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  11. <title>Initial Charge</title>
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  13. <link>http://initialcharge.net</link>
  14. <description>A daily weblog written by Michael Rockwell which focuses on Apple products, mobile software, the internet, and other geek-related topics.</description>
  15. <lastBuildDate>Fri, 28 Jul 2017 15:04:00 +0000</lastBuildDate>
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  21. <title>The Nano and Shuffle Discontinuation</title>
  22. <link>http://initialcharge.net/feeder/?FeederAction=clicked&amp;feed=Articles+%28RSS2%29&amp;seed=http%3A%2F%2Finitialcharge.net%2F2017%2F07%2Fnano-shuffle-discontinued%2F&amp;seed_title=The+Nano+and+Shuffle+Discontinuation</link>
  23. <pubDate>Fri, 28 Jul 2017 15:04:00 +0000</pubDate>
  24. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Michael Rockwell]]></dc:creator>
  25. <category><![CDATA[Feature]]></category>
  26. <category><![CDATA[Apple]]></category>
  27. <category><![CDATA[Business Insider]]></category>
  28. <category><![CDATA[iPod]]></category>
  29. <category><![CDATA[iPod nano]]></category>
  30. <category><![CDATA[iPod shuffle]]></category>
  31.  
  32. <guid isPermaLink="false">http://initialcharge.net/?p=16959</guid>
  33. <description><![CDATA[As you may have heard, Apple quietly discontinued the iPod Nano and iPod Shuffle yesterday. The move wasn&#8217;t done alongside a press release or a statement, Instead, Apple simply removed the items from their online store. And people noticed. The news was later confirmed by Business Insider, who received confirmation from Apple that the Nano [&#8230;]]]></description>
  34. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>As you may have heard, Apple quietly discontinued the iPod Nano and iPod Shuffle yesterday. The move wasn&#8217;t done alongside a press release or a statement, Instead, Apple simply removed the items from their online store. <a href="https://www.macrumors.com/2017/07/27/apple-removes-ipod-nano-ipod-shuffle/">And</a> <a href="http://www.kirkville.com/ipod-rip/">people</a> <a href="https://9to5mac.com/2017/07/27/apple-removes-ipod-shuffle-nano-sale-discontinue/">noticed</a>. The news was later confirmed by <a href="http://www.businessinsider.com/apple-kills-off-ipod-nano-ipod-shuffle-2017-7">Business Insider</a>, who received confirmation from Apple that the Nano and Shuffle were, indeed, discontinued.</p>
  35. <p>The Nano and Shuffle will still be available in some retail stores while supplies last, but this news leaves the <a href="https://www.apple.com/ipod-touch/">iPod Touch</a> as the only &#8220;iPod&#8221; branded product in Apple&#8217;s lineup. You&#8217;ll get more storage for your money with the iPod Touch today, though. Apple has increased storage capacities on the two models — 32GB for $199 and 128GB for $299.</p>
  36. <p>The first-generation iPod Nano was the first Apple product I ever owned. I received it as a Christmas gift in 2005 and it marked a turning point in my computing life. Prior to owning the iPod, I was a dedicated PC enthusiast. I was enthralled by graphics cards, motherboards, processors, and all other forms of computer components. All I wanted to do was build computers and set them up. But the iPod changed that.</p>
  37. <p>The iPod Nano acted as the halo product that everyone claimed it to be. From the moment I connected the iPod Nano to my PC and configured it in iTunes, I was hooked. I had never interacted with a device that was so easy to use and <em>fun</em> to manage. Nothing felt like a chore. Once I had my sync settings just right, I could connect the iPod once a day and all of my new music and podcasts would automatically transfer. It was like magic.</p>
  38. <p>The iPod Nano allowed me to dip my toes in the water before jumping in the following year by purchasing a MacBook for college. If it wasn&#8217;t for the iPod Nano, I might never have fallen in love with Apple design aesthetics and acquired a dozen or so Apple devices over the past twelve years.</p>
