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  11. <title>Wild About Utah</title>
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  13. <link>http://wildaboututah.org</link>
  14. <description>A Utah Public Radio production featuring contributors who share a love of nature, preservation and education</description>
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  23. <title>Wild About Utah</title>
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  29. <title>Hidden in Plain Sight</title>
  30. <link>http://wildaboututah.org/hidden-in-plain-sight/</link>
  31. <pubDate>Mon, 14 May 2018 13:41:38 +0000</pubDate>
  32. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Josh Boling]]></dc:creator>
  33. <category><![CDATA[Birds]]></category>
  34. <category><![CDATA[American Dipper]]></category>
  35. <category><![CDATA[Western Screech Owl]]></category>
  36.  
  37. <guid isPermaLink="false">http://wildaboututah.org/?p=8638</guid>
  38. <description><![CDATA[<p>My wife and I paddled our kayak gingerly into the eaves of a limestone cliff, our eyes scanning its face for some sort of concavity or movement where there was none. “I don’t see where she could possibly be,” my wife confessed. She was right. We knew we had found the right rock, soiled as &#8230; </p>
  39. <p class="link-more"><a href="http://wildaboututah.org/hidden-in-plain-sight/" class="more-link">Continue reading<span class="screen-reader-text"> "Hidden in Plain Sight"</span></a></p>
  40. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://wildaboututah.org/hidden-in-plain-sight/">Hidden in Plain Sight</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://wildaboututah.org">Wild About Utah</a>.</p>
  41. ]]></description>
  42. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<figure id="attachment_8642" style="width: 250px" class="wp-caption alignright"><a href="http://wildaboututah.org/wp-content/uploads/Giddings-Western-Screech-Owl-2119343553_2b485dc71c.jpg"><img class="size-full wp-image-8642" src="http://wildaboututah.org/wp-content/uploads/Giddings-Western-Screech-Owl-2119343553_2b485dc71c.250x371.jpg" alt="Hidden in Plain Sight: Western Sceech Owl Courtesy &amp; Copyright Lou Giddings" width="250" height="371" srcset="http://wildaboututah.org/wp-content/uploads/Giddings-Western-Screech-Owl-2119343553_2b485dc71c.250x371.jpg 250w, http://wildaboututah.org/wp-content/uploads/Giddings-Western-Screech-Owl-2119343553_2b485dc71c.250x371-202x300.jpg 202w" sizes="(max-width: 250px) 100vw, 250px" /></a><figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Western Sceech Owl<br />Courtesy &amp; Copyright Lou Giddings</figcaption></figure>
  43. <p>My wife and I paddled our kayak gingerly into the eaves of a limestone cliff, our eyes scanning its face for some sort of concavity or movement where there was none. “I don’t see where she could possibly be,” my wife confessed. She was right. We knew we had found the right rock, soiled as it was with bird refuse, but there was nowhere for the nest to lie it seemed. Just then, on cue, a stirring of movement. Dark triangles rose out of the rock, followed by the lemony-yellow eyes of a mother Western Screech Owl. She climbed slowly from her grotto before exploding out of the rock toward us. A flurry of feathers rocketed toward us. I’m pretty sure I screamed, ducked as the bird soared away over our heads. We backed off a little. Concerned about the integrity of the nest site and our own well-being, we didn’t want to venture too close. When we were finally far enough away for mother’s comfort, she leap-frogged her way back to the cliff-side and disappeared again into the rock.</p>
  44. <p>It’s a wonder she was there at all! Inconspicuous as it is, her placement is nevertheless adjacent to a highly frequented recreational reservoir. As we watched her descend back into her incubation chamber, country music blared from the opposite shore and the joyous yelps of our fellow boaters rang out through the air. To be sure, this wasn’t the first time she had been stirred from her nest; but she must have somehow grown accustomed to human sights and sounds. Otherwise, she wouldn’t choose this same nesting site year after year, as I’d heard she does. My wife and I marveled at her bravery in defying what seemed a too-close proximity to our louder, more aggressively curious species; but the more I thought about it, the peculiarity of her choice faded. This was not the first intimate space we had discovered this spring.</p>
