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  11. <title>Electronic Literature Organization</title>
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  13. <link>http://eliterature.org</link>
  14. <description>To facilitate and promote the writing, publishing, and reading of literature in electronic media.</description>
  15. <lastBuildDate>Sat, 13 Jan 2018 09:20:21 +0000</lastBuildDate>
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  21. <title>Electronic Literature Organization</title>
  22. <link>http://eliterature.org</link>
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  26. <item>
  27. <title>CFP: Multilingual Digital Authorship (3/8-9;2/2/18)</title>
  28. <link>http://eliterature.org/2018/01/3319/</link>
  29. <pubDate>Sat, 13 Jan 2018 09:18:45 +0000</pubDate>
  30. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Mark Marino]]></dc:creator>
  31. <category><![CDATA[Calls]]></category>
  32. <category><![CDATA[ELO]]></category>
  33.  
  34. <guid isPermaLink="false">http://eliterature.org/?p=3319</guid>
  35. <description><![CDATA[Multilingual Digital Authorship Lancaster University, 8-9 March 2018 The inaugural symposium of The Creative Web of Languages (MEITS flexible funding project)  Call for Papers The World Wide Web is commonly perceived the ultimate tool of homogenizing culture through dominant platforms such as Google and Facebook and consequently as the major culprit in the loss of&#8230; <p class="toivo-read-more"><a href="http://eliterature.org/2018/01/3319/" class="more-link">Read more <span class="screen-reader-text">CFP: Multilingual Digital Authorship (3/8-9;2/2/18)</span></a></p>]]></description>
  36. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<h1 style="text-align: center"><strong>Multilingual Digital Authorship<br />
  37. </strong><strong>Lancaster University, 8-9 March 2018</strong></h1>
  38. <p><strong>The inaugural symposium</strong><strong> of The Creative Web of Languages (MEITS flexible funding project)</strong><strong> </strong></p>
  39. <p><strong>Call for Papers</strong></p>
  40. <p>The World Wide Web is commonly perceived the ultimate tool of homogenizing culture through dominant platforms such as Google and Facebook and consequently as the major culprit in the loss of ground of local cultures. Digital culture<em>s</em> are in reality plural, however, in terms of both form and language, and they not only continue pre-digital traditions through new modes of expression and in a new space for creativity in specific languages, but also invite us to rethink the nature and role of cultural heritage, language, identity, and their relationships today. At the same time, the web remains a fluid and open space that allows for the mixing and cross-fertilization of cultures more than any other previous mode of interaction. Artists and authors who engage in digital creativity often live in and between different cultures and languages that feed into their works; they translate their own or others’ works; engage with audiences across cultures; and are critical of dominant platforms and discourses, which they often hijack. The digital has never been neutral, as Alexandra Saemmer notes, and creatively engaging with it entails questioning established modes of thinking and writing as well as the relationship between language, tradition, and identity. The work of multilingual authors and artists such as Gregory Chatonsky, Alexandra Saemmer, Serge Bouchardon, Canan Marasligil, Lou Sarabadzic, María Mencía, Guillaume Vissac, or Belén Gache, to mention only a few, well illustrate the centrality of these concerns to born digital literature across languages. The importance of the linguistic identity and hybridity of electronic literature is still largely unexplored, however.</p>
  41. <p>This symposium will be the inaugural event of The Creative Web of Languages, a two-year project addressing these questions, funded by the ‘Multilingualism: Empowering Individuals, Transforming Societies’ AHRC Open World Research Initiative (<a href="http://www.meits.org">www.meits.org</a>). The project aims to bring together researchers and artists across languages and specialisms to enable a rich dialogue and a comparative approach. The symposium benefits from additional support from the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences and the Department of Languages and Cultures of Lancaster University, and will happen in partnership with the Electronic Literature Organization (<a href="https://eliterature.org/">https://eliterature.org/</a>).</p>
  42. <p><strong>Confirmed speakers:</strong></p>
  43. <p><a href="http://www.sergebouchardon.com">Serge Bouchardon</a>; <a href="http://www.cananmarasligil.net">Canan Marasligil</a>; <a href="http://www.mariamencia.com">María Mencía</a>; <a href="http://www.alexandrasaemmer.fr">Alexandra Saemmer</a>; <a href="https://predictedprose.com">Lou Sarabadzic</a>; Claire Larsonneur (Paris 8); Emanuela Patti (Royal Holloway); Claire Taylor (Liverpool University)</p>
  44. <p><strong>200-word proposals for 20-minute papers</strong> are invited on digital authors and creative works with a focus on the role of language and languages. Contributions discussing ongoing or completed web-based projects, including blogs, vlogs, microblogs, or social media experiments are particularly welcome. Topics may include, but need not be limited to:</p>
  45. <ul>
  46. <li>The coexistence or mixing of languages and cultures in digital works and projects</li>
  47. <li>Linguistic and cultural identity in and through digital creativity</li>
  48. <li>Creative web-based communities across languages</li>
  49. <li>Linguistic border crossing in digital works and projects</li>
  50. <li>Translation and self-translation of digital works</li>
  51. <li>The creative web and the politics of language / language and the politics of the creative web</li>
  52. </ul>
  53. <p>Postgraduate students and early career scholars are particularly encouraged to submit proposals. Two small bursaries for postgraduate speakers will be available to help with the travel and accommodation costs.</p>
  54. <p>Please send your proposal by <strong>Friday the 2<sup>nd</sup> of February</strong> to the organizer, Erika Fülöp at <a href="mailto:[email protected]">[email protected]</a>.</p>
  55. ]]></content:encoded>
  56. </item>
  57. <item>
  58. <title>ELO at Baby Castles Jan 4</title>
  59. <link>http://eliterature.org/2018/01/elo-at-baby-castles-jan-4/</link>
  60. <pubDate>Tue, 02 Jan 2018 18:33:11 +0000</pubDate>
  61. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Mark Marino]]></dc:creator>
  62. <category><![CDATA[ELO]]></category>
  63. <category><![CDATA[Events]]></category>
  64. <category><![CDATA[Other News]]></category>
  65.  
  66. <guid isPermaLink="false">http://eliterature.org/?p=3308</guid>
  67. <description><![CDATA[BABYCASTLES Jan 4, 2018, 8pm Join the Electronic Literature Organization at an evening of readings and performances at Babycastles, located at 145 W. 14th St., NY, NY The event takes place on Thursday, January 4, from 8-10 p.m. It is free and open to the public. Featured Artists and Works Performed: Nick Montfort, “The Truelist” Stephanie Strickland, “Hours&#8230; <p class="toivo-read-more"><a href="http://eliterature.org/2018/01/elo-at-baby-castles-jan-4/" class="more-link">Read more <span class="screen-reader-text">ELO at Baby Castles Jan 4</span></a></p>]]></description>
  68. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<header class="entry-header">
  69. <h1 class="entry-title">BABYCASTLES</h1>
  70. <h1>Jan 4, 2018, 8pm</h1>
  71. </header>
  72. <div class="entry-content">
  73. <p><img class="alignleft size-full wp-image-3277" src="http://eliterature.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/elo-babycastles.png" alt="" width="464" height="600" srcset="http://eliterature.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/elo-babycastles.png 464w, http://eliterature.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/elo-babycastles-232x300.png 232w" sizes="(max-width: 464px) 100vw, 464px" /><img class="alignleft size-full wp-image-3277" src="http://eliterature.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/elo-babycastles.png" alt="Baby Castles Reading Image" width="464" height="600" srcset="http://eliterature.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/elo-babycastles.png 464w, http://eliterature.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/elo-babycastles-232x300.png 232w" sizes="(max-width: 464px) 100vw, 464px" /></p>
  74. <p>Join the Electronic Literature Organization at an evening of readings and performances at Babycastles, located at 145 W. 14th St., NY, NY</p>
  75. <p>The event takes place on Thursday, January 4, from 8-10 p.m. It is free and open to the public.</p>
  76. <p>Featured Artists and Works Performed:</p>
  77. <ul>
  78. <li>Nick Montfort, “The Truelist”</li>
  79. <li>Stephanie Strickland, “Hours of the Night”</li>
  80. <li>Andrew Demirijian, ‘Pan-Terrestrial People’s Anthem’.</li>
  81. <li>Laura Zaylea, “Style Guide for Erasing Human Dignity”</li>
  82. <li>Alan Sondheim, “Splatter”</li>
  83. <li>Kyle Booten, “Gymnasion”</li>
  84. <li>Bill Bly, <em>We Descend, Volume 3</em></li>
  85. </ul>
  86. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  87. <p><strong><img class="alignleft size-full wp-image-3291" src="http://eliterature.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/montfort.jpg" alt="" width="150" height="150" srcset="http://eliterature.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/montfort.jpg 150w, http://eliterature.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/montfort-140x140.jpg 140w" sizes="(max-width: 150px) 100vw, 150px" />Nick Montfort, “The Truelist”<br />
  88. </strong></p>
  89. <p><img class="alignleft size-full wp-image-3291" src="http://eliterature.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/montfort.jpg" alt="" width="150" height="150" srcset="http://eliterature.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/montfort.jpg 150w, http://eliterature.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/montfort-140x140.jpg 140w" sizes="(max-width: 150px) 100vw, 150px" />Nick Montfort’s computer-generated books of poetry include #!, the collaboration 2×6, Autopia, and The Truelist, the first in the new Using Electricity series from Counterpath. Among his more than fifty digital projects are the collaborations The Deletionist, Sea and Spar Between, and Renderings. His digital artwork was shown this summer at Babycastles in New York and in Boston City Hall. He has six books out from the MIT Press, most recently The Future (in the Essential Knowledge series). He is professor of digital media at MIT and lives in New York and Boston. You can find this with all the italics in place here: <a href="http://nickm.com/me.html#summary">http://nickm.com/me.html#summary</a></p>
  90. <p><strong style="font-size: 1rem">Stephanie Strickland, “</strong><strong style="font-size: 1rem">Hours of the Night”</strong><strong style="font-size: 1rem"><img class="alignleft size-full wp-image-3290" src="http://eliterature.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/strickland.jpg" alt="" width="150" height="150" srcset="http://eliterature.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/strickland.jpg 150w, http://eliterature.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/strickland-140x140.jpg 140w" sizes="(max-width: 150px) 100vw, 150px" /><br />