  39. <p>I can imagine my story is no different from millions of others who first realized how great computing devices could be when they purchased an iPod. But it&#8217;s time to put the Nano and Shuffle out to pasture. The smartphone, being <a href="http://www.amazon.com/dp/031654616X/?tag=initialcharge-20">The One Device</a> that it is, has completely obliterated the dedicated music player market. The Nano and Shuffle served their roles well, but there&#8217;s no reason to sell a single-purpose device when the iPhone can do everything the iPod could, and more.</p>
  40. <p>Pour one out for two of the best halo products Apple ever had.</p>
  41. ]]></content:encoded>
  42. </item>
  43. <item>
  44. <title><![CDATA[How Jony Ive Masterminded Apple&#8217;s New Headquarters ➝]]></title>
  45. <link><![CDATA[https://apple.news/AZmal7GmaRQmG72TnCeukNA]]></link>
  46. <pubDate>Thu, 27 Jul 2017 04:30:00 +0000</pubDate>
  47. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Michael Rockwell]]></dc:creator>
  48. <category><![CDATA[Linked List]]></category>
  49. <category><![CDATA[Apple]]></category>
  50. <category><![CDATA[Apple Park]]></category>
  51. <category><![CDATA[Christina Passariello]]></category>
  52. <category><![CDATA[Jony Ive]]></category>
  53. <category><![CDATA[The Wall Street Journal]]></category>
  54.  
  55. <guid isPermaLink="false">http://initialcharge.net/?p=16956</guid>
  56. <description><![CDATA[If you&#8217;ve been searching for a way to bypass the Wall Street Journal&#8217;s paywall to read Christina Passariello&#8217;s recent piece on Apple Park and Jony Ive, the full article is available on Apple News. Of course, that means you&#8217;ll have to read it on an iOS device, since Apple hasn&#8217;t released a News app for [&#8230;]<p><a href="http://initialcharge.net/feeder/?FeederAction=clicked&amp;feed=Articles+%28RSS2%29&amp;seed=http%3A%2F%2Finitialcharge.net%2F2017%2F07%2Fpassariello-apple-park%2F&amp;seed_title=%3C%21%5BCDATA%5BHow+Jony+Ive+Masterminded+Apple%26%238217%3Bs+New+Headquarters+%E2%9E%9D%5D%5D%3E" rel="bookmark" title="Permanent link to 'How Jony Ive Masterminded Apple&#8217;s New Headquarters'" class="glyph">∞ Permalink</a></p>
  57. ]]></description>
  58. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>If you&#8217;ve been searching for a way to bypass the Wall Street Journal&#8217;s paywall to read <a href="https://www.wsj.com/articles/how-jony-ive-masterminded-apples-new-headquarters-1501063201">Christina Passariello&#8217;s recent piece</a> on Apple Park and Jony Ive, the full article is available on Apple News. Of course, that means you&#8217;ll have to read it on an iOS device, since Apple hasn&#8217;t released a News app for macOS yet.</p>
  59. <p><strong>Update:</strong> <a href="https://pxlnv.com/linklog/wsj-mag-apple-park/">Nick Heer</a> found another way to bypass the paywall — the full article is displayed when visiting the page from <a href="https://t.co/mR2XIbaqRL">this t.co link</a>.</p>
  60. <p><a href="http://initialcharge.net/feeder/?FeederAction=clicked&amp;feed=Articles+%28RSS2%29&amp;seed=http%3A%2F%2Finitialcharge.net%2F2017%2F07%2Fpassariello-apple-park%2F&amp;seed_title=%3C%21%5BCDATA%5BHow+Jony+Ive+Masterminded+Apple%26%238217%3Bs+New+Headquarters+%E2%9E%9D%5D%5D%3E" rel="bookmark" title="Permanent link to 'How Jony Ive Masterminded Apple&#8217;s New Headquarters'" class="glyph">∞ Permalink</a></p>
  61. ]]></content:encoded>
  62. </item>
  63. <item>
  64. <title><![CDATA[The End of Flash ➝]]></title>
  65. <link><![CDATA[https://blogs.adobe.com/conversations/2017/07/adobe-flash-update.html]]></link>
  66. <pubDate>Tue, 25 Jul 2017 17:59:00 +0000</pubDate>
  67. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Michael Rockwell]]></dc:creator>
  68. <category><![CDATA[Linked List]]></category>
  69. <category><![CDATA[Adobe]]></category>
  70. <category><![CDATA[Daring Fireball]]></category>
  71. <category><![CDATA[Flash]]></category>
  72. <category><![CDATA[John Gruber]]></category>
  73.  