  45. <p><figure id="attachment_6962" style="width: 250px" class="wp-caption alignright"><a href="http://wildaboututah.org/wp-content/uploads/flickr.hart_.american_dipper_photo_3.jpg"><img src="http://wildaboututah.org/wp-content/uploads/flickr.hart_.american_dipper_photo_3.250x184.jpg" alt="Hidden in Plain Sight: American Dipper Peter Hart, Photographer Photo credit: PEHart via Visual hunt / CC BY-SA" width="250" height="184" class="size-full wp-image-6962" /></a><figcaption class="wp-caption-text">American Dipper<br />Peter Hart, Photographer<br />Photo credit: <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/pehart/19269566775/">PEHart</a> via <a href="https://visualhunt.com">Visual hunt</a> / <a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/"> CC BY-SA</a></figcaption></figure>A couple weeks earlier, as we sat at swift water’s edge, a small charcoal feather-bundle fell out of the sky toward the water near the opposite bank. A Water Ouzel—otherwise known as the American Dipper—had just lit upon a boulder where it commenced its famous bouncing. At once, it lunged at the riffles of water at its feet, torpedoing itself toward whatever invertebrate morsel was to be found in early spring. Having fetched what it was after, the dipper surfaced into full flight. I thought it would have returned to the rock; but instead, it swept itself into the girders of the small bridge spanning the river.</p>
  46. <p><figure id="attachment_8647" style="width: 250px" class="wp-caption alignright"><a href="http://wildaboututah.org/wp-content/uploads/boling.dipper.nest_.png"><img src="http://wildaboututah.org/wp-content/uploads/boling.dipper.nest_.250x333.png" alt="American Dipper Courtesy &amp; Copyright Josh Boling" width="250" height="333" class="size-full wp-image-8647" srcset="http://wildaboututah.org/wp-content/uploads/boling.dipper.nest_.250x333.png 250w, http://wildaboututah.org/wp-content/uploads/boling.dipper.nest_.250x333-225x300.png 225w" sizes="(max-width: 250px) 100vw, 250px" /></a><figcaption class="wp-caption-text">American Dipper<br />Courtesy &#038; Copyright Josh Boling</figcaption></figure>I waited for what I thought was a polite enough amount of time before investigating the scene. As I peered into the dim shadows beneath the bridge, my eyes adjusted to two others blinking back at me from the rounded doorway of a mossy, gourd-like dipper nest. “Why here?” I wondered aloud. The bird had taken offense to the question and took its immediate leave of my presence. This was the second dipper nest I’d found within a few miles’ stretch of river—the mark of a healthy and robust riparian zone, and perhaps also indicative of a healthy human/nature relationship. The other, too, neighbored a well-travelled recreational space.</p>
  47. <p>It seems heroic at first glance, the wild ones enduring our somewhat rude domesticity; but perhaps it’s a complement. They’re comfortable enough to hide in plain sight.</p>
  48. <p>I’m Josh Boling, and I’m Wild About Utah.</p>
  49. <p><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 10pt;"><span style="color: #2a7f55; font-weight: bold;">Credits:</span></span><br />
  50. Photos: Courtesy US FWS<br />
  51. Text: Josh Boling, 2018</p>
  52. <p><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 10pt;"><span style="color: #2a7f55; font-weight: bold;">Sources &amp; Additional Reading</span></span></p>
  53. <p>Western Screech Owl (images &#038; sounds), AllAboutBirds.org, The Cornell Lab of Ornithology, <a href="https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Western_Screech-Owl/sounds">https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Western_Screech-Owl/</a></p>
  54. <p>American Dipper (images &#038; sounds), AllAboutBirds.org, The Cornell Lab of Ornithology, <a href="https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/American_Dipper/">https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/American_Dipper/sounds</a></p>
  55. <p><a href=""></a></p>
  56. <p><a href=""></a></p>
  57. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://wildaboututah.org/hidden-in-plain-sight/">Hidden in Plain Sight</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://wildaboututah.org">Wild About Utah</a>.</p>
  58. ]]></content:encoded>
  59. </item>
  60. <item>
  61. <title>Consider Soundscapes</title>
  62. <link>http://wildaboututah.org/soundscapes-2/</link>
  63. <pubDate>Mon, 07 May 2018 13:41:13 +0000</pubDate>
  64. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Aspen Flake]]></dc:creator>
  65. <category><![CDATA[Soundscapes]]></category>
  66. <category><![CDATA[peaceful sounds of nature]]></category>
  67. <category><![CDATA[quiet]]></category>
  68.  