  91. </strong><span style="font-size: 1rem">Stephanie Strickland has published 8 books of poetry, most recently </span><em style="font-size: 1rem">Dragon Logic </em><span style="font-size: 1rem">and </span><em style="font-size: 1rem">V: WaveTercets / Losing L’una, </em><span style="font-size: 1rem">and 11 works of electronic literature. </span><em style="font-size: 1rem">Zone : Zero,</em><span style="font-size: 1rem"> book + CD, includes the poem </span><em style="font-size: 1rem">slippingglimpse </em><span style="font-size: 1rem">which maps text to Atlantic wave patterns. Recent digital poems include </span><em style="font-size: 1rem">House of Trust</em><span style="font-size: 1rem"> with Ian Hatcher and </span><em style="font-size: 1rem">Hours of the Night</em><span style="font-size: 1rem"> with M.D. Coverley. A volume of  New &amp; Selected is forthcoming in early 2019. </span><a style="background-color: #ffffff;font-size: 1rem" href="http://stephaniestrickland.com/">http://stephaniestrickland.com</a><strong><br />
  92. <img class="alignleft size-full wp-image-3290" src="http://eliterature.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/strickland.jpg" alt="" width="150" height="150" srcset="http://eliterature.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/strickland.jpg 150w, http://eliterature.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/strickland-140x140.jpg 140w" sizes="(max-width: 150px) 100vw, 150px" /></strong></p>
  93. <p><strong style="font-size: 1rem"><img class="alignleft size-full wp-image-3293" src="http://eliterature.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/demirijian.jpg" alt="" width="150" height="150" srcset="http://eliterature.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/demirijian.jpg 150w, http://eliterature.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/demirijian-140x140.jpg 140w" sizes="(max-width: 150px) 100vw, 150px" />Andrew Demirijian, “Pan-Terrestrial People’s Anthem”<br />
  94. </strong>Andrew Demirjian is an interdisciplinary artist who creates experimental assemblages of image, sound and text. His practice features a heightened attention to the role of sound and language and uses constraint systems, chance operations and remixing to produce the work. The pieces take the form of interactive installations, digital poems and audiovisual performances. Andrew’s work has been exhibited at The Museum of the Moving Image, Fridman Gallery, The Newark Museum, Eyebeam, Rush Arts, Fieldgate Gallery, the Center for Book Arts, LMAK Projects and many other galleries, festivals and museums. The MacDowell Colony, Puffin Foundation, Artslink, Harvestworks, Clocktower Gallery, Bemis Center, LMCC and the New Jersey State Council on the Arts are among some of the organizations that have supported his work. Andrew teaches theory and production courses in emerging media in the Film and Media Department and Integrated Media Arts MFA program at Hunter College. In 2018 he will be a Fellow at the MIT Open Documentary Lab working on a language analysis and visualization project.</p>
  95. <p><strong style="font-size: 1rem"><img class="alignleft size-full wp-image-3287" src="http://eliterature.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/zaylea.jpeg" alt="" width="150" height="150" srcset="http://eliterature.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/zaylea.jpeg 150w, http://eliterature.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/zaylea-140x140.jpeg 140w" sizes="(max-width: 150px) 100vw, 150px" />Laura Zaylea, “Style Guide for Erasing Human Dignity”</strong><br />
  96. <img class="alignleft size-full wp-image-3287" src="http://eliterature.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/zaylea.jpeg" alt="" width="150" height="150" srcset="http://eliterature.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/zaylea.jpeg 150w, http://eliterature.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/zaylea-140x140.jpeg 140w" sizes="(max-width: 150px) 100vw, 150px" /><br />
  97. Laura Zaylea is a media artist and Assistant Professor at Temple University in Philadelphia. Recent e-lit works include the web-based multimedia novel <i>Closer Than Rust</i>and the “locative romance” and grammar guide<span class="apple-converted-space"> </span><i>Speak2MeInCode</i>. She is currently working on an interactive documentary about LGBTQ families, which can be found at <a href="http://www.lgbtq-family.com/">www.LGBTQ-family.com</a>. Laura holds a BA from Brown University and MFA from the San Francisco Art Institute. More about her creative work can be found at <i><a href="http://www.laurazaylea.com/">www.LauraZaylea.com</a></i>. Closer Than Rust –<span class="apple-converted-space"> </span><a href="https://laurazaylea.com/creative-work/ctr/">https://laurazaylea.com/creative-work/ctr/</a>. Speak2MeInCode – <a href="https://speak2meincode.com/">https://speak2meincode.com/</a>.</p>
  98. <p><strong>Alan Sondheim, “Splatter”</strong><br />
  99. <img class="size-full wp-image-3289 alignleft" src="http://eliterature.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/sondheim.jpg" alt="" width="150" height="150" srcset="http://eliterature.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/sondheim.jpg 150w, http://eliterature.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/sondheim-140x140.jpg 140w" sizes="(max-width: 150px) 100vw, 150px" />Alan Sondheim is a city-based new media artist, musician, writer, and performer concerned with issues of virtuality, and the stake that the real world has in the virtual. He has worked with his partner Azure Carter among others. Sondheim is interested in examining the grounds of the virtual and how the body is<span style="font-size: 1rem">inhabited. He performs in virtual, real, and cross-over worlds; his virtual work is known for its highly complex and m</span><span style="font-size: 1rem">obile architectures. He has used altered motion-capture technology extensively for examining and creating new lexicons of behavior. His current work is centered around notions of gamespace, ‘edgespace’ (the border areas of gamespace) and ‘blankness,’ projections around edgespace. He’s been developing a theory of semiotic splatter / splatter semiotics, dealing with fast-forward literatures of twitter, politics, 4chan, facebook, etc. His writing stems out of codework, a problematic style in which code substrates and surface content interfere with each other – in which, in other words, the textual body and body of text are deeply entangled.  His current music is based on the impossibility of time reversal, on fast improvisation, and anti-gestural approaches to playing. His most recent work is this short biography.</span></p>
  100. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  101. <p>Kyle Booten, “Gymnasion”<br />
  102. <img class="alignleft size-full wp-image-3285" src="http://eliterature.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/booten.jpg" alt="" width="200" height="200" srcset="http://eliterature.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/booten.jpg 200w, http://eliterature.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/booten-150x150.jpg 150w, http://eliterature.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/booten-140x140.jpg 140w" sizes="(max-width: 200px) 100vw, 200px" />Kyle Booten is a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Neukom Institute for Computational Science at Dartmouth College.  His recent work has appeared or is forthcoming in<i>Fence</i>, <i>Western Humanities Review</i>, <i>Poor Claudia</i>, <i></i>and the proceedings of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics. He holds a PhD from UC Berkeley and an MFA from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.  You can see his website at <a href="https://kylebooten.me/">https://kylebooten.me</a>.</p>
  103. <p><strong>Bill Bly, <em>We Descend, Volume 3<br />
  104. </em></strong>Bill Bly is the author of <em>We Descend</em>, an ongoing hypertext archive of writings begun in the 1980s with a fountain pen on notebook paper jammed in a clipboard: Volume One came out on floppy disk; Volume Two is on the web; Volume Three is under development. He has won the Stanley Drama Award and (with John McDaid) the John Culkin Award for Outstanding Praxis in Media Ecology. Bill was a founding member of the Hypertext Writers Workshop, and served as recorder for the legendary Cybermountain Colloquium. He has taught hypertext theory and practice at New York University and Fordham University, and was Director of Writing Programs at Wagner College. He lives in Mexico.</p>
  105. <p><img class="alignleft size-full wp-image-3295" src="http://eliterature.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/grigar-lab.jpg" alt="" width="150" height="150" srcset="http://eliterature.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/grigar-lab.jpg 150w, http://eliterature.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/grigar-lab-140x140.jpg 140w" sizes="(max-width: 150px) 100vw, 150px" /></p>
  106. <p><span style="font-size: 1rem">Th</span><span style="font-size: 1rem">e emcee for the evening is </span><a style="font-size: 1rem;background-color: #ffffff" href="http://nouspace.net/dene">Dene Grigar</a><span style="font-size: 1rem">, a curator, e-lit artist, and digital preservationist from the </span><a style="font-size: 1rem;background-color: #ffffff" href="http://dtc-wsuv.org/cmdc">Creative Media &amp; Digital Culture Program</a><span style="font-size: 1rem"> at Washingto</span><span style="font-size: 1rem">n State University Vancouver. She directs the </span><a style="background-color: #ffffff;font-size: 1rem" href="http://dtc-wsuv.org/wp/ell">Electronic Literature Lab</a><span style="font-size: 1rem"> and is President of the Electronic Literature Organization.</span></p>
  107. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  108. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  109. <p>Sponsors include the ELO, Babycastles, &amp; Washington State University Vancouver.</p>
  110. <p><img class="alignleft wp-image-3179" src="http://eliterature.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/cropped-elo_logo_vector-1.jpg" alt="" width="131" height="131" srcset="http://eliterature.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/cropped-elo_logo_vector-1.jpg 512w, http://eliterature.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/cropped-elo_logo_vector-1-150x150.jpg 150w, http://eliterature.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/cropped-elo_logo_vector-1-300x300.jpg 300w, http://eliterature.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/cropped-elo_logo_vector-1-140x140.jpg 140w, http://eliterature.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/cropped-elo_logo_vector-1-270x270.jpg 270w, http://eliterature.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/cropped-elo_logo_vector-1-192x192.jpg 192w, http://eliterature.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/cropped-elo_logo_vector-1-180x180.jpg 180w, http://eliterature.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/cropped-elo_logo_vector-1-32x32.jpg 32w" sizes="(max-width: 131px) 100vw, 131px" /><img class="alignleft wp-image-3297" src="http://eliterature.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/wsuvancouver-primarylogo.png" alt="" width="278" height="77" srcset="http://eliterature.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/wsuvancouver-primarylogo.png 433w, http://eliterature.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/wsuvancouver-primarylogo-300x83.png 300w" sizes="(max-width: 278px) 100vw, 278px" /><img class="alignleft wp-image-3296" src="http://eliterature.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/bcLogo.png" alt="" width="130" height="154" srcset="http://eliterature.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/bcLogo.png 329w, http://eliterature.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/bcLogo-254x300.png 254w" sizes="(max-width: 130px) 100vw, 130px" /></p>
  111. </div>
  112. ]]></content:encoded>
  113. </item>
  114. <item>
  115. <title>ELO Board Welcomes Astrid Ensslin</title>
  116. <link>http://eliterature.org/2017/10/elo-board-welcomes-astrid-ensslin/</link>
  117. <pubDate>Sun, 22 Oct 2017 16:44:26 +0000</pubDate>
  118. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Mark Marino]]></dc:creator>
  119. <category><![CDATA[ELO]]></category>
  120.  
