wfw:commentRss> http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dxcomments/best-practices-for-robotics-competition-work-and-life-in-general</wfw:commentRss>
  251. <wfw:comment> http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/best-practices-for-robotics-competition-work-and-life-in-general?opendocument&amp;comments</wfw:comment>
  252. </item>
  253. <item>
  254. <title>Technology alone won&#8217;t fix how we work (and work together)</title>
  255. <pubDate>Mon, 4 May 2015 16:55:00 -0700</pubDate>
  256. <description>
  257. <![CDATA[
  258. :: Abstract not available ::
  259. ]]>
  260. </description>
  261. <link>http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/technology-alone-wont-solve-our-work-or-collaboration-problems</link>
  262. <category>Collaborative Tech</category>
  263. <dc:creator>Eric Mack</dc:creator>
  264. <comments>http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/technology-alone-wont-solve-our-work-or-collaboration-problems?opendocument&amp;comments</comments>
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  266. <content:encoded><![CDATA[ <br><br>Originally posted on <a href="http://www.NotesOnProductivity.com">Notes On Productivity</a> ]]></content:encoded>
  267. <wfw:commentRss> http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dxcomments/technology-alone-wont-solve-our-work-or-collaboration-problems</wfw:commentRss>
  268. <wfw:comment> http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/technology-alone-wont-solve-our-work-or-collaboration-problems?opendocument&amp;comments</wfw:comment>
  269. </item>
  270. <item>
  271. <title>Email in real life</title>
  272. <pubDate>Mon, 13 Apr 2015 14:55:00 -0700</pubDate>
  273. <description>
  274. <![CDATA[
  275. :: Abstract not available ::
  276. ]]>
  277. </description>
  278. <link>http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/email-in-real-life</link>
  279. <category>Email</category>
  280. <dc:creator>Nathan Paul</dc:creator>
  281. <comments>http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/email-in-real-life?opendocument&amp;comments</comments>
  282. <guid isPermaLink="true">http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/email-in-real-life</guid>
  283. <content:encoded><![CDATA[ <br><br>Originally posted on <a href="http://www.NotesOnProductivity.com">Notes On Productivity</a> ]]></content:encoded>
  284. <wfw:commentRss> http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dxcomments/email-in-real-life</wfw:commentRss>
  285. <wfw:comment> http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/email-in-real-life?opendocument&amp;comments</wfw:comment>
  286. </item>
  287. <item>
  288. <title>Don&#8217;t &quot;like&quot; this post</title>
  289. <pubDate>Wed, 8 Apr 2015 10:56:00 -0700</pubDate>
  290. <description>
  291. <![CDATA[
  292. A few days ago, I was talking to my Robotics students about the posts made in our Facebook group. I didn't want to come across as the old guy bashing social media, but I told them I was surprised at how little discussion was actually taking place online. Students would post, but usually others would only respond by "liking." <br /> <br /> If my students were only posting cat videos, I wouldn't have a problem with this, but most of the posts were meant to start discussion or get feedback. For these kinds of posts, "like" doesn't mean anything. <br /> <br /> Before Facebook and Twitter, if you wanted to engage with somebody's post, the only way (on nearly all platforms) was to make a comment. Writing and posting a comment takes at least a little thought and effort. <br /> <br /> I'm <strong>not</strong> saying that "liking" is bad and everyone should stop it. What I <strong>am</strong> saying is this: think about what your "like" means. <br /> <br /> Here's an example of a post where "liking" would be completely appropriate: <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> In this case, "like" simply means "yes." <br /> <br /> On the other hand, think about what "like" means for a post like this:<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> In this case, "like" doesn't mean much of anything, except maybe "I approve of this idea, but don't want to contribute anything to it." <br /> <br /> After that talk with my students, I noticed that they commented more and "liked" less.<br>[Originally posted on the Notes on Productivity web site. (http://www.NotesOnProductivity.com)]<br><br>Originally posted on <a href="http://www.NotesOnProductivity.com">Notes On Productivity</a>
