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  5.        <description>News for nerds, stuff that matters</description>
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  10.            <title>Many Businesses Still Love COBOL</title>
  11.            <link>https://developers.slashdot.org/story/20/02/17/0141200/many-businesses-still-love-cobol?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&amp;utm_medium=feed</link>
  12.            <description>TechRadar shares some surprising results from a new survey of enterprises using COBOL and mainframe technologies:
  13. According to a survey by Micro Focus, which follows data gathered in previous 2017 survey, 70 percent favor modernization as an approach for implementing strategic change. This is opposed to replacing or retiring their key COBOL applications as they continue to provide a low-risk and effective means of transforming IT to support digital business initiatives...
  14. This is further supported by the results of the survey with an increase in the size of the average application code base which grew from 8.4m in 2017 to 9.9m this year, showing continued investment, re-use and expansion in core business systems.
  15. "92 percent of respondents felt as though their organization's COBOL applications are strategic in comparison to 84 percent of respondents in 2017," according to the official survey results. The survey spanned 40 different countries, and involved COBOL-connected architects, developers, development managers and IT executives.
  16. "COBOL's credentials as a strong digital technology appear to be set for another decade," according to Micro Focus' senior vice president of application modernization and connectivity. "With 60 years of experience supporting mission-critical applications and business systems, COBOL continues to evolve as a flexible and resilient computer language that will remain relevant and important for businesses around the world."&lt;p&gt;&lt;div class="share_submission" style="position:relative;"&gt;
  17. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://twitter.com/home?status=Many+Businesses+Still+Love+COBOL%3A+http%3A%2F%2Fbit.ly%2F39EQv1u"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/twitter_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  18. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://www.facebook.com/sharer.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Fdevelopers.slashdot.org%2Fstory%2F20%2F02%2F17%2F0141200%2Fmany-businesses-still-love-cobol%3Futm_source%3Dslashdot%26utm_medium%3Dfacebook"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/facebook_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  19.  
  20.  
  21.  
  22. &lt;/div&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;a href="https://developers.slashdot.org/story/20/02/17/0141200/many-businesses-still-love-cobol?utm_source=rss1.0moreanon&amp;amp;utm_medium=feed"&gt;Read more of this story&lt;/a&gt; at Slashdot.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;iframe src="https://slashdot.org/slashdot-it.pl?op=discuss&amp;amp;id=15787780&amp;amp;smallembed=1" style="height: 300px; width: 100%; border: none;"&gt;&lt;/iframe&gt;&lt;img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~4/45arG-apdkY" height="1" width="1" alt=""/&gt;</description>
  23.            <pubDate>Mon, 17 Feb 2020 11:34:00 +0100</pubDate>
  24.        </item>
  25.        <item>
  26.            <title>Uber and Lyft Are Creating Traffic, Not Reducing It</title>
  27.            <link>https://tech.slashdot.org/story/20/02/17/045209/uber-and-lyft-are-creating-traffic-not-reducing-it?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&amp;utm_medium=feed</link>
  28.            <description>The Wall Street Journal remembers how five years ago, Uber's co-founder "was so confident that Uber's rides would prompt people to leave their cars at home that he told a tech conference: 'If every car in San Francisco was Ubered there would be no traffic.'"
  29.  
  30. He was wrong.
  31. Rather than the apps becoming a model of algorithm-driven efficiency, drivers in major cities cruise for fares without passengers an estimated 40% of the time. Multiple studies show that Uber and Lyft have pulled people away from buses, subways and walking, and that the apps add to the overall amount of driving in the U.S. A study published last year by San Francisco County officials and University of Kentucky researchers in the journal Science Advances found that over 60% of the slowdown of traffic speeds in San Francisco between 2010 and 2016 was due to the introduction of the ride-hail companies...
  32.  
  33. The reversal of ride-hailing from would-be traffic hero to congestion villain is the sort of unintended consequence that has become a recurring feature of Silicon Valley disruption. Companies seeking rapid growth by reinventing the way we do things are delivering solutions that sometimes create their own problems... Silicon Valley is particularly prone to focusing on positive potential effects of new technologies given a decadeslong culture of utopian ideals, said Fred Turner, a Stanford University communications professor who has written a book on the topic... Tech companies tend to have an engineering-like, narrow focus on solving specific problems, often missing the broader picture as a result. "You're not rewarded for seeing the landscape within which your device will be deployed," he said... [I]n hindsight, some of the pitfalls -- such as cars cruising empty between passengers -- seem obvious...
  34. Riders also take car trips that wouldn't have happened before Uber and Lyft. Bruce Schaller, a transportation consultant and former New York City official who has studied the topic, said in his paper that surveys in numerous cities found roughly 60% of riders in Ubers and Lyfts would have walked, biked, taken public transit or stayed home if a ride-hail car hadn't been available.&lt;p&gt;&lt;div class="share_submission" style="position:relative;"&gt;
  35. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://twitter.com/home?status=Uber+and+Lyft+Are+Creating+Traffic%2C+Not+Reducing+It%3A+http%3A%2F%2Fbit.ly%2F3bF8Tt3"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/twitter_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  36. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://www.facebook.com/sharer.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Ftech.slashdot.org%2Fstory%2F20%2F02%2F17%2F045209%2Fuber-and-lyft-are-creating-traffic-not-reducing-it%3Futm_source%3Dslashdot%26utm_medium%3Dfacebook"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/facebook_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  37.  
  38.  
  39.  
  40. &lt;/div&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;a href="https://tech.slashdot.org/story/20/02/17/045209/uber-and-lyft-are-creating-traffic-not-reducing-it?utm_source=rss1.0moreanon&amp;amp;utm_medium=feed"&gt;Read more of this story&lt;/a&gt; at Slashdot.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;iframe src="https://slashdot.org/slashdot-it.pl?op=discuss&amp;amp;id=15788134&amp;amp;smallembed=1" style="height: 300px; width: 100%; border: none;"&gt;&lt;/iframe&gt;&lt;img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~4/_hnRENnAIRU" height="1" width="1" alt=""/&gt;</description>
  41.            <pubDate>Mon, 17 Feb 2020 07:34:00 +0100</pubDate>
  42.        </item>
  43.        <item>
  44.            <title>Mark Zuckerberg Again Calls for Big Tech to be Regulated</title>
  45.            <link>https://tech.slashdot.org/story/20/02/17/039239/mark-zuckerberg-again-calls-for-big-tech-to-be-regulated?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&amp;utm_medium=feed</link>
  46.            <description>Mark Zuckerberg wrote an op-ed published in The Financial Times "once again calling for more regulation of Big Tech," reports MarketWatch, "even if it affects his company's bottom line."
  47. Zuckerberg has previously called for more government regulation of internet companies, and reiterated his arguments in favor of laws covering four major areas: elections, harmful content, privacy and data portability. "I don't think private companies should make so many decisions alone when they touch on fundamental democratic values," he wrote, adding: "We have to balance promoting innovation and research against protecting people's privacy and security."
  48.  
  49. Zuckerberg warned that regulation could have "unintended consequences, especially for small businesses that can't do sophisticated data analysis and marketing on their own...."
  50.  
  51. At his Munich appearance, Zuckerberg spoke about what type of regulation he envisioned: "Right now there are two frameworks that I think people have for existing industries &amp;mdash; there's like newspapers and existing media, and then there's the telco-type model, which is 'the data just flows through you', but you're not going to hold a telco responsible if someone says something harmful on a phone line... I actually think where we should be is somewhere in between," he said, according to Reuters.
  52.  
  53. Reuters also reports that Zuckerberg said Facebook is already employing 35,000 people to review online content and implement security measures.
  54. "Those teams and Facebook's automated technology currently suspend more than 1 million fake accounts each day, he said, adding that 'the vast majority are detected within minutes of signing up.'"&lt;p&gt;&lt;div class="share_submission" style="position:relative;"&gt;
  55. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://twitter.com/home?status=Mark+Zuckerberg+Again+Calls+for+Big+Tech+to+be+Regulated%3A+http%3A%2F%2Fbit.ly%2F2SJ6Ueg"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/twitter_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  56. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://www.facebook.com/sharer.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Ftech.slashdot.org%2Fstory%2F20%2F02%2F17%2F039239%2Fmark-zuckerberg-again-calls-for-big-tech-to-be-regulated%3Futm_source%3Dslashdot%26utm_medium%3Dfacebook"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/facebook_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  57.  
  58.  
  59.  
  60. &lt;/div&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;a href="https://tech.slashdot.org/story/20/02/17/039239/mark-zuckerberg-again-calls-for-big-tech-to-be-regulated?utm_source=rss1.0moreanon&amp;amp;utm_medium=feed"&gt;Read more of this story&lt;/a&gt; at Slashdot.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;iframe src="https://slashdot.org/slashdot-it.pl?op=discuss&amp;amp;id=15787992&amp;amp;smallembed=1" style="height: 300px; width: 100%; border: none;"&gt;&lt;/iframe&gt;&lt;img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~4/xH-HyDlAEXw" height="1" width="1" alt=""/&gt;</description>
  61.            <pubDate>Mon, 17 Feb 2020 03:34:00 +0100</pubDate>
  62.        </item>
  63.        <item>
  64.            <title>IOTA Cryptocurrency Shut Down Its Entire Network After a Wallet Breach</title>
  65.            <link>https://news.slashdot.org/story/20/02/17/018259/iota-cryptocurrency-shut-down-its-entire-network-after-a-wallet-breach?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&amp;utm_medium=feed</link>
  66.            <description>The nonprofit organization behind the IOTA cryptocurrency shut down its entire network this week after someone exploited a vulnerability in their wallet app to steal funds.
  67. ZDNet reports:
  68. The attack happened this week, Wednesday, on February 12, 2020, according to a message the foundation posted on its official Twitter account. According to a status page detailing the incident, within 25 minutes of receiving reports that hackers were stealing funds from user wallets, the IOTA Foundation shut down "Coordinator," a node in the IOTA network that puts the final seal of approval on any IOTA currency transactions.
  69.  
  70. The never-before-seen move was meant to prevent hackers from executing new thefts, but also had the side-effect of effectively shut down the entire IOTA cryptocurrency...
  71.  
  72. IOTA members said hackers used an exploit in "a third-party integration" of Trinity, a mobile and desktop wallet app developed by the IOTA Foundation. Based on current evidence, confirmed by the IOTA team, it is believed that hackers targeted at least 10 high-value IOTA accounts and used the Trinity exploit to steal funds.
  73.  
  74.  
  75. Sunday the team released "a safe version" of their Trinity Desktop "to allow users to check their balance and transactions. This version (1.4.0) removes the vulnerability announced on 12th February 2020..."
  76.  
  77. Their status page advised users to contact a member of the IOTA Foundation if their balance looks incorrect. "Please be aware that there are unfortunately active imposters posing as IOTA Foundation personnel on our Discord. Therefore it is important that you directly initiate contact with the IF or mod team yourself..."
  78. "The Coordinator remains down for now as we finalise our remediation plan. You will not be able to send value transactions."&lt;p&gt;&lt;div class="share_submission" style="position:relative;"&gt;
  79. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://twitter.com/home?status=IOTA+Cryptocurrency+Shut+Down+Its+Entire+Network+After+a+Wallet+Breach%3A+http%3A%2F%2Fbit.ly%2F37BjSAi"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/twitter_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  80. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://www.facebook.com/sharer.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Fnews.slashdot.org%2Fstory%2F20%2F02%2F17%2F018259%2Fiota-cryptocurrency-shut-down-its-entire-network-after-a-wallet-breach%3Futm_source%3Dslashdot%26utm_medium%3Dfacebook"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/facebook_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  81.  
  82.  
  83.  
  84. &lt;/div&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;a href="https://news.slashdot.org/story/20/02/17/018259/iota-cryptocurrency-shut-down-its-entire-network-after-a-wallet-breach?utm_source=rss1.0moreanon&amp;amp;utm_medium=feed"&gt;Read more of this story&lt;/a&gt; at Slashdot.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;iframe src="https://slashdot.org/slashdot-it.pl?op=discuss&amp;amp;id=15787702&amp;amp;smallembed=1" style="height: 300px; width: 100%; border: none;"&gt;&lt;/iframe&gt;&lt;img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~4/3x6fLh3fwMk" height="1" width="1" alt=""/&gt;</description>
  85.            <pubDate>Mon, 17 Feb 2020 01:34:00 +0100</pubDate>
  86.        </item>
  87.        <item>
  88.            <title>Iran Has Been Targeting VPN Servers to Plant Backdoors</title>
  89.            <link>https://it.slashdot.org/story/20/02/17/0023254/iran-has-been-targeting-vpn-servers-to-plant-backdoors?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&amp;utm_medium=feed</link>
  90.            <description>"A new report published today reveals that Iran's government-backed hacking units have made a top priority last year to exploit VPN bugs as soon as they became public in order to infiltrate and plant backdoors in companies all over the world," writes ZDNet:
  91.  
  92. According to a report from Israeli cyber-security firm ClearSky, Iranian hackers have targeted companies "from the IT, Telecommunication, Oil and Gas, Aviation, Government, and Security sectors." The report comes to dispel the notion that Iranian hackers are not sophisticated, and less talented than their Russian, Chinese, or North Korean counterparts. ClearSky says that "Iranian APT groups have developed good technical offensive capabilities and are able to exploit 1-day vulnerabilities in relatively short periods of time." [ATP stands for "advanced persistent threat" and is often used to describe nation-state backed cyberattackers.]
  93.  
  94. In some instances, ClearSky says it observed Iranian groups exploiting VPN flaws within hours after the bugs have been publicly disclosed...
  95. According to the ClearSky report, the purpose of these attacks is to breach enterprise networks, move laterally throughout their internal systems, and plant backdoors to exploit at a later date.&lt;p&gt;&lt;div class="share_submission" style="position:relative;"&gt;
  96. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://twitter.com/home?status=Iran+Has+Been+Targeting+VPN+Servers+to+Plant+Backdoors%3A+http%3A%2F%2Fbit.ly%2F2SNckoR"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/twitter_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  97. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://www.facebook.com/sharer.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Fit.slashdot.org%2Fstory%2F20%2F02%2F17%2F0023254%2Firan-has-been-targeting-vpn-servers-to-plant-backdoors%3Futm_source%3Dslashdot%26utm_medium%3Dfacebook"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/facebook_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  98.  
  99.  
  100.  
  101. &lt;/div&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;a href="https://it.slashdot.org/story/20/02/17/0023254/iran-has-been-targeting-vpn-servers-to-plant-backdoors?utm_source=rss1.0moreanon&amp;amp;utm_medium=feed"&gt;Read more of this story&lt;/a&gt; at Slashdot.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;iframe src="https://slashdot.org/slashdot-it.pl?op=discuss&amp;amp;id=15787650&amp;amp;smallembed=1" style="height: 300px; width: 100%; border: none;"&gt;&lt;/iframe&gt;&lt;img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~4/X09NAUp0cfo" height="1" width="1" alt=""/&gt;</description>
  102.            <pubDate>Sun, 16 Feb 2020 23:26:00 +0100</pubDate>
  103.        </item>
  104.        <item>
  105.            <title> NASA is Looking for New Astronauts</title>
  106.            <link>https://science.slashdot.org/story/20/02/16/230254/nasa-is-looking-for-new-astronauts?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&amp;utm_medium=feed</link>
  107.            <description>"With a renewed interest in sending humans back to the Moon and then eventually to Mars, NASA needs all the able-bodied space explorers it can get..." writes BGR.
  108. "The requirements are, well, pretty strict, but what else would you expect from a group that sends humans into space?"
  109.  
  110. Quoting NASA.gov:
  111. Since the 1960s, NASA has selected 350 people to train as astronaut candidates for its increasingly challenging missions to explore space. With 48 astronauts in the active astronaut corps, more will be needed to crew spacecraft bound for multiple destinations and propel exploration forward as part of Artemis missions and beyond...
  112.  
  113. The basic requirements to apply include United States citizenship and a master's degree in a STEM field, including engineering, biological science, physical science, computer science, or mathematics, from an accredited institution... Candidates also must have at least two years of related, progressively responsible professional experience, or at least 1,000 hours of pilot-in-command time in jet aircraft. Astronaut candidates must pass the NASA long-duration spaceflight physical... As part of the application process, applicants will, for the first time, be required to take an online assessment that will require up to two hours to complete...
  114.  
  115. After completing training, the new astronauts could launch on American rockets and spacecraft developed for NASA's Commercial Crew Program to live and work aboard the International Space Station, 250 miles above Earth, where they will take part in experiments that benefit life at home and prepare us for more distant exploration. They may also launch on NASA's powerful new Space Launch System rocket and Orion spacecraft, docking the spacecraft at the Gateway in lunar orbit before taking a new human landing system to the Moon's surface. After returning humans to the Moon in 2024, NASA plans to establish sustainable lunar exploration by 2028. Gaining new experiences on and around the Moon will prepare NASA to send the first humans to Mars in the mid-2030s.
  116. NASA expects to select the new class of astronaut candidates in mid-2021 to begin training as the next class of Artemis Generation astronauts.
  117.  
  118. "We're celebrating our 20th year of continuous presence aboard the International Space Station in low-Earth orbit this year..." NASA said in its statement.
  119. Applications will be accepted from March 2nd through March 31st.&lt;p&gt;&lt;div class="share_submission" style="position:relative;"&gt;
  120. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://twitter.com/home?status=+NASA+is+Looking+for+New+Astronauts%3A+http%3A%2F%2Fbit.ly%2F38z10Dh"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/twitter_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  121. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://www.facebook.com/sharer.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Fscience.slashdot.org%2Fstory%2F20%2F02%2F16%2F230254%2Fnasa-is-looking-for-new-astronauts%3Futm_source%3Dslashdot%26utm_medium%3Dfacebook"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/facebook_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  122.  
  123.  
  124.  
  125. &lt;/div&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;a href="https://science.slashdot.org/story/20/02/16/230254/nasa-is-looking-for-new-astronauts?utm_source=rss1.0moreanon&amp;amp;utm_medium=feed"&gt;Read more of this story&lt;/a&gt; at Slashdot.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;iframe src="https://slashdot.org/slashdot-it.pl?op=discuss&amp;amp;id=15787510&amp;amp;smallembed=1" style="height: 300px; width: 100%; border: none;"&gt;&lt;/iframe&gt;&lt;img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~4/2q9tKFc9nec" height="1" width="1" alt=""/&gt;</description>
  126.            <pubDate>Sun, 16 Feb 2020 22:03:00 +0100</pubDate>
  127.        </item>
  128.        <item>
  129.            <title>Alternative Browser 'Waterfox' Acquired By System1</title>
  130.            <link>https://tech.slashdot.org/story/20/02/16/2146256/alternative-browser-waterfox-acquired-by-system1?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&amp;utm_medium=feed</link>
  131.            <description>Waterfox is an open-source web browser for x64, ARM64, and PPC64LE systems, "intended to be speedy and ethical, and maintain support for legacy extensions dropped by Firefox, from which it is forked," according to Wikipedia. (Its tabs also still have angled sides with rounded corners.)
  132.  
  133. Friday Waterfox's original creator, 24-year-old Alexandros Kontos, announced that the browser "now has funding and a development team, so Waterfox can finally start to grow!" after its acquisition by a company called System1.
  134. I started Waterfox when I was 16. It was a way for me to understand how large software projects worked and the Mozilla documentation was a great introduction... I've touted Waterfox as an ethical and privacy friendly browser... I never wanted Waterfox to be a part of the hyper-privacy community. It would just feel like standards that would be impossible to uphold, especially for something such as a web browser on the internet. Throughout the years people have always asked about Waterfox and privacy, and if they've ever wanted more than it can afford, I've always pushed them to use Tor. Waterfox was here for customisations and speed, with a good level of privacy...