  121. <guid isPermaLink="false">http://eliterature.org/?p=3198</guid>
  122. <description><![CDATA[The ELO Board is proud to welcome its newest member, Astrid Ensslin.  Astrid has distinguished herself with her scholarship on electronic literature, including video games and children’s e-lit.  She is a professor of Digital Humanities and Game Studies at the University of Alberta and has published extensively in our field.  Among her many contributions to&#8230; <p class="toivo-read-more"><a href="http://eliterature.org/2017/10/elo-board-welcomes-astrid-ensslin/" class="more-link">Read more <span class="screen-reader-text">ELO Board Welcomes Astrid Ensslin</span></a></p>]]></description>
  123. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<div>The ELO Board is proud to welcome its newest member, Astrid Ensslin.  <span style="font-weight: 400">Astrid has distinguished herself with her scholarship on electronic literature, including video games and children’s e-lit.  She is a professor of Digital Humanities and Game Studies at the University of Alberta and has published extensively in our field.  Among her many contributions to ELO, she co-curated the e-lit for kids exhibit in Porto. We are grateful to have her experience and talents.</span></div>
  124. <div></div>
  125. <div> Below is her bio:</div>
  126. <div></div>
  127. <blockquote>
  128. <div>Astrid Ensslin is Professor in Digital Humanities and Game Studies at the University of Alberta. She has a PhD (s.c.l.) from Heidelberg University, and previously held academic and managerial faculty, research, and teaching positions at the Universities of Wales (Bangor), Manchester, and Leeds. Her main publications include <i>Literary Gaming</i> (MIT Press 2014), <i>Analyzing Digital Fiction </i>(Routledge, 2013)<i>,</i><i>The Language of Gaming</i> (Palgrave, 2011),<i> Creating Second Lives: Community, Identity and Spatiality as Constructions of the Virtual</i> (Routledge, 2011), <i>Canonizing Hypertext: Explorations and Constructions</i> (Bloomsbury, 2007), and <i>Language in the Media: Representations, Identities, Ideologies</i> (Bloomsbury, 2007). She is Principal Editor of the <i>Journal of Gaming and Virtual Worlds</i> and has led various government and charity funded projects, for example on researching and teaching videogames across cultures; empirical digital fiction reader-response research and curating digital fictions for broad audiences (AHRC &#8220;Reading Digital Fiction&#8221; project), analyzing digital fictions (Leverhulme Digital Fiction International Network), specialized language corpora, and training graduate students in digital humanities tools and methods.</div>
  129. </blockquote>
  130. <div></div>
  131. <div>ELO has a volunteer Board who serve for renewable three-year terms.  See members and bios here: http://eliterature.org/people/</div>
  132. ]]></content:encoded>
  133. </item>
  134. <item>
  135. <title>CALL FOR PAPERS &#8211; ELO 2018</title>
  136. <link>http://eliterature.org/2017/10/3194/</link>
  137. <pubDate>Fri, 20 Oct 2017 16:05:05 +0000</pubDate>
  138. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Mark Marino]]></dc:creator>
  139. <category><![CDATA[Calls]]></category>
  140. <category><![CDATA[ELO]]></category>
  141. <category><![CDATA[Events]]></category>
  142.  
  143. <guid isPermaLink="false">http://eliterature.org/?p=3194</guid>
  144. <description><![CDATA[CALL FOR PAPERS &#8211; ELO 2018 Mind the Gap! Thinking Electronic Literature in a Digital Culture: Explorations and Interventions http://elo2018.org/ The Electronic Literature Organization (ELO) is pleased to announce its 2018 Conference and Festival, hosted by the Université du Québec à Montréal. The Conference, the Festival and Exhibits will be held August 13th to 17th&#8230; <p class="toivo-read-more"><a href="http://eliterature.org/2017/10/3194/" class="more-link">Read more <span class="screen-reader-text">CALL FOR PAPERS &#8211; ELO 2018</span></a></p>]]></description>
  145. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p style="text-align: center"><strong>CALL FOR PAPERS &#8211; ELO 2018</strong><br />
  146. <strong>Mind the Gap!</strong><br />
  147. <strong>Thinking Electronic Literature in a Digital Culture:</strong><br />
  148. <strong>Explorations and Interventions</strong><br />
  149. <strong>http://elo2018.org/</strong></p>
  150. <p>The Electronic Literature Organization (ELO) is pleased to announce its 2018 Conference and Festival, hosted by the Université du Québec à Montréal. The Conference, the Festival and Exhibits will be held August 13th to 17th in downtown Montréal, Québec, Canada. Mind the Gap! will be bilingual, with both English and French tracks, showcasing Montreal’s important and dynamic local Québécois e-lit/digital arts community and extending a special welcome to e-lit’s global francophonie.</p>
  151. <p>The aim of this conference is to think about e-lit in a digital culture. What is its relationship to current cultural practices and trends? Two directions are proposed: explorations and interventions. The first direction features e-lit’s exploratory nature, its formal aspects, its use of technology, its renewal of narrative conventions, and at the same time its impact on literary theories and methodologies to renew themselves. The second direction considers e-lit’s place in the public sphere, its relationship to digital and urban culture, to forms of conservation and presentation, and also to performance.</p>
  152. <p><strong>TOPICS</strong></p>
  153. <p>Possible topics for presentations, performances and exhibits are:</p>
  154. <p>Gaps in the field<br />
  155. Translation gaps: code, natural language, media<br />
  156. Narrative theory, temporal gaps and the imaginative space of the in-between<br />
  157. Understanding e-lit: towards digital methodologies and/or pedagogies<br />
  158. Mobile technologies’ effect on writing and reading habits<br />
  159. Perceptual gaps: AR, VR, and Linking Structures<br />
  160. Politics of e-lit: gaps between reception communities<br />
  161. Gaps and Bridges between e-lit and digital humanities<br />
  162. Gender gaps in e-lit<br />
  163. Spoken screens: the gap between performance and presence<br />
  164. Linguistic and cultural specificities to E-lit<br />
  165. Electronic literature and urban culture<br />
  166. Mind the gap! E-lit and humour<br />
  167. Gaps between datasets and interfaces<br />
  168. Archiving differences between libraries and museums<br />
  169. Exhibition differences: ephemeral and permanent installations<br />
  170. What is different about e-lit for children?</p>
  171. <p><strong>SUBMISSION GUIDELINES</strong></p>
  172. <p>For the Conference (peer-reviewed):</p>
  173. <p>Paper (15 min &#8211; a presentation of a single paper by one or more authors &#8211; 500 word abstract).<br />
  174. Lightning talk (5 min &#8211; a short paper for a focused presentation &#8211; 250 word abstract).<br />
  175. Poster (1 page poster). n.b. A poster can be combined with a lightning talk.<br />
  176. Panel (90 min &#8211; a proposal for a complete panel including 3 or 4 separate papers on the same general topic &#8211; 250 word overview plus 500 word individual abstracts).<br />
  177. Pre-conference Workshop (Action sessions, focused on hands-on group work on a given project or topic &#8211; 500 word abstract).<br />
  178. For the Festival (peer-reviewed):</p>
  179. <p>Performance and screening (10 min &#8211; readings, actions, interventions &#8211; 250 word abstract; provide links to images, videos, etc.)<br />
  180. Gallery exhibit (provide description of installation, as well as technical needs)</p>
  181. <p>Submissions open: October 16th, 2017 to December 15th, 2017.</p>
  182. <p>Acceptances sent out: January 30th, 2018.</p>
  183. <p>You must attend the conference to appear on the program. You may submit as many proposals as you want, but participants may present a maximum of two pieces/papers.</p>
  184. <p>Registration: Early registration will close April 30st, 2018. There will be a registration fee for the Conference (to be determined), which will include ELO Membership, invitations to all sessions of the Conference, the Festival, and the Exhibits. Lunch and coffee-breaks will be served. Conference banquet requires an additional fee.</p>
  185. <p>The conference will be hosted by the University du Québec à Montréal, at the Berri-UQAM subway station. The campus is fully wheelchair accessible. ELO 2018 is committed to making its conference accessible and will provide a simple accessibility guide to all venues.</p>
  186. <p>Some of the sessions will be streamed via the Conference website.</p>
  187. <p>For more information, contact Bertrand Gervais, ELO 2018 Chair, elo2018mtl (at) gmail.com</p>
  188. ]]></content:encoded>
  189. </item>
  190. <item>
  191. <title>Announcing the 2017 ELO Prize Winners</title>
  192. <link>http://eliterature.org/2017/09/announcing-the-2017-elo-prize-winners/</link>
  193. <pubDate>Thu, 21 Sep 2017 18:02:48 +0000</pubDate>
  194. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Mark Marino]]></dc:creator>
  195. <category><![CDATA[ELO]]></category>
  196. <category><![CDATA[Press Release]]></category>
  197.  