  69. <guid isPermaLink="false">http://wildaboututah.org/?p=8633</guid>
  70. <description><![CDATA[<p>Imagine yourself in your favorite place outside. What sounds do you expect to hear? The sound of water rushing over rocks? Crickets chirping? The wind softly blowing through the trees? These are some of the natural sounds you might expect to hear, but it might not always work out that way. Recreation areas are often &#8230; </p>
  71. <p class="link-more"><a href="http://wildaboututah.org/soundscapes-2/" class="more-link">Continue reading<span class="screen-reader-text"> "Consider Soundscapes"</span></a></p>
  72. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://wildaboututah.org/soundscapes-2/">Consider Soundscapes</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://wildaboututah.org">Wild About Utah</a>.</p>
  73. ]]></description>
  74. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p><figure id="attachment_8098" style="width: 250px" class="wp-caption alignright"><a href="https://www.nps.gov/articles/denali-understanding-managing-soundscapes.htm" target="newWindow"><img src="http://wildaboututah.org/wp-content/uploads/nps.denali.recording.equipment.250x147.jpg" alt="Scoundscape Recording Equipment Courtesy US NPS"
  75. title="Scoundscape Recording Equipment Courtesy US NPS" width="250" height="142" class="size-full wp-image-8098" /></a><figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Scoundscape Recording Equipment<br />Courtesy US NPS</figcaption></figure>Imagine yourself in your favorite place outside.  What sounds do you expect to hear?  The sound of water rushing over rocks? Crickets chirping? The wind softly blowing through the trees?  These are some of the natural sounds you might expect to hear, but it might not always work out that way.  Recreation areas are often filled with anthropogenic noises like vehicles, people talking, music playing, machinery, and more.</p>
  76. <p><figure id="attachment_8102" style="width: 250px" class="wp-caption alignright"><a href="https://www.nps.gov/articles/denali-understanding-managing-soundscapes.htm"><img src="http://wildaboututah.org/wp-content/uploads/nps.adjusting.denali.recording.equipment.6E9368C7-1DD8-B71B-0B4345B4C7986992.250x188.jpg" alt="Checking sound equipment set up near the McKinley Bar Trail, Denali National Park Courtesy US NPS" width="250" height="188" class="size-full wp-image-8102" /></a><figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Checking sound equipment set up near the McKinley Bar Trail, Denali National Park<br />Courtesy US NPS</figcaption></figure>Soundscapes, or the acoustic environment, are not often thought of as a natural resource, but are actually an important part of the environment.  A common reason people go to nature is for peace and quiet.  Quiet is considered a valuable resource.  Humans have grown accustomed to a constant background of noise, but it is not always good.  Escaping to nature can potentially provide relief from noise pollution, but natural soundscapes are becoming less and less common.</p>
  77. <p>Noise pollution significantly impacts human health.  Physical and mental impacts can include hearing disorders, sleep disruption, and even interruptions in the cardiovascular and endocrine systems.  Sound is more important than you might realize.</p>
  78. <p>Soundscapes may be important to humans, but they are arguably even more important for wildlife.  Many animals depend on hearing for warning them of danger, communicating with other animals, and locating prey.  Birds and other animals can hear noises from very far away, and noise interference can disrupt them easily.  Behavioral responses may include leaving an area for a brief time or leaving an area for good.</p>
  79. <p>Through evolution, some animals have lost sight, because it was not a necessary trait in some situations.  Up to this point, there has been no animal discovered that has lost its hearing through evolution.  This illustrates how vital the acoustic environment is to wildlife and ecosystem health.</p>