  135.  
  136. I wasn't doing anything with Waterfox except developing it and making some money via search. Why I kept going throughout the years, I'll never know... System1 has been to Waterfox a search syndication partner. Essentially a way to have a search engine partnership (such as Bing) is through them, because companies such as Microsoft are too big and too busy to talk to small players such as Waterfox... It's probably the one easy way a browser can make money without doing anything dodgy, and it's a way I've been happy to do it without having to compromise Waterfox (and will be the same way System1 makes money from Waterfox -- nothing else). People also don't seem to understand what System1 does...
  137.  
  138. "Now I can finally focus on making Waterfox into a viable alternative to the big browsers," Kontos concludes.
  139.  
  140. Long-time Slashdot reader Freshly Exhumed contextualized the news with this brief history of the alternate browser ecosystem: As the usage share of web browsers continues to show a lopsideded dominance by Google Chrome, many previously-independent browsers have fallen by the wayside or have been reinvented as Chrome variants (i.e. Opera, Edge, Brave). Apple forges on with its Safari browser while other, smaller projects tend to be quite limited for multi-platform users, such as Dolphin and Bromite.
  141.  
  142. Mozilla continues independently with Firefox for almost every platform, while variants such as Pale Moon and Sea Monkey have attempted to provide products that avoid drastic and/or controversial changes made by Mozilla but sometimes do not match the multi-platform support of Firefox. Let us not forget Tor, the Firefox-based anonymity-focused browser.
  143.  
  144. Alex Kontos is a developer who attempted to provide continuity with dropped Firefox capabilities in his multi-platform Waterfox browser, proudly declaring that Firefox's user data sharing and telemetry collection was not included. For that privacy focus a certain popularity of Waterfox occurred. Now Kontos has revealed that his Waterfox project has been sold to System1, a company describing itself as "a consumer internet and applications company with the most powerful audience expansion platform in the industry."
  145. &lt;p&gt;&lt;div class="share_submission" style="position:relative;"&gt;
  146. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://twitter.com/home?status=Alternative+Browser+'Waterfox'+Acquired+By+System1%3A+http%3A%2F%2Fbit.ly%2F2SyoPWr"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/twitter_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  147. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://www.facebook.com/sharer.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Ftech.slashdot.org%2Fstory%2F20%2F02%2F16%2F2146256%2Falternative-browser-waterfox-acquired-by-system1%3Futm_source%3Dslashdot%26utm_medium%3Dfacebook"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/facebook_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  148.  
  149.  
  150.  
  151. &lt;/div&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;a href="https://tech.slashdot.org/story/20/02/16/2146256/alternative-browser-waterfox-acquired-by-system1?utm_source=rss1.0moreanon&amp;amp;utm_medium=feed"&gt;Read more of this story&lt;/a&gt; at Slashdot.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;iframe src="https://slashdot.org/slashdot-it.pl?op=discuss&amp;amp;id=15787342&amp;amp;smallembed=1" style="height: 300px; width: 100%; border: none;"&gt;&lt;/iframe&gt;&lt;img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~4/QwRBlPjbXCo" height="1" width="1" alt=""/&gt;</description>
  152.            <pubDate>Sun, 16 Feb 2020 20:54:00 +0100</pubDate>
  153.        </item>
  154.        <item>
  155.            <title>Dark Mode vs. Light Mode: Which Is Better?</title>
  156.            <link>https://hardware.slashdot.org/story/20/02/16/2041240/dark-mode-vs-light-mode-which-is-better?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&amp;utm_medium=feed</link>
  157.            <description>Recently a well-respected UI consulting firm (the Nielsen Norman Group) published their analysis of academic studies on the question of whether Dark Mode or Light Mode was better for reading?
  158.  
  159.  
  160. Cosima Piepenbrock and her colleagues at the Institut f&amp;uuml;r Experimentelle Psychologie in D&amp;uuml;sseldorf, Germany studied two groups of adults with normal (or corrected-to-normal) vision: young adults (18 to 33 years old) and older adults (60 to 85 years old). None of the participants suffered from any eye diseases (e.g., cataract)... Their results showed that light mode won across all dimensions: irrespective of age, the positive contrast polarity was better for both visual-acuity tasks and for proofreading tasks...
  161.  
  162. Another study, published in the journal Human Factors by the same research group, looked at how text size interacts with contrast polarity in a proofreading task. It found that the positive-polarity advantage increased linearly as the font size was decreased: namely, the smaller the font, the better it is for users to see the text in light mode. Interestingly, even though their performance was better in the light mode, participants in the study did not report any difference in their perception of text readability (e.g., their ability to focus on text) in light versus dark mode &amp;mdash; which only reinforces the first rule of usability: don't listen to users...
  163.  
  164. While dark mode may present some advantages for some low-vision users &amp;mdash; in particular, those with cloudy ocular media such as cataract, the research evidence points in the direction of an advantage of positive polarity for normal-vision users. In other words, in users with normal vision, light mode leads to better performance most of the time... These findings are best explained by the fact that, with positive contrast polarity, there is more overall light and so the pupil contracts more. As a result, there are fewer spherical aberrations, greater depth of field, and overall better ability to focus on details without tiring the eyes...
  165. That being said, we strongly recommend that designers allow users to switch to dark mode if they want to &amp;mdash; for three reasons: (1) there may be long-term effects associated with light mode; (2) some people with visual impairments will do better with dark mode; and (3) some users simply like dark mode better.
  166. The long-term effects associated with light mode come from an "intriguing" 2018 study they found which argued that reading white text from a black screen or tablet "may be a way to inhibit myopia, while conventional black text on white background may stimulate myopia..."
  167.  
  168. The researchers wrote that myopia "is tightly linked to the educational status and is on the rise worldwide."&lt;p&gt;&lt;div class="share_submission" style="position:relative;"&gt;
  169. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://twitter.com/home?status=Dark+Mode+vs.+Light+Mode%3A+Which+Is+Better%3F%3A+http%3A%2F%2Fbit.ly%2F2V7rU1t"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/twitter_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  170. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://www.facebook.com/sharer.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Fhardware.slashdot.org%2Fstory%2F20%2F02%2F16%2F2041240%2Fdark-mode-vs-light-mode-which-is-better%3Futm_source%3Dslashdot%26utm_medium%3Dfacebook"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/facebook_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  171.  
  172.  
  173.  
  174. &lt;/div&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;a href="https://hardware.slashdot.org/story/20/02/16/2041240/dark-mode-vs-light-mode-which-is-better?utm_source=rss1.0moreanon&amp;amp;utm_medium=feed"&gt;Read more of this story&lt;/a&gt; at Slashdot.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;iframe src="https://slashdot.org/slashdot-it.pl?op=discuss&amp;amp;id=15787216&amp;amp;smallembed=1" style="height: 300px; width: 100%; border: none;"&gt;&lt;/iframe&gt;&lt;img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~4/iV2lloBkJSY" height="1" width="1" alt=""/&gt;</description>
  175.            <pubDate>Sun, 16 Feb 2020 19:48:00 +0100</pubDate>
  176.        </item>
  177.        <item>
  178.            <title>Google Chrome Will Soon Start Blocking Insecure Downloads</title>
  179.            <link>https://tech.slashdot.org/story/20/02/16/1926231/google-chrome-will-soon-start-blocking-insecure-downloads?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&amp;utm_medium=feed</link>
  180.            <description>"Google has revealed plans to initially warn Chrome users about 'insecure' downloads and eventually block them outright," reports The Verge.
  181. The warnings will begin in April:
  182. "Today we're announcing that Chrome will gradually ensure that secure (HTTPS) pages only download secure files," Joe DeBlasio of the Chrome security team wrote in a blog post. "Insecurely-downloaded files are a risk to users' security and privacy. For instance, insecurely-downloaded programs can be swapped out for malware by attackers, and eavesdroppers can read users' insecurely-downloaded bank statements."
  183.  
  184. Beginning with Chrome 82, due for release in April, Chrome will warn users if they're about to download mixed content executables from a secure website. Then, when version 83 is released, those executable downloads will be blocked and the warning will be applied to archive files. PDFs and .doc files will get the warning in Chrome 84, with audio, images, text, and video files displaying it by version 85. Finally, all mixed content downloads &amp;mdash; a non-secure file coming from a secure site &amp;mdash; will be blocked as of the release of Chrome 86. Right now, Google is estimating an October release for that build of the popular web browsing.&lt;p&gt;&lt;div class="share_submission" style="position:relative;"&gt;
  185. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://twitter.com/home?status=Google+Chrome+Will+Soon+Start+Blocking+Insecure+Downloads%3A+http%3A%2F%2Fbit.ly%2F3bIB9ec"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/twitter_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  186. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://www.facebook.com/sharer.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Ftech.slashdot.org%2Fstory%2F20%2F02%2F16%2F1926231%2Fgoogle-chrome-will-soon-start-blocking-insecure-downloads%3Futm_source%3Dslashdot%26utm_medium%3Dfacebook"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/facebook_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  187.  
  188.  
  189.  
  190. &lt;/div&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;a href="https://tech.slashdot.org/story/20/02/16/1926231/google-chrome-will-soon-start-blocking-insecure-downloads?utm_source=rss1.0moreanon&amp;amp;utm_medium=feed"&gt;Read more of this story&lt;/a&gt; at Slashdot.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;iframe src="https://slashdot.org/slashdot-it.pl?op=discuss&amp;amp;id=15787056&amp;amp;smallembed=1" style="height: 300px; width: 100%; border: none;"&gt;&lt;/iframe&gt;&lt;img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~4/bYq9Q1lMieA" height="1" width="1" alt=""/&gt;</description>
  191.            <pubDate>Sun, 16 Feb 2020 18:47:00 +0100</pubDate>
  192.        </item>
  193.        <item>
  194.            <title>Do We Need To Talk About 'Cloud Neutrality'?</title>
  195.            <link>https://tech.slashdot.org/story/20/02/16/1847204/do-we-need-to-talk-about-cloud-neutrality?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&amp;utm_medium=feed</link>
  196.            <description>"A multibillion-dollar, privately-owned infrastructure is now essential to the modern internet economy," writes Wired. And if you care about net neutrality, "That should freak you out."
  197.  
  198. [T]here's an even bigger issue brewing, and it's time to start talking about it: cloud neutrality. "While its name sounds soft and fluffy," Microsoft president and general counsel Brad Smith and coauthor Carol Ann Browne write in their recent book, Tools and Weapons: The Promise and the Peril of the Digital Age, "in truth the cloud is a fortress...." Each data center costs hundreds of millions of dollars to build and many millions more to maintain; and you pretty much can't build a successful new company without them. So, thank goodness for Microsoft, right?
  199.  
  200. The book means to portray this might and power as both a source of wonder and an enabling feature of the modern economy. To me, it reads like a threat. The cloud economy exists at the pleasure, and continued profit, of a handful of companies. The internet is no longer the essential enabler of the tech economy. That title now belongs to the cloud. But the infrastructure of the internet, at least, was publicly financed and subsidized. The government can set rules about how companies have to interact with their customers. Whether and how it sets and enforces those rules isn't the point, for now. It can.
  201.  
  202. That's not the case with the cloud. This infrastructure is solely owned by a handful of companies with hardly any oversight. [Besides Microsoft, the article also notes Google and Amazon.] The potential for abuse is huge, whether it's through trade-secret snooping or the outright blocking, slowing, or hampering of transmission. No one seems to be thinking about what could happen if these behemoths decide it's against their interests to have all these barnacles on their flanks.
  203. They should be.
  204.  
  205. Cloud companies "are essentially incubating and hosting their competition..." the article points out.
  206.  
  207. "The problem is that few have the resources to replicate the cloud infrastructure, should the landlords suddenly turn on their tenants."&lt;p&gt;&lt;div class="share_submission" style="position:relative;"&gt;
  208. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://twitter.com/home?status=Do+We+Need+To+Talk+About+'Cloud+Neutrality'%3F%3A+http%3A%2F%2Fbit.ly%2F2SOC0Bh"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/twitter_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  209. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://www.facebook.com/sharer.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Ftech.slashdot.org%2Fstory%2F20%2F02%2F16%2F1847204%2Fdo-we-need-to-talk-about-cloud-neutrality%3Futm_source%3Dslashdot%26utm_medium%3Dfacebook"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/facebook_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  210.  
  211.  
  212.  
  213. &lt;/div&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;a href="https://tech.slashdot.org/story/20/02/16/1847204/do-we-need-to-talk-about-cloud-neutrality?utm_source=rss1.0moreanon&amp;amp;utm_medium=feed"&gt;Read more of this story&lt;/a&gt; at Slashdot.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;iframe src="https://slashdot.org/slashdot-it.pl?op=discuss&amp;amp;id=15786944&amp;amp;smallembed=1" style="height: 300px; width: 100%; border: none;"&gt;&lt;/iframe&gt;&lt;img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~4/_khEE_yuA9c" height="1" width="1" alt=""/&gt;</description>
  214.            <pubDate>Sun, 16 Feb 2020 17:49:00 +0100</pubDate>
  215.        </item>
  216.        <item>
  217.            <title>OpenPower Foundation Releases a Friendly EULA For IBM's Power ISA RISC</title>
  218.            <link>https://news.slashdot.org/story/20/02/16/1743222/openpower-foundation-releases-a-friendly-eula-for-ibms-power-isa-risc?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&amp;utm_medium=feed</link>
  219.            <description>Long-time Slashdot reader lkcl writes: Michael Larabel, of Phoronix, writes that the OpenPower Foundation has released a license agreement for Hardware Vendors to implement the Power ISA RISC instruction set in their processors. Hugh Blemings, the Director of OpenPower, was responsible for ensuring that the EULA is favourable and friendly towards Libre and Open Hardware projects and businesses. Of particular interest is that IBM's massive patent portfolio is automatically granted, royalty-free as long as two conditions apply: firstly, the hardware must be fully and properly Power ISA compliant, and secondly, the implementor must not "try it on" as a patent troll. Innovation in the RISC space just got a little more interesting.
  220.  
  221. "Amidst the fully free and open RISC-V ISA making headway into the computing market, and ARM feeling pressured to loosen up its licensing, it seems they figured that it's best to join the party early," argues Hackaday.&lt;p&gt;&lt;div class="share_submission" style="position:relative;"&gt;
  222. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://twitter.com/home?status=OpenPower+Foundation+Releases+a+Friendly+EULA+For+IBM's+Power+ISA+RISC%3A+http%3A%2F%2Fbit.ly%2F2HtpKB5"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/twitter_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  223. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://www.facebook.com/sharer.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Fnews.slashdot.org%2Fstory%2F20%2F02%2F16%2F1743222%2Fopenpower-foundation-releases-a-friendly-eula-for-ibms-power-isa-risc%3Futm_source%3Dslashdot%26utm_medium%3Dfacebook"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/facebook_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  224.  
  225.  
  226.  
  227. &lt;/div&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;a href="https://news.slashdot.org/story/20/02/16/1743222/openpower-foundation-releases-a-friendly-eula-for-ibms-power-isa-risc?utm_source=rss1.0moreanon&amp;amp;utm_medium=feed"&gt;Read more of this story&lt;/a&gt; at Slashdot.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;iframe src="https://slashdot.org/slashdot-it.pl?op=discuss&amp;amp;id=15786764&amp;amp;smallembed=1" style="height: 300px; width: 100%; border: none;"&gt;&lt;/iframe&gt;&lt;img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~4/dL7IKbZ9r4Q" height="1" width="1" alt=""/&gt;</description>
  228.            <pubDate>Sun, 16 Feb 2020 16:48:00 +0100</pubDate>
  229.        </item>
  230.        <item>
  231.            <title>The Gig Workers For Target's Delivery App Hate Their Algorithmically-Determined Pay</title>
  232.            <link>https://slashdot.org/story/20/02/16/0541248/the-gig-workers-for-targets-delivery-app-hate-their-algorithmically-determined-pay?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&amp;utm_medium=feed</link>
  233.            <description>In 2017 Target bought a same-day home-delivery company called Shipt for $550 million. Shipt now services half of Target's stores, reports Motherboard, and employs more than 100,000 gig workers.
  234. Unfortunately, they're working for a company that "has a track record of censoring and retaliating against workers for asking basic questions about their working conditions or expressing dissent," reports Motherboard. For example, an hour after tweeting about how there was now much more competition for assignments, one Seattle gig worker found their account suddenly "deactivated" &amp;mdash; the equivalent of being fired &amp;mdash; and also received an email saying they were no longer "eligible to reapply".
  235. "They stamp out resistance by flooding the market with new workers..." complained one Shipt worker, "and they're actively monitoring all the social media groups."
  236. On its official national Facebook group, known as the Shipt Shopper Lounge, which has more than 100,000 members, Shipt moderators selected by the company frequently censor and remove posts, turn off comments sections, and ban workers who speak out about their working conditions, according to screenshots, interviews, and other documentation provided to Motherboard. The same is true on local Facebook groups, which Shipt also monitors closely, according to workers. Motherboard spoke to seven current Shipt workers, each of whom described a culture of retaliation, fear, and censorship online...
  237.  
  238. Because Shipt classifies its workers as contractors, not employees, workers pay for all of their expenses &amp;mdash; including gas, wear and tear on their cars, and accidents &amp;mdash; out of pocket. They say the tips on large orders from Target, sometimes with hundreds of items, can be meager. Workers say Shipt customers often live in gated and upscale communities and that the app encourages workers to tack on gifts like thank you cards, hot cocoa, flowers, and balloons onto orders (paid for out of their own pocket) and to offer to walk customer's dogs and take out their trash, as a courtesy. Shipt calls this kind of service "Bringing the Magic," which can improve workers' ratings from customers that factor into the algorithm that determines who gets offered the most lucrative orders...
  239. Unfortunately, that new algorithm (which began rolling out last year) is opaque to the workers affected by it &amp;mdash; though Gizmodo reported pay appears to be at least 28% lower. And Motherboard heard even higher estimates:
  240. "Our best estimate is that payouts are now 30 percent less, and up to 50 percent on orders," one Shipt worker in Kalamazoo with two years under her belt, who wished to remain anonymous for fear of retaliation, told Motherboard. "I fluctuate between extreme anger and despair. It's been three weeks since this has been implemented, and one of my good friends told me that she's down the equivalent of a car payment."
  241. Another Shipt worker in Palm Springs, California provided Motherboard with receipts for a 181-item order that included six Snapple cases, five La Croix cases, and 12 packs of soda. They had to wheel three shopping carts out of a Ralph's grocery store and deliver them -- and earned $12.68 for the job. The customer did not tip. (Under the older, more transparent pay model, they would have earned $44.19.) "That's a real slap in the face," they told Motherboard.
  242. &lt;p&gt;&lt;div class="share_submission" style="position:relative;"&gt;
  243. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://twitter.com/home?status=The+Gig+Workers+For+Target's+Delivery+App+Hate+Their+Algorithmically-Determined+Pay%3A+http%3A%2F%2Fbit.ly%2F2SAfOw5"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/twitter_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  244. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://www.facebook.com/sharer.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Fslashdot.org%2Fstory%2F20%2F02%2F16%2F0541248%2Fthe-gig-workers-for-targets-delivery-app-hate-their-algorithmically-determined-pay%3Futm_source%3Dslashdot%26utm_medium%3Dfacebook"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/facebook_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  245.  
  246.  
  247.  