  198. <guid isPermaLink="false">http://eliterature.org/?p=3135</guid>
  199. <description><![CDATA[ Announcing International Awards in Electronic Literature:  The 2017 ELO Prize &#8212; Porto Portugal Literature is changing right in front of our eyes, and this year’s awards from the Electronic Literature Organization celebrate artists and scholars who are at the vanguard. At the annual conference of the Electronic Literature Organization (ELO), held this year in Porto,&#8230; <p class="toivo-read-more"><a href="http://eliterature.org/2017/09/announcing-the-2017-elo-prize-winners/" class="more-link">Read more <span class="screen-reader-text">Announcing the 2017 ELO Prize Winners</span></a></p>]]></description>
  200. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<h1 style="text-align: center"><b> </b><b>Announcing International Awards in Electronic Literature: </b></h1>
  201. <h1 style="text-align: center" align="center"><b>The 2017 ELO Prize</b></h1>
  202. <p>&#8212; Porto Portugal</p>
  203. <p>Literature is changing right in front of our eyes, and this year’s awards from the Electronic Literature Organization celebrate artists and scholars who are at the vanguard.</p>
  204. <p>At the annual conference of the Electronic Literature Organization (ELO), held this year in Porto, Portugal, President Dene Grigar announced the 2017 ELO Prize winners: Alan Bigelow, John Cayley, and David Jhave Johnston for transformative work in the field of digital literature.   Second place winners include María Mencía, Mez Breeze and Andy Campbell, and shortlisted authors include Serge Bouchardon, JR Carpenter, Judy Malloy, Anastasia Salter.</p>
  205. <p><span id="more-3135"></span></p>
  206. <p>The ELO Prize consists of two international awards, one for creative work and one for critical scholarship in the area of electronic literature, and a third award celebrating lifetime achievement in the field of digital literature.  All three prizes come with a $1000 purse.</p>
  207. <p><strong>The Robert Coover Award for a Work of Electronic Literature</strong></p>
  208. <p><strong></strong><strong>1<sup>st</sup> Place:</strong> “How to Rob a Bank” by Alan Bigelow<br />
  209. <a href="http://www.webyarns.com/howto/howto.html">http://www.webyarns.com/howto/howto.html</a></p>
  210. <p><strong>2<sup>nd</sup> Place:</strong>  “All the Delicate Duplicates” by Mez Breeze and Andy Campbell<br />
  211. <a href="http://allthedelicateduplicat.es/">http://allthedelicateduplicat.es/</a></p>
  212. <p><b>Shortlist: “DO IT” by Serge Bouchardon  </b><a href="https://appsto.re/cn/WDN8fb.i">https://appsto.re/cn/WDN8fb.i</a><b></b></p>
  213. <p><b>“The Gathering Cloud” by JR Carpenter  </b><a href="http://luckysoap.com/thegatheringcloud/">http://luckysoap.com/thegatheringcloud/</a></p>
  214. <p>The Robert Coover Award for a Work of Electronic Literature is given for the best creative work of electronic literature of any length or genre.<b>  </b>This year, Alan Bigelow (US) won for “How to Rob a Bank.” Second Place went to Mez Breeze (Australia) and Andy Campbell’s (UK) “All the Delicate Duplicates.”  Serge Bouchardon’s (France) “DO IT” and JR Carpenter’s (UK) “The Gathering Cloud” were shortlisted.</p>
  215. <p>&#8220;How to Rob a Bank&#8221; is a contemporary story about a bank robbery gone bad told through screenshots and animations from the protagonist&#8217;s iPhone as he uses Google searches, Wikipedia pages, social networks, apps, and websites to achieve his goal. Built in HTML5, CSS, and Javascript, it is playable on desktops, laptops, and portable devices.</p>
  216. <p>One judge wrote,<b> “</b>Alan Bigelow’s “How to Rob a Bank” is formally interesting [with] its use of Google searches, app screenshots, net radio, etc. Particularly enjoyed the gameplay interludes, as they change the register of the whole thing and communicate the combination of boredom and panic. Characters build up over time and take on weight in the imagination.”</p>
  217. <p>Another said that it is a “very clever work taps into a Bonnie and Clyde mythos to tell a work that is very American in its structure, technologies, and conception. Just as Bonnie and Clyde captured the American zeitgeist and landscape in 1967, “How to Rob a Bank” captures our contemporary digital landscape of apps, social networks, GIS, and their reflection of analog reality. It is Bigelow’s most successful work to date.”</p>
  218. <p>The Coover prize second place went to Mez Breeze and Andy Campbell for “All the Delicate Duplicates.” <a href="http://allthedelicateduplicat.es/">http://allthedelicateduplicat.es/</a>. A game created for the PC platform, it unfolds as a haunting narrative about a single father, John, who inherits a collection of arcane objects from his mysterious relative named Mo. Over time, John and his daughter Charlotte begin to realize that these objects have unusual properties: the more they are exposed to them, the more their reality and memories appear to change.</p>
  219. <p>One judge commented, “Exquisitely produced immersive atmosphere, environment, tone, and narrative. It is an excellent example of how the poetic line is still one of the best ways to deploy language in digital environments.” Another said that “[The w]riting [is b]eautiful and evocative. The<b> </b>[v]isuals are rich and immersive. Use of ‘physical’ text particularly engaging, whether forming objects, sculptures, or streaming across the landscape.”</p>
  220. <p>Bestowed by the Electronic Literature Organization and funded through a generous donation from supporters and members of the ELO, this annual prize aims to recognize creative excellence.</p>
  221. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  222. <p><b>The N. Katherine Hayles Award for Criticism of Electronic Literature</b></p>
  223. <p><b>1<sup>st</sup> place: <i>Aesthetic Animism: Digital Poetry&#8217;s Ontological Implications</i> by David Jhave Johnston<br />
  224. </b><span style="text-decoration: underline">https://mitpress.mit.edu/aesthetic</span></p>
  225. <p><b>2<sup>nd</sup> Place:</b> <b><i>#WomenTechLit </i></b><b>edited by </b><b>María Mencía<br />
  226. </b><a href="http://wvupressonline.com/node/702">http://wvupressonline.com/node/702</a></p>
  227. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  228. <p><strong>Shortlist:</strong></p>
  229. <p><b></b>“Towards an Tension-Based Definition of Digital Literature” by Serge Bouchardon<br />
  230. <i><a href="http://scholarworks.rit.edu/jcws/vol2/iss1/6/">http://scholarworks.rit.edu/jcws/vol2/iss1/6/</a></i><b> </b></p>
  231. <p><i>Social Media Archeology and Poetics</i> ed. by Judy Malloy<br />
  232. <a href="https://mitpress.mit.edu/books/social-media-archeology-and-poetics">https://mitpress.mit.edu/books/social-media-archeology-and-poetics</a></p>
  233. <p><i>Alice in Dataland</i> by Anastasia Salter<br />
  234. <a href="http://aliceindataland.net/">http://aliceindataland.net/</a></p>
  235. <p>The N. Katherine Hayles Award for Criticism of Electronic Literature is an award given for the best work of criticism, of any length, on the topic of electronic literature. This year, the N. Katherine Hayles Award went to David Jhave Johnston for <i>Aesthetic Animism: Digital Poetry&#8217;s Ontological Implications </i>(MIT Press, 2016).</p>
  236. <p>“This book offers a decoder for some of the new forms of poetry enabled by digital technology. Examining many of the strange technological vectors converging on language, it proposes a poetics appropriate to the digital era while connecting digital poetry to traditional poetry&#8217;s concerns with being (a.k.a. ontological implications). Digital poetry, in this context, is not simply a descendent of the book. Digital poems are not necessarily &#8220;poems&#8221; or written by &#8220;poets&#8221;; they are found in ads, conceptual art, interactive displays, performative projects, games, or apps. Poetic tools include algorithms, browsers, social media, and data. Code blossoms into poetic objects and poetic proto-organisms.” &#8211;The MIT Press</p>