  80. <p><figure id="attachment_8096" style="width: 250px" class="wp-caption alignright"><img src="http://wildaboututah.org/wp-content/uploads/fws.04132015_Barnowl.250x167.jpg" alt="Barn Owl Courtesy US FWS" width="250" height="167" class="size-full wp-image-8096" /><figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Barn Owl Courtesy US FWS</figcaption></figure>Think of a Barn Owl.  Hunting in the dark, they rely on the tiniest rustle to lead them to their prey.  Their sense of hearing is fine-tuned and adapted specially for this purpose.  One ear hole is slightly higher than the other, which allows them to perceive depth through hearing.  Also, one ear hole can hear sounds below them on the ground, and the other can hear the sounds in the air.  Just by listening, an owl can locate a mouse far below it on the ground.  Noise pollution would make it nearly impossible for owls to hunt.</p>
  81. <p>Owls are just one example of noise pollution negatively effecting wildlife.  As soundscapes are disturbed, wildlife will be displaced or even die.  Public land managers now have the challenge of managing soundscapes. This is a difficult, but soundscapes are important for humans recreating, wildlife, and whole ecosystems.   </p>
  82. <p>As William Shakespeare said, “The earth has music for those who listen.”</p>
  83. <p>This is Aspen Flake and I am Wild About Utah.</p>
  84. <p><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 10pt;"><span style="color: #2a7f55; font-weight: bold;">Credits:</span></span><br />
  85. Photos: Courtesy US NPS ans US FWS<br />
  86. Text: Aspen Flake</p>
  87. <p><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 10pt;"><span style="color: #2a7f55; font-weight: bold;">Additional Reading &amp; Listening</span></span></p>
  88. <p><a href="http://naturalheroes.org/videos/natures-orchestra/" target="newWindow">http://naturalheroes.org/videos/natures-orchestra/</a></p>
  89. <p><b>Bernie Krause, Recording Artist:</b><br />
  90. <a href="https://www.wildsanctuary.com/" target="newWindow">https://www.wildsanctuary.com/</a></p>
  91. <p>Bryan C. Pijanowski, Luis J. Villanueva-Rivera, Sarah L. Dumyahn, Almo Farina, Bernie L. Krause,<br />
  92. Brian M. Napoletano, Stuart H. Gage, and Nadia Pieretti, Soundscape Ecology: The Science<br />
  93. of Sound in the Landscape, BioScience, Volume 61, Issue 3, 1 March 2011, Pages 203–216, <a href="https://www.wildsanctuary.com/BioScience2011-SoundscapeEcology.pdf" target="newWindow">https://www.wildsanctuary.com/BioScience2011-SoundscapeEcology.pdf</a> or <a href="https://academic.oup.com/bioscience/article/61/3/203/238162" target="newWindow">https://academic.oup.com/bioscience/article/61/3/203/238162</a></p>
  94. <p>Wild Soundscapes: Discovering the Voice of the Natural World, Revised Edition Paperback – May 24, 2016<br />
  95. by Bernie Krause  (Author),‎ Roger Payne (Foreword) <a href="https://www.amazon.com/Wild-Soundscapes-Discovering-Natural-Revised/dp/0300218192" target="newWindow">https://www.amazon.com/Wild-Soundscapes-Discovering-Natural-Revised/dp/0300218192</a></p>
  96. <p>Voices of the Wild: Animal Songs, Human Din, and the Call to Save Natural Soundscapes (The Future Series) Hardcover – August 25, 2015<br />
  97. by Bernie Krause (Author)  <a href="https://www.amazon.com/Voices-Wild-Animal-Natural-Soundscapes/dp/0300206313" target="newWindow">https://www.amazon.com/Voices-Wild-Animal-Natural-Soundscapes/dp/0300206313</a></p>
  98. <p>The Great Animal Orchestra: Finding the Origins of Music in the World&#8217;s Wild Places Paperback – March 12, 2013<br />
  99. by Bernie Krause  (Author)   <a href="https://www.amazon.com/Great-Animal-Orchestra-Finding-Origins/dp/031608686X/" target="newWindow">https://www.amazon.com/Great-Animal-Orchestra-Finding-Origins/dp/031608686X/</a></p>
  100. <p><b>Kevin Colver, Recording Artist:</b></p>
  101. <p>Know Your Bird Sounds: Common Western Species (with audio CD) (The Lang Elliott Audio Library) Paperback – January 10, 2008<br />
  102. by Lang Elliott  (Author),‎ Kevin Colver (Contributor)  <a href="https://www.amazon.com/Know-Your-Bird-Sounds-Western/dp/0811734463/" target="newWindow">https://www.amazon.com/Know-Your-Bird-Sounds-Western/dp/0811734463/</a></p>
  103. <p>Songbirds of Yellowstone and the High Rockies Audio CD – January 1, 1996<br />
  104. by Kevin J. Colver  (Author) <a href="https://www.amazon.com/Songbirds-Yellowstone-Rockies-Kevin-Colver/dp/1929797079/" target="newWindow">https://www.amazon.com/Songbirds-Yellowstone-Rockies-Kevin-Colver/dp/1929797079/</a> or <a href="https://wildstore.wildsanctuary.com/collections/all-albums/products/songbirds-of-yellowstone-and-the-high-rockies" target="newWindow">https://wildstore.wildsanctuary.com/collections/all-albums/products/songbirds-of-yellowstone-and-the-high-rockies</a></p>
  105. <p>Songbirds of the Southwest Canyon Country Audio CD – January 1, 1994<br />