  74. <guid isPermaLink="false">http://initialcharge.net/?p=16953</guid>
  75. <description><![CDATA[Adobe: Given this progress, and in collaboration with several of our technology partners – including Apple, Facebook, Google, Microsoft and Mozilla – Adobe is planning to end-of-life Flash. Specifically, we will stop updating and distributing the Flash Player at the end of 2020 and encourage content creators to migrate any existing Flash content to these [&#8230;]<p><a href="http://initialcharge.net/feeder/?FeederAction=clicked&amp;feed=Articles+%28RSS2%29&amp;seed=http%3A%2F%2Finitialcharge.net%2F2017%2F07%2Fflash-eol%2F&amp;seed_title=%3C%21%5BCDATA%5BThe+End+of+Flash+%E2%9E%9D%5D%5D%3E" rel="bookmark" title="Permanent link to 'The End of Flash'" class="glyph">∞ Permalink</a></p>
  76. ]]></description>
  77. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Adobe:</p>
  78. <blockquote>
  79. <p>Given this progress, and in collaboration with several of our technology partners – including <a href="https://webkit.org/blog/7839/adobe-announces-flash-distribution-and-updates-to-end/">Apple</a>, <a href="https://developers.facebook.com/blog/post/2017/07/25/Games-Migration-to-Open-Web-Standards/">Facebook</a>, <a href="https://www.blog.google/products/chrome/saying-goodbye-flash-chrome/">Google</a>, <a href="https://blogs.windows.com/msedgedev/2017/07/25/flash-on-windows-timeline/">Microsoft</a> and <a href="https://blog.mozilla.org/futurereleases/2017/07/25/firefox-roadmap-flash-end-life/">Mozilla</a> – Adobe is planning to end-of-life Flash. Specifically, we will stop updating and distributing the Flash Player at the end of 2020 and encourage content creators to migrate any existing Flash content to these new open formats.</p>
  80. </blockquote>
  81. <p>I haven&#8217;t had the Flash plug-in installed in my primary browser since <a href="https://daringfireball.net/2010/11/flash_free_and_cheating_with_google_chrome">2010</a>. And, with my transition to iOS over the past few years, I haven&#8217;t missed it one bit. I&#8217;m glad they&#8217;re finally pulling the plug on it. Although, I think they should have done it sooner.</p>
  82. <p><a href="http://initialcharge.net/feeder/?FeederAction=clicked&amp;feed=Articles+%28RSS2%29&amp;seed=http%3A%2F%2Finitialcharge.net%2F2017%2F07%2Fflash-eol%2F&amp;seed_title=%3C%21%5BCDATA%5BThe+End+of+Flash+%E2%9E%9D%5D%5D%3E" rel="bookmark" title="Permanent link to 'The End of Flash'" class="glyph">∞ Permalink</a></p>
  83. ]]></content:encoded>
  84. </item>
  85. <item>
  86. <title><![CDATA[Apple Maps in iOS 11 ➝]]></title>
  87. <link><![CDATA[http://www.loopinsight.com/2017/07/24/the-most-improved-apple-app-in-ios-11/]]></link>
  88. <pubDate>Mon, 24 Jul 2017 21:20:00 +0000</pubDate>
  89. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Michael Rockwell]]></dc:creator>
  90. <category><![CDATA[Linked List]]></category>
  91. <category><![CDATA[Apple]]></category>
  92. <category><![CDATA[Apple Maps]]></category>
  93. <category><![CDATA[iOS]]></category>
  94. <category><![CDATA[iOS 11]]></category>
  95. <category><![CDATA[iPhone]]></category>
  96. <category><![CDATA[Jim Dalrymple]]></category>
  97.  