  248. &lt;/div&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;a href="https://slashdot.org/story/20/02/16/0541248/the-gig-workers-for-targets-delivery-app-hate-their-algorithmically-determined-pay?utm_source=rss1.0moreanon&amp;amp;utm_medium=feed"&gt;Read more of this story&lt;/a&gt; at Slashdot.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;iframe src="https://slashdot.org/slashdot-it.pl?op=discuss&amp;amp;id=15785058&amp;amp;smallembed=1" style="height: 300px; width: 100%; border: none;"&gt;&lt;/iframe&gt;&lt;img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~4/K2aher65X8g" height="1" width="1" alt=""/&gt;</description>
  249.            <pubDate>Sun, 16 Feb 2020 15:34:00 +0100</pubDate>
  250.        </item>
  251.        <item>
  252.            <title>Firefox, Wordpress Move to Support Lazy Loading of Images and iFrames</title>
  253.            <link>https://news.slashdot.org/story/20/02/16/0229240/firefox-wordpress-move-to-support-lazy-loading-of-images-and-iframes?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&amp;utm_medium=feed</link>
  254.            <description>"Lazy Loading" would augment HTML's &amp;lt;img&amp;gt; tag (and &amp;lt;iframe&amp;gt; tag) with two new attributes -- "eager" (to load immediately) and "lazy" (to load only when it becomes relevant in the viewport).
  255.  
  256. Felix Arntz, a developer programs engineer at Google (and a WordPress core committer) notes the updates in the HTML specification for the lazy loading attributes, adding that it's "already supported by several browsers, including Chrome and Edge" and also the Android browser and Opera.
  257.  
  258. And lazy loading can now also be toggled on for Firefox 75 Nightly users, reports Neowin, though it's disabled by default:
  259. It's not clear if it will be enabled by the time Firefox 75 reaches the stable branch but according to comments on the Bugzilla thread, it's in high demand. Previously, websites could employ lazy loading by using JavaScript but now lazy loading syntax is supported directly in the web browser.
  260. The implementation in Firefox comes after Google added the feature to its browser.
  261. Google's Arntz has also written a post describing a proposal to begin lazy-loading images by default in Wordpress.
  262. The proposed solution is available as a feature plugin WP Lazy Loading in the plugin repository. The plugin is being developed on GitHub. Your testing and feedback will be much appreciated.&lt;p&gt;&lt;div class="share_submission" style="position:relative;"&gt;
  263. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://twitter.com/home?status=Firefox%2C+Wordpress+Move+to+Support+Lazy+Loading+of+Images+and+iFrames%3A+http%3A%2F%2Fbit.ly%2F37tliwF"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/twitter_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  264. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://www.facebook.com/sharer.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Fnews.slashdot.org%2Fstory%2F20%2F02%2F16%2F0229240%2Ffirefox-wordpress-move-to-support-lazy-loading-of-images-and-iframes%3Futm_source%3Dslashdot%26utm_medium%3Dfacebook"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/facebook_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  265.  
  266.  
  267.  
  268. &lt;/div&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;a href="https://news.slashdot.org/story/20/02/16/0229240/firefox-wordpress-move-to-support-lazy-loading-of-images-and-iframes?utm_source=rss1.0moreanon&amp;amp;utm_medium=feed"&gt;Read more of this story&lt;/a&gt; at Slashdot.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;iframe src="https://slashdot.org/slashdot-it.pl?op=discuss&amp;amp;id=15784694&amp;amp;smallembed=1" style="height: 300px; width: 100%; border: none;"&gt;&lt;/iframe&gt;&lt;img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~4/MWmo1eIABGE" height="1" width="1" alt=""/&gt;</description>
  269.            <pubDate>Sun, 16 Feb 2020 14:34:00 +0100</pubDate>
  270.        </item>
  271.        <item>
  272.            <title>Watch Out: This Verizon Smishing Scam Is Crazy Realistic</title>
  273.            <link>https://yro.slashdot.org/story/20/02/15/2026244/watch-out-this-verizon-smishing-scam-is-crazy-realistic?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&amp;utm_medium=feed</link>
  274.            <description>Slashdot reader Iwastheone shared a warning from the editor-in-chief at How-To Geek about a "shockingly convincing" scam:
  275. The scam text message says, "Your Verizon account security needs validation" and invites you to tap a link to "validate your account." Once you do, you end up at a phishing website that looks almost exactly like Verizon's real website. The fake website asks for your My Verizon mobile number or user ID and password. After you provide those, it'll ask for your account PIN. Finally, it requests all your personal details to "identify yourself."
  276.  
  277.  
  278. For smishing scams, this is convincing work. The website looks real and authentic &amp;mdash; if you don't look too hard at the address, which isn't actually Verizon's actual website... At the end of the process, the phishing website thanks you for providing your information and "redirects you to the home page." For maximum deception, the phishing website actually redirects you to Verizon's real website at the end of the process. If you don't look too close, you might be deceived into thinking you were on Verizon's website the whole time.
  279.  
  280.  
  281. What's the game? We didn't provide real Verizon account details, so we can't say for sure. The scammer will probably try to take over your Verizon account, order smartphones on credit, and stick you with the bill.&lt;p&gt;&lt;div class="share_submission" style="position:relative;"&gt;
  282. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://twitter.com/home?status=Watch+Out%3A+This+Verizon+Smishing+Scam+Is+Crazy+Realistic%3A+http%3A%2F%2Fbit.ly%2F2vxafoZ"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/twitter_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  283. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://www.facebook.com/sharer.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Fyro.slashdot.org%2Fstory%2F20%2F02%2F15%2F2026244%2Fwatch-out-this-verizon-smishing-scam-is-crazy-realistic%3Futm_source%3Dslashdot%26utm_medium%3Dfacebook"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/facebook_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  284.  
  285.  
  286.  
  287. &lt;/div&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;a href="https://yro.slashdot.org/story/20/02/15/2026244/watch-out-this-verizon-smishing-scam-is-crazy-realistic?utm_source=rss1.0moreanon&amp;amp;utm_medium=feed"&gt;Read more of this story&lt;/a&gt; at Slashdot.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;iframe src="https://slashdot.org/slashdot-it.pl?op=discuss&amp;amp;id=15784116&amp;amp;smallembed=1" style="height: 300px; width: 100%; border: none;"&gt;&lt;/iframe&gt;&lt;img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~4/K4q0ZHcEU5I" height="1" width="1" alt=""/&gt;</description>
  288.            <pubDate>Sun, 16 Feb 2020 13:34:00 +0100</pubDate>
  289.        </item>
  290.        <item>
  291.            <title>What America's NSA Thinks of Python</title>
  292.            <link>https://developers.slashdot.org/story/20/02/16/0149240/what-americas-nsa-thinks-of-python?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&amp;utm_medium=feed</link>
  293.            <description>"Now budding Python developers can read up on the National Security Agency's own Python training materials," reports ZDNet:
  294. Software engineer Chris Swenson filed a Freedom of Information Act request with the NSA for access to its Python training materials and received a lightly redacted 400-page printout of the agency's COMP 3321 Python training course. Swenson has since scanned the documents, ran OCR on the text to make it searchable, and hosted it on Digital Oceans Spaces. The material has also been uploaded to the Internet Archive...
  295.  
  296. "If you don't know any programming languages yet, Python is a good place to start. If you already know a different language, it's easy to pick Python on the side. Python isn't entirely free of frustration and confusion, but hopefully you can avoid those parts until long after you get some good use out of Python," writes the NSA...
  297.  
  298. Swenson told ZDNet that it was "mostly just curiosity" that motivated him to ask the NSA about its Python training material. He also said the NSA had excluded some course material, but that he'll keep trying to get more from the agency... Python developer Kushal Das has pulled out some interesting details from the material. He found that the NSA has an internal Python package index, that its GitLab instance is gitlab.coi.nsa.ic.gov, and that it has a Jupyter gallery that runs over HTTPS. NSA also offers git installation instructions for CentOS, Red Hat Enterprise Linux, Ubuntu, and Windows, but not Debian.&lt;p&gt;&lt;div class="share_submission" style="position:relative;"&gt;
  299. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://twitter.com/home?status=What+America's+NSA+Thinks+of+Python%3A+http%3A%2F%2Fbit.ly%2F39EULy6"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/twitter_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  300. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://www.facebook.com/sharer.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Fdevelopers.slashdot.org%2Fstory%2F20%2F02%2F16%2F0149240%2Fwhat-americas-nsa-thinks-of-python%3Futm_source%3Dslashdot%26utm_medium%3Dfacebook"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/facebook_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  301.  
  302.  
  303.  
  304. &lt;/div&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;a href="https://developers.slashdot.org/story/20/02/16/0149240/what-americas-nsa-thinks-of-python?utm_source=rss1.0moreanon&amp;amp;utm_medium=feed"&gt;Read more of this story&lt;/a&gt; at Slashdot.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;iframe src="https://slashdot.org/slashdot-it.pl?op=discuss&amp;amp;id=15784606&amp;amp;smallembed=1" style="height: 300px; width: 100%; border: none;"&gt;&lt;/iframe&gt;&lt;img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~4/1n9-0yi55FQ" height="1" width="1" alt=""/&gt;</description>
  305.            <pubDate>Sun, 16 Feb 2020 11:34:00 +0100</pubDate>
  306.        </item>
  307.        <item>
  308.            <title>Police Say Amazon's Ring Isn't Much of a Crime Fighter</title>
  309.            <link>https://yro.slashdot.org/story/20/02/16/0634243/police-say-amazons-ring-isnt-much-of-a-crime-fighter?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&amp;utm_medium=feed</link>
  310.            <description>Ring's promotional video includes the police chief of the small Florida suburb of Winter Park saying "we understand the value of those cameras in helping us solve crimes." But over the last 22 months, their partnership with Ring hasn't actually led to a single arrest, reports NBC News.
  311.  
  312. The only crime it solved was a 13-year-old boy who opened two delivered packages, decided he didn't like what was inside, and rode away on his bike. "Eventually the boy was sent to a state diversion program for first-time offenders in lieu of being formally charged in court."
  313.  
  314.  
  315. Ring promises to "make neighborhoods safer" by deterring and helping to solve crimes, citing its own research that says an installation of its doorbell cameras reduces burglaries by more than 50 percent. But an NBC News Investigation has found -- after interviews with 40 law enforcement agencies in eight states that have partnered with Ring for at least three months -- that there is little concrete evidence to support the claim. Three agencies said the ease with which the public can share Ring videos means officers spend time reviewing clips of non-criminal issues such as racoons and petty disagreements between neighbors. Others noted that the flood of footage generated by Ring cameras rarely led to positive identifications of suspects, let alone arrests.
  316.  
  317. Thirteen of the 40 jurisdictions reached, including Winter Park, said they had made zero arrests as a result of Ring footage. Thirteen were able to confirm arrests made after reviewing Ring footage, while two offered estimates. The rest, including large cities like Phoenix, Miami, and Kansas City, Missouri, said that they don't know how many arrests had been made as a result of their relationship with Ring -- and therefore could not evaluate its effectiveness -- even though they had been working with the company for well over a year... None of the departments said they collect data to measure the impact of their Ring partnership in terms of reducing or deterring crimes, nor did they consistently record when Ring footage was helpful in identifying or arresting a suspect...
  318.  
  319. "There's a deafening lack of evidence that any city has been made safer," Liz O'Sullivan, the technology director of the Surveillance Technology Oversight Project, a nonprofit that fights excessive local and state-level surveillance, told NBC News. The lack of evidence that Ring reduces crime adds to a list of concerns that have plagued the company in recent months, ranging from bad security practices to privacy questions surrounding the company's plans to incorporate facial recognition, among other biometric characteristics.
  320.  
  321. NBC News also spoke to Ben Stickle, a professor of criminal justice at Middle Tennessee State University (and a former police officer) who published an academic study analyzing the effectiveness of Ring cameras as a deterrent. "If you expect the camera to deter people, you're assuming that they see it and that they care. Those are two big assumptions."
  322.  
  323. Ring's claim that its doorbell cameras reduce crime seem to be based on a 2015 report by a police captain in Los Angeles' wealthy Wilshire Park neighborhood of a 55% drop in burglaries after Ring cameras were installed on 10% of the doors. But in an overlooked follow-up, MIT's Technology Review reported that in 2017, Wilshire Park "suffered more burglaries than in any of the previous seven years."&lt;p&gt;&lt;div class="share_submission" style="position:relative;"&gt;
  324. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://twitter.com/home?status=Police+Say+Amazon's+Ring+Isn't+Much+of+a+Crime+Fighter%3A+http%3A%2F%2Fbit.ly%2F2UVM4eo"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/twitter_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  325. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://www.facebook.com/sharer.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Fyro.slashdot.org%2Fstory%2F20%2F02%2F16%2F0634243%2Fpolice-say-amazons-ring-isnt-much-of-a-crime-fighter%3Futm_source%3Dslashdot%26utm_medium%3Dfacebook"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/facebook_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  326.  
  327.  
  328.  
  329. &lt;/div&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;a href="https://yro.slashdot.org/story/20/02/16/0634243/police-say-amazons-ring-isnt-much-of-a-crime-fighter?utm_source=rss1.0moreanon&amp;amp;utm_medium=feed"&gt;Read more of this story&lt;/a&gt; at Slashdot.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;iframe src="https://slashdot.org/slashdot-it.pl?op=discuss&amp;amp;id=15785226&amp;amp;smallembed=1" style="height: 300px; width: 100%; border: none;"&gt;&lt;/iframe&gt;&lt;img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~4/W_J9SP88JWA" height="1" width="1" alt=""/&gt;</description>
  330.            <pubDate>Sun, 16 Feb 2020 07:34:00 +0100</pubDate>
  331.        </item>
  332.        <item>
  333.            <title>Free Coding Bootcamp 'Lambda' Tries Selling Its Income-Sharing Agreements -- In Bundles</title>
  334.            <link>https://news.slashdot.org/story/20/02/16/0420217/free-coding-bootcamp-lambda-tries-selling-its-income-sharing-agreements----in-bundles?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&amp;utm_medium=feed</link>
  335.            <description>An anonymous reader quotes the Verge:
  336. In December, online coding bootcamp Lambda School quietly partnered with Edly, a digital marketplace that helps schools sell income-sharing agreements (ISAs) to accredited investors. The arrangement allows Lambda to receive money from the ISAs upfront, rather than waiting for students to find jobs. But it also flies in the face of the values Lambda typically espouses: namely, that ISAs align its incentives with the goals and aspirations of the students...
  337.  
  338. Lambda's ISAs promise an alternative to traditional student loans by allowing students to defer tuition until they've landed a job that pays $50,000 a year or more. When that happens, they hand over 17 percent of their income until the $30,000 tuition is paid off. If students don't find work within five years of completing the program, the ISA is automatically dissolved. It's a business model that allows Lambda to brag about investing in students &amp;mdash; which, in many ways, it still does. The school provides living stipends and even housing to some students who need it. But reselling ISAs muddies the narrative a bit since Lambda can make money long before students find jobs...
  339. Shortly after the arrangement was called out on Twitter, following a report by The Verge about some students' disappointment with the curriculum, Edly began taking down pages that referenced the Lambda partnership. Edly did not immediately respond to a request for comment about why these pages were taken down, and Lambda declined to comment on the nature of the partnership at all.
  340.  
  341. "I wonder why Lambda isn't so keen on seeing discussions about how students are being packed into the same kind of CDOs that brought us the financial crisis," tweeted David Heinemeier Hansson, the creator of Ruby on Rails, who's been tweeting screenshots of Edly's past statements about their ambitions as well as links to Google's cache of Edly's pitches to investors.
  342.  
  343. Last year Wired reported that nearly half of Lambda's ISAs had at least partly been sold off to investors. They also note that in January of 2019, Lambda "received $30 million from investors including Google Ventures, Y Combinator, and Ashton Kutcher."&lt;p&gt;&lt;div class="share_submission" style="position:relative;"&gt;
  344. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://twitter.com/home?status=Free+Coding+Bootcamp+'Lambda'+Tries+Selling+Its+Income-Sharing+Agreements+--+In+Bundles%3A+http%3A%2F%2Fbit.ly%2F2SwqQCh"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/twitter_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  345. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://www.facebook.com/sharer.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Fnews.slashdot.org%2Fstory%2F20%2F02%2F16%2F0420217%2Ffree-coding-bootcamp-lambda-tries-selling-its-income-sharing-agreements----in-bundles%3Futm_source%3Dslashdot%26utm_medium%3Dfacebook"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/facebook_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  346.  
  347.  
  348.  
  349. &lt;/div&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;a href="https://news.slashdot.org/story/20/02/16/0420217/free-coding-bootcamp-lambda-tries-selling-its-income-sharing-agreements----in-bundles?utm_source=rss1.0moreanon&amp;amp;utm_medium=feed"&gt;Read more of this story&lt;/a&gt; at Slashdot.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;iframe src="https://slashdot.org/slashdot-it.pl?op=discuss&amp;amp;id=15784902&amp;amp;smallembed=1" style="height: 300px; width: 100%; border: none;"&gt;&lt;/iframe&gt;&lt;img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~4/cogwrmTESjA" height="1" width="1" alt=""/&gt;</description>
  350.            <pubDate>Sun, 16 Feb 2020 04:34:00 +0100</pubDate>
  351.        </item>
  352.        <item>
  353.            <title>China Quarantines Cash to Sanitize Old Bank Notes From Coronavirus </title>
  354.            <link>https://news.slashdot.org/story/20/02/16/0130240/china-quarantines-cash-to-sanitize-old-bank-notes-from-coronavirus?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&amp;utm_medium=feed</link>
  355.            <description>Today China announced it was taking unusual new steps to help stop the spread of the coronavirus. It's blocking the transfer of old bank notes between provinces and cities affected by the outbreak, according to the deputy governor of the People's Bank of China &amp;mdash; and that's just the beginning.
  356. Bloomberg reports:
  357. The central bank also ramped up measures to sanitize old money to reduce contagion risks and added 600 billion yuan ($85.9 billion) of new cash for Hubei, the epicenter of the coronavirus, he said.
  358.  
  359. "Money from key virus-hit areas will be sanitized with ultraviolet rays or heated and locked up for at least 14 days, before it is distributed again," Fan said at a press conference on Saturday. Money circulated in less riskier areas is subject to a week of quarantine and commercial lenders have been asked to separate cash from hospitals and food markets, he said.
  360. The share of cash in broad money supply has dropped steadily in recent years in China, with the rise of mobile payments largely replacing bank notes in daily life.
  361.  
  362. "It's an extreme move that makes sense," argues Quartz:
  363.  
  364. Whether it's dollars, pounds, euros, shekels, or in this case yuan, currency is notoriously dirty. A 2017 study [PDF] of $1 bills in New York found some 397 bacterial species living on the surface. And when someone with the flu handles it, that virus has been shown to survive for up to 12 days.
  365.  
  366. The World Health Organization has said that it is still not known how long the the coronavirus can survive on surfaces and objects, including money. Preliminary information has shown it can survive a few hours or more, but can be killed with basic disinfectants.&lt;p&gt;&lt;div class="share_submission" style="position:relative;"&gt;
  367. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://twitter.com/home?status=China+Quarantines+Cash+to+Sanitize+Old+Bank+Notes+From+Coronavirus+%3A+http%3A%2F%2Fbit.ly%2F2wls8aO"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/twitter_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  368. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://www.facebook.com/sharer.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Fnews.slashdot.org%2Fstory%2F20%2F02%2F16%2F0130240%2Fchina-quarantines-cash-to-sanitize-old-bank-notes-from-coronavirus%3Futm_source%3Dslashdot%26utm_medium%3Dfacebook"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/facebook_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  369.  
  370.  
  371.  