  106. by Kevin J. Colver  (Author)  <a href="https://www.amazon.com/Songbirds-Southwest-Canyon-Country-Colver/dp/1929797036/" target="newWindow">https://www.amazon.com/Songbirds-Southwest-Canyon-Country-Colver/dp/1929797036/</a>  or <a href="https://wildstore.wildsanctuary.com/products/songbirds-of-the-southwest-canyon-country" target="newWindow">https://wildstore.wildsanctuary.com/products/songbirds-of-the-southwest-canyon-country</a></p>
  107. <p>Songbirds of the Rocky Mountain Foothills Audio CD – January 1, 1994<br />
  108. by Kevin J. Colver  (Author) <a href="https://www.amazon.com/Songbirds-Rocky-Mountain-Foothills-Colver/dp/192979701X/" target="newWindow">https://www.amazon.com/Songbirds-Rocky-Mountain-Foothills-Colver/dp/192979701X/</a>  or <a href="https://wildstore.wildsanctuary.com/products/songbirds-of-the-rocky-mountain-foothills" target="newWindow">https://wildstore.wildsanctuary.com/products/songbirds-of-the-rocky-mountain-foothills</a></p>
  109. <p>Songbirds of Yosemite and the Sierra Nevadas by Kevin J. Colver  (Author) <a href="https://www.amazon.com/Songbirds-Yosemite-Sierra-Nevadas-Colver/dp/B00004T1L2/" target="newWindow">https://www.amazon.com/Songbirds-Yosemite-Sierra-Nevadas-Colver/dp/B00004T1L2/</a>, or<br />
  110. <a href="https://wildstore.wildsanctuary.com/products/songbirds-of-yosemite-and-the-sierra-nevadas" target="newWindow">https://wildstore.wildsanctuary.com/products/songbirds-of-yosemite-and-the-sierra-nevadas</a></p>
  111. <p>Frogs and Toads, Kevin J Colver, August 16, 2011  <a href="https://www.amazon.com/Frogs-Toads-Kevin-J-Colver/dp/B005I0C4ZQ/" target="newWindow">https://www.amazon.com/Frogs-Toads-Kevin-J-Colver/dp/B005I0C4ZQ/</a></p>
  112. <p><a href="https://wildstore.wildsanctuary.com/products/katmai-wilderness" target="newWindow">https://wildstore.wildsanctuary.com/products/katmai-wilderness</a><br />
  113. <a href="https://wildstore.wildsanctuary.com/products/saguaro-sunrise" target="newWindow">https://wildstore.wildsanctuary.com/products/saguaro-sunrise</a><br />
  114. <a href="https://wildstore.wildsanctuary.com/products/voice-of-the-arctic-refuge" target="newWindow">https://wildstore.wildsanctuary.com/products/voice-of-the-arctic-refuge</a><br />
  115. <a href="https://wildstore.wildsanctuary.com/products/starvation-creek-utah" target="newWindow">https://wildstore.wildsanctuary.com/products/starvation-creek-utah</a></p>
  116. <p><b>Jeff Rice, Recording Artist:</b><br />
  117. Dobner, Jennifer, LISTENING TO THE NATURAL WEST<br />
  118. The U’s Western Soundscape Archive captures the animal and ambient music of the wild., CONTINUUM<br />
  119. THE MAGAZINE OF THE UNIVERSITY OF UTAH, Summer 2014, <a href="https://continuum.utah.edu/web-exclusives/listening-to-the-natural-west/" target="newWindow">https://continuum.utah.edu/web-exclusives/listening-to-the-natural-west/</a></p>
  120. <p>Vanderbilt, Tom, You Need to Hear This, Recording engineer Jeff Rice is on a mission to preserve the sounds of nature. Why? Listening to them might actually make us healthier., OutsideOnline.com, 20 Oct 2011, <a href="https://www.outsideonline.com/1887466/you-need-hear" target="newWindow">https://www.outsideonline.com/1887466/you-need-hear</a></p>
  121. <p><a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/sound/index.htm" target="newWindow">https://www.nps.gov/subjects/sound/index.htm</a></p>
  122. <p>A Symphony of Sounds, US National Park Service (US NPS), <a href="https://www.nps.gov/articles/denali-understanding-managing-soundscapes.htm" target="newWindow">https://www.nps.gov/articles/denali-understanding-managing-soundscapes.htm</a></p>
  123. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://wildaboututah.org/soundscapes-2/">Consider Soundscapes</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://wildaboututah.org">Wild About Utah</a>.</p>
  124. ]]></content:encoded>
  125. </item>
  126. <item>
  127. <title>Spring&#8217;s Gifts</title>
  128. <link>http://wildaboututah.org/springs-gifts/</link>
  129. <pubDate>Tue, 01 May 2018 00:53:45 +0000</pubDate>
  130. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Jack Greene]]></dc:creator>
  131. <category><![CDATA[Birds]]></category>
  132. <category><![CDATA[Flora]]></category>
  133. <category><![CDATA[Seasons]]></category>
  134. <category><![CDATA[birch canyon]]></category>
  135. <category><![CDATA[Zions National Park]]></category>
  136.  