  293. ]]>
  294. </description>
  295. <link>http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/dont-like-this-post</link>
  296. <category>Collaborative Tech</category>
  297. <dc:creator>Eric Mack</dc:creator>
  298. <comments>http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/dont-like-this-post?opendocument&amp;comments</comments>
  299. <guid isPermaLink="true">http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/dont-like-this-post</guid>
  300. <content:encoded><![CDATA[ A few days ago, I was talking to my Robotics students about the posts made in our Facebook group. I didn't want to come across as the old guy bashing social media, but I told them I was surprised at how little discussion was actually taking place online. Students would post, but usually others would only respond by "liking." <br /> <br /> If my students were only posting cat videos, I wouldn't have a problem with this, but most of the posts were meant to start discussion or get feedback. For these kinds of posts, "like" doesn't mean anything. <br /> <br /> Before Facebook and Twitter, if you wanted to engage with somebody's post, the only way (on nearly all platforms) was to make a comment. Writing and posting a comment takes at least a little thought and effort. <br /> <br /> I'm <strong>not</strong> saying that "liking" is bad and everyone should stop it. What I <strong>am</strong> saying is this: think about what your "like" means. <br /> <br /> Here's an example of a post where "liking" would be completely appropriate: <br /> <br /> <img  src="http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/FB post mockup.png/$file/FB post mockup.png" alt="An example of a Facebook post where liking would be appropriate"/> <br /> <br /> In this case, "like" simply means "yes." <br /> <br /> On the other hand, think about what "like" means for a post like this:<br /> <br /> <img  src="http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/FB post mockup 2.jpg/$file/FB post mockup 2.jpg" alt="An example of a Facebook post where liking contributes absolutely nothing"/> <br /> <br /> In this case, "like" doesn't mean much of anything, except maybe "I approve of this idea, but don't want to contribute anything to it." <br /> <br /> After that talk with my students, I noticed that they commented more and "liked" less. <br><br>Originally posted on <a href="http://www.NotesOnProductivity.com">Notes On Productivity</a> ]]></content:encoded>
  301. <wfw:commentRss> http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dxcomments/dont-like-this-post</wfw:commentRss>
  302. <wfw:comment> http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/dont-like-this-post?opendocument&amp;comments</wfw:comment>
  303. </item>
  304. <item>
  305. <title>Have you ever experienced an empty inbox? Here&#8217;s how</title>
  306. <pubDate>Thu, 2 Apr 2015 16:12:00 -0700</pubDate>
  307. <description>
  308. <![CDATA[
  309. In an hour, I went from about 120 emails (in five inboxes) to 0. <br /> <br /> For the first time in months, I saw this: <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> This felt <em>so good</em> to achieve. <br /> <br /> If you've never experienced this, it's hard to understand -- it just feels so <em>clean</em> and <em>complete. </em>Can you imagine that being your inbox (even if you don't use an iPhone)? <br /> <br /> Here's how I did it. As I looked at each email, one at a time, I chose what to: <br /><br>[Originally posted on the Notes on Productivity web site. (http://www.NotesOnProductivity.com)]<br><br>Originally posted on <a href="http://www.NotesOnProductivity.com">Notes On Productivity</a>
  310. ]]>
  311. </description>
  312. <link>http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/experience-empty-inbox</link>
  313. <category></category>
  314. <dc:creator>Nathan Paul</dc:creator>
  315. <comments>http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/experience-empty-inbox?opendocument&amp;comments</comments>
  316. <guid isPermaLink="true">http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/experience-empty-inbox</guid>