  98. <guid isPermaLink="false">http://initialcharge.net/?p=16951</guid>
  99. <description><![CDATA[Jim Dalrymple: Apple Maps now has lane guidance in iOS 11 and it works perfectly. I haven’t taken a trip to LA since I’ve been using it, but I have gone to a couple of places I hadn’t been before and it worked just as I expected. Maps now also shows you what turn is [&#8230;]<p><a href="http://initialcharge.net/feeder/?FeederAction=clicked&amp;feed=Articles+%28RSS2%29&amp;seed=http%3A%2F%2Finitialcharge.net%2F2017%2F07%2Fdalrymple-lane-guidance%2F&amp;seed_title=%3C%21%5BCDATA%5BApple+Maps+in+iOS+11+%E2%9E%9D%5D%5D%3E" rel="bookmark" title="Permanent link to 'Apple Maps in iOS 11'" class="glyph">∞ Permalink</a></p>
  100. ]]></description>
  101. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Jim Dalrymple:</p>
  102. <blockquote>
  103. <p>Apple Maps now has lane guidance in iOS 11 and it works perfectly. I haven’t taken a trip to LA since I’ve been using it, but I have gone to a couple of places I hadn’t been before and it worked just as I expected.</p>
  104. <p>Maps now also shows you what turn is coming up next. For example, on the top of the mapping screen it will show that you need to make a left hand turn—directly under that, it will show you that your next turn is a right. This helps you determine which lane you should be in.</p>
  105. </blockquote>
  106. <p>My wife and I take several road trips throughout the year and rely on Apple Maps for turn-by-turn navigation. These improvements will make for a much more enjoyable experience while driving. I can&#8217;t wait to use them.</p>
  107. <p><a href="http://initialcharge.net/feeder/?FeederAction=clicked&amp;feed=Articles+%28RSS2%29&amp;seed=http%3A%2F%2Finitialcharge.net%2F2017%2F07%2Fdalrymple-lane-guidance%2F&amp;seed_title=%3C%21%5BCDATA%5BApple+Maps+in+iOS+11+%E2%9E%9D%5D%5D%3E" rel="bookmark" title="Permanent link to 'Apple Maps in iOS 11'" class="glyph">∞ Permalink</a></p>
  108. ]]></content:encoded>
  109. </item>
  110. <item>
  111. <title>On Subscription Pricing</title>
  112. <link>http://initialcharge.net/feeder/?FeederAction=clicked&amp;feed=Articles+%28RSS2%29&amp;seed=http%3A%2F%2Finitialcharge.net%2F2017%2F07%2Fsubscription-pricing%2F&amp;seed_title=On+Subscription+Pricing</link>
  113. <pubDate>Sat, 22 Jul 2017 12:30:00 +0000</pubDate>
  114. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Michael Rockwell]]></dc:creator>
  115. <category><![CDATA[Feature]]></category>
  116. <category><![CDATA[1Password]]></category>
  117. <category><![CDATA[App Store]]></category>
  118. <category><![CDATA[Application]]></category>
  119. <category><![CDATA[Developers]]></category>
  120. <category><![CDATA[Michael Tsai]]></category>
  121. <category><![CDATA[Nick Heer]]></category>
  122. <category><![CDATA[Plex]]></category>
  123.  