  137. <guid isPermaLink="false">http://wildaboututah.org/?p=8623</guid>
  138. <description><![CDATA[<p>I doubt there was a song left unsung as I worked my way up Birch Canyon early am. Testosterone laden birds filled the morning with delight. Robins, finches, meadow larks, song sparrows- what a marvelous symphony! I breathed deeply to fully absorb air filled with titillating odors from last night’s gentle spring rain- nature’s perfume, &#8230; </p>
  139. <p class="link-more"><a href="http://wildaboututah.org/springs-gifts/" class="more-link">Continue reading<span class="screen-reader-text"> "Spring&#8217;s Gifts"</span></a></p>
  140. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://wildaboututah.org/springs-gifts/">Spring&#8217;s Gifts</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://wildaboututah.org">Wild About Utah</a>.</p>
  141. ]]></description>
  142. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p><figure id="attachment_8627" style="width: 250px" class="wp-caption alignright"><img src="http://wildaboututah.org/wp-content/uploads/liberatore.glacier.lilies.jpg" alt="Glacier Lilies, Courtesy Andrea Liberatore, Photographer" width="1024" height="768" class="size-full wp-image-8627" srcset="http://wildaboututah.org/wp-content/uploads/liberatore.glacier.lilies.jpg 1024w, http://wildaboututah.org/wp-content/uploads/liberatore.glacier.lilies-250x188.jpg 250w, http://wildaboututah.org/wp-content/uploads/liberatore.glacier.lilies-768x576.jpg 768w" sizes="(max-width: 767px) 89vw, (max-width: 1000px) 54vw, (max-width: 1071px) 543px, 580px" /><figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Glacier Lilies,<br />Courtesy Andrea Liberatore, Photographer</figcaption></figure>I doubt there was a song left unsung as I worked my way up Birch Canyon early am. Testosterone laden birds filled the morning with delight. Robins, finches, meadow larks, song sparrows- what a marvelous symphony! I breathed deeply to fully absorb air filled with titillating odors from last night’s gentle spring rain- nature’s perfume, free and priceless.</p>
  143. <p>Waters surging down Summit and Birch creeks released from winter’s cold grip. Further along, I take notice of recent bloom- glacier lilies exploding with bluebells soon to follow. Yellow bells in sage with promise of early Indian paintbrush. Arrowleaf balsamroot and penstemon only a few weeks away.</p>
  144. <p>Thanks to earth’s 23 degree tilted axis spring is in full swing! This combined with the annual journey around our medium sized star brings the rebirth once again. How boring it would be had it been a tilt of zero degrees- negating our seasonal change. We complain as temperatures swing wildly from 60 degree days plummeting to 30’s in the course of a few hours. But please don’t despair- it may return to pleasantness almost as quickly.</p>
  145. <p>I would not care to be a meteorologist in San Diego where temperatures rarely deviates more than a few degrees, winds are calm, and precipitation comes primarily during winter in dribbles. I relish the beauty and drama of a cumulonimbus cloud burst pummeling me with a deluge of rain pushed by strong wind spawned by a warm, moist air mass colliding with another cool and dry. Grand symbols crashing as lightening energizes countless trillion molecules of nitrogen and oxygen. How could something minute as a gas particle make such a ruckus! Miracles abound. </p>
  146. <p>A spring trek across Zion N.P. last week to welcome spring on the south end. Townsend solitaires, scrub and Steller jays, mountain chickadees, and courtship drumming of woodpecker species were there to welcome me. White throated swifts launched from towering cliffs with occasional canyon wrens emitting cascading, descending notes from their vertical realm. </p>
  147. <p>All three species of nuthatches were present- white and red breasted with small flocks of gregarious pygmies in ponderosa pine forest, busily searching bark crevasses for delectable grubs and insect eggs.</p>
  148. <p>Indian potato and spring beauty were found among the sage near 8000 feet beneath lava point. These delectables were enjoyed by Native Americans. I sampled a few flowers leaving the mini-potato like roots undisturbed. I enjoyed waterleaf stems growing in hardwood forested areas. </p>
  149. <p>After 36 miles of sublime scenery beyond comprehension, I descended into throngs of park visitors from many distant lands evident by their strange dialects. There are no down seasons in Zion these days that I once enjoyed years ago while working as a park seasonal. But the stunning beauty remains, with new greenery showing on cottonwood and boxelder in contrast to the warm glow of massive cliff. </p>