  372. &lt;/div&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;a href="https://news.slashdot.org/story/20/02/16/0130240/china-quarantines-cash-to-sanitize-old-bank-notes-from-coronavirus?utm_source=rss1.0moreanon&amp;amp;utm_medium=feed"&gt;Read more of this story&lt;/a&gt; at Slashdot.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;iframe src="https://slashdot.org/slashdot-it.pl?op=discuss&amp;amp;id=15784570&amp;amp;smallembed=1" style="height: 300px; width: 100%; border: none;"&gt;&lt;/iframe&gt;&lt;img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~4/A-8nSIsBEEM" height="1" width="1" alt=""/&gt;</description>
  373.            <pubDate>Sun, 16 Feb 2020 01:34:00 +0100</pubDate>
  374.        </item>
  375.        <item>
  376.            <title>'Sonic the Hedgehog' Has Biggest-Ever Opening For a Video Game Adaptation</title>
  377.            <link>https://games.slashdot.org/story/20/02/15/2229226/sonic-the-hedgehog-has-biggest-ever-opening-for-a-video-game-adaptation?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&amp;utm_medium=feed</link>
  378.            <description>An anonymous reader quotes The Wrap:
  379. "Sonic the Hedgehog" is giving Paramount its best box office news in over a year, with a currently 3-day opening weekend of $55 million to become the best opening weekend ever for a video game adaptation... The delayed release of this film prompted by an intense rejection of Sonic's initial design is turning out to be a bit of a blessing in disguise. Moved from last November to this extended Presidents' Day weekend, "Sonic" is standing out in the movie marketplace as a popular family offering with no major competition currently in theaters and none coming until Pixar's "Onward" arrives in three weeks.
  380.  
  381. Audience reception, driven by both families and hardcore Sonic fans, has been very strong with an A on CinemaScore, 4/5 on Postrak, and 95% audience score on Rotten Tomatoes. Even critics have been fairly positive with a 65% Rotten Tomatoes score... If this weekend's estimates hold, "Sonic" will have an opening weekend that's more than double any of Paramount's 2019 films, including the $29 million opening of "Terminator: Dark Fate." In fact, it has the highest opening weekend for the studio since "Mission: Impossible &amp;mdash; Fallout," which opened to $61.2 million in July 2018.
  382.  
  383. The Wrap's article also includes a list ranking "all 46 videogame movies" from best to worst. They rank 2001's "Tomb Raider" just ahead of 2018's "Tomb Raider" (at #14 and #15, respectively), and also remember several forgotten early-1990s films based on videogames (including "Street Fighter," "Mortal Kombat" and "Super Mario Bros.")&lt;p&gt;&lt;div class="share_submission" style="position:relative;"&gt;
  384. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://twitter.com/home?status='Sonic+the+Hedgehog'+Has+Biggest-Ever+Opening+For+a+Video+Game+Adaptation%3A+http%3A%2F%2Fbit.ly%2F37u8iad"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/twitter_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  385. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://www.facebook.com/sharer.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Fgames.slashdot.org%2Fstory%2F20%2F02%2F15%2F2229226%2Fsonic-the-hedgehog-has-biggest-ever-opening-for-a-video-game-adaptation%3Futm_source%3Dslashdot%26utm_medium%3Dfacebook"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/facebook_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  386.  
  387.  
  388.  
  389. &lt;/div&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;a href="https://games.slashdot.org/story/20/02/15/2229226/sonic-the-hedgehog-has-biggest-ever-opening-for-a-video-game-adaptation?utm_source=rss1.0moreanon&amp;amp;utm_medium=feed"&gt;Read more of this story&lt;/a&gt; at Slashdot.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;iframe src="https://slashdot.org/slashdot-it.pl?op=discuss&amp;amp;id=15784272&amp;amp;smallembed=1" style="height: 300px; width: 100%; border: none;"&gt;&lt;/iframe&gt;&lt;img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~4/nRE-nM3wxWI" height="1" width="1" alt=""/&gt;</description>
  390.            <pubDate>Sat, 15 Feb 2020 23:34:00 +0100</pubDate>
  391.        </item>
  392.        <item>
  393.            <title>Northrop Grumman Launches Spacecraft Delivering Snacks and Equipment To the ISS</title>
  394.            <link>https://science.slashdot.org/story/20/02/15/2314208/northrop-grumman-launches-spacecraft-delivering-snacks-and-equipment-to-the-iss?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&amp;utm_medium=feed</link>
  395.            <description>Space.com has footage of Northrop Grumman's successful launch of a spacecraft that's bringing 7,500 pounds of supplies (as well as scientific equipment for experiments) to the astronauts on the International Space Station:
  396. Those experiments include studies into bone loss from prolonged exposure to weightlessness, bacteria-targeting viruses that could lead to new medications, as well as some cowpeas to be grown as part of a space food experiment. Heidi Parris, NASA's assistant program scientist for the International Space Station program's science office, said those experiments aim to use the weightless environment on the station to learn more about how to live off Earth, including on the moon and Mars.
  397.  
  398. One novel experiment is Mochii, a small scanning electron microscope about the size of a breadbox that can help astronauts quickly identify the composition of small particles, such as debris or contamination in spacesuits. "Currently the ISS has a blind spot, in that we can't perform this kind of analysis on orbit," James Martinez, a materials scientist at NASA's Johnson Space Center participating in the experiment... Another key experiment on Cygnus is the Spacecraft Fire Experiment IV, or Saffire-IV. As its name suggests, Saffire-IV is the fourth experiment to study how fire behaves in space
  399.  
  400. Northrop Grumman's Cygnus is one of two private spacecraft (SpaceX's Dragon capsules are the other) that currently haul cargo to the International Space Station for NASA. NG-13 is the 13th Cygnus mission to reach space for NASA by Northrop Grumman as part of the agency's Commercial Resupply Services...
  401. Northrop Grumman's Cygnus NG-13 spacecraft will arrive at the International Space Station and be captured by a robotic arm on Tuesday, Feb. 18, at 4 a.m. EST (0900 GMT). NASA's live webcast of the rendezvous will begin at 2:30 a.m. EST (0730 GMT) and run through spacecraft capture.
  402.  
  403. The spacecraft will also be bringing the astronauts candy, fresh fruit, and three different kinds of cheese wedge -- cheddar, Parmesan and Fontina.&lt;p&gt;&lt;div class="share_submission" style="position:relative;"&gt;
  404. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://twitter.com/home?status=Northrop+Grumman+Launches+Spacecraft+Delivering+Snacks+and+Equipment+To+the+ISS%3A+http%3A%2F%2Fbit.ly%2F37qqr8M"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/twitter_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  405. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://www.facebook.com/sharer.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Fscience.slashdot.org%2Fstory%2F20%2F02%2F15%2F2314208%2Fnorthrop-grumman-launches-spacecraft-delivering-snacks-and-equipment-to-the-iss%3Futm_source%3Dslashdot%26utm_medium%3Dfacebook"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/facebook_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  406.  
  407.  
  408.  
  409. &lt;/div&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;a href="https://science.slashdot.org/story/20/02/15/2314208/northrop-grumman-launches-spacecraft-delivering-snacks-and-equipment-to-the-iss?utm_source=rss1.0moreanon&amp;amp;utm_medium=feed"&gt;Read more of this story&lt;/a&gt; at Slashdot.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;iframe src="https://slashdot.org/slashdot-it.pl?op=discuss&amp;amp;id=15784366&amp;amp;smallembed=1" style="height: 300px; width: 100%; border: none;"&gt;&lt;/iframe&gt;&lt;img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~4/MrcvLoIscv4" height="1" width="1" alt=""/&gt;</description>
  410.            <pubDate>Sat, 15 Feb 2020 22:34:00 +0100</pubDate>
  411.        </item>
  412.        <item>
  413.            <title>Huawei's Silicon Valley Outpost Allegedly Stole Trade Secrets From Cisco</title>
  414.            <link>https://yro.slashdot.org/story/20/02/15/069219/huaweis-silicon-valley-outpost-allegedly-stole-trade-secrets-from-cisco?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&amp;utm_medium=feed</link>
  415.            <description>"Controversial Chinese technology firm Huawei and its Santa Clara-based subsidiary Futurewei allegedly stole trade secrets from San Jose tech giant Cisco and used them to copy Cisco routers," reports the San Jose Mercury News, citing the federal indictment released Thursday.
  416.  
  417. The U.S. Department of Justice claimed in its racketeering indictment and a news release that Huawei and its Silicon Valley subsidiary stole operating system code and other data needed to make routers, and used the pilfered secrets to make Huawei-branded routers sold in the U.S. The indictment also alleges that five other unnamed U.S. firms were targeted. Cisco is not mentioned by name in the indictment, which refers to "Company 1." But the indictment cites a lawsuit filed in Texas against Futurewei and Huawei over the alleged router-data theft...
  418.  
  419. The indictment alleges that when the Texas litigation started, Futurewei and Huawei claimed to have already removed misappropriated code from products, and recalled routers containing that code. However, the firms had erased the memory drives of the recalled routers and sent them to China before they could be accessed, "thus destroying evidence of Huawei and Futurewei's illicit conduct," the indictment claims. "Also, in an effort to destroy evidence, Futurewei attempted to remotely access Huawei routers that had already been sold in the United States and erase the misappropriated source code contained therein," the indictment alleges, without saying whether the government believes the attempted erasure was successful.
  420.  
  421. The indictment does not make clear how U.S. prosecutors believe Futurewei and Huawei obtained the copyrighted code, but it claims the two companies had "hired or attempted to hire Company 1 employees and directed these employees to misappropriate Company 1 source code...." The two companies also engaged in "flagrant plagiarism" of Cisco's user manuals for routers, the suit alleged. While the allegations of stolen Cisco secrets concern routers sold in the U.S. in 2002, the indictment charges Huawei, Futurewei and two other Huawei subsidiaries with running a scheme from 2000 to the present "to operate and grow the worldwide business of Huawei and its parents, global affiliates and subsidiaries through the deliberate and repeated misappropriation of intellectual property of companies headquartered or with offices in the United States."&lt;p&gt;&lt;div class="share_submission" style="position:relative;"&gt;
  422. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://twitter.com/home?status=Huawei's+Silicon+Valley+Outpost+Allegedly+Stole+Trade+Secrets+From+Cisco%3A+http%3A%2F%2Fbit.ly%2F2Suwipc"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/twitter_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  423. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://www.facebook.com/sharer.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Fyro.slashdot.org%2Fstory%2F20%2F02%2F15%2F069219%2Fhuaweis-silicon-valley-outpost-allegedly-stole-trade-secrets-from-cisco%3Futm_source%3Dslashdot%26utm_medium%3Dfacebook"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/facebook_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  424.  
  425.  
  426.  
  427. &lt;/div&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;a href="https://yro.slashdot.org/story/20/02/15/069219/huaweis-silicon-valley-outpost-allegedly-stole-trade-secrets-from-cisco?utm_source=rss1.0moreanon&amp;amp;utm_medium=feed"&gt;Read more of this story&lt;/a&gt; at Slashdot.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;iframe src="https://slashdot.org/slashdot-it.pl?op=discuss&amp;amp;id=15780602&amp;amp;smallembed=1" style="height: 300px; width: 100%; border: none;"&gt;&lt;/iframe&gt;&lt;img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~4/m6HPoVB51p8" height="1" width="1" alt=""/&gt;</description>
  428.            <pubDate>Sat, 15 Feb 2020 21:34:00 +0100</pubDate>
  429.        </item>
  430.        <item>
  431.            <title>Warning: Microsoft Pulls Windows 10 Security Update After Reports of Serious Bugs</title>
  432.            <link>https://tech.slashdot.org/story/20/02/15/209209/warning-microsoft-pulls-windows-10-security-update-after-reports-of-serious-bugs?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&amp;utm_medium=feed</link>
  433.            <description>Slashdot reader golden_donkey quotes Forbes:
  434. Are you booting up your Windows 10 machine and discovering you can't log in to your profile? It appears you're not alone. Reports are increasing across Twitter and Microsoft forums that following the most recent Patch Tuesday update (KB4532693), users are complaining that their profiles and desktop files are missing, and that custom icons and wallpaper have all been reset to their default state...
  435.  
  436. The KB4532693 update is allegedly causing much more serious headaches for some users. A newer report by Windows Latest cites multiple users in their comments section complaining that the data is nowhere to be found and allegedly not recoverable.
  437.  
  438. Microsoft has now "yanked KB4524244 from its update servers..." reports ZDNet, "after acknowledging reports of 'an issue affecting a sub-set of devices.'"
  439. Microsoft says customers who have successfully installed the update don't need to take any further steps. Those who have configured PCs to defer installation of updates by at least four days should also be unaffected.
  440. For those who are experiencing issues related to this update, Microsoft recommends uninstalling the update.
  441.  
  442. Forbes also shared a video "on a related note." Its title? "How To Choose A Linux Distro That's Right For You..."&lt;p&gt;&lt;div class="share_submission" style="position:relative;"&gt;
  443. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://twitter.com/home?status=Warning%3A+Microsoft+Pulls+Windows+10+Security+Update+After+Reports+of+Serious+Bugs%3A+http%3A%2F%2Fbit.ly%2F2u1nJch"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/twitter_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  444. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://www.facebook.com/sharer.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Ftech.slashdot.org%2Fstory%2F20%2F02%2F15%2F209209%2Fwarning-microsoft-pulls-windows-10-security-update-after-reports-of-serious-bugs%3Futm_source%3Dslashdot%26utm_medium%3Dfacebook"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/facebook_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  445.  
  446.  
  447.  
  448. &lt;/div&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;a href="https://tech.slashdot.org/story/20/02/15/209209/warning-microsoft-pulls-windows-10-security-update-after-reports-of-serious-bugs?utm_source=rss1.0moreanon&amp;amp;utm_medium=feed"&gt;Read more of this story&lt;/a&gt; at Slashdot.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;iframe src="https://slashdot.org/slashdot-it.pl?op=discuss&amp;amp;id=15784068&amp;amp;smallembed=1" style="height: 300px; width: 100%; border: none;"&gt;&lt;/iframe&gt;&lt;img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~4/U2Y4G3xSs_s" height="1" width="1" alt=""/&gt;</description>
  449.            <pubDate>Sat, 15 Feb 2020 20:34:00 +0100</pubDate>
  450.        </item>
  451.        <item>
  452.            <title>Former NASA Official William Gerstenmaier Joins SpaceX</title>
  453.            <link>https://science.slashdot.org/story/20/02/15/0512222/former-nasa-official-william-gerstenmaier-joins-spacex?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&amp;utm_medium=feed</link>
  454.            <description>schwit1 shared this report from Ars Technica:
  455. This is a consequential hire for SpaceX &amp;mdash; it is difficult to overstate the influence Gerstenmaier has over human spaceflight both in the United States and abroad. He led NASA's space shuttle, International Space Station, commercial crew, and exploration programs for more than a decade. He immediately brings credibility to the company's safety culture. Former Space Shuttle Program Manager Wayne Hale, who now chairs the human spaceflight committee of NASA's Advisory Council, told Ars last summer, "Bill was recognized by everybody as being technically well-grounded and very astute. He was known to listen carefully and to make his judgments based on good technical reasons...."
  456.  
  457. Although the role is officially a consultancy, it is expected to become a full-time position. SpaceX is poised to launch the first crewed mission of its Dragon spacecraft by June of this year. [Or possibly even in early May.] Gerstenmaier will play a key role in ensuring the safety of those missions and helping SpaceX secure certification for the Crew Dragon vehicle. The hiring could have longer-term implications as well. Few people in the global aerospace community have as much gravitas as Gerstenmaier or as much understanding of how to build coalitions to explore space...
  458.  
  459. In December 2008, Gerstenmaier saved a cash-strapped SpaceX with a Commercial Resupply Service contract for operational cargo missions to the International Space Station. Gerstenmaier's decision to maintain two competitors as part of the commercial crew program in 2014 (SpaceX and Boeing) was also essential, although it was not a company-saving move. Boeing was lobbying hard for all of the funds and very nearly got them. Gerstenmaier was the deciding official who kept two providers in the competition. It has proven to be a smart decision, as SpaceX is poised to beat Boeing into space by months, if not years, at 50 percent less cost.&lt;p&gt;&lt;div class="share_submission" style="position:relative;"&gt;
  460. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://twitter.com/home?status=Former+NASA+Official+William+Gerstenmaier+Joins+SpaceX%3A+http%3A%2F%2Fbit.ly%2F38w9X0h"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/twitter_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  461. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://www.facebook.com/sharer.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Fscience.slashdot.org%2Fstory%2F20%2F02%2F15%2F0512222%2Fformer-nasa-official-william-gerstenmaier-joins-spacex%3Futm_source%3Dslashdot%26utm_medium%3Dfacebook"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/facebook_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  462.  
  463.  
  464.  
  465. &lt;/div&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;a href="https://science.slashdot.org/story/20/02/15/0512222/former-nasa-official-william-gerstenmaier-joins-spacex?utm_source=rss1.0moreanon&amp;amp;utm_medium=feed"&gt;Read more of this story&lt;/a&gt; at Slashdot.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;iframe src="https://slashdot.org/slashdot-it.pl?op=discuss&amp;amp;id=15780336&amp;amp;smallembed=1" style="height: 300px; width: 100%; border: none;"&gt;&lt;/iframe&gt;&lt;img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~4/Iuo2cjUH-e0" height="1" width="1" alt=""/&gt;</description>
  466.            <pubDate>Sat, 15 Feb 2020 19:34:00 +0100</pubDate>
  467.        </item>
  468.        <item>
  469.            <title>'Five Open-Source Projects AI Enthusiasts Might Want To Know About'</title>
  470.            <link>https://news.slashdot.org/story/20/02/15/0438213/five-open-source-projects-ai-enthusiasts-might-want-to-know-about?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&amp;utm_medium=feed</link>
  471.            <description>b-dayyy quotes Linux Security:
  472. As AI becomes more and more ingrained in our daily lives through consumer products, we can't help but be concerned that proprietary software will comprise the market. And we are not talking about a million-dollar market, but a bigger one that may reach US$118.6 billion by 2025. Many industries and end-users would thus benefit from more open-source AI projects and tools for developers' use. That would save tons of individuals and companies money to build their own AI-powered apps.
  473.  
  474. In this post, we explore five open-source AI projects or tools that are compatible with Linux and delve into the pros and cons of open-source AI and AI in general.
  475.  
  476. The list includes TensorFlow by Google's AI research team, as well as Microsoft Cognitive Toolkit.
  477. The article points out that open-source AI "is also being explored in developing hardware, specifically microprocessors that are more secure," and suggests some other possible transformative uses (including smart farming technologies "that aid in livestock and crop monitoring, irrigation, weather forecasting, and overall farm management... [H]ealthcare becomes more factual than intuitive, increases in revenue can be seen more clearly in marketing efforts, and food security becomes a reality rather than a dream.
  478.  
  479. "However, we should not discount the fact that AI can also be weaponized, empowering the wrong people. Cybersecurity systems must also be upgraded to counter AI-powered cyberattacks. And when developing AI-powered machines, it is critical to ensure that they are not vulnerable to attacks."&lt;p&gt;&lt;div class="share_submission" style="position:relative;"&gt;
  480. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://twitter.com/home?status='Five+Open-Source+Projects+AI+Enthusiasts+Might+Want+To+Know+About'%3A+http%3A%2F%2Fbit.ly%2F39D5J77"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/twitter_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  481. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://www.facebook.com/sharer.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Fnews.slashdot.org%2Fstory%2F20%2F02%2F15%2F0438213%2Ffive-open-source-projects-ai-enthusiasts-might-want-to-know-about%3Futm_source%3Dslashdot%26utm_medium%3Dfacebook"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/facebook_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  482.  
  483.  
  484.  