  317. <content:encoded><![CDATA[ In an hour, I went from about 120 emails (in five inboxes) to 0. <br /> <br /> For the first time in months, I saw this: <br /> <br /> <img  src="http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/iPhone Mail - No Mail.png/$file/iPhone Mail - No Mail.png" alt="iPhone Mail - No Mail.png"/ width="270" height="405"> <br /> <br /> This felt <em>so good</em> to achieve. <br /> <br /> If you've never experienced this, it's hard to understand -- it just feels so <em>clean</em> and <em>complete. </em>Can you imagine that being your inbox (even if you don't use an iPhone)? <br /> <br /> Here's how I did it. As I looked at each email, one at a time, I chose what to: <br /> <strong><br /> Defer</strong> - If it was something I was <em>committed</em> to do, but would take more than 2 minutes, I created an action in my personal task management system, where I <em>know</em> I'll see it again when I need to. <strong><br /> <br /> Delete</strong> - if I decided I wasn't going to do anything with it (this is my favorite) <strong><br /> <br /> Do</strong> - If it was something I was committed to do and would take 2 minutes or less, I got it done right then and there <strong><br /> <br /> Distribute </strong>- Just a fancy word for "file," but I wanted to keep the alliteration. If I wanted to save an email, it went in a folder -- <em>not</em> so I could put off deciding what to do about it, but because I'd <em>already</em> decided what to do (and captured that thing on an action list)<strong><br /> <br /> Delegate</strong> - If it was something someone else needed to do, I forwarded it to them (and set a "waiting for" if I needed something back from them)<strong><br /> <br /> The key</strong> to achieving an empty inbox, time and time again, is to decide right up front what the thing means to you and what you're going to do about it (if anything). Don't leave it and let it keep bugging you. <br /> <br /> (Hint: this is also <strong>the key</strong> to dealing with any kind of input in your live: phone calls, Facebook messages, online articles, interruptions, information from conversations...) <br /> <br /> I learned these methods and ways of thinking as part of the eProductivity team. In our way of thinking (invented here), this whole thing about dealing with email would fall under "method" -- as in, you need knowledge, method, and technology, all multiplied together, to be effective and valuable at what you do. See <a href="http://inside.eproductivity.com/dx/heres-why-you-dont-have-time-to-save-time">here</a> for more about that.<br /> <br /> It had been a while since I'd completely emptied my email, and I'd forgotten how much of a stress-reliever it is -- like having a huge weight lifted off my mind that I didn't realize was there. <br /> <br /> To be honest, I hope you'll follow this blog for more good stuff about living and working effectively in our information-saturated, interruption-driven, always-changing always-on world. There is a better way! <br /> <br /> All the best, <br /> <br /> Nathan <strong><br /> <br /> P.S. </strong>What are your best email tips, whether for dealing with email or sending it? Tweet with the hashtag #egreement (for "email agreement," i.e. shared agreement to send and receive email responsibly, because seriously, <em>the madness needs to stop</em>). <em><br /> <br /> <br /> Find us on social:</em> <br /> <a href=http://www.twitter.com/eproductivity>@eProductivity</a> | <a href=http://www.twitter.com/ericmack>@EricMack</a><br /> FB: <a href=http://www.facebook.com/eproductivity>eProductivity</a> <br /> LI: <a href="http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/www.linkedin.com/pub/nathan-paul/29/667/8bb/en">Nathan Paul</a> <br /> LI: <a href=https://www.linkedin.com/in/ericmack>Eric Mack</a> <em><br /> <br /> The hottest from our blog:</em> <br /> Email is not the problem. How we use it is the problem: <a href="http://inside.eproductivity.com/dx/email-is-not-the-problem---lack-of-agreement-is">&#91;read more&#93;</a> <br /> Why your late-night emails are hurting your team: <a href="http://inside.eproductivity.com/dx/why-your-late-night-emails-are-hurting-your-team">&#91;read more&#93;</a> <br /> Moving from Lotus Notes to Outlook? It might not actually matter: <a href="http://inside.eproductivity.com/dx/migrating-from-outlook-to-lotus-notes">&#91;read more&#93;</a> <br /> How to prevent an overload of "due today:" <a href="http://inside.eproductivity.com/dx/gtd-how-do-you-decide-when-to-put-a-due-date-on-something">&#91;read more&#93;</a> <br><br>Originally posted on <a href="http://www.NotesOnProductivity.com">Notes On Productivity</a> ]]></content:encoded>
  318. <wfw:commentRss> http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dxcomments/experience-empty-inbox</wfw:commentRss>