  150. <p>Please don’t inquire of me which season I enjoy most.</p>
  151. <p>This is Jack Greene and I’m wild about Utah!!</p>
  152. <p><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 10pt;"><span style="color: #2a7f55; font-weight: bold;">Credits:</span></span></p>
  153. <p>Pictures: Courtesy &amp; Copyright Andrea Liberatore<br />
  154. Text: Jack Greene, Bridgerland Audubon Society</p>
  155. <p><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 10pt;"><span style="color: #2a7f55; font-weight: bold;">Additional Reading:</span></span></p>
  156. <p>Northern Utah Hikes &#038; Lakes, HikesandLakes.com, <a href="http://www.hikesandlakes.com/northern.html" target="newWindow">http://www.hikesandlakes.com/northern.html</a></p>
  157. <p>Birch Canyon Road Trail, AllTrails.com, <a href="https://www.alltrails.com/trail/us/utah/birch-canyon-road-trail" target="newWindow">https://www.alltrails.com/trail/us/utah/birch-canyon-road-trail</a>  </p>
  158. <p><a href="" target="newWindow"></a></p>
  159. <p><a href="" target="newWindow"></a></p>
  160. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://wildaboututah.org/springs-gifts/">Spring&#8217;s Gifts</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://wildaboututah.org">Wild About Utah</a>.</p>
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  162. <enclosure url="http://wildaboututah.org/wp-content/uploads/WildUtah043018.mp3" length="0" type="" />
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  164. <item>
  165. <title>Poetry of the Forest</title>
  166. <link>http://wildaboututah.org/poetry-of-the-forest/</link>
  167. <pubDate>Mon, 23 Apr 2018 13:41:31 +0000</pubDate>
  168. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Ron Hellstern]]></dc:creator>
  169. <category><![CDATA[Biome]]></category>
  170. <category><![CDATA[Flora]]></category>
  171. <category><![CDATA[Mountains]]></category>
  172. <category><![CDATA[Trees]]></category>
  173. <category><![CDATA[forest]]></category>
  174. <category><![CDATA[Poetry]]></category>
  175. <category><![CDATA[poets]]></category>
  176. <category><![CDATA[tree]]></category>
  177.  
  178. <guid isPermaLink="false">http://wildaboututah.org/?p=8556</guid>
  179. <description><![CDATA[<p>There are people who can capture beautiful scenery by painting on canvas, using film photography, and with digital technology. And these forms of art can be visually stunning. But there is a unique perspective of visualizing when written words are read, allowing one’s mind to see not only the exterior of a scene, but the &#8230; </p>
  180. <p class="link-more"><a href="http://wildaboututah.org/poetry-of-the-forest/" class="more-link">Continue reading<span class="screen-reader-text"> "Poetry of the Forest"</span></a></p>
  181. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://wildaboututah.org/poetry-of-the-forest/">Poetry of the Forest</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://wildaboututah.org">Wild About Utah</a>.</p>
  182. ]]></description>
  183. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<figure id="attachment_8526" style="width: 250px" class="wp-caption alignright"><a href="http://wildaboututah.org"><img class="size-full wp-image-8526" src="http://wildaboututah.org/wp-content/uploads/fs.usda_.fall_.from_.nebo_.loop_.stelprdb5123030.250x188.jpg" alt="Poetry of the Forest: Fall Colors along the Nebo Loop between Payson, UT and HWY 132 between Nephi and Fountain Green. Courtesy USDA Forest Service" width="250" height="188" /></a><figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Fall Colors along the Nebo Loop between Payson, UT and HWY 132 between Nephi and Fountain Green.<br />Courtesy USDA Forest Service</figcaption></figure>
  184. <p>There are people who can capture beautiful scenery by painting on canvas, using film photography, and with digital technology. And these forms of art can be visually stunning. But there is a unique perspective of visualizing when written words are read, allowing one’s mind to see not only the exterior of a scene, but the interior heart intended by the writer.</p>
  185. <p>What memories does your mind recall as you listen to the words of these renowned authors about the poetry of the forest?</p>
  186. <li> Robert Louis Stevenson &#8211; <i>…it is not so much for its beauty that the forest makes a claim upon men’s hearts, as for that subtle something, that quality of the air, that emanation from the old trees, that so wonderfully changes and renews a weary spirit.</i>