  237. <p>In discussing the merits of this book, one judge said that “Jhave understands . . . that &#8220;the literary&#8221; may no longer be primarily textual or even verbal/linguistic. Hence a knowledgeable (and actively trans-disciplinary) engagement is called for among artists, scholars and curators who are capable of sharing some basic knowledge with scientists, technologists, programmers and (not least) administrators of Open Access, not for profit institutions. Aesthetically, literary scholars no less than makers need to engage with visual, sonic and computational media. Jhave achieves such widespread fluency, yet his starting point and sustained concern is with the aesthetic and there&#8217;s a sustained argumentative focus throughout the volume, from its early announcement of its aim.”</p>
  238. <p>Another judge wrote, “Jhave argues persuasively that it is in the convergence of literature and computation that language truly comes alive, proliferates, “rolls over” and wriggles through data space. [His] expressive prose matches his bold ideas. At the same time, the book’s structure provides a clear, scholarly, always informative account and analysis of the theories of animism in language arts and its practice in computer-based arts.”</p>
  239. <p>The Hayles Prize Second Place went to <b><i>#WomenTechLit </i></b><b>edited by </b><b>María Mencía</b> (Center for Literary Computing Press, 2017).  The book is introduced by N. Katherine Hayles. Contributors include: Maria Angel, Kate Armstrong, Kathi Inman Berens, Amaranth Borsuk, Mez Breeze, J.R. Carpenter, Odile Farge, Natalia Fedorova, Anna Gibbs, María Goicoechea, Dene Grigar, Angelica J. Huizar, Zuzana Husárová, Claudia Kozak, Deena Larsen, Dolores Romero López, Marjorie Coverley Luesebrink, Judy Malloy, María Mencía, Jeneen Naji, Maya Zalbidea Paniagua, Giovanna di Rosario, Laura Sánchez, Laura Shackelford, Hazel Smith, Stephanie Strickland, and Christine Wilks.</p>
  240. <p>“This book of electronic literature (e-lit) brings together pioneering and emerging women whose work has earned international impact and scholarly recognition. It extends a historical critical overview of the state of the field from the diverse perspectives of twenty-eight worldwide contributors. It illustrates the authors’ scholarly interests through discussion of creative practice as research, historical accounts documenting collections of women’s new media art and literary works, and art collectives. It also covers theoretical approaches and critical overviews, from feminist discourses to close readings and “close-distant-located readings” of pertinent works in the field. #WomenTechLit includes authors from Latin America, Russia, Austria, Ireland, Spain, France, Italy, Portugal, Slovakia, Czech Republic, Poland, United Kingdom, Australia, Canada, and the US.  This volume addresses electronic literature but also in the adjacent areas of language art, new media art practices, digital humanities, and feminist studies.”—Center for Literary Computing Press</p>
  241. <p>One judge stated that<i> “#WomenTechLit</i> is a celebration of the contributions of multiple generations of women to the field of electronic literature. Rather than a schematic history, it presents a polyphony of voices from the women who have helped form the core thinking and techniques in hypertext, multimedia, computational arts, augmented reality, VR , social media, flash animation and sound arts.” A second judge said that “David Foster Wallace once made a helpful observation about a certain kind of essay, which he called a &#8220;service essay,&#8221; both in terms of the work it does (a public service) and in terms of its virtue (to serve others). . . . The collection edited by . . . María Mencía,  [is] laudable for the coverage and depth that they provide to the field of electronic literature, indeed, to helping establish it as a field.”</p>
  242. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  243. <p><b>The Marjorie C. Luesebrink Career Achievement Award</b></p>
  244. <p><b>Winner: John Cayley</b></p>
  245. <p><b>Scholar: Luciana Gattas</b></p>
  246. <p><b>Video: https://youtu.be/chA_yKTrF_8</b></p>
  247. <p>The Marjorie C. Luesebrink Career Achievement Award was given to poet/practitioner, professor, scholar, critic, and translator, John Cayley. A Professor of Literary Arts at Brown University, Cayley investigates ambient poetics in programmable media and writing for immersive stereo 3D audiovisual environments (the &#8216;Cave&#8217; and now also the &#8216;YURT&#8217;). He is working with the Brown University Library (Center for Digital Scholarship) and CIS staff to produce a ‘Distributed Gallery’ driven by arts-project and other documentary material in the Brown Digital Repository and has organized several conferences (‘Interrupt’s I, II, III and IV; ‘Visuality and Creativity in Immersive 3D Environments — from Cave to YURT’; and ‘ELO_AI: Archive and Innovate.’)</p>
  248. <p>In his long career Cayley has produced a stunning series of works. In 2001, his <i>windsound</i> was the winner of the Electronic Literature Organization’s Award for Poetry. Other remarkable works include: <i>riverIsland</i> (1999- ) a navigable text movie,<i> overboard</i> (2003- ) an example of ambient poetics in digital (multi)media, <i>The Readers Project</i> (2009- ) with Daniel Howe, a collaboration for the development of quasi-autonomous software readers for a multi-faceted literary installation and performance work.<i> </i>Most recently, his piece, <i>The Listeners</i>, using Alexa, a domestic, data-gathering robot, moves the field forward in terms of technical experimentation.  Details of his internationally recognized writing in networked and programmable media may be found on his personal website  <span style="text-decoration: underline"><a href="http://programmatology.shadoof.net.*">http://programmatology.shadoof.net.*</a></span></p>
  249. <p>Cayley is also well known as a literary scholar and theorist in the field of digital practice. He has, over the years, delivered dozens of papers, written chapters for books, contributed to journals and book reviews, and written books.  His essays include among many others: ‘Literal Art: Neither Lines nor Pixels but Letters.’<i>First Person: New Media as Story, Performance, and Game</i>. Eds. Noah Wardrip-Fruin and Pat Harrigan. Cambridge: MIT Press, 2004. 208-17;  ‘Beyond Codexspace: Potentialities of Literary Cybertext’ (<i>Media Poetry: An International Anthology</i>. Ed. Eduardo Kac. Bristol: Intellect Books, 2007), ‘Screen Writing: A Practice-based, EuroRelative Introduction to Digital Literature and Poetics’ (<i>Literary Art in Digital Performance: Case Studies in New Media Art and Criticism</i>. Ed. Francisco J. Ricardo. New York: Continuum, 2009);  ‘The Code Is Not the Text (Unless It Is the Text)’ (<i>electronic book review</i> 2002-10-09); and ‘The Advent of Aurature and the End of (Electronic) Literature’ (The Bloomsbury Handbook of Electronic Literature. Ed. Joseph Tabbi. New York, 2017).  <i>Image Generation:  a reader</i>, was published by Veer Books, London in 2015. This book brings together original &#8216;supply&#8217; texts and works composed from generated poetic language.</p>
  250. <p>ELO awards these prizes at its annual conference.  The next conference will be held in Montrèal.  The call for next year’s awards will be issued months before via ELO’s Website.</p>
  251. <p>The Electronic Literature Organization, or ELO, is A 501(c)(3) non­profit organization composed of an international community that includes writers, artists, teachers, scholars, and developers. The Organization&#8217;s focus is new literary forms that are made to be read on digital systems, including smartphones, Web browsers, and networked computers. ELO is an international organization of artists and scholars, currently based at Washington State University, Vancouver.</p>
  252. <p>For more information about the ELO Prizes, contact Nicholas Schiller, ELO Coordinator at <a href="mailto:[email protected]">[email protected]</a>, or Mark Marino at  <a href="mailto:[email protected]">markcmarino at gmail.com</a>.</p>
  253. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  254. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  255. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  256. ]]></content:encoded>
  257. </item>
  258. <item>
  259. <title>Research Opportunities at the ELD</title>
  260. <link>http://eliterature.org/2017/02/research-opportunities-at-the-eld/</link>
  261. <pubDate>Mon, 20 Feb 2017 05:16:41 +0000</pubDate>
  262. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Mark Marino]]></dc:creator>
  263. <category><![CDATA[ELO]]></category>
  264. <category><![CDATA[Job Listings]]></category>
  265.  