  485. &lt;/div&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;a href="https://news.slashdot.org/story/20/02/15/0438213/five-open-source-projects-ai-enthusiasts-might-want-to-know-about?utm_source=rss1.0moreanon&amp;amp;utm_medium=feed"&gt;Read more of this story&lt;/a&gt; at Slashdot.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;iframe src="https://slashdot.org/slashdot-it.pl?op=discuss&amp;amp;id=15780222&amp;amp;smallembed=1" style="height: 300px; width: 100%; border: none;"&gt;&lt;/iframe&gt;&lt;img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~4/ZBQlzzuZY-o" height="1" width="1" alt=""/&gt;</description>
  486.            <pubDate>Sat, 15 Feb 2020 18:34:00 +0100</pubDate>
  487.        </item>
  488.        <item>
  489.            <title>Tesla Restores Remotely-Disabled Autopilot to Used Model S</title>
  490.            <link>https://tech.slashdot.org/story/20/02/15/033232/tesla-restores-remotely-disabled-autopilot-to-used-model-s?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&amp;utm_medium=feed</link>
  491.            <description>An anonymous reader quotes The Verge:
  492. Tesla has restored the Autopilot driver assistance features it remotely disabled on a used Model S, just days after Jalopnik published a story about the customer's ordeal.
  493.  
  494. The owner, who Jalopnik simply referred to as Alec, confirmed to The Verge that the features are back after The Next Web spotted new Tesla Motors Club forum posts he wrote earlier this week. Alec said he was contacted by a Tesla customer experience rep who "apologized for my troubles, told me that Tesla has restored all missed options" and "cited a miscommunication" as the reason why the company pulled the Autopilot features in the first place.
  495.  
  496. Jalopnik also reported that Tesla's message boards "have stories from other owners who have experienced similar incidents."&lt;p&gt;&lt;div class="share_submission" style="position:relative;"&gt;
  497. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://twitter.com/home?status=Tesla+Restores+Remotely-Disabled+Autopilot+to+Used+Model+S%3A+http%3A%2F%2Fbit.ly%2F2SsdXct"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/twitter_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  498. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://www.facebook.com/sharer.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Ftech.slashdot.org%2Fstory%2F20%2F02%2F15%2F033232%2Ftesla-restores-remotely-disabled-autopilot-to-used-model-s%3Futm_source%3Dslashdot%26utm_medium%3Dfacebook"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/facebook_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  499.  
  500.  
  501.  
  502. &lt;/div&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;a href="https://tech.slashdot.org/story/20/02/15/033232/tesla-restores-remotely-disabled-autopilot-to-used-model-s?utm_source=rss1.0moreanon&amp;amp;utm_medium=feed"&gt;Read more of this story&lt;/a&gt; at Slashdot.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;iframe src="https://slashdot.org/slashdot-it.pl?op=discuss&amp;amp;id=15779968&amp;amp;smallembed=1" style="height: 300px; width: 100%; border: none;"&gt;&lt;/iframe&gt;&lt;img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~4/IOmTNlojaZs" height="1" width="1" alt=""/&gt;</description>
  503.            <pubDate>Sat, 15 Feb 2020 17:34:00 +0100</pubDate>
  504.        </item>
  505.        <item>
  506.            <title>FSF Sends Microsoft A Blank Hard Drive For Sending Back The Windows 7 Source Code</title>
  507.            <link>https://tech.slashdot.org/story/20/02/15/0213242/fsf-sends-microsoft-a-blank-hard-drive-for-sending-back-the-windows-7-source-code?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&amp;utm_medium=feed</link>
  508.            <description>The Free Software Foundation sent Microsoft a hard drive for Valentine's Day -- along with a petition calling for the release of the source code for Windows 7 (which is no longer supported by Microsoft):
  509.  
  510. It's as easy as copying the source code, giving it a license notice, and mailing it back to us. As the author of the most popular free software license in the world, we're ready to give them all of the help we can. All they have to do is ask.
  511.  
  512. We want them to show exactly how much love they have for the "open source" software they mention in their advertising. If they really do love free software -- and we're willing to give them the benefit of the doubt -- they have the opportunity to show it to the world. We hope they're not just capitalizing on the free software development model in the most superficial and exploitative way possible: by using it as a marketing tool to fool us into thinking that they care about our freedom.
  513.  
  514. Together, we've stood up for our principles. They can reject us, or ignore us, but what they cannot do is stop us. We'll go on campaigning, until all of us are free.&lt;p&gt;&lt;div class="share_submission" style="position:relative;"&gt;
  515. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://twitter.com/home?status=FSF+Sends+Microsoft+A+Blank+Hard+Drive+For+Sending+Back+The+Windows+7+Source+Code%3A+http%3A%2F%2Fbit.ly%2F37rnUet"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/twitter_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  516. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://www.facebook.com/sharer.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Ftech.slashdot.org%2Fstory%2F20%2F02%2F15%2F0213242%2Ffsf-sends-microsoft-a-blank-hard-drive-for-sending-back-the-windows-7-source-code%3Futm_source%3Dslashdot%26utm_medium%3Dfacebook"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/facebook_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  517.  
  518.  
  519.  
  520. &lt;/div&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;a href="https://tech.slashdot.org/story/20/02/15/0213242/fsf-sends-microsoft-a-blank-hard-drive-for-sending-back-the-windows-7-source-code?utm_source=rss1.0moreanon&amp;amp;utm_medium=feed"&gt;Read more of this story&lt;/a&gt; at Slashdot.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;iframe src="https://slashdot.org/slashdot-it.pl?op=discuss&amp;amp;id=15779844&amp;amp;smallembed=1" style="height: 300px; width: 100%; border: none;"&gt;&lt;/iframe&gt;&lt;img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~4/6xia_6L96I8" height="1" width="1" alt=""/&gt;</description>
  521.            <pubDate>Sat, 15 Feb 2020 16:34:00 +0100</pubDate>
  522.        </item>
  523.        <item>
  524.            <title>Linux is Ready for the End of Time</title>
  525.            <link>https://linux.slashdot.org/story/20/02/15/0247201/linux-is-ready-for-the-end-of-time?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&amp;utm_medium=feed</link>
  526.            <description>January 19, 2038 is for Linux what Y2K was for mainframe and PC computers in 2000, reports ZDNet. It's the day that the value for time "runs out of numbers" and, in the case of 32-bit Unix-based operating systems like Linux and older versions of macOS, "starts counting time with negative numbers..."
  527.  
  528. "But the fixes are underway to make sure all goes well when that fatal time rolls around." nickwinlund77 shared their report:
  529.  
  530. Linux developers have seen this coming for decades. So, Linux kernel developer Arnd Bergmann and others have been working on a repair. These corrections are now in the forthcoming Linux 5.6 kernel. Bergmann explained, "Linux-5.6, or my backport of the patches to 5.4, should be the first release that can serve as a base for a 32-bit system designed to run beyond year 2038."
  531.  
  532. There are some caveats:
  533. - All user space must be compiled with a 64-bit time_t, which will be supported in the coming musl-1.2 and glibc-2.32 releases, along with installed kernel headers from Linux-5.6 or higher.
  534.  
  535. - Applications that use the system call interfaces directly need to be ported to use the time64 syscalls added in Linux-5.1 in place of the existing system calls.
  536. - Applications that use a private copy of kernel uapi header files or their contents may need to update to the Linux-5.6 version.
  537. - A few remaining interfaces cannot be changed to pass a 64-bit time_t in a compatible way, so they must be configured to use CLOCK_MONOTONIC times...
  538.  
  539.  
  540. After we fix this, we won't have to worry about 64-bit Linux running out of seconds until 15:30:08 GMT Sunday, December 4, 29,227,702,659. Personally, I'm not going to worry about that one.&lt;p&gt;&lt;div class="share_submission" style="position:relative;"&gt;
  541. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://twitter.com/home?status=Linux+is+Ready+for+the+End+of+Time%3A+http%3A%2F%2Fbit.ly%2F38yhsUy"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/twitter_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  542. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://www.facebook.com/sharer.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Flinux.slashdot.org%2Fstory%2F20%2F02%2F15%2F0247201%2Flinux-is-ready-for-the-end-of-time%3Futm_source%3Dslashdot%26utm_medium%3Dfacebook"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/facebook_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  543.  
  544.  
  545.  
  546. &lt;/div&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;a href="https://linux.slashdot.org/story/20/02/15/0247201/linux-is-ready-for-the-end-of-time?utm_source=rss1.0moreanon&amp;amp;utm_medium=feed"&gt;Read more of this story&lt;/a&gt; at Slashdot.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;iframe src="https://slashdot.org/slashdot-it.pl?op=discuss&amp;amp;id=15779924&amp;amp;smallembed=1" style="height: 300px; width: 100%; border: none;"&gt;&lt;/iframe&gt;&lt;img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~4/DOdx4yLZnC8" height="1" width="1" alt=""/&gt;</description>
  547.            <pubDate>Sat, 15 Feb 2020 15:34:00 +0100</pubDate>
  548.        </item>
  549.        <item>
  550.            <title>Bill Gates Did Not Order a &amp;pound;500m Hydrogen-Powered Superyacht</title>
  551.            <link>https://hardware.slashdot.org/story/20/02/10/0337217/bill-gates-did-not-order-a-500m-hydrogen-powered-superyacht?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&amp;utm_medium=feed</link>
  552.            <description>"Billionaire Bill Gates has not commissioned a hydrogen-powered superyacht from designer Sinot," reports the BBC, citing their direct confirmation from the company itself.
  553.  
  554. It has been widely reported that Mr Gates ordered a &amp;pound;500m ($644m) luxury vessel, based on the concept which was displayed in Monaco in 2019. Sinot said it had "no business relationship" with Bill Gates. It added that that the concept yacht, called Aqua, was "not linked" to either him or any of his representatives.
  555.  
  556. "Aqua is a concept under development and has not been sold to Mr. Gates," a spokeswoman said.
  557.  
  558. The Guardian has now removed their original article. But here's what they'd originally reported: Bill Gates has ordered the world's first hydrogen-powered superyacht, worth an estimated &amp;pound;500m ($644m) and featuring an infinity pool, helipad, spa and gym...
  559. The boat has five decks and space to accommodate 14 guests and 31 crew members. In a further environmentally friendly feature, gel-fuelled fire bowls allow guests to stay warm outside without having to burn wood or coals.
  560.  
  561.  
  562.  
  563. But its most cutting-edge feature is tucked away below decks &amp;ndash; two 28-tonne vacuum-sealed tanks that are cooled to -423F (-253C) and filled with liquid hydrogen, which powers the ship. The fuel will generate power for the two one-megawatt motors and propellors via on-board fuel cells, which combine hydrogen with oxygen to produce electricity. Water is a byproduct.
  564. &lt;p&gt;&lt;div class="share_submission" style="position:relative;"&gt;
  565. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://twitter.com/home?status=Bill+Gates+Did+Not+Order+a+%26pound%3B500m+Hydrogen-Powered+Superyacht%3A+http%3A%2F%2Fbit.ly%2F3bmDZVX"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/twitter_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  566. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://www.facebook.com/sharer.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Fhardware.slashdot.org%2Fstory%2F20%2F02%2F10%2F0337217%2Fbill-gates-did-not-order-a-500m-hydrogen-powered-superyacht%3Futm_source%3Dslashdot%26utm_medium%3Dfacebook"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/facebook_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  567.  
  568.  
  569.  
  570. &lt;/div&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;a href="https://hardware.slashdot.org/story/20/02/10/0337217/bill-gates-did-not-order-a-500m-hydrogen-powered-superyacht?utm_source=rss1.0moreanon&amp;amp;utm_medium=feed"&gt;Read more of this story&lt;/a&gt; at Slashdot.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;iframe src="https://slashdot.org/slashdot-it.pl?op=discuss&amp;amp;id=15741786&amp;amp;smallembed=1" style="height: 300px; width: 100%; border: none;"&gt;&lt;/iframe&gt;&lt;img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~4/CRoA9McmXLg" height="1" width="1" alt=""/&gt;</description>
  571.            <pubDate>Sat, 15 Feb 2020 14:34:00 +0100</pubDate>
  572.        </item>
  573.        <item>
  574.            <title>Google Redraws the Borders On Maps Depending On Who's Looking</title>
  575.            <link>https://news.slashdot.org/story/20/02/15/0054256/google-redraws-the-borders-on-maps-depending-on-whos-looking?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&amp;utm_medium=feed</link>
  576.            <description>An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Washington Post: For more than 70 years, India and Pakistan have waged sporadic and deadly skirmishes over control of the mountainous region of Kashmir. Tens of thousands have died in the conflict, including three just this month. Both sides claim the Himalayan outpost as their own, but web surfers in India could be forgiven for thinking the dispute is all but settled: The borders on Google's online maps there display Kashmir as fully under Indian control. Elsewhere, users see the region's snaking outlines as a dotted line, acknowledging the dispute. Google's corporate mission is "to organize the world's information," but it also bends it to its will. From Argentina to the U.K. to Iran, the world's borders look different depending on where you're viewing them from. That's because Google -- and other online mapmakers -- simply change them.
  577. [...]
  578. Unlike mapping geographical features, sketching the contours of towns or countries is ultimately a human construct. So, Google consults with local governments and other official bodies to help make a decision about where to draw its lines, according to people familiar with the matter. And it refers to historical maps, news events and atlases, these people said. But changes are also made with little fanfare and can be done immediately, while physical maps are beholden to printing schedules. When it comes to contested borders, people in different countries often see different things. Take the body of water between Japan and the Korean Peninsula. To almost all it is known as the Sea of Japan, but for Google Maps users in South Korea it's listed as the East Sea. More than 4,000 miles away, the waterway separating Iran from Saudi Arabia may be either the Persian Gulf or the Arabian Gulf, depending on who's looking online. And the line in Western Sahara marking the northern border with Morocco disappears for Moroccans seeking it out on the Web -- along with the region's name altogether. The sparsely populated northwest Africa region is disputed between Morocco, which seized it in 1975, and the indigenous Sahrawi. One of Google's contract employees said they "are often told to alter maps with no reason given and that their changes take effect almost immediately," the report says. "That typically includes relatively minor adjustments like widening a path in a park or removing mentions of landmarks like a statue or traffic circle. But, these people said, Google has a special team employees refer to as 'the disputed region team' that addresses more prickly matters..."
  579. "The company also responds to feedback, such as once changing the name of Native American tribal land to 'nation' from 'reservation,'" notes The Washington Post. "Google's maps can also be revised by a band of enthusiasts known as Local Guides who can submit suggestions for alterations, which often are implemented automatically. [...] In some cases, local laws dictate how Google and others must represent maps to avoid censure, as is the case in China or Russia, according to people familiar with the matter."&lt;p&gt;&lt;div class="share_submission" style="position:relative;"&gt;
  580. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://twitter.com/home?status=Google+Redraws+the+Borders+On+Maps+Depending+On+Who's+Looking%3A+http%3A%2F%2Fbit.ly%2F2UUc89K"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/twitter_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  581. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://www.facebook.com/sharer.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Fnews.slashdot.org%2Fstory%2F20%2F02%2F15%2F0054256%2Fgoogle-redraws-the-borders-on-maps-depending-on-whos-looking%3Futm_source%3Dslashdot%26utm_medium%3Dfacebook"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/facebook_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  582.  
  583.  
  584.  
  585. &lt;/div&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;a href="https://news.slashdot.org/story/20/02/15/0054256/google-redraws-the-borders-on-maps-depending-on-whos-looking?utm_source=rss1.0moreanon&amp;amp;utm_medium=feed"&gt;Read more of this story&lt;/a&gt; at Slashdot.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;iframe src="https://slashdot.org/slashdot-it.pl?op=discuss&amp;amp;id=15779716&amp;amp;smallembed=1" style="height: 300px; width: 100%; border: none;"&gt;&lt;/iframe&gt;&lt;img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~4/HpJupqmM4UE" height="1" width="1" alt=""/&gt;</description>
  586.            <pubDate>Sat, 15 Feb 2020 12:00:00 +0100</pubDate>
  587.        </item>
  588.        <item>
  589.            <title>Activate this 'Bracelet of Silence,' and Alexa Can't Eavesdrop</title>
  590.            <link>https://yro.slashdot.org/story/20/02/15/0039252/activate-this-bracelet-of-silence-and-alexa-cant-eavesdrop?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&amp;utm_medium=feed</link>
  591.            <description>Ben Zhao and his wife, Heather Zheng, computer science professors at the University of Chicago, designed what they are calling a "bracelet of silence" that will jam the Echo or any other microphones in the vicinity from listening in on the wearer's conversations. The New York Times reports: The bracelet is like an anti-smartwatch, both in its cyberpunk aesthetic and in its purpose of defeating technology. A large, somewhat ungainly white cuff with spiky transducers, the bracelet has 24 speakers that emit ultrasonic signals when the wearer turns it on. The sound is imperceptible to most ears, with the possible exception of young people and dogs, but nearby microphones will detect the high-frequency sound instead of other noises. "It's so easy to record these days," Mr. Lopes said. "This is a useful defense. When you have something private to say, you can activate it in real time. When they play back the recording, the sound is going to be gone." During a phone interview, Mr. Lopes turned on the bracelet, resulting in static-like white noise for the listener on the other end. At this point, the bracelet is just a prototype. The researchers say that they could manufacture it for as little as $20, and that a handful of investors have asked them about commercializing it. "The 'bracelet of silence' is not the first device invented by researchers to stuff up digital assistants' ears," the report notes. "In 2018, two designers created Project Alias, an appendage that can be placed over a smart speaker to deafen it. But Ms. Zheng argues that a jammer should be portable to protect people as they move through different environments, given that you don't always know where a microphone is lurking."
  592. "Other precursors to the bracelet include a 'jammer coat' designed by an Austrian architecture firm in 2014 to block radio waves that could collect information from a person's phone or credit cards," reports The New York Times. "In 2012, the artist Adam Harvey created silver-plated stealth wear garments that masked people's heat signature to protect them from the eyes of drones, as well as a line of makeup and hairstyles, called CV Dazzle, to thwart facial recognition cameras."&lt;p&gt;&lt;div class="share_submission" style="position:relative;"&gt;
  593. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://twitter.com/home?status=Activate+this+'Bracelet+of+Silence%2C'+and+Alexa+Can't+Eavesdrop%3A+http%3A%2F%2Fbit.ly%2F2UVCiJk"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/twitter_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  594. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://www.facebook.com/sharer.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Fyro.slashdot.org%2Fstory%2F20%2F02%2F15%2F0039252%2Factivate-this-bracelet-of-silence-and-alexa-cant-eavesdrop%3Futm_source%3Dslashdot%26utm_medium%3Dfacebook"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/facebook_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  595.  
  596.  
  597.  
  598. &lt;/div&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;a href="https://yro.slashdot.org/story/20/02/15/0039252/activate-this-bracelet-of-silence-and-alexa-cant-eavesdrop?utm_source=rss1.0moreanon&amp;amp;utm_medium=feed"&gt;Read more of this story&lt;/a&gt; at Slashdot.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;iframe src="https://slashdot.org/slashdot-it.pl?op=discuss&amp;amp;id=15779690&amp;amp;smallembed=1" style="height: 300px; width: 100%; border: none;"&gt;&lt;/iframe&gt;&lt;img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~4/oupK-DQU6IA" height="1" width="1" alt=""/&gt;</description>
  599.            <pubDate>Sat, 15 Feb 2020 09:00:00 +0100</pubDate>
  600.        </item>
  601.        <item>
  602.            <title>Twitter Ran Ads For Human Organs Because Money Is Money</title>
  603.            <link>https://news.slashdot.org/story/20/02/15/0016221/twitter-ran-ads-for-human-organs-because-money-is-money?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&amp;utm_medium=feed</link>
  604.            <description>Earlier this week, freelance journalist Tyler Coats had an organ-buying service appear on his feed in the form of a promoted tweet. Gizmodo has the details: The fact that this cropped up in front of his face to begin with is indicative of how badly these ads are targeted in the first place. "Despite my cold, dead heart, I am not in the market for new organs," Coates later told Gizmodo. Understanding how broken Twitter's system is requires a bit of context. Since being pressured to juice its promoted content roughly half a decade ago, Twitter's been, shall we say, "experimenting" with new ways to push that content in front of its user base and milk those eyeballs for profit. At the same time, it's been gradually limiting the ways advertisers can target the people who might want to see that content in the first place. The result? Weird promoted tweets -- about organs or otherwise -- flooding people's feeds.