  187. </li>
  188. <li> John Fowles – <i>In some mysterious way woods have never seemed to me to be static things. In physical terms, I move through them, yet in metaphysical ones, they seem to move through me.</i>
  189. </li>
  190. <li> Walt Whitman – <i>Why are there trees I never walk under but large and melodious thoughts descend upon me?</i>
  191. </li>
  192. <li> William Wordsworth – <i>One impulse from a vernal wood may teach you more of man, of moral evil and of good, than all the sages can.</i>
  193. </li>
  194. <li> Marcel Proust – <i>We have nothing to fear and a great deal to learn from trees, that vigorous and Pacific tribe which without stint produces strengthening essences for us, soothing balms, and in whose gracious company we spend so many cool, silent and intimate hours.</i>
  195. </li>
  196. <li> Washington Irving – <i>As the leaves of trees are said to absorb all noxious qualities of the air, and to breathe forth a purer atmosphere, so it seems to me as if they drew from us all sordid and angry passions and breathed forth peace and philanthropy. There is a severe and settled majesty in woodland scenery that enters into the soul, and dilates and elevates it, and fills it with noble inclinations.</i>
  197. </li>
  198. <li> James Henry Leigh Hunt – <i>They refresh the commonplaces of life, shed a harmony through the busy discord, and appeal to those first sources of emotion, which are associated with the remembrance of all that is young and innocent. They seem also to present us with a portion of the tranquility we think we are laboring for.</i>
  199. </li>
  200. <li> Harold Monro – <i>One summer afternoon, you find some lonely trees. Persuade your mind to drowse. Then, as your eyelids close, and you still hover into those three stages of a darkening doze, this side the barrier of sleep,…..pause. In that last clear moment open quick your sight toward where the green is bright and thick. Be sure that everything you keep to dream with is made out of trees.</i>
  201. <p><figure id="attachment_8561" style="width: 250px" class="wp-caption alignright"><a href="http://wildaboututah.org/wp-content/uploads/fs.usda_.tree_.planting.stelprdb5333628.third_.jpg"><img class="size-full wp-image-8561" src="http://wildaboututah.org/wp-content/uploads/fs.usda_.tree_.planting.stelprdb5333628.250x167.jpg" alt="Plantng a Tree Coutesy USDA Forest Service" width="250" height="167" /></a><figcaption class="wp-caption-text">Plantng a Tree<br />Coutesy USDA Forest Service</figcaption></figure>*Lucy Larcom – <i>He who plants a tree plants a hope.</i></p>
  202. </li>
  203. <li> Henry David Thoreau – <i>In wildness is the preservation of the world. Silence alone is worthy to be heard.</i>
  204. </li>
  205. <li> English Proverb – <i>He that plants trees loves others beside himself.</i>
  206. <p>&nbsp;<br />
  207. <span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 10pt;"><span style="color: #2a7f55; font-weight: bold;">Credits:</span></span><br />
  208. Text: Excerpts from the book, “The Forest”, compiled by Michelle Lovric <a href="https://www.amazon.co.uk/Forest-Poetry-Earth-Michelle-Levric/dp/1561385077" target="newWindow">https://www.amazon.co.uk/Forest-Poetry-Earth-Michelle-Levric/dp/1561385077</a><br />
  209. Images: Courtesy USDA Forest Service<br />
  210. Collector &#038; Reader: Ron Hellstern, Cache Valley Wildlife Association</p>
  211. <p><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 10pt;"><span style="color: #2a7f55; font-weight: bold;">Additional Reading</span></span></p>
  212. <p>Lovric, Michelle, The Forest, A Celebration of Nature, In Word and Image, <a href="https://www.amazon.co.uk/Forest-Poetry-Earth-Michelle-Levric/dp/1561385077" target="newWindow">https://www.amazon.co.uk/Forest-Poetry-Earth-Michelle-Levric/dp/1561385077</a></p>
  213. <p>Poems about Trees, Academy of American Poets, <a href="https://www.poets.org/poetsorg/text/poems-about-trees" target="newWindow">https://www.poets.org/poetsorg/text/poems-about-trees</a></p>
  214. <p>Search for Poems about Trees, Poetry Foundation, <a href="https://www.poetryfoundation.org/search?query=trees" target="newWindow">https://www.poetryfoundation.org/search?query=trees</a></li>
  215. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://wildaboututah.org/poetry-of-the-forest/">Poetry of the Forest</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://wildaboututah.org">Wild About Utah</a>.</p>
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