  124. <guid isPermaLink="false">http://initialcharge.net/?p=16948</guid>
  125. <description><![CDATA[Michael Tsai: My hunch is that, for an app under ongoing development, many people would be fine paying a subscription that averages out to about the same amount they had previously been paying per year (initial purchase plus occasional upgrades). […] But that doesn’t seem to be what’s been happening. Instead, we’ve seen subscriptions combined [&#8230;]]]></description>
  126. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p><a href="https://mjtsai.com/blog/2017/07/20/productivity-apps-and-subscription-pricing/">Michael Tsai</a>:</p>
  127. <blockquote>
  128. <p>My hunch is that, for an app under ongoing development, many people would be fine paying a subscription that averages out to about the same amount they had previously been paying per year (initial purchase plus occasional upgrades). […]</p>
  129. <p>But that doesn’t seem to be what’s been happening. Instead, we’ve seen subscriptions <em>combined</em> with price increases, customers balking, and insinuations that people just don’t want to pay for anything anymore. With more than one variable changing at once, I don’t think we can conclude that people hate subscriptions.</p>
  130. </blockquote>
  131. <p>I&#8217;ve spent <em>a lot</em> of money on software during the App Store era, it&#8217;s not uncommon for me to spend ten or twenty dollars on random apps that I don&#8217;t even use a few weeks later. I&#8217;m not one to hesitate if an application seems like it will be useful to me. But I&#8217;ve been uneasy about subscription pricing since the day it was made available for non-media apps.</p>
  132. <p>I understand that the current state of software economics is a bit broken and that the race to the bottom has made it incredibly difficult for indie app developers to make a living. But it seems like <em>every single application</em> that transitions to a subscription model is pricing their software <em>much higher</em> than what I would be willing to pay.</p>
  133. <p><a href="https://1password.com/">1Password</a> is the perfect example of this. I rely on 1Password to keep my login credentials secure and in-sync across all of my devices. My password vault lives in iCloud and I don&#8217;t <em>need</em> any of their premium subscription features. But I would still be willing to pay for a subscription to 1Password to help support the developers and on the off-chance that I find one of their premium features to be useful. I&#8217;m not willing to pay $36 each year for it, though.</p>
  134. <p>Maybe 1Password is just giving too much away for free right now and, as a result, the app&#8217;s perceived value is lower than it should be. Or maybe <em>any</em> transition to a new business model would make me feel uncomfortable, regardless of what the new model is. But the thought of paying <em>$36 every single year</em> for an application that, to my eyes, is feature complete seems <em>ludicrous</em> to me.</p>
  135. <p>If the 1Password subscription was half the price, though, I&#8217;d pay for it in a heart beat. Granted, everyone&#8217;s threshold is different, but I think developers are pricing their subscriptions too high. I can&#8217;t exactly blame them, this is <em>mostly</em> uncharted territory and it may take some experimentation before the market finds comfortable price points. From what I&#8217;ve seen so far, though, prices need to come down before customers are willing to jump in.</p>
  136. <p><a href="https://pxlnv.com/linklog/tsai-subscription-pricing/">Nick Heer</a> points out that there&#8217;s an additional wrinkle in this new model that developers need to keep in mind when they&#8217;re pricing their subscriptions:</p>
  137. <blockquote>
  138. <p>But I think one thing a lot of developers might forget is that their subscription is not the only one a user has to make a decision on: as more apps adopt this model, users have to make more decisions about which software they can really afford.</p>
  139. </blockquote>
  140. <p>Assuming the prices are fair, the first few subscriptions are much easier to sign up for than the fourth and fifth. Subscription pricing just doesn&#8217;t scale well. If I had to pay a monthly fee for all of the apps I use regularly, I&#8217;d go bankrupt.</p>
  141. <p>Maybe the solution to this whole mess is a multi-tiered pricing model similar to what Plex has done with it&#8217;s <a href="https://www.plex.tv/features/plex-pass/">Plex Pass</a>. They offer three pricing options for customers — $5 each month, $40 each year, or you can purchase a lifetime pass for $150 (currently discounted to $120). This gives each customer the option to pay what they feel comfortable with and, if it&#8217;s priced right, the majority of customers will choose the option that&#8217;s most lucrative for the developer. If I was developing an app with subscription pricing, this is what I&#8217;d want to be doing.</p>
  142. ]]></content:encoded>
  143. </item>
  144. <item>
  145. <title><![CDATA[Muscle Memory ➝]]></title>
  146. <link><![CDATA[http://www.joecieplinski.com/blog/2017/07/20/muscle-memory/]]></link>
  147. <pubDate>Fri, 21 Jul 2017 22:31:00 +0000</pubDate>
  148. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Michael Rockwell]]></dc:creator>
  149. <category><![CDATA[Linked List]]></category>
  150. <category><![CDATA[Apple]]></category>
  151. <category><![CDATA[Flick Keyboard]]></category>
  152. <category><![CDATA[iOS]]></category>
  153. <category><![CDATA[iOS 11]]></category>
  154. <category><![CDATA[iPad]]></category>
  155. <category><![CDATA[Joe Cieplinski]]></category>
  156. <category><![CDATA[Keyboard]]></category>
  157.  