  605. Though the account running the human organ ads has since been suspended, it looks like the same person created another account under a similar name (which was also suspended). And they will likely just keep going. In a statement to Gizmodo, a Twitter spokesperson said that this particular tweet violated the company's Unacceptable Business Practices policy and Inappropriate Content policy. "In general we have both humans and machines that review our content for policy compliance," they added. "And, of course, we're constantly investing in both our automated and human review processes and systems."&lt;p&gt;&lt;div class="share_submission" style="position:relative;"&gt;
  606. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://twitter.com/home?status=Twitter+Ran+Ads+For+Human+Organs+Because+Money+Is+Money%3A+http%3A%2F%2Fbit.ly%2F2URuCHZ"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/twitter_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  607. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://www.facebook.com/sharer.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Fnews.slashdot.org%2Fstory%2F20%2F02%2F15%2F0016221%2Ftwitter-ran-ads-for-human-organs-because-money-is-money%3Futm_source%3Dslashdot%26utm_medium%3Dfacebook"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/facebook_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  608.  
  609.  
  610.  
  611. &lt;/div&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;a href="https://news.slashdot.org/story/20/02/15/0016221/twitter-ran-ads-for-human-organs-because-money-is-money?utm_source=rss1.0moreanon&amp;amp;utm_medium=feed"&gt;Read more of this story&lt;/a&gt; at Slashdot.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;iframe src="https://slashdot.org/slashdot-it.pl?op=discuss&amp;amp;id=15779658&amp;amp;smallembed=1" style="height: 300px; width: 100%; border: none;"&gt;&lt;/iframe&gt;&lt;img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~4/CdiJGWpFq6U" height="1" width="1" alt=""/&gt;</description>
  612.            <pubDate>Sat, 15 Feb 2020 06:00:00 +0100</pubDate>
  613.        </item>
  614.        <item>
  615.            <title>A New Spin On 3D Printing Can Produce an Object In Seconds</title>
  616.            <link>https://hardware.slashdot.org/story/20/02/14/232211/a-new-spin-on-3d-printing-can-produce-an-object-in-seconds?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&amp;utm_medium=feed</link>
  617.            <description>An anonymous reader quotes a report from Ars Technica: A 3D model is sliced up into hundreds of 2D horizontal layers and slowly built up, one layer at a time. This layer-by-layer process can take hours or even days, but what if we could print the entire model at once? A new technique demonstrated by researchers from Switzerland's Ecole polytechnique federale de Lausanne (EPFL) -- and further detailed in this Nature article -- does just that and can print an entire model in seconds. The new technique builds a model by hardening a photosensitive resin with a laser, not unlike existing stereolithography (SLA) printers. The big difference here is the application of tomographic techniques, the same used in x-rays and ultrasounds, that allows for rotational printing. Laser light is modulated with a DLP chip (just like in old rear-projection HDTVs) and is blasted into a container full of resin. The laser covers the entire build volume, and the container of resin actually rotates while it's being exposed to the light. The laser projects the model at different rotational perspectives, which is synced up with the spinning resin, and a whole 3D model can be produced in seconds.
  618. The EPFL writes, "The system is currently capable of making two-centimeter structures with a precision of 80 micrometers, about the same as the diameter of a strand of hair. But as the team develops new devices, they should be able to build much bigger objects, potentially up to 15 centimeters." In this first public demonstration, the build volume is 16mm x 16mm x 20mm, making it one of the smallest 3D printers on earth. An 80 um resolution is also nothing to write home about and can be bested by ~$500 consumer SLA printers. It is very fast, though, and the technique is just getting started. The researchers have set up a spin-off company called "Readily 3D" to develop and market the technology.&lt;p&gt;&lt;div class="share_submission" style="position:relative;"&gt;
  619. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://twitter.com/home?status=A+New+Spin+On+3D+Printing+Can+Produce+an+Object+In+Seconds%3A+http%3A%2F%2Fbit.ly%2F37vbimF"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/twitter_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  620. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://www.facebook.com/sharer.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Fhardware.slashdot.org%2Fstory%2F20%2F02%2F14%2F232211%2Fa-new-spin-on-3d-printing-can-produce-an-object-in-seconds%3Futm_source%3Dslashdot%26utm_medium%3Dfacebook"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/facebook_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  621.  
  622.  
  623.  
  624. &lt;/div&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;a href="https://hardware.slashdot.org/story/20/02/14/232211/a-new-spin-on-3d-printing-can-produce-an-object-in-seconds?utm_source=rss1.0moreanon&amp;amp;utm_medium=feed"&gt;Read more of this story&lt;/a&gt; at Slashdot.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;iframe src="https://slashdot.org/slashdot-it.pl?op=discuss&amp;amp;id=15779514&amp;amp;smallembed=1" style="height: 300px; width: 100%; border: none;"&gt;&lt;/iframe&gt;&lt;img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~4/S1mSPXtsU2U" height="1" width="1" alt=""/&gt;</description>
  625.            <pubDate>Sat, 15 Feb 2020 02:30:00 +0100</pubDate>
  626.        </item>
  627.        <item>
  628.            <title>HQ Trivia, the Once-Popular Mobile Game, Is Shutting Down</title>
  629.            <link>https://games.slashdot.org/story/20/02/14/2253210/hq-trivia-the-once-popular-mobile-game-is-shutting-down?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&amp;utm_medium=feed</link>
  630.            <description>CNN Business has learned that the once-popular live mobile trivia game "HQ Trivia" is shutting down. From the report: When HQ launched in 2017, its first game HQ Trivia quickly attracted millions of people across the world who stopped whatever they were doing twice a day to play the game on their smartphones. The company was profiled by The New York Times and its original host Scott Rogowsky became a household name, appearing on programs like NBC's "Today" show. But over the next year, the game's popularity faded and its parent company was hit with a series of setbacks. The company grappled with internal turmoil, including the death of HQ cofounder Colin Kroll, who died in December 2018 from a drug overdose.
  631. CEO Rus Yusupov said in a company-wide email on Friday that "lead investors are no longer willing to fund the company, and so effective today, HQ will cease operations and move to dissolution." In the email, which was obtained by CNN Business, Yusupov also disclosed that the company had hired a banker "to help find additional investors and partners to support the expansion of the company." He said the company had "received an offer from an established business" and was expected to close the deal on Saturday, but the potential acquisition fell through.&lt;p&gt;&lt;div class="share_submission" style="position:relative;"&gt;
  632. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://twitter.com/home?status=HQ+Trivia%2C+the+Once-Popular+Mobile+Game%2C+Is+Shutting+Down%3A+http%3A%2F%2Fbit.ly%2F2vDUexp"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/twitter_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  633. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://www.facebook.com/sharer.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Fgames.slashdot.org%2Fstory%2F20%2F02%2F14%2F2253210%2Fhq-trivia-the-once-popular-mobile-game-is-shutting-down%3Futm_source%3Dslashdot%26utm_medium%3Dfacebook"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/facebook_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  634.  
  635.  
  636.  
  637. &lt;/div&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;a href="https://games.slashdot.org/story/20/02/14/2253210/hq-trivia-the-once-popular-mobile-game-is-shutting-down?utm_source=rss1.0moreanon&amp;amp;utm_medium=feed"&gt;Read more of this story&lt;/a&gt; at Slashdot.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;iframe src="https://slashdot.org/slashdot-it.pl?op=discuss&amp;amp;id=15779502&amp;amp;smallembed=1" style="height: 300px; width: 100%; border: none;"&gt;&lt;/iframe&gt;&lt;img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~4/VdZxzzasXEU" height="1" width="1" alt=""/&gt;</description>
  638.            <pubDate>Sat, 15 Feb 2020 01:02:00 +0100</pubDate>
  639.        </item>
  640.        <item>
  641.            <title>EU Judge Raises Prospect of Increasing Multibillion Fine Against Google</title>
  642.            <link>https://tech.slashdot.org/story/20/02/14/2242232/eu-judge-raises-prospect-of-increasing-multibillion-fine-against-google?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&amp;utm_medium=feed</link>
  643.            <description>Alphabet's appeal against a multibillion-dollar fine for alleged anticompetitive behavior by its Google unit risks backfiring after a European Union court floated the prospect of increasing the fine (Warning: source paywalled; alternative source), rather than scrapping it. The Wall Street Journal reports: In a surprise twist Friday at the end of a three-day hearing, one of five judges on the panel said the EU's General Court has the power to increase the $2.6 billion fine, levied in 2017, if it finds that the sum was insufficient to deter the company from further anticompetitive behavior. "The fine of ~$2.6 billion was described as eye-catching, but it is a small amount of cash in your hands," Judge Colm Mac Eochaidh said in court. "Did that level of fine deter you from repeating your behavior?" he asked Google's counsel. Increasing a fine has only one precedent in the court's history, according to Mr. Mac Eochaidh, when German chemicals giant BASF SE was ordered to pay ~$58,000 in 2007 on top of an initial ~$38 million fine for participating in a chemicals cartel.
  644. Christopher Thomas, a counsel for Google, dismissed the idea that the fine was warranted and said the company takes the entire antitrust process "with extreme seriousness." Google disputes the findings of the commission that it had willingly or negligently squeezed competitors out of its shopping searches. The prospect of raising the fine was described as theoretical by the panel's presiding judge. Still, it sent Google lawyers scrambling for arguments, with one sitting on the floor outside the courtroom frantically researching how to contest such a move. If Google loses the case, it has the right to appeal to the bloc's highest court, the European Court of Justice.&lt;p&gt;&lt;div class="share_submission" style="position:relative;"&gt;
  645. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://twitter.com/home?status=EU+Judge+Raises+Prospect+of+Increasing+Multibillion+Fine+Against+Google%3A+http%3A%2F%2Fbit.ly%2F39C89Da"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/twitter_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  646. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://www.facebook.com/sharer.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Ftech.slashdot.org%2Fstory%2F20%2F02%2F14%2F2242232%2Feu-judge-raises-prospect-of-increasing-multibillion-fine-against-google%3Futm_source%3Dslashdot%26utm_medium%3Dfacebook"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/facebook_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  647.  
  648.  
  649.  
  650. &lt;/div&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;a href="https://tech.slashdot.org/story/20/02/14/2242232/eu-judge-raises-prospect-of-increasing-multibillion-fine-against-google?utm_source=rss1.0moreanon&amp;amp;utm_medium=feed"&gt;Read more of this story&lt;/a&gt; at Slashdot.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;iframe src="https://slashdot.org/slashdot-it.pl?op=discuss&amp;amp;id=15779480&amp;amp;smallembed=1" style="height: 300px; width: 100%; border: none;"&gt;&lt;/iframe&gt;&lt;img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~4/RyGFsp5VSjU" height="1" width="1" alt=""/&gt;</description>
  651.            <pubDate>Sat, 15 Feb 2020 00:25:00 +0100</pubDate>
  652.        </item>
  653.        <item>
  654.            <title>Signal Is Finally Bringing Its Secure Messaging To the Masses</title>
  655.            <link>https://it.slashdot.org/story/20/02/14/2216214/signal-is-finally-bringing-its-secure-messaging-to-the-masses?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&amp;utm_medium=feed</link>
  656.            <description>An anonymous reader quotes a report from Wired: [Cryptographer and coder known as Moxie Marlinspike] has always talked about making encrypted communications easy enough for anyone to use. The difference, today, is that Signal is finally reaching that mass audience it was always been intended for -- not just the privacy diehards, activists, and cybersecurity nerds that formed its core user base for years -- thanks in part to a concerted effort to make the app more accessible and appealing to the mainstream. That new phase in Signal's evolution began two years ago this month. That's when WhatsApp cofounder Brian Acton, a few months removed from leaving the app he built amid post-acquisition clashes with Facebook management, injected $50 million into Marlinspike's end-to-end encrypted messaging project. Acton also joined the newly created Signal Foundation as executive chairman. The pairing up made sense; WhatsApp had used Signal's open source protocol to encrypt all WhatsApp communications end-to-end by default, and Acton had grown disaffected with what he saw as Facebook's attempts to erode WhatsApp's privacy.
  657. Since then, Marlinspike's nonprofit has put Acton's millions -- and his experience building an app with billions of users -- to work. After years of scraping by with just three overworked full-time staffers, the Signal Foundation now has 20 employees. For years a bare-bones texting and calling app, Signal has increasingly become a fully featured, mainstream communications platform. With its new coding muscle, it has rolled out features at a breakneck speed: In just the last three months, Signal has added support for iPad, ephemeral images and video designed to disappear after a single viewing, downloadable customizable "stickers," and emoji reactions. More significantly, it announced plans to roll out a new system for group messaging, and an experimental method for storing encrypted contacts in the cloud. Many of those features might sound trivial. They certainly aren't the sort that appealed to Signal's earliest core users. Instead, they're what Acton calls "enrichment features." They're designed to attract normal people who want a messaging app as multifunctional as WhatsApp, iMessage, or Facebook Messenger but still value Signal's widely trusted security and the fact that it collects virtually no user data. Wired explains how adding simple-sounding enhancements can require significant feats of security engineering to fit within Signal's privacy constraints. Adding downloadable customizable stickers, for example, "required designing a system where every sticker 'pack' is encrypted with a 'pack key,'" reports Wired. "That key is itself encrypted and shared from one user to another when someone wants to install new stickers on their phone, so that Signal's server can never see decrypted stickers or even identify the Signal user who created or sent them."
  658. For Signal's new group messaging, Signal partnered with Microsoft Research to invent a novel form of "anonymous credentials" that let a server gatekeep who belongs in a group, but without ever learning the members' identities.&lt;p&gt;&lt;div class="share_submission" style="position:relative;"&gt;
  659. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://twitter.com/home?status=Signal+Is+Finally+Bringing+Its+Secure+Messaging+To+the+Masses%3A+http%3A%2F%2Fbit.ly%2F31SLe3M"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/twitter_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  660. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://www.facebook.com/sharer.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Fit.slashdot.org%2Fstory%2F20%2F02%2F14%2F2216214%2Fsignal-is-finally-bringing-its-secure-messaging-to-the-masses%3Futm_source%3Dslashdot%26utm_medium%3Dfacebook"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/facebook_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  661.  
  662.  
  663.  
  664. &lt;/div&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;a href="https://it.slashdot.org/story/20/02/14/2216214/signal-is-finally-bringing-its-secure-messaging-to-the-masses?utm_source=rss1.0moreanon&amp;amp;utm_medium=feed"&gt;Read more of this story&lt;/a&gt; at Slashdot.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;iframe src="https://slashdot.org/slashdot-it.pl?op=discuss&amp;amp;id=15779420&amp;amp;smallembed=1" style="height: 300px; width: 100%; border: none;"&gt;&lt;/iframe&gt;&lt;img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~4/xWJoGsfwuzI" height="1" width="1" alt=""/&gt;</description>
  665.            <pubDate>Fri, 14 Feb 2020 23:45:00 +0100</pubDate>
  666.        </item>
  667.        <item>
  668.            <title>Huawei's Silicon Valley Output Allegedly Stole Trade Secrets From Cisco</title>
  669.            <link>https://yro.slashdot.org/story/20/02/15/069219/huaweis-silicon-valley-output-allegedly-stole-trade-secrets-from-cisco?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&amp;utm_medium=feed</link>
  670.            <description>"Controversial Chinese technology firm Huawei and its Santa Clara-based subsidiary Futurewei allegedly stole trade secrets from San Jose tech giant Cisco and used them to copy Cisco routers," reports the San Jose Mercury News, citing the federal indictment released Thursday.
  671.  
  672. The U.S. Department of Justice claimed in its racketeering indictment and a news release that Huawei and its Silicon Valley subsidiary stole operating system code and other data needed to make routers, and used the pilfered secrets to make Huawei-branded routers sold in the U.S. The indictment also alleges that five other unnamed U.S. firms were targeted. Cisco is not mentioned by name in the indictment, which refers to "Company 1." But the indictment cites a lawsuit filed in Texas against Futurewei and Huawei over the alleged router-data theft...
  673.  
  674. The indictment alleges that when the Texas litigation started, Futurewei and Huawei claimed to have already removed misappropriated code from products, and recalled routers containing that code. However, the firms had erased the memory drives of the recalled routers and sent them to China before they could be accessed, "thus destroying evidence of Huawei and Futurewei's illicit conduct," the indictment claims. "Also, in an effort to destroy evidence, Futurewei attempted to remotely access Huawei routers that had already been sold in the United States and erase the misappropriated source code contained therein," the indictment alleges, without saying whether the government believes the attempted erasure was successful.
  675.  
  676. The indictment does not make clear how U.S. prosecutors believe Futurewei and Huawei obtained the copyrighted code, but it claims the two companies had "hired or attempted to hire Company 1 employees and directed these employees to misappropriate Company 1 source code...." The two companies also engaged in "flagrant plagiarism" of Cisco's user manuals for routers, the suit alleged. While the allegations of stolen Cisco secrets concern routers sold in the U.S. in 2002, the indictment charges Huawei, Futurewei and two other Huawei subsidiaries with running a scheme from 2000 to the present "to operate and grow the worldwide business of Huawei and its parents, global affiliates and subsidiaries through the deliberate and repeated misappropriation of intellectual property of companies headquartered or with offices in the United States."&lt;p&gt;&lt;div class="share_submission" style="position:relative;"&gt;
  677. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://twitter.com/home?status=Huawei's+Silicon+Valley+Output+Allegedly+Stole+Trade+Secrets+From+Cisco%3A+https%3A%2F%2Fyro.slashdot.org%2Fstory%2F20%2F02%2F15%2F069219%2F%3Futm_source%3Dtwitter%26utm_medium%3Dtwitter"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/twitter_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  678. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://www.facebook.com/sharer.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Fyro.slashdot.org%2Fstory%2F20%2F02%2F15%2F069219%2Fhuaweis-silicon-valley-output-allegedly-stole-trade-secrets-from-cisco%3Futm_source%3Dslashdot%26utm_medium%3Dfacebook"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/facebook_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  679.  
  680.  
  681.  