  266. <guid isPermaLink="false">http://eliterature.org/?p=3110</guid>
  267. <description><![CDATA[Announcing opportunities to contribute to one of ELO&#8217;s major projects is the Electronic Literature Directory (ELD). (http://directory.eliterature.org/) The Electronic Literature Directory (ELD 2.0) is a collection of literary works, descriptions, and keywords. Both a repository of works and a critical companion to e-literature, the ELD hosts discussions that are capable of being referenced and revised&#8230; <p class="toivo-read-more"><a href="http://eliterature.org/2017/02/research-opportunities-at-the-eld/" class="more-link">Read more <span class="screen-reader-text">Research Opportunities at the ELD</span></a></p>]]></description>
  268. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Announcing opportunities to contribute to one of ELO&#8217;s major projects is the Electronic Literature Directory (ELD). (http://directory.eliterature.org/)</p>
  269. <p>The Electronic Literature Directory (ELD 2.0) is a collection of literary works, descriptions, and keywords. Both a repository of works and a critical companion to e-literature, the ELD hosts discussions that are capable of being referenced and revised over years of use, and the ELD feed directly into ELO&#8217;s larger CELL project (<a href="http://cellproject.net/">http://cellproject.net/</a>).</p>
  270. <p>The ELD is looking for 3 Associate Editors and for entries for the Electronic Literature Directory.</p>
  271. <p>Why is contributing to the ELD so important?<br />
  272. You help expand the field of electronic literature.<br />
  273. You help other scholars and curators putting together classes and exhibits.<br />
  274. You help yourself by making your scholarship available in an open-access peer-reviewed platform opportunity.</p>
  275. <p>Consider submitting entries to the ELD or applying for these positions.</p>
  276. <p>Deadline for applications <strong>March 17, 2017<br />
  277. Apply and Submit via: <a href="mailto:[email protected]" target="_blank">eliterature.org at gmail.com</a>.<br />
  278. </strong></p>
  279. <p><span id="more-3110"></span></p>
  280. <p><strong>Associate Editor positions (ELD) (3 Positions Open)</strong><br />
  281. The title of Associate Editor for the ELD will be given to selected members of our affiliated (CELL) database who agree to identify research areas of common interest between the ELD and other databases. The drafting and assignment of entries on specific works of born digital literature that are identified as incomplete, merely descriptive, or missing in one database, might be undertaken by the Associate Editor or assigned to others whose research interests are suitable. The creation, or assignment of one entry a month for presentation in the ELD is expected of each Associate.</p>
  282. <p><strong>Managing Editor: (Filled)</strong><br />
  283. The Managing Editor (M.E.) of the ELD is responsible for the overall management of the site, including checking all necessary paratext that accompanies each entry on the ELD: author bios; lists of works cited, and links to related entries on affiliated databases. He or she is also expected to participate in bi-weekly meetings via phone or Skype with the<br />
  284. Project Director (Joseph Tabbi). The M.E. will be supported in the placement of entries on the site along with the routine follow up with authors and peer reviewers by Tabbi&#8217;s Research Assistant at the University of Illinois at Chicago.</p>
  285. <p>note on remuneration<br />
  286. Both the Managing Editor and Associate Editor positions are voluntary.</p>
  287. <hr />
  288. <p><strong>Submit an ELD Enry:</strong></p>
  289. <p><strong>Guidelines for ELD entries:</strong><br />
  290. Entries must be about &#8220;electronic literature.&#8221; Electronic Literature refers to works with important literary aspects that take advantage of the capabilities and contexts provided by the stand-alone or networked computer. Within the broad category of electronic literature are several forms and threads of practice, some of which are:<br />
  291. Hypertext fiction and poetry, on and off the Web<br />
  292. Kinetic poetry presented in Flash and using other platforms<br />
  293. Computer art installations which ask viewers to read them or otherwise have literary aspects<br />
  294. Conversational characters, also known as chatterbots<br />
  295. Interactive fiction<br />
  296. Novels that take the form of emails, SMS messages, or blogs<br />
  297. Poems and stories that are generated by computers, either interactively or based on parameters given at the beginning<br />
  298. Collaborative writing projects that allow readers to contribute to the text of a work<br />
  299. Literary performances online that develop new ways of writing<br />
  300. Entries should not be written by the authors of the works that they describe.<br />
  301. Entries should be well-developed, well-written, descriptive, and accurate.<br />
  302. Entries should be written in English. Read more about this policy »</p>
  303. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  304. ]]></content:encoded>
  305. </item>
  306. <item>
  307. <title>MLA 2017 Readings &#038; Performances</title>
  308. <link>http://eliterature.org/2017/01/mla-2017-readings-performances/</link>
  309. <pubDate>Wed, 04 Jan 2017 18:46:31 +0000</pubDate>
  310. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Mark Marino]]></dc:creator>
  311. <category><![CDATA[Conference]]></category>
  312. <category><![CDATA[ELO]]></category>
  313.  
  314. <guid isPermaLink="false">http://eliterature.org/?p=3101</guid>
  315. <description><![CDATA[Join the Electronic Literature Organization for an evening of readings &#38; performances during the Modern Language Association conference in Philadelphia, PA. The event takes place in the Connelly Auditorium (room 806) in the Terra Building at The University of the Arts, on January 5, 2017, from 8-10 p.m. Dene Grigar and Jennifer Zaylea, Emcees Performers and Works:&#8230; <p class="toivo-read-more"><a href="http://eliterature.org/2017/01/mla-2017-readings-performances/" class="more-link">Read more <span class="screen-reader-text">MLA 2017 Readings &#38; Performances</span></a></p>]]></description>
  316. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Join the Electronic Literature Organization for an evening of readings &amp; performances during the Modern Language Association conference in Philadelphia, PA. The event takes place in the Connelly Auditorium (room 806) in the Terra Building at <a title="Directions to The University of the Arts" href="https://www.google.com/maps/dir/211+S+Broad+St,+Philadelphia,+PA+19107//@39.9489914,-75.1662013,17z/data=!3m1!4b1!4m8!4m7!1m5!1m1!1s0x89c6c62565408cf7:0x734bdbc47bb4d2e9!2m2!1d-75.1640073!2d39.9489873!1m0" target="_blank">The University of the Arts</a>, on <strong>January 5, 2017, from 8-10 p.m.</strong></p>
  317. <p dir="ltr">Dene Grigar and Jennifer Zaylea, Emcees</p>
  318. <p><strong>Performers and Works:</strong></p>
  319. <p>Sandy Baldwin &amp; Gabriel Tremblay-Gaudette, “Poems you should know”</p>
  320. <p>Daniel Anderson, “A Blessing” and “The Red Wheelbarrow”</p>
  321. <p>Kathi Inman Berens, “Abaya”</p>
  322. <p>Helen Burgess, “Anna, Autopoietic”</p>
  323. <p>Caitlin Fisher, “Pareidolia: the Doll Universe”</p>
  324. <p>Riham Hosny, “Salome,” by Mohamed Abdelghani (Yuzerssif)</p>
  325. <p>Anastasia Salter and Bridget Blodgett, “Alt-Right: Ctrl+A; Del”</p>
  326. <p>Liz Losh, “While Chopping Red Peppers” and “The Last Day of Betty Nkomo”</p>
  327. <p>Laura Zaylea,  ”Closer than Rust”</p>
  328. <p>The ELO would like to thank our hosts at The University of the Arts, and in particular Jennifer Zaylea for organizing this event.</p>
  329. <p><img class="aligncenter size-full wp-image-3090" alt="UArtsLogo_color_side" src="http://eliterature.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/UArtsLogo_color_side.jpg" width="394" height="84" srcset="http://eliterature.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/UArtsLogo_color_side.jpg 394w, http://eliterature.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/UArtsLogo_color_side-300x63.jpg 300w" sizes="(max-width: 394px) 100vw, 394px" /></p>
  330. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  331. ]]></content:encoded>
  332. </item>
  333. <item>
  334. <title>Launching ELC3</title>
  335. <link>http://eliterature.org/2016/09/launching-elc3/</link>
  336. <pubDate>Wed, 28 Sep 2016 21:14:07 +0000</pubDate>
  337. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Mark Marino]]></dc:creator>
  338. <category><![CDATA[ELO]]></category>
  339. <category><![CDATA[Press Release]]></category>
  340.  