  158. <guid isPermaLink="false">http://initialcharge.net/?p=16946</guid>
  159. <description><![CDATA[A great piece by Joe Cieplinski on the frustrating transition to iOS 11&#8217;s Flick Keyboard. I&#8217;ve had iOS 11 on my iPad since the public beta went live a few weeks ago and I&#8217;m still having trouble with the new keyboard. The biggest pain points for me have been hyphens, asterisks, and square brackets. Basically, [&#8230;]<p><a href="http://initialcharge.net/feeder/?FeederAction=clicked&amp;feed=Articles+%28RSS2%29&amp;seed=http%3A%2F%2Finitialcharge.net%2F2017%2F07%2Fmuscle-memory-ios-keyboard%2F&amp;seed_title=%3C%21%5BCDATA%5BMuscle+Memory+%E2%9E%9D%5D%5D%3E" rel="bookmark" title="Permanent link to 'Muscle Memory'" class="glyph">∞ Permalink</a></p>
  160. ]]></description>
  161. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>A great piece by Joe Cieplinski on the frustrating transition to iOS 11&#8217;s Flick Keyboard. I&#8217;ve had iOS 11 on my iPad since the <a href="https://beta.apple.com/sp/betaprogram/">public beta</a> went live a few weeks ago and I&#8217;m still having trouble with the new keyboard. The biggest pain points for me have been hyphens, asterisks, and square brackets. Basically, if it&#8217;s commonly used while writing in Markdown, I&#8217;m probably having a hard time remember where it has been moved to.</p>
  162. <p><a href="http://initialcharge.net/feeder/?FeederAction=clicked&amp;feed=Articles+%28RSS2%29&amp;seed=http%3A%2F%2Finitialcharge.net%2F2017%2F07%2Fmuscle-memory-ios-keyboard%2F&amp;seed_title=%3C%21%5BCDATA%5BMuscle+Memory+%E2%9E%9D%5D%5D%3E" rel="bookmark" title="Permanent link to 'Muscle Memory'" class="glyph">∞ Permalink</a></p>
  163. ]]></content:encoded>
  164. </item>
  165. <item>
  166. <title>Canopy by Studio Neat</title>
  167. <link>http://initialcharge.net/feeder/?FeederAction=clicked&amp;feed=Articles+%28RSS2%29&amp;seed=http%3A%2F%2Finitialcharge.net%2F2017%2F07%2Fcanopy-review%2F&amp;seed_title=Canopy+by+Studio+Neat</link>
  168. <pubDate>Fri, 21 Jul 2017 12:29:00 +0000</pubDate>
  169. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Michael Rockwell]]></dc:creator>
  170. <category><![CDATA[Feature]]></category>
  171. <category><![CDATA[Accessory]]></category>
  172. <category><![CDATA[Apple]]></category>
  173. <category><![CDATA[Canopy]]></category>
  174. <category><![CDATA[iPad]]></category>
  175. <category><![CDATA[iPad Stand]]></category>
  176. <category><![CDATA[Magic Keyboard]]></category>
  177. <category><![CDATA[Studio Neat]]></category>
  178.  