  682. &lt;/div&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;a href="https://yro.slashdot.org/story/20/02/15/069219/huaweis-silicon-valley-output-allegedly-stole-trade-secrets-from-cisco?utm_source=rss1.0moreanon&amp;amp;utm_medium=feed"&gt;Read more of this story&lt;/a&gt; at Slashdot.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;iframe src="https://slashdot.org/slashdot-it.pl?op=discuss&amp;amp;id=15780602&amp;amp;smallembed=1" style="height: 300px; width: 100%; border: none;"&gt;&lt;/iframe&gt;&lt;img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~4/IdkqeLEaPIs" height="1" width="1" alt=""/&gt;</description>
  683.            <pubDate>Fri, 14 Feb 2020 23:34:00 +0100</pubDate>
  684.        </item>
  685.        <item>
  686.            <title>Jaguar To Cut I-Pace Output On Battery Shortage</title>
  687.            <link>https://hardware.slashdot.org/story/20/02/14/2234249/jaguar-to-cut-i-pace-output-on-battery-shortage?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&amp;utm_medium=feed</link>
  688.            <description>Thelasko shares a report from Automotive News Europe: Jaguar Land Rover is pausing production of the Jaguar I-Pace electric SUV due to battery supply issues from LG Chem's Poland plant. JLR said it has adjusted production schedules of the model due to temporary supplier scheduling issues. "We are working with the supplier to resolve this and minimize impact on customer orders," JLR said. JLR did not name the supplier [A source familiar with the matter told Automotive News Europe that the battery supplier is LG Chem]. It also did not say when the production pause would start. The I-Pace is a rival to the Tesla Model X, featuring a large 90kWh battery and a range of about 377 km (234 miles). According to The Times newspaper, production of the I-Pace will stop for a week starting on Monday, Feb. 17.&lt;p&gt;&lt;div class="share_submission" style="position:relative;"&gt;
  689. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://twitter.com/home?status=Jaguar+To+Cut+I-Pace+Output+On+Battery+Shortage%3A+http%3A%2F%2Fbit.ly%2F2OWcxop"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/twitter_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  690. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://www.facebook.com/sharer.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Fhardware.slashdot.org%2Fstory%2F20%2F02%2F14%2F2234249%2Fjaguar-to-cut-i-pace-output-on-battery-shortage%3Futm_source%3Dslashdot%26utm_medium%3Dfacebook"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/facebook_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  691.  
  692.  
  693.  
  694. &lt;/div&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;a href="https://hardware.slashdot.org/story/20/02/14/2234249/jaguar-to-cut-i-pace-output-on-battery-shortage?utm_source=rss1.0moreanon&amp;amp;utm_medium=feed"&gt;Read more of this story&lt;/a&gt; at Slashdot.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;iframe src="https://slashdot.org/slashdot-it.pl?op=discuss&amp;amp;id=15779468&amp;amp;smallembed=1" style="height: 300px; width: 100%; border: none;"&gt;&lt;/iframe&gt;&lt;img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~4/Ome61DNoyTQ" height="1" width="1" alt=""/&gt;</description>
  695.            <pubDate>Fri, 14 Feb 2020 23:20:00 +0100</pubDate>
  696.        </item>
  697.        <item>
  698.            <title>Tesla Owner Says Remotely Disabled Autopilot Features Have Been Restored</title>
  699.            <link>https://tech.slashdot.org/story/20/02/14/223208/tesla-owner-says-remotely-disabled-autopilot-features-have-been-restored?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&amp;utm_medium=feed</link>
  700.            <description>Tesla has restored the Autopilot driver assistance features it remotely disabled on a Model S, just days after the story was first reported by Jalopnik. The owner in question, who Jalopnik refers to as Alec, said he was contacted by a Tesla customer experience rep who "apologized for my troubles, told me that Tesla has restored all missed options" and "cited a miscommunication" as the reason why the company pulled the Autopilot features in the first place. The Verge reports: Alec had purchased the used 2017 Model S in December from a third-party dealer that acquired the car from Tesla at auction in November. The original owner had equipped the car with the (now-retired) "Enhanced Autopilot" version of Tesla's driver assistance package and the company's "Full Self-Driving" package, which promises increased autonomy over the years. Three days after Tesla sold the car to the dealer, Tesla performed a "remote audit" that flagged those features for removal, according to Jalopnik. Even then, the features were never removed, and the dealer posted the car for sale with both Enhanced Autopilot and Full Self-Driving featured on the car's Monroney sticker -- meaning Alec paid for a car with those features.
  701. But when Alec took the car to a Tesla service center a few weeks after his purchase, he was told that the features were removed. Tesla has removed features from used cars in the past, but typically does so before the car is sold off to a third-party dealer or a new owner. Since Tesla pulled these features both after it sold the car to the dealer, and after that dealer sold it to Alec, it caused some fear that the company was setting a precedent for yanking features on a whim.&lt;p&gt;&lt;div class="share_submission" style="position:relative;"&gt;
  702. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://twitter.com/home?status=Tesla+Owner+Says+Remotely+Disabled+Autopilot+Features+Have+Been+Restored%3A+http%3A%2F%2Fbit.ly%2F2vxIxIH"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/twitter_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  703. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://www.facebook.com/sharer.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Ftech.slashdot.org%2Fstory%2F20%2F02%2F14%2F223208%2Ftesla-owner-says-remotely-disabled-autopilot-features-have-been-restored%3Futm_source%3Dslashdot%26utm_medium%3Dfacebook"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/facebook_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  704.  
  705.  
  706.  
  707. &lt;/div&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;a href="https://tech.slashdot.org/story/20/02/14/223208/tesla-owner-says-remotely-disabled-autopilot-features-have-been-restored?utm_source=rss1.0moreanon&amp;amp;utm_medium=feed"&gt;Read more of this story&lt;/a&gt; at Slashdot.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;iframe src="https://slashdot.org/slashdot-it.pl?op=discuss&amp;amp;id=15779400&amp;amp;smallembed=1" style="height: 300px; width: 100%; border: none;"&gt;&lt;/iframe&gt;&lt;img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~4/sU2Gp_6Femc" height="1" width="1" alt=""/&gt;</description>
  708.            <pubDate>Fri, 14 Feb 2020 23:02:00 +0100</pubDate>
  709.        </item>
  710.        <item>
  711.            <title>Facebook Says Political Candidates Can Use Paid Memes</title>
  712.            <link>https://tech.slashdot.org/story/20/02/14/2152207/facebook-says-political-candidates-can-use-paid-memes?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&amp;utm_medium=feed</link>
  713.            <description>Facebook said Friday that political candidates, campaigns and groups can use paid branded content across its platforms, a clarification prompted by a move from Michael Bloomberg's campaign to pay top Instagram influencers to post memes on its behalf. Axios reports: Its policy didn't explicitly state that it was OK for candidates to use branded content posts, but after hearing from various campaigns about the issue, Facebook moved to clarify its stance. Facebook has agreed that branded content should be allowed to be used by candidates, as long as the candidates are authorized and the creators disclose paid partnerships through branded content tools, according to a spokesperson.
  714. Facebook previously prohibited political candidates and campaigns from running branded content by default because it wanted to avoid any risk that such actions could be viewed as accounts giving monetary contributions to campaigns. It's tweaking its approach now -- only in the U.S. -- because it believes that this is no longer a concern, given that it doesn't provide payments as a feature of its branded content tools. If a campaign were to buy ads to boost its branded content, then it would be subject to Facebook's advertising policies. That paid promotion would then need to be included in Facebook public, searchable political ad library for seven years.&lt;p&gt;&lt;div class="share_submission" style="position:relative;"&gt;
  715. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://twitter.com/home?status=Facebook+Says+Political+Candidates+Can+Use+Paid+Memes%3A+http%3A%2F%2Fbit.ly%2F2vvyEeK"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/twitter_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  716. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://www.facebook.com/sharer.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Ftech.slashdot.org%2Fstory%2F20%2F02%2F14%2F2152207%2Ffacebook-says-political-candidates-can-use-paid-memes%3Futm_source%3Dslashdot%26utm_medium%3Dfacebook"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/facebook_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  717.  
  718.  
  719.  
  720. &lt;/div&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;a href="https://tech.slashdot.org/story/20/02/14/2152207/facebook-says-political-candidates-can-use-paid-memes?utm_source=rss1.0moreanon&amp;amp;utm_medium=feed"&gt;Read more of this story&lt;/a&gt; at Slashdot.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;iframe src="https://slashdot.org/slashdot-it.pl?op=discuss&amp;amp;id=15779372&amp;amp;smallembed=1" style="height: 300px; width: 100%; border: none;"&gt;&lt;/iframe&gt;&lt;img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~4/vlEiGrCuCCY" height="1" width="1" alt=""/&gt;</description>
  721.            <pubDate>Fri, 14 Feb 2020 22:20:00 +0100</pubDate>
  722.        </item>
  723.        <item>
  724.            <title>A Radio Frequency Exposure Test Finds an iPhone 11 Pro Exceeds the FCC's Limit</title>
  725.            <link>https://mobile.slashdot.org/story/20/02/14/2143245/a-radio-frequency-exposure-test-finds-an-iphone-11-pro-exceeds-the-fccs-limit?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&amp;utm_medium=feed</link>
  726.            <description>An anonymous reader quotes a report from IEEE Spectrum: A test by Penumbra Brands to measure how much radiofrequency energy an iPhone 11 Pro gives off found that the phone emits more than twice the amount allowable by the U.S. Federal Communications Commission. The FCC measures exposure to RF energy as the amount of wireless power a person absorbs for each kilogram of their body. The agency calls this the specific absorption rate, or SAR. For a cellphone, the FCC's threshold of safe exposure is 1.6 watts per kilogram. Penumbra's test found that an iPhone 11 Pro emitted 3.8 W/kg.
  727. Ryan McCaughey, Penumbra's chief technology officer, said the test was a follow up to an investigation conducted by the Chicago Tribune last year. The Tribune tested several generations of Apple, Samsung, and Motorola phones, and found that many exceeded the FCC's limit. Penumbra used RF Exposure Labs, an independent, accredited SAR testing lab for the tests (The Tribune also used the San Diego-based lab for its investigation). Penumbra was conducting the test, which also included testing an iPhone 7, to study its Alara phone cases, which the company says are designed to reduce RF exposure in a person. It's worth noting that when the FCC conducted a follow-up investigation they did not find evidence that any of the phones exceed SAR limits. "That said, while the Tribune and Penumbra both used off-the-shelf phones, the FCC largely tested phones supplied by the manufacturers, including Apple," adds IEEE Spectrum.
  728. Joel Moskowitz, a researcher at UC Berkeley, says that could be because there's a systematic problem with RF Exposure Lab's testing methods, or Apple rigged the software in the provided test phones to ensure they didn't put out enough power to exceed the SAR limit. Either way, both McCaughey and Moskowitz agree that the FCC's RF exposure testing is woefully out of date, as the limits reflect what the FCC deemed safe 25 years ago.&lt;p&gt;&lt;div class="share_submission" style="position:relative;"&gt;
  729. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://twitter.com/home?status=A+Radio+Frequency+Exposure+Test+Finds+an+iPhone+11+Pro+Exceeds+the+FCC's+Limit%3A+http%3A%2F%2Fbit.ly%2F2USIFgH"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/twitter_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  730. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://www.facebook.com/sharer.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Fmobile.slashdot.org%2Fstory%2F20%2F02%2F14%2F2143245%2Fa-radio-frequency-exposure-test-finds-an-iphone-11-pro-exceeds-the-fccs-limit%3Futm_source%3Dslashdot%26utm_medium%3Dfacebook"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/facebook_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  731.  
  732.  
  733.  
  734. &lt;/div&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;a href="https://mobile.slashdot.org/story/20/02/14/2143245/a-radio-frequency-exposure-test-finds-an-iphone-11-pro-exceeds-the-fccs-limit?utm_source=rss1.0moreanon&amp;amp;utm_medium=feed"&gt;Read more of this story&lt;/a&gt; at Slashdot.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;iframe src="https://slashdot.org/slashdot-it.pl?op=discuss&amp;amp;id=15779358&amp;amp;smallembed=1" style="height: 300px; width: 100%; border: none;"&gt;&lt;/iframe&gt;&lt;img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~4/jU3vqhUzEaU" height="1" width="1" alt=""/&gt;</description>
  735.            <pubDate>Fri, 14 Feb 2020 21:40:00 +0100</pubDate>
  736.        </item>
  737.        <item>
  738.            <title>Online-only Platforms Are Going Offline With Permanent Spaces</title>
  739.            <link>https://tech.slashdot.org/story/20/02/14/1934250/online-only-platforms-are-going-offline-with-permanent-spaces?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&amp;utm_medium=feed</link>
  740.            <description>An anonymous reader shares a report: The retailpocalypse started in 2010. It followed the 2008 global recession, with the parallel birth and rise of social media adding fuel to the growth of online shopping. Suburban and rural malls sat empty, underutilized or poorly maintained as the most affected brands lost their customer base in the squeezed middle class. Meanwhile, online retailers thrived without the overhead costs of a physical space. Nearly a decade later, the online-only platforms that disrupted retail are choosing to pay rent as an additional, unnecessary expense. There are items available for purchase in each space, but the stores' ultimate goal is to offer a tangible experience offline to their users or consumers.
  741.  
  742. Hunker describes itself as an editorial website to help "first-timers improve their homes -- with inspiring tours, practical solutions and design advice for real people." Shopify is an all-in-one commerce platform where users can start and run an online business, facilitating 820,000 online stores since June 2019. Depop calls itself "the creative community's marketplace" and projects that its existing user base will increase threefold over the next three years, from 5 million to 15 million users. In the last two years, each company has added a physical space that isn't exactly a store and isn't really an office, though they definitely borrow aspects of each. Hunker's space, known as Hunker House, is a three-story loft in the Abbot-Kinney neighborhood of Venice, CA. Shopify opened a 1,600 square foot location in downtown Los Angeles' The Row, and Depop's two community spots are in Little Italy, Manhattan, and Silver Lake, LA.&lt;p&gt;&lt;div class="share_submission" style="position:relative;"&gt;
  743. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://twitter.com/home?status=Online-only+Platforms+Are+Going+Offline+With+Permanent+Spaces%3A+http%3A%2F%2Fbit.ly%2F38u2FKj"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/twitter_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  744. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://www.facebook.com/sharer.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Ftech.slashdot.org%2Fstory%2F20%2F02%2F14%2F1934250%2Fonline-only-platforms-are-going-offline-with-permanent-spaces%3Futm_source%3Dslashdot%26utm_medium%3Dfacebook"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/facebook_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  745.  
  746.  
  747.  
  748. &lt;/div&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;a href="https://tech.slashdot.org/story/20/02/14/1934250/online-only-platforms-are-going-offline-with-permanent-spaces?utm_source=rss1.0moreanon&amp;amp;utm_medium=feed"&gt;Read more of this story&lt;/a&gt; at Slashdot.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;iframe src="https://slashdot.org/slashdot-it.pl?op=discuss&amp;amp;id=15779098&amp;amp;smallembed=1" style="height: 300px; width: 100%; border: none;"&gt;&lt;/iframe&gt;&lt;img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~4/gsYAKAK17c0" height="1" width="1" alt=""/&gt;</description>
  749.            <pubDate>Fri, 14 Feb 2020 21:03:00 +0100</pubDate>
  750.        </item>
  751.        <item>
  752.            <title>Inside the Pentagon's Secret UFO Program</title>
  753.            <link>https://news.slashdot.org/story/20/02/14/1925208/inside-the-pentagons-secret-ufo-program?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&amp;utm_medium=feed</link>
  754.            <description>Newly leaked documents show that the Department of Defense funded a study concerning UFOs, contradicting recent statements by the Pentagon. From a report: In 2017, The New York Times revealed the existence of $22 million dollar UFO investigation program called the Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program, or AATIP. A twist came two months ago, however, when Pentagon spokesperson Susan Gough told John Greenewald -- curator of the Black Vault, the largest civilian archive of declassified government documents -- that AATIP had nothing to do with UFOs. Greenewald also wrote that the Pentagon told him that another program, the Advanced Aerospace Weapons System Application Program or AAWSAP, was the name of the contract that the government gave out to produce reports under AATIP. In a new Popular Mechanics article, journalist Tim McMillan acquired documents from Bigelow Aerospace's exotic science division, Bigelow Aerospace Advanced Space Studies, or BAASS, indicating that the organization did explore strange phenomena under the auspices of the AATIP program.
  755.  
  756. One BAASS report, leaked to McMillan by an unnamed source, previously appeared on a list of products produced under the AATIP contract "for DIA to publish" that was obtained via FOIA laws. The report was cited incorrectly on that list, but Popular Mechanics tracked down its author, who confirmed its authenticity. The report investigated "exotic" propulsion via injuries sustained by people who experienced "exposure to anomalous vehicles." The text mentions UFOs several times. "What can not be overly emphasized, is that when one looks at the literature of anomalous cases, including UFO claims from the most reliable sources, the extent and degree of acute high but not necessarily chronic low-level injuries are consistent across patients who are injured, compared to witnesses in the far-field, who are not," the report states. Notably, the report's author -- Christopher "Kit" Green -- told Popular Mechanics that he was not contracted by BAASS except to produce this report and that it provides zero evidence for extraterrestrial or non-human technologies. Further reading: Navy Confirms It Has a Secret Classified Video of an Infamous UFO Incident, Says Releasing It Would Threaten National Security.&lt;p&gt;&lt;div class="share_submission" style="position:relative;"&gt;
  757. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://twitter.com/home?status=Inside+the+Pentagon's+Secret+UFO+Program%3A+http%3A%2F%2Fbit.ly%2F3bzRX7f"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/twitter_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  758. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://www.facebook.com/sharer.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Fnews.slashdot.org%2Fstory%2F20%2F02%2F14%2F1925208%2Finside-the-pentagons-secret-ufo-program%3Futm_source%3Dslashdot%26utm_medium%3Dfacebook"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/facebook_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  759.  
  760.  
  761.  
  762. &lt;/div&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;a href="https://news.slashdot.org/story/20/02/14/1925208/inside-the-pentagons-secret-ufo-program?utm_source=rss1.0moreanon&amp;amp;utm_medium=feed"&gt;Read more of this story&lt;/a&gt; at Slashdot.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;iframe src="https://slashdot.org/slashdot-it.pl?op=discuss&amp;amp;id=15779064&amp;amp;smallembed=1" style="height: 300px; width: 100%; border: none;"&gt;&lt;/iframe&gt;&lt;img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~4/Ht1v6vRkvjs" height="1" width="1" alt=""/&gt;</description>
  763.            <pubDate>Fri, 14 Feb 2020 20:25:00 +0100</pubDate>
  764.        </item>
  765.        <item>
  766.            <title>YouTube Says it Paid the Music Industry More Than $3 Billion Last Year</title>
  767.            <link>https://news.slashdot.org/story/20/02/14/1836220/youtube-says-it-paid-the-music-industry-more-than-3-billion-last-year?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&amp;utm_medium=feed</link>
  768.            <description>YouTube says it paid the music industry more than $3 billion last year. "YouTube offers twin engines for revenue with advertising and subscribers, paying out more than $3 billion to the music industry last year from ads and subscriptions," YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki wrote in a blog post Friday. From a report: The latest figure hints at how much of the Alphabet-owned company's ad revenue goes back to music industry and creators. The data has been largely unknown to investors who have wondered how much money the company is actually pocketing at the end of the day.&lt;p&gt;&lt;div class="share_submission" style="position:relative;"&gt;
  769. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://twitter.com/home?status=YouTube+Says+it+Paid+the+Music+Industry+More+Than+%243+Billion+Last+Year%3A+http%3A%2F%2Fbit.ly%2F2uDmi4a"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/twitter_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  770. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://www.facebook.com/sharer.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Fnews.slashdot.org%2Fstory%2F20%2F02%2F14%2F1836220%2Fyoutube-says-it-paid-the-music-industry-more-than-3-billion-last-year%3Futm_source%3Dslashdot%26utm_medium%3Dfacebook"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/facebook_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  771.  
  772.  
  773.  