  319. <wfw:comment> http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/experience-empty-inbox?opendocument&amp;comments</wfw:comment>
  320. </item>
  321. <item>
  322. <title>Email is not the problem. Lack of agreement on how to use it is.</title>
  323. <pubDate>Wed, 25 Mar 2015 12:44:00 -0700</pubDate>
  324. <description>
  325. <![CDATA[
  326. <br /> <br /> I've been working with electronic messaging (email, etc.) in one form or another for over 30 years. Back in 1992, I (successfully) sold a server-software product that promised to help people deal with the "flood" of 40 emails a day! Much of my executive coaching business has revolved around helping professionals manage their email (many receive up to 400 a day). <br /> <br /> I've had a front-row seat to the rise of email along the whole way. For many people, it's grown into a monstrous beast. A couple years ago, McKinsey &amp; Company found that workers spend up to 28% of their day writing and reading emails. Inboxes fill up over lunch breaks. We're all guilty of being to quick to send to others whose email is just as out-of-control as ours. <br /> <br /> I think that's at least half of the issue: who's <em>creating</em> the problem. I also think we can definitely find ways to address this together. <br /><br>[Originally posted on the Notes on Productivity web site. (http://www.NotesOnProductivity.com)]<br><br>Originally posted on <a href="http://www.NotesOnProductivity.com">Notes On Productivity</a>
  327. ]]>
  328. </description>
  329. <link>http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/email-is-not-the-problem---lack-of-agreement-is</link>
  330. <category>Collaborative Tech</category>
  331. <dc:creator>Eric Mack</dc:creator>
  332. <comments>http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/email-is-not-the-problem---lack-of-agreement-is?opendocument&amp;comments</comments>
  333. <guid isPermaLink="true">http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/email-is-not-the-problem---lack-of-agreement-is</guid>
  334. <content:encoded><![CDATA[ <img  src="http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/Email irritation.png/$file/Email irritation.png" alt="Email frustration"/> <br /> <br /> I've been working with electronic messaging (email, etc.) in one form or another for over 30 years. Back in 1992, I (successfully) sold a server-software product that promised to help people deal with the "flood" of 40 emails a day! Much of my executive coaching business has revolved around helping professionals manage their email (many receive up to 400 a day). <br /> <br /> I've had a front-row seat to the rise of email along the whole way. For many people, it's grown into a monstrous beast. A couple years ago, McKinsey &amp; Company found that workers spend up to 28% of their day writing and reading emails. Inboxes fill up over lunch breaks. We're all guilty of being to quick to send to others whose email is just as out-of-control as ours. <br /> <br /> I think that's at least half of the issue: who's <em>creating</em> the problem. I also think we can definitely find ways to address this together. <br />  <br /> As email has grown in reach and volume, methods for effectively dealing with it have not kept up. I see several reasons for this:  <ul> <li>People tend to think that email itself is the problem, not how they use it, so they look for other solutions instead of better ways to use what they have  </li><li>Vendors like IBM, Microsoft, Google, and others continuously promise shiny new solutions that distract from the real problem without addressing it  </li><li>Email is typically considered a <em>receiver's </em>problem. I've found almost nothing that addresses how email is <em>sent.</em></li></ul><em>&nbsp;</em>Proven methods for dealing with received email are not complicated, but they require learning new habits and ways of thinking. Again, these aren't hard, and they don't take much effort to learn, but consistent effort <em>is</em> required. <br /> <br /> Methods for effectively <em>sending</em> email are certainly not widely shared. I'm trying to help fill that gap -- that's why I offer my Top 10 Tips for writing email as an incentive to follow this blog. <br /> <br /> I think email, as a medium of communication, has some fantastic capabilities that can't be matched by almost anything else, and I think the solution to the problem of too much email needs to be