  179. <guid isPermaLink="false">http://initialcharge.net/?p=16943</guid>
  180. <description><![CDATA[From an accessory standpoint, I&#8217;m a bit of a minimalist. I don&#8217;t have a case on my iPhone or iPad and prefer to carry as few items in my tech bag as possible. The less I have to schlep around the better. And when I&#8217;m looking to add new items to my setup, I have [&#8230;]]]></description>
  181. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>From an accessory standpoint, I&#8217;m a bit of a minimalist. I don&#8217;t have a case on my iPhone or iPad and prefer to carry as few items in my tech bag as possible. The less I have to schlep around the better. And when I&#8217;m looking to add new items to my setup, I have a high barrier to entry — the product has to be well-made <em>and</em> provide incredible utility before it finds a permanent home in my kit.</p>
  182. <p>For years, my iPad stand of choice was the <a href="http://www.amazon.com/dp/B0053XG1AC/?tag=initialcharge-20">Compass by Twelve South</a>. A simple, foldable stand made out of heavy gauge steel with rubber feet. It can hold most iPads in portrait or landscape, at two different angles, without too much wobble when tapping the top corners of the screen.</p>
  183. <p>The Compass is a great product, but Twelve South released an updated version — the <a href="https://www.twelvesouth.com/product/compass2">Compass 2</a> — a few years ago, which is a major regression. The feet sit much closer together compared to the original Compass and, as a result, it offers far less stability when tapping on the edges of the screen. If you can still find an original Compass, I highly recommend it.</p>
  184. <p><img src="http://initialcharge.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/top-down-canopy.jpeg" alt="Canopy Beside iPhone and AirPods"/></p>
  185. <p>I bought the Compass when it first become available — during the original iPad era. But last year it was beginning to show signs of its age with relatively loose hinges and one foot that swung further open than the other, which had my iPad sitting a bit askew. It worked, but I thought I was better off buying a new one <em>before</em> it became unusable and while Amazon still had them available.</p>
  186. <p>The Compass was an important accessory for me. Whenever I would type a feature article, my iPad Air 2 would be propped-up in the Compass with my Bluetooth keyboard on the desk in front of it. I&#8217;ve typed tens of thousands of words with that setup and the thought of having to find a new stand was a bit unnerving — there&#8217;s very few iPad stands on the market that collapse into such a small package and still offer great stability for your device.</p>
  187. <p>But earlier this year, in an effort to <a href="http://initialcharge.net/2017/03/transitioning-to-lightning/">transition all of my accessories to Lightning-powered variants</a>, I retired my old, AA-powered <a href="http://www.amazon.com/dp/B002TMRZOQ/?tag=initialcharge-20">Apple Bluetooth Keyboard</a> and purchased a <a href="http://www.amazon.com/dp/B016QO64FI/?tag=initialcharge-20">Magic Keyboard</a>. It took some getting used to, especially the odd arrow key configuration, but I&#8217;ve grown to love it. The keys produce a satisfying sound while typing and the slim profile allows it to easily slip into a small bag.</p>
  188. <p>After a few months with the keyboard, I realized that my iPad habits were changing. I was writing less content for Initial Charge with the on-screen keyboard than ever before. Even if I just planned on writing a paragraph or two in a <a href="http://initialcharge.net/category/links/">Linked List</a> entry, I would get out the keyboard and setup my iPad in the Compass.</p>
  189. <p>I can&#8217;t exactly put my finger on why this happened. Prior to purchasing the Magic Keyboard, I would frequently use the Compass alone, laid back in &#8220;typing mode&#8221;, to write shorter pieces with the on-screen keyboard. But over the past few months, the Magic Keyboard and Compass became inseparable, I never used one without the other. And I saw this as an opportunity to further simplify my kit.</p>