  341. <guid isPermaLink="false">http://eliterature.org/?p=3062</guid>
  342. <description><![CDATA[ELC3 2.0 &#160; We are pleased to announce the 2.0 version of the Electronic Literature Collection, Volume 3 (ELC3). This version adds preservation and new resources to the 114 featured works. Here are four new features that should be of special interest to our community. The works are now hosted in ELO servers (whenever possible),&#8230; <p class="toivo-read-more"><a href="http://eliterature.org/2016/09/launching-elc3/" class="more-link">Read more <span class="screen-reader-text">Launching ELC3</span></a></p>]]></description>
  343. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<h1>ELC3 2.0</h1>
  344. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  345. <p><a href="http://collection.eliterature.org/3/"><img class="aligncenter size-full wp-image-3063" alt="ELC3 cover" src="http://eliterature.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/elc3logofront.png" width="330" height="193" srcset="http://eliterature.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/elc3logofront.png 330w, http://eliterature.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/elc3logofront-300x175.png 300w" sizes="(max-width: 330px) 100vw, 330px" /></a></p>
  346. <p dir="ltr">We are pleased to announce the 2.0 version of the <a href="http://collection.eliterature.org/3">Electronic Literature Collection, Volume 3</a> (ELC3). This version adds preservation and new resources to the 114 featured works. Here are four new features that should be of special interest to our community.</p>
  347. <p dir="ltr">
  348. <ul>
  349. <li>
  350. <p dir="ltr">The works are now hosted in ELO servers (whenever possible), but we also link directly to their original websites to offer access to their authorial contexts. You can access both, as well as video documentation, through the Begin menu.</p>
  351. </li>
  352. <li>
  353. <p dir="ltr">Downloadable, editable source files and other materials provided by the authors are now included in a new section titled Downloads, beneath the Editorial Statements for each work. You can study these materials from a variety of critical or creative approaches or remix them to create your own.</p>
  354. </li>
  355. <li>
  356. <p dir="ltr">Twitter bots now have archives which allow you to browse, search, and read deeply into their output, from their launch up to January 2016. You can access them through the Begin menu or download them as spreadsheets in the Downloads section.</p>
  357. </li>
  358. <li>
  359. <p dir="ltr">A downloadable version of the ELC3 will soon be available for those who wish to install it in classrooms, labs, or have an offline copy.</p>
  360. </li>
  361. </ul>
  362. <p dir="ltr">We are still fundraising to offer a USB version free to ELO members, sponsors, and to distribute to libraries, museums, and archives. If you are interested in contributing to this free and open ELO initiative, contact us at <a href="mailto:[email protected]">[email protected]</a>.</p>
  363. <p dir="ltr">The Electronic Literature Collection is one of ELO&#8217;s many initiatives to promote and preserve digital literature.  Your membership helps to fund these projects.  Join or renew your membership today or increase your membership level to enable ELO to continue to increase and spread information about this innovative mode of art.  <a href="https://eliterature.org/membership/">https://eliterature.org/membership/</a></p>
  364. <p><img class="aligncenter size-large wp-image-3064" alt="Slip Case for ELC3" src="http://eliterature.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/slipcase-USB-edition-11-1024x597.png" width="670" height="390" srcset="http://eliterature.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/slipcase-USB-edition-11-1024x597.png 1024w, http://eliterature.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/slipcase-USB-edition-11-300x175.png 300w" sizes="(max-width: 670px) 100vw, 670px" /></p>
  365. <p dir="ltr">Share and enjoy!</p>
  366. <p dir="ltr">The ELC3 Editorial Collective</p>
  367. <ul>
  368. <li>
  369. <p dir="ltr">Stephanie Boluk</p>
  370. </li>
  371. <li>
  372. <p dir="ltr">Leonardo Flores</p>
  373. </li>
  374. <li>
  375. <p dir="ltr">Jacob Garbe</p>
  376. </li>
  377. <li>
  378. <p dir="ltr">Anastasia Salter</p>
  379. </li>
  380. </ul>
  381. ]]></content:encoded>
  382. </item>
  383. <item>
  384. <title>ELO at The Kitchen &#8212; NYC &#8211; Sept. 10</title>
  385. <link>http://eliterature.org/2016/09/3051/</link>
  386. <pubDate>Fri, 09 Sep 2016 22:35:04 +0000</pubDate>
  387. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Mark Marino]]></dc:creator>
  388. <category><![CDATA[ELO]]></category>
  389. <category><![CDATA[Events]]></category>
  390.  
  391. <guid isPermaLink="false">http://eliterature.org/?p=3051</guid>
  392. <description><![CDATA[If you’re in NYC (or near enough to hop a train), join us for We Have Always Been Digital, at The Kitchen.  ELO President Dene Grigar will be there with hard copies of ELC3  (announcement forthcoming) and previous collections for the first people to sign up as members. Come for a night of e-lit wonderment&#8230; <p class="toivo-read-more"><a href="http://eliterature.org/2016/09/3051/" class="more-link">Read more <span class="screen-reader-text">ELO at The Kitchen &#8212; NYC &#8211; Sept. 10</span></a></p>]]></description>
  393. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p style="text-align: center"><a href="http://www.thekitchen.org/event/electronic-literature-organization-we-have-always-been-digital"><img class="aligncenter size-full wp-image-3055" alt="Screen Shot 2016-09-09 at 3.29.48 PM" src="http://eliterature.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/Screen-Shot-2016-09-09-at-3.29.48-PM1.png" width="710" height="370" srcset="http://eliterature.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/Screen-Shot-2016-09-09-at-3.29.48-PM1.png 710w, http://eliterature.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/Screen-Shot-2016-09-09-at-3.29.48-PM1-300x156.png 300w" sizes="(max-width: 710px) 100vw, 710px" /></a></p>
  394. <p>If you’re in NYC (or near enough to hop a train), join us for <b>We Have Always Been Digital, at The Kitchen</b>.  ELO President Dene Grigar will be there with hard copies of ELC3  (announcement forthcoming) and previous collections for the first people to sign up as members.</p>
  395. <p>Come for a night of e-lit wonderment and (re)join an international organization of artists and scholars in ELO!</p>
  396. <p><a href="http://www.thekitchen.org/event/electronic-literature-organization-we-have-always-been-digital">http://www.thekitchen.org/event/electronic-literature-organization-we-have-always-been-digital</a></p>
  397. <p><b>Announcement:</b></p>
  398. <p>The <b>Electronic Literature Organization</b> (ELO) presents performances of digitally-born writing and poetry. Curated by <b>Illya Szilak</b>, this afternoon of interactive presentations showcases a range of dynamic forms from bots and games to interactive online works, and offers audience members the chance to engage with works and authors after the performances.</p>
  399. <p>Artists include: <b>Abraham Avnisan</b>, <b>Amaranth Borsuk</b>, <b>John Cayley</b>, <b>David Clark</b>, <b>Caitlin Fisher</b>, <b>Ian Hatcher</b>, <b>Porpentine Charity Heartscape</b>, <b>Flourish Klink</b>, <b>Tan Lin</b>, <b>Nick Montfort</b>, <b>Kia Miakka Natisse</b>, <b>Allison Parrish</b>, and others.</p>
  400. <p><b>September 10, 1–6pm, FREE<br />
  401. 512 West 19th Street, New York, NY 10011</b></p>
  402. <p><span id="more-3051"></span></p>
  403. <p>This event is made possible with support from Axe-Houghton Foundation and Lambent Foundation Fund of Tides Foundation, and in part by public funds from New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council and New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.</p>
  404. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  405. ]]></content:encoded>
  406. </item>
  407. <item>
  408. <title>CFP ELO 17 (Dec 5; July 19-22, 2017)</title>
  409. <link>http://eliterature.org/2016/08/cfp-elo-17-dec-5-july-19-22-2017/</link>
  410. <pubDate>Fri, 12 Aug 2016 16:07:25 +0000</pubDate>
  411. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Mark Marino]]></dc:creator>
  412. <category><![CDATA[Calls]]></category>
  413. <category><![CDATA[Conference]]></category>
  414. <category><![CDATA[ELO]]></category>
  415.  
  416. <guid isPermaLink="false">http://eliterature.org/?p=3013</guid>
  417. <description><![CDATA[ELO’17 Electronic Literature &#62; Affiliations, Communities, Translations Hosted by UFP &#8211; University Fernando Pessoa, Porto, Portugal, July 19 &#8211; 22, 2017 http://conference.eliterature.org Call For Papers &#38; Works The ELO (Electronic Literature Organization) is pleased to announce its 2017 Conference and Festival, to be held from July 19-22. The Conference is hosted by University Fernando Pessoa,&#8230; <p class="toivo-read-more"><a href="http://eliterature.org/2016/08/cfp-elo-17-dec-5-july-19-22-2017/" class="more-link">Read more <span class="screen-reader-text">CFP ELO 17 (Dec 5; July 19-22, 2017)</span></a></p>]]></description>
  418. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p><b>ELO’17</b></p>
  419. <p><b>Electronic Literature &gt; Affiliations, Communities, Translations</b></p>
  420. <p>Hosted by UFP &#8211; University Fernando Pessoa, Porto, Portugal, July 19 &#8211; 22, 2017</p>
  421. <p><a href="http://conference.eliterature.org/">http://conference.eliterature.org</a></p>
  422. <p><b>Call For Papers &amp; Works</b></p>
  423. <p>The ELO (Electronic Literature Organization) is pleased to announce its 2017 Conference and Festival, to be held from July 19-22. The Conference is hosted by University Fernando Pessoa, Porto, and the Festival and Exhibits will be held in the center of the historic city of Porto, Portugal.</p>
  424. <p>Titled «Electronic Literature: Affiliations, Communities, Translations<i>», </i>the Conference and Festival welcome dialogues and untold histories of electronic literature, providing a space for discussion about what exchanges, negotiations, and movements we can track in the field of electronic literature. These three threads will weave through the conference, structuring dialogue, debate, performances, presentations, and exhibits. The threads are meant as provocations, enabling constraints, and aim at forming a diagram of electronic literature today and expanding awareness of the history and diversity of the field.</p>