a <em>shared and</em> <em>social</em> solution -- an agreement. <br /> <br /> <img  class="img-center" src="http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/Handshake.jpg/$file/Handshake.jpg" alt="Handshake.jpg"/> <br /> Here's a framework I came up with for thinking about these kinds of problems and solutions, based on my years of research in productivity and knowledge management. My "value equation" describes this as Value = Knowledge x Methodology x Technology (or V=KMT). &nbsp; <br /> <br />In the case of email and how we use it, our "T" is moderately high (because this is a reasonably capable technology), but our "M" for using it (as senders <em>and</em> receivers) is low. <br /> <br /> In other words, I don't think we're going to collectively relieve frustration with email without two things:  <ul> <li>Shared knowledge on how to process email effectively  </li><li>Shared agreement on how to write and send email and when to use it</li></ul>After focusing for so long on <em>who deals with</em> the problem (receivers), it's about time we &nbsp;balance it out by acknowledging <em>who's creating</em> the problem. It's not any one of us: it's all of us together, and all of us together need to learn how to solve it. <br /> <br /> What we need is an email agreement -- or "egreement" for short. I don't think it needs to be anything formalized, but there should be a general practice that people recognize and follow. <br /> <br /> I hope you'll join me in creating and following this! <br /> <br /> Best, <br /> <br /> Eric <br /> <br /> P.S. When tweeting about this issue and how to resolve it, please use the hashtag #egreement. <br /> <br /> <a href=http://www.twitter.com/ericmack>@EricMack</a> | <a href=http://www.twitter.com/eproductivity>@eProductivity</a><br /> FB: <a href=http://www.facebook.com/eproductivity>eProductivity</a> <br /> LI: <a href=https://www.linkedin.com/in/ericmack>Eric Mack</a> <br /> <br /> For more about my V=KMT framework, see <a href="http://inside.eproductivity.com/dx/heres-why-you-dont-have-time-to-save-time">here</a>. <br /> <br /> More from Inside.eProductivity: <br /> Why your late-night emails are hurting your team - <a href="http://inside.eproductivity.com/dx/why-your-late-night-emails-are-hurting-your-team">&#91;read more&#93;</a> <br /> 4 steps to recover from email overwhelm - <a href="http://inside.eproductivity.com/dx/4-steps-to-recover-email-overwhelm">&#91;read more&#93;</a> <br /> <br /> <span style="font-size: 11px;">Image credits: <br /> "Handshake" image by Duisenberg &#91;CC BY-SA 4.0 (<a href=http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0></a><a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/deed.en">http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/deed.en</a>)&#93;, via Wikimedia Commons.</span> <br><br>Originally posted on <a href="http://www.NotesOnProductivity.com">Notes On Productivity</a> ]]></content:encoded>
  335. <wfw:commentRss> http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dxcomments/email-is-not-the-problem---lack-of-agreement-is</wfw:commentRss>
  336. <wfw:comment> http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/email-is-not-the-problem---lack-of-agreement-is?opendocument&amp;comments</wfw:comment>
  337. </item>
  338. <item>
  339. <title>Why your late night emails are hurting your team (from Harvard Business Review)</title>
  340. <pubDate>Mon, 23 Mar 2015 12:15:00 -0700</pubDate>
  341. <description>
  342. <![CDATA[
  343. <br /> <br /> This article points out a very important truth that seems to be slowly gaining recognition in the business world: <em>resting</em> is an important part of <em>producing. </em><br /> <br /> HBR uses the topic of late-night emails to dive into the issue of how we work when our work is <em>always accessible. </em>I remember professionals of my father's generation grumbling that work could reach them at home by phone -- and the issue has grown exponentially since then. <br /> <br /> The real problem is not the means of communication, but how a lack of agreement on how to use them and when. As Maura Thomas insightfully points out in this article, after-hours emails (not to mention texts, calls, faxes, Facebook messages, etc.) can easily create a culture where everyone feels they're expected to be connected at all times. <br /> <br /> More often than not, this is driven by leaders who feel that they have to do more to keep the company moving forward -- but by doing so in a way that involves their subordinates, they tend to create pressure to keep up. <br /> <br /> Here's a key quote on this mentality: <br /> <br /> <blockquote>The (often unconscious) belief that more work equals more success is difficult to overcome, but the truth is that this is neither beneficial nor sustainable.