  774. &lt;/div&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;a href="https://news.slashdot.org/story/20/02/14/1836220/youtube-says-it-paid-the-music-industry-more-than-3-billion-last-year?utm_source=rss1.0moreanon&amp;amp;utm_medium=feed"&gt;Read more of this story&lt;/a&gt; at Slashdot.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;iframe src="https://slashdot.org/slashdot-it.pl?op=discuss&amp;amp;id=15778926&amp;amp;smallembed=1" style="height: 300px; width: 100%; border: none;"&gt;&lt;/iframe&gt;&lt;img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~4/r7dv5JqJLLc" height="1" width="1" alt=""/&gt;</description>
  775.            <pubDate>Fri, 14 Feb 2020 19:45:00 +0100</pubDate>
  776.        </item>
  777.        <item>
  778.            <title>US Cyber Command, DHS, and FBI Expose New North Korean Malware</title>
  779.            <link>https://news.slashdot.org/story/20/02/14/1917203/us-cyber-command-dhs-and-fbi-expose-new-north-korean-malware?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&amp;utm_medium=feed</link>
  780.            <description>US Cyber Command, the Department of Homeland Security, and the Federal Bureau of Investigations have exposed today a new North Korean hacking operation. Authorities have published security advisories detailing six new malware families that are currently being used by North Korean hackers. From a report: According to the Twitter account of the Cyber National Mission Force (CNMF), a subordinate unit of US Cyber Command, the malware is being distributed via a North Korean phishing campaign. US Cyber Command believes the malware is used to provide North Korean hackers with remote access to infected systems in order to steal funds that are later transfered back to North Korea, as a way to avoid economical sanctions. The North Korean government has a long history of using hackers to steal funds from banks and cryptocurrency exchanges in order to evade economic sanctions and raise funds for its nuclear weapons and missile programs. In September 2019, the US Department of the Treasury imposed sanctions on the Pyongyang regime for the use of this exact tactic.&lt;p&gt;&lt;div class="share_submission" style="position:relative;"&gt;
  781. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://twitter.com/home?status=US+Cyber+Command%2C+DHS%2C+and+FBI+Expose+New+North+Korean+Malware%3A+http%3A%2F%2Fbit.ly%2F31T1NfQ"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/twitter_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  782. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://www.facebook.com/sharer.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Fnews.slashdot.org%2Fstory%2F20%2F02%2F14%2F1917203%2Fus-cyber-command-dhs-and-fbi-expose-new-north-korean-malware%3Futm_source%3Dslashdot%26utm_medium%3Dfacebook"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/facebook_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  783.  
  784.  
  785.  
  786. &lt;/div&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;a href="https://news.slashdot.org/story/20/02/14/1917203/us-cyber-command-dhs-and-fbi-expose-new-north-korean-malware?utm_source=rss1.0moreanon&amp;amp;utm_medium=feed"&gt;Read more of this story&lt;/a&gt; at Slashdot.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;iframe src="https://slashdot.org/slashdot-it.pl?op=discuss&amp;amp;id=15779048&amp;amp;smallembed=1" style="height: 300px; width: 100%; border: none;"&gt;&lt;/iframe&gt;&lt;img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~4/e7U0IuDCWdU" height="1" width="1" alt=""/&gt;</description>
  787.            <pubDate>Fri, 14 Feb 2020 19:05:00 +0100</pubDate>
  788.        </item>
  789.        <item>
  790.            <title>An Anonymous Group Claims it Took DNA From Global Elites -- And is Auctioning It Off</title>
  791.            <link>https://slashdot.org/story/20/02/14/1914209/an-anonymous-group-claims-it-took-dna-from-global-elites----and-is-auctioning-it-off?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&amp;utm_medium=feed</link>
  792.            <description>An anonymous organization called the Earnest Project is offering the chance to own DNA samples of a handful of world leaders and celebrities. The group claims it has surreptitiously collected items discarded by attendees of the 2018 World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, that may contain their DNA. President Trump, French President Emmanuel Macron, German Chancellor Angela Merkel, and Elton John all attended the conference. From a report: The group has compiled these artifacts -- napkins, paper coffee cups, a glass parfait jar, cigarette butts, and other items -- in an online catalog it calls the "Davos Collection." Each has an estimated dollar value: A strand of human hair is listed at $1,200 to $3,000. A used breakfast fork has an estimated worth up to $36,500. And a wine glass is valued at up to $65,000. None of the items are identified with names, but it's assumed they come from the leaders or celebrities at the forum. The Earnest Project is planning to auction off the items to raise awareness about "surveillance capitalism," the practice of monetizing people's personal data. They fear that our genetic data could eventually end up in the hands of tech companies like Facebook and Google, which already harvest a lot of personal data.
  793.  
  794. "By collecting and selling vital and sensitive data harvested from the most powerful people on the planet, we hope to encourage a visceral reaction against surveillance capitalism among the elite," the Earnest Project told OneZero in an email. "We're all constantly depositing our DNA around us and on discarded items. Once you start paying attention, it's really quite easy to collect a target's DNA." Now that genetic testing is getting cheaper and companies are developing hand-held DNA sequencing devices, it's no longer a far-off possibility that someone could take your DNA, get it analyzed, and use it against you for blackmail, extortion, or discrimination. The Earnest Project had planned to hold the auction in New York on February 20 but is postponing the sale due to "unresolved legal issues," according to a statement emailed to OneZero.&lt;p&gt;&lt;div class="share_submission" style="position:relative;"&gt;
  795. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://twitter.com/home?status=An+Anonymous+Group+Claims+it+Took+DNA+From+Global+Elites+--+And+is+Auctioning+It+Off%3A+http%3A%2F%2Fbit.ly%2F2SKjOJ1"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/twitter_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  796. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://www.facebook.com/sharer.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Fslashdot.org%2Fstory%2F20%2F02%2F14%2F1914209%2Fan-anonymous-group-claims-it-took-dna-from-global-elites----and-is-auctioning-it-off%3Futm_source%3Dslashdot%26utm_medium%3Dfacebook"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/facebook_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  797.  
  798.  
  799.  
  800. &lt;/div&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;a href="https://slashdot.org/story/20/02/14/1914209/an-anonymous-group-claims-it-took-dna-from-global-elites----and-is-auctioning-it-off?utm_source=rss1.0moreanon&amp;amp;utm_medium=feed"&gt;Read more of this story&lt;/a&gt; at Slashdot.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;iframe src="https://slashdot.org/slashdot-it.pl?op=discuss&amp;amp;id=15779040&amp;amp;smallembed=1" style="height: 300px; width: 100%; border: none;"&gt;&lt;/iframe&gt;&lt;img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~4/N-5i2VV-zac" height="1" width="1" alt=""/&gt;</description>
  801.            <pubDate>Fri, 14 Feb 2020 18:20:00 +0100</pubDate>
  802.        </item>
  803.        <item>
  804.            <title>Plastic Surgery Images and Invoices Leak From Unsecured Database</title>
  805.            <link>https://yro.slashdot.org/story/20/02/14/162242/plastic-surgery-images-and-invoices-leak-from-unsecured-database?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&amp;utm_medium=feed</link>
  806.            <description>Thousands of images, videos and records pertaining to plastic surgery patients were left on an unsecured database where they could be viewed by anyone with the right IP address, researchers said Friday. From a report: The data included about 900,000 records, which researchers say could belong to thousands of different patients. The data was generated at clinics around the world using software made by French imaging company NextMotion. Images in the database included before-and-after photos of cosmetic procedures. Those photos often contained nudity, the researchers said. Other records included images of invoices that contained information that would identify a patient. The database is now secured. Researchers Noam Rotem and Ran Locar found the exposed database. They published their research with vpnMonitor, a security website. Rotem said he sees exposed health care databases all too often as part of his web-mapping project, which looks for exposed data. "The state of privacy protection, especially in health care, is really abysmal," Rotem said.&lt;p&gt;&lt;div class="share_submission" style="position:relative;"&gt;
  807. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://twitter.com/home?status=Plastic+Surgery+Images+and+Invoices+Leak+From+Unsecured+Database%3A+http%3A%2F%2Fbit.ly%2F2SrKhw7"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/twitter_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  808. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://www.facebook.com/sharer.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Fyro.slashdot.org%2Fstory%2F20%2F02%2F14%2F162242%2Fplastic-surgery-images-and-invoices-leak-from-unsecured-database%3Futm_source%3Dslashdot%26utm_medium%3Dfacebook"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/facebook_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  809.  
  810.  
  811.  
  812. &lt;/div&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;a href="https://yro.slashdot.org/story/20/02/14/162242/plastic-surgery-images-and-invoices-leak-from-unsecured-database?utm_source=rss1.0moreanon&amp;amp;utm_medium=feed"&gt;Read more of this story&lt;/a&gt; at Slashdot.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;iframe src="https://slashdot.org/slashdot-it.pl?op=discuss&amp;amp;id=15778464&amp;amp;smallembed=1" style="height: 300px; width: 100%; border: none;"&gt;&lt;/iframe&gt;&lt;img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~4/YJ9AgUjV8Jo" height="1" width="1" alt=""/&gt;</description>
  813.            <pubDate>Fri, 14 Feb 2020 17:45:00 +0100</pubDate>
  814.        </item>
  815.        <item>
  816.            <title>'Pale Blue Dot' Revisited</title>
  817.            <link>https://news.slashdot.org/story/20/02/14/1746242/pale-blue-dot-revisited?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&amp;utm_medium=feed</link>
  818.            <description>cusco shares a report: For the 30th anniversary of one of the most iconic views from the Voyager mission, NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, is publishing a new version of the image known as the "Pale Blue Dot." The updated image uses modern image-processing software and techniques while respecting the intent of those who planned the image. Like the original, the new color view shows Planet Earth as a single, bright blue pixel in the vastness of space. Rays of sunlight scattered within the camera optics stretch across the scene, one of which happens to have intersected dramatically with Earth.
  819.  
  820. The view was obtained on Feb. 14, 1990, just minutes before Voyager 1's cameras were intentionally powered off to conserve power and because the probe -- along with its sibling, Voyager 2 -- would not make close flybys of any other objects during their lifetimes. Shutting down instruments and other systems on the two Voyager spacecraft has been a gradual and ongoing process that has helped enable their longevity. This celebrated Voyager 1 view was part of a series of 60 images designed to produce what the mission called the "Family Portrait of the Solar System." This sequence of camera-pointing commands returned images of six of the solar system's planets, as well as the Sun. The Pale Blue Dot view was created using the color images Voyager took of Earth. Planetary scientist Carolyn Porco shared the story behind the idea of Pale Blue Dot picture on Neil deGrasse Tyson's video podcast "Star Talk" last year. It's fascinating -- watch from 51:05 seconds and hang around for 13 minutes. Also the famous video where Carl Sagan describes the Pale Blue Dot. An interview he did on the subject later.&lt;p&gt;&lt;div class="share_submission" style="position:relative;"&gt;
  821. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://twitter.com/home?status='Pale+Blue+Dot'+Revisited%3A+http%3A%2F%2Fbit.ly%2F37qO0OL"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/twitter_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  822. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://www.facebook.com/sharer.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Fnews.slashdot.org%2Fstory%2F20%2F02%2F14%2F1746242%2Fpale-blue-dot-revisited%3Futm_source%3Dslashdot%26utm_medium%3Dfacebook"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/facebook_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  823.  
  824.  
  825.  
  826. &lt;/div&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;a href="https://news.slashdot.org/story/20/02/14/1746242/pale-blue-dot-revisited?utm_source=rss1.0moreanon&amp;amp;utm_medium=feed"&gt;Read more of this story&lt;/a&gt; at Slashdot.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;iframe src="https://slashdot.org/slashdot-it.pl?op=discuss&amp;amp;id=15778786&amp;amp;smallembed=1" style="height: 300px; width: 100%; border: none;"&gt;&lt;/iframe&gt;&lt;img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~4/Yd2bv58vyIY" height="1" width="1" alt=""/&gt;</description>
  827.            <pubDate>Fri, 14 Feb 2020 17:00:00 +0100</pubDate>
  828.        </item>
  829.        <item>
  830.            <title>Popular Preprint Servers Face Closure Because of Money Troubles</title>
  831.            <link>https://science.slashdot.org/story/20/02/14/1655219/popular-preprint-servers-face-closure-because-of-money-troubles?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&amp;utm_medium=feed</link>
  832.            <description>The rise of preprint repositories has helped scientists worldwide to share results and get feedback quickly. But several platforms that serve researchers in emerging economies are struggling to raise money to stay afloat. One, which hosts research from Indonesia, has decided to close because of this funding shortfall. From a report: INA-Rxiv, which was set up in 2017, was one of the first repositories to host studies from a particular region. Previous platforms served specific disciplines: for example, arXiv, the original preprint repository, hosts physical-sciences research, and bioRxiv is a popular repository for biology studies. Other region or language-specific repositories followed, including ArabiXiv, which hosts Arabic-language research; AfricArxiv and IndiaRxiv. Managers of these repositories say they increase exposure for research from the regions, and facilitate collaborations. INA-Rxiv, ArabiXiv, AfricArxiv and IndiaRxiv are run by volunteers around the world, but the servers are hosted online by the non-profit Center for Open Science (COS), based in Charlottesville, Virginia. The centre's platform hosts 26 repositories, including more than a dozen that are discipline-specific. In December 2018, the COS informed repository managers that from 2020, it would be introducing fees, charged to repository managers, to cover maintenance costs. The charges, which were finalized last December, start at about US$1,000 a year, and increase as repositories' annual submissions grow. The costs can be significant, particularly for repositories run by volunteers in emerging economies.&lt;p&gt;&lt;div class="share_submission" style="position:relative;"&gt;
  833. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://twitter.com/home?status=Popular+Preprint+Servers+Face+Closure+Because+of+Money+Troubles%3A+http%3A%2F%2Fbit.ly%2F2vutT59"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/twitter_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  834. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://www.facebook.com/sharer.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Fscience.slashdot.org%2Fstory%2F20%2F02%2F14%2F1655219%2Fpopular-preprint-servers-face-closure-because-of-money-troubles%3Futm_source%3Dslashdot%26utm_medium%3Dfacebook"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/facebook_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  835.  
  836.  
  837.  
  838. &lt;/div&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;a href="https://science.slashdot.org/story/20/02/14/1655219/popular-preprint-servers-face-closure-because-of-money-troubles?utm_source=rss1.0moreanon&amp;amp;utm_medium=feed"&gt;Read more of this story&lt;/a&gt; at Slashdot.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;iframe src="https://slashdot.org/slashdot-it.pl?op=discuss&amp;amp;id=15778636&amp;amp;smallembed=1" style="height: 300px; width: 100%; border: none;"&gt;&lt;/iframe&gt;&lt;img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~4/1kmYhv0CW6I" height="1" width="1" alt=""/&gt;</description>
  839.            <pubDate>Fri, 14 Feb 2020 16:22:00 +0100</pubDate>
  840.        </item>
  841.        <item>
  842.            <title>Data from Spotify Suggest That Listeners Are Gloomiest in February</title>
  843.            <link>https://entertainment.slashdot.org/story/20/02/14/1555239/data-from-spotify-suggest-that-listeners-are-gloomiest-in-february?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&amp;utm_medium=feed</link>
  844.            <description>Around the world, the most popular tunes this month will be depressing ones [Editor's note: the link may be paywalled.]. From a report: Residents of the northern hemisphere might think that their moods are worst in January. Christmas is over, the nights are long and summer is a distant prospect. Newspapers often claim that "Blue Monday," in the third week of January, is the most depressing day. To create a quantitative measure of seasonal misery, The Economist has analysed music consumption. Our calculations use data from Spotify, which offers 50m tracks to 270m users in over 70 countries, mostly in Europe and the Americas. The firm has an algorithm that classifies a song's "valence," or how happy it sounds, on a scale from 0 to 100. The algorithm is trained on ratings of positivity by musical experts, and gives Aretha Franklin's soaring "Respect" a score of 97; Radiohead's gloomy "Creep" gets just 10.
  845.  
  846. Since 2017 Spotify has also published daily tables of the 200 most-streamed songs, both worldwide and in each country. We gathered data for 30 countries around the globe, including 46,000 unique tracks with 330bn streams, to identify the annual nadir of musical mood. Drum roll, please. The global top 200 songs are gloomiest in February, when their valence is 4% lower than the annual average. In July, the perkiest month, the mood is 3% higher. The most joyful spike comes at Christmas. Strikingly, this February slump occurs in some countries near the equator, such as Singapore, and far south of it, such as Australia -- even though their musical tastes differ. A few Latin American countries lack such a dip, perhaps because the algorithm sees Latin music as mostly happy. The icy north shows the biggest seasonal swings. Finland's mood in July is 11% happier than usual. Overall, on days when a country gets one more hour of sunlight than its annual average, the valence of its streams increases by 0.6%. In contrast, wet days bring particularly downcast tunes.&lt;p&gt;&lt;div class="share_submission" style="position:relative;"&gt;
  847. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://twitter.com/home?status=Data+from+Spotify+Suggest+That+Listeners+Are+Gloomiest+in+February%3A+http%3A%2F%2Fbit.ly%2F38EsPKk"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/twitter_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
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  849.  
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  852. &lt;/div&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;a href="https://entertainment.slashdot.org/story/20/02/14/1555239/data-from-spotify-suggest-that-listeners-are-gloomiest-in-february?utm_source=rss1.0moreanon&amp;amp;utm_medium=feed"&gt;Read more of this story&lt;/a&gt; at Slashdot.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;iframe src="https://slashdot.org/slashdot-it.pl?op=discuss&amp;amp;id=15778442&amp;amp;smallembed=1" style="height: 300px; width: 100%; border: none;"&gt;&lt;/iframe&gt;&lt;img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~4/HwbxQQ6fr3w" height="1" width="1" alt=""/&gt;</description>
  853.            <pubDate>Fri, 14 Feb 2020 15:41:00 +0100</pubDate>
  854.        </item>
  855.        <item>
  856.            <title>UK Police Deny Responsibility For Poster Urging Parents To Report Kids For Using Kali Linux</title>
  857.            <link>https://news.slashdot.org/story/20/02/14/1545228/uk-police-deny-responsibility-for-poster-urging-parents-to-report-kids-for-using-kali-linux?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&amp;utm_medium=feed</link>
  858.            <description>The UK's National Crime Agency (NCA) has publicly said it has nothing to do with a misleading poster designed to put fear into the hearts of parents and urge them to call the police if their children are using Kali Linux. From a report: The poster, made public by Twitter user @G_IW, has reportedly been distributed by local authorities on behalf of the West Midlands Regional Organised Crime Unit (WMROCU). It appears the creators of the poster are aiming to inform parents of what dubious software to look out for if they suspect their children are up to no good on the computer. While a good and reasonable intention, the disinformation on the poster, as described by @G_IW, is "staggering." Virtual machines, the Tor Browser, Kali Linux, WiFi Pineapple, Discord, and Metasploit are all deemed terrible finds and the poster urges parents to call the cops "so we can give advice and engage them into positive diversions."&lt;p&gt;&lt;div class="share_submission" style="position:relative;"&gt;
  859. &lt;a class="slashpop" href="http://twitter.com/home?status=UK+Police+Deny+Responsibility+For+Poster+Urging+Parents+To+Report+Kids+For+Using+Kali+Linux%3A+http%3A%2F%2Fbit.ly%2F39AMyuO"&gt;&lt;img src="https://a.fsdn.com/sd/twitter_icon_large.png"&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
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  861.  
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  864. &lt;/div&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;a href="https://news.slashdot.org/story/20/02/14/1545228/uk-police-deny-responsibility-for-poster-urging-parents-to-report-kids-for-using-kali-linux?utm_source=rss1.0moreanon&amp;amp;utm_medium=feed"&gt;Read more of this story&lt;/a&gt; at Slashdot.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;iframe src="https://slashdot.org/slashdot-it.pl?op=discuss&amp;amp;id=15778402&amp;amp;smallembed=1" style="height: 300px; width: 100%; border: none;"&gt;&lt;/iframe&gt;&lt;img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~4/wSJgMmtUVkY" height="1" width="1" alt=""/&gt;</description>
  865.            <pubDate>Fri, 14 Feb 2020 15:01:00 +0100</pubDate>
  866.        </item>
  867.    </channel>
  868. </rss>
  869.  

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