  190. <p><img src="http://initialcharge.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/canopy-folded.jpeg" alt="Canopy Stacked on iPad"/></p>
  191. <p><a href="http://www.amazon.com/dp/B06XWY56J8/?tag=initialcharge-20">Studio Neat&#8217;s Canopy</a> seemed like the perfect addition to my setup. The Canopy is a slim Magic Keyboard case that folds out into a stand for the iPad. It offers the functionality I need from the Compass without the increased volume in my bag — it only adds a few millimeters to each side of the Magic Keyboard.</p>
  192. <p>I was first made aware of the Canopy when John Voorhees wrote about it on <a href="https://www.macstories.net/news/studio-neat-reveals-canopy-a-magic-keyboard-case-and-stand/">MacStories</a>. It looked like a great product, which is what I would expect given Studio Neat&#8217;s reputation. With the idea of simplifying my setup in mind, I ordered the Canopy about a month ago and have used it on a near-daily-basis since it arrived.</p>
  193. <p>My first surprise upon receiving the Canopy was that it attaches to the Magic Keyboard using &#8220;micro-suction pads&#8221;. Perhaps I should have read the <a href="https://www.studioneat.com/products/canopy">product page</a> a little more thoroughly, but for some reason I assumed the keyboard was attached in such a way that I could remove it more easily.</p>
  194. <p>With these micro-suction pads, there&#8217;s a finite number of times your keyboard can be detached. With each removal, the suction pads&#8217; stickiness weakens. When I first placed my keyboard inside the Canopy, it was a bit off-center and it took a few tries to get it right. Even with just a few removals, I could notice the degradation of stickiness. And because of that, you&#8217;ll probably want your Magic Keyboard to just <em>live</em> inside the Canopy.</p>
  195. <p>Having your Magic Keyboard permanently placed inside the Canopy means that it probably isn&#8217;t a great fit for anyone that uses the same keyboard on their iPad as they do on their Mac. You could certainly lay the Canopy flat when your keyboard is paired with a Mac, but you&#8217;d need a fair bit of desk space between your keyboard and display, which might not be practical for some users.</p>
  196. <p><img src="http://initialcharge.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/canopy-angle.jpeg" alt="iPad in Canopy"/></p>
  197. <p>One concern I had before using it myself was the way the iPad sat up against the top edge of the keyboard — the Canopy doesn&#8217;t offer any material to act as a buffer between the two. There&#8217;s the possibility that the keyboard&#8217;s aluminum housing could scratch the iPad, but I haven&#8217;t had any blemishes develop yet.</p>
  198. <p>In the four weeks that I&#8217;ve had the Canopy, it has held up quite well. I&#8217;ve noticed some minor fraying develop on the front edge from opening and closing, but overall, the whole thing feels solid. The material is rigid enough to hold your iPad without any wobble from screen taps and the snap mechanism that keeps the stand upright, while in use, and holds it closed, while it&#8217;s folded up, feels like it could withstand years of abuse. The fraying would be concerning, but I don&#8217;t expect it to snowball into something that renders the Canopy unusable.</p>
  199. <p>Studio Neat&#8217;s Canopy is perfect for iPad-only (or iPad-mostly) users who enjoy typing on the Magic Keyboard and prefer to use their iPad without a case. Which isn&#8217;t to say that you couldn&#8217;t use the Canopy alongside an iPad case — there&#8217;s certainly enough room to — but it&#8217;s refreshing to find a product that&#8217;s designed to help you add a physical keyboard to your iPad that doesn&#8217;t also <em>attach</em> to your iPad. The Canopy gives you much of the benefits of an iPad keyboard case without having to <em>actually</em> use an iPad keyboard case — most of which are ugly and miserable to use.</p>
  200. <p>The Canopy stands out from the keyboard accessory crowd because it combines sturdy materials and a brilliant aesthetic with a keyboard that feels good