</blockquote> <br /> The bottom line is that being "always on" never leaves you time "off," and that hurts everybody. <br /> <br /> <a href="https://hbr.org/2015/03/your-late-night-emails-are-hurting-your-team">Click here</a> for the article from HBR. <br /> <br /> Best, <br /> <br /> Eric <br /> <br /> <a href=http://www.twitter.com/ericmack>@EricMack</a> <br /> <a href=http://www.twitter.com/eproductivity>@eProductivity</a> <br /> <a href=http://www.facebook.com/eproductivity>FB/eProductivity</a> <br /> <a href=https://www.linkedin.com/in/ericmack>LI:EricMack</a> <br /> <br /> <br /> <span style="font-size: 11px;">Image credits: <br /> "Up All Night" by MisterGuy11 &#91;CC BY-S<br>[Originally posted on the Notes on Productivity web site. (http://www.NotesOnProductivity.com)]<br><br>Originally posted on <a href="http://www.NotesOnProductivity.com">Notes On Productivity</a>
  344. ]]>
  345. </description>
  346. <link>http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/why-your-late-night-emails-are-hurting-your-team</link>
  347. <category>Collaborative Tech</category>
  348. <dc:creator>Eric Mack</dc:creator>
  349. <comments>http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/why-your-late-night-emails-are-hurting-your-team?opendocument&amp;comments</comments>
  350. <guid isPermaLink="true">http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/why-your-late-night-emails-are-hurting-your-team</guid>
  351. <content:encoded><![CDATA[ <img  align="center" src="http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/Email late night.jpg/$file/Email late night.jpg" alt="Email late night.jpg"/> <br /> <br /> This article points out a very important truth that seems to be slowly gaining recognition in the business world: <em>resting</em> is an important part of <em>producing. </em><br /> <br /> HBR uses the topic of late-night emails to dive into the issue of how we work when our work is <em>always accessible. </em>I remember professionals of my father's generation grumbling that work could reach them at home by phone -- and the issue has grown exponentially since then. <br /> <br /> The real problem is not the means of communication, but how a lack of agreement on how to use them and when. As Maura Thomas insightfully points out in this article, after-hours emails (not to mention texts, calls, faxes, Facebook messages, etc.) can easily create a culture where everyone feels they're expected to be connected at all times. <br /> <br /> More often than not, this is driven by leaders who feel that they have to do more to keep the company moving forward -- but by doing so in a way that involves their subordinates, they tend to create pressure to keep up. <br /> <br /> Here's &nbsp;a key quote on this mentality: <br /> <br /> <blockquote>The (often unconscious) belief that more work equals more success is difficult to overcome, but the truth is that this is neither beneficial nor sustainable.</blockquote> <br /> The bottom line is that being "always on" never leaves you time "off," and that hurts everybody. <br /> <br /> <a href="https://hbr.org/2015/03/your-late-night-emails-are-hurting-your-team">Click here</a> for the article from HBR. <br /> <br /> Best, <br /> <br /> Eric <br /> <br /> <a href=http://www.twitter.com/ericmack>@EricMack</a> <br /> <a href=http://www.twitter.com/eproductivity>@eProductivity</a> <br /> <a href=http://www.facebook.com/eproductivity>FB/eProductivity</a> <br /> <a href=https://www.linkedin.com/in/ericmack>LI:EricMack</a> <br /> <br /> <br /> <span style="font-size: 11px;">Image credits: <br /> "Up All Night" by MisterGuy11 &#91;CC BY-SA 3.0 (<a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/">http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/</a>)&#93;, via DeviantArt.</span><br><br>Originally posted on <a href="http://www.NotesOnProductivity.com">Notes On Productivity</a> ]]></content:encoded>
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  353. <wfw:comment> http://www.notesonproductivity.com/ICA/NOP.nsf/dx/why-your-late-night-emails-are-hurting-your-team?opendocument&amp;comments</wfw:comment>
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