  425. <p>The goal of this International Conference is to contribute to displacing and re-situating accepted views and histories of electronic literature, in order to construct a larger and more expansive field, to map discontinuous textual relations across histories and forms, and to create productive and poetic apparatuses from unexpected combinations. Each of the three strands &#8211; <i>Affiliations, Communities, Translations</i> &#8211; is described in detail below. Participants can apply to the Conference and Festival by locating their work within a strand. In all cases, we are open to experimental proposals that integrate theory and practice, and proposals that challenge presentation formats.</p>
  426. <p><span id="more-3013"></span></p>
  427. <p><b>Affiliations</b></p>
  428. <p><i>Electronic literature is trans-temporal. It has an untold history.</i></p>
  429. <p><b>Conference</b>: to be held at University Fernando Pessoa, July 19-22. We welcome submissions of Papers, Lightning talks, Posters, Panels, Roundtables, and Workshops for peer-review evaluation, disclosing multiple diachronic and genealogical perspectives on electronic literature, providing room for comparative studies, and exploring untold archeologies and commerces between electronic literature and other expressive and material practices. Topics include, but are not limited to: intermedia and ergodicity in Baroque poetry, futurism and dada; concretism, videopoetry and Fluxus; early experiments in generative and combinatory literature; videoart and soundart; and how these expressive forms are recreated and transcoded in digital forms of literature.</p>
  430. <p><b>Festival</b>: to be held at Culturgest, July 19. Proposals for performances, installations and screenings will be evaluated by the Artistic Committee. Evaluation criteria will include the works’ mapping of the aesthetic and material antecedents of electronic literature, and attention to remixing/re-coding of previous materials from the avant-gardes.</p>
  431. <p><b>Exhibit</b>: July 18-22<b><i>, </i></b>curated by Álvaro Seiça and Daniela Côrtes Maduro.</p>
  432. <p><b>Communities</b></p>
  433. <p><i>Electronic literature is global. It creates a forum where subjects in the global network act out and struggle over their location and situation.</i></p>
  434. <p><b>Conference</b>: to be held at University Fernando Pessoa, July 19-22. We welcome submissions of Papers, Lightning talks, Posters, Panels, Roundtables, and Workshops for peer-review evaluation that expand our understanding of electronic literature communities and how literature is accounted for within diverse communities of practice. Papers may include case studies of individual communities as well as broader engagement with how communities form and develop, and how they interact with and create affinities with other communities. Topics for comparative case studies include but are not limited to artists’ books, Augmented and Virtual Reality; Perl poetry; Sound-video practitioners; ASCII art and Net.Art; Hacktivism/Activism; Memes and Fan Fiction cultures; kids’ e-lit; Minecraft, Twine, Bots and Indie Gaming; and how these practices are connected to electronic literature.</p>
  435. <p><b>Festival</b>: to be held at Mosteiro de São Bento da Vitória, July 20. Proposals for performances, installations and screenings will be evaluated by peers. Evaluation criteria will include the work’s engagement with the diversity of practices in electronic literature and affiliated communities, as well as their critical awareness of network aesthetics.</p>
  436. <p><b>Exhibit</b>: July 18-22,<b><i> </i></b>curated by Bruno Ministro and Sandra Guerreiro Dias.</p>
  437. <p><b>Translations</b></p>
  438. <p><i>Electronic literature is an exchange between language and code. It contains many voices.</i></p>
  439. <p><b>Conference</b>: to be held at University Fernando Pessoa, July 19-22. We welcome submissions of Papers, Lightning talks, Posters, Panels, Roundtables, and Workshops for peer-review evaluation that understand electronic literature as translation in the broadest possible sense. Beyond interlinguistic translation, we will accept papers on emulations, virtualizations, re-readings, and interpretations. We particularly welcome papers that address the limits and specifics of the programmability of natural languages as a means of literary expression. Topics include but are not limited to plagiotropy; linguistic, intermedial and intersemiotic translation; code and text translation; generative literature; emulations of historic electronic literature; re-readings and interpretations of previous works; and how these activities expand our understanding of literature and textuality.</p>
  440. <p><b>Festival</b>: to be held at Mosteiro de São Bento da Vitória, July 21. Proposals for performances, installations and screenings will be evaluated by peers. Evaluation criteria will include the works’ linguistic reflexivity and their engagement with translation, broadly understood, i.e., as a transcoding mechanism involving exchange in and across media, languages and cultures.</p>
  441. <p><b>Exhibit</b>: July 18-22,<b><i> </i></b>curated by Ana Marques da Silva and Diogo Marques.</p>
  442. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  443. <p><b>Submission Guidelines</b></p>
  444. <p><b>Acceptance policy</b></p>
  445. <ul>
  446. <li>● For the <b>Conference (peer-reviewed): </b>
  447. <ul>
  448. <li>○ <b>Paper</b> (10 to 15 mins &#8211; a presentation of a single paper by one or more authors &#8211; 500 word abstract).</li>
  449. <li>○ <b>Lightning talk</b> (5 mins &#8211; a short paper for a focused presentation &#8211; 250 word abstract).</li>
  450. <li>○ <b>Poster</b> (for poster sessions &#8211; submit 1-page poster).</li>
  451. <li>○ <b>Panel</b> (45 mins &#8211; a proposal for a complete panel including separate papers on the same general topic &#8211; 250 word overview plus 500 word individual abstracts).</li>
  452. <li>○ <b>Roundtable</b> (45 mins &#8211; a group presentation of a specific topic emphasizing discussion and audience interaction &#8211; 500 word abstract).</li>
  453. <li>○ <b>Workshop</b> (Action sessions, focused on hands-on group work on a given project or topic &#8211; 500 word abstract).</li>
  454. </ul>
  455. </li>
  456. <li>● For the <b>Festival (peer-reviewed): </b>
  457. <ul>
  458. <li>○ <b>Performance</b> (10 to 15 mins &#8211; readings, actions, interventions &#8211; 250 word abstract; provide links to images, videos, etc.)</li>
  459. <li>○ <b>Installation</b> (provide description of installation, as well as technical needs)</li>
  460. <li>○ <b>Screening</b> (provide link to video)</li>
  461. </ul>
  462. </li>
  463. </ul>
  464. <ul>
  465. <li>● <b>Submissions open</b>: August 15th, 2016.</li>
  466. <li>● <b>Abstracts Due:</b> December 5th, 2016. Review will follow a double-blind process, using easychair (<a href="https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=elo2017">https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=elo2017</a>). The CFP and review process will take into consideration the differences between Paper, Lightning Talk, Poster, Panel, Roundtable, Workshop, Performance, Installation, Screening.</li>
  467. <li>● <b>Acceptances sent out</b>: January 15th, 2017.</li>
  468. <li>● Proposers must attend the conference. Authors can submit as many proposals as they want, but a maximum of two will be accepted for presentation. Submissions should be done using easychair:<a href="https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=elo2017"> https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=elo2017</a></li>
  469. <li>● <b>Registration:</b> Early registration will close March 31st, 2017. There will be a registration fee for the Conference, which includes ELO Membership, invitations to all sessions of the Conference, Festival, and Exhibits, as well as access to the Banquet. Lunch and coffee-breaks will be served.</li>
  470. <li>ELO 2017 will provide basic technological needs such as Internet, projectors, power cords, sound systems, and cables. Specific and/or specialized equipment needs should be provided by artists. ELO is not responsible for shipping costs. Proposals for all creative activities must be submitted via the conference website.</li>
  471. <li>Abstracts, papers, lightning talks, posters, and audiovisual documentation of the Festival and Exhibits will be published. A selection of papers will be published in <i>Hyperrhiz: New Media Cultures </i>(ISSN 1555-9351).</li>
  472. <li>For more information, contact Rui Torres, ELO’17 Chair, rtorres [at] ufp.edu.pt</li>
  473. <li></li>
  474. </ul>
  475. <ul>
  476. <li><b>Curated Exhibitions</b></li>
  477. </ul>
  478. <ul>
  479. <li>● <b>Dene Grigar, Chair</b> (Washington State Univ. Vancouver, USA)</li>
  480. <li>● Affiliations<i> </i>&#8211; Curated by Álvaro Seiça and Daniela Côrtes Maduro</li>
  481. <li>● Communities<i> </i>&#8211; Curated by Bruno Ministro and Sandra Guerreiro Dias</li>
  482. <li>● Translations<i> </i>&#8211; Curated by Ana Marques da Silva and Diogo Marques</li>
  483. <li><b>Keynote Speakers &amp; Featured Artists Talks</b></li>
  484. <li>Keynote speakers will offer provocative perspectives on electronic literature. Artists will also offer exciting and stimulating perspectives on electronic literature.</li>
  485. <li><b>Setting</b></li>
  486. <li>Porto (<a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Porto">https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Porto</a>), also known, in English, as Oporto, is the second-largest city in Portugal. Located along the Douro river estuary in Northern Portugal, Porto was proclaimed a World Heritage Site by UNESCO (1996). In 2014, Porto was elected The Best European Destination by the Best European Destinations Agency.</li>
  487. <li><b>Transportation and Hotel</b></li>
  488. <li>Located in northern Portugal, Porto (OPO) is easy to reach by land or air. Instructions will be available soon. A list of Hotels and Hostels will also be provided and accounted for. The Conference will be held at University Fernando Pessoa, and the Festival and Exhibits will be held in different venues in the center of Porto.</li>
  489. <li><b>Venues</b></li>
  490. <li><b>UFP (Universidade Fernando Pessoa)</b> &#8211;<a href="http://www.ufp.pt/"> http://www.ufp.pt</a></li>
  491. <li><b>Culturgest</b> &#8211;<a href="http://www.culturgest.pt/info/porto.html"> http://www.culturgest.pt/info/porto.html</a></li>
  492. <li><b>Mosteiro de São Bento da Vitória </b>&#8211; <a href="http://www.tnsj.pt/home/msbv/index.php?intID=7&amp;intSubID=12">http://www.tnsj.pt/home/msbv/index.php?intID=7&amp;intSubID=12</a></li>
  493. <li><b>Palacete Viscondes de Balsemão</b> &#8211; <a href="http://visitasvirtuais.cm-porto.pt/pvb.php">http://visitasvirtuais.cm-porto.pt/pvb.php</a></li>
  494. </ul>
  495. ]]></content:encoded>
  496. </item>
  497. </channel>
  498. </rss>
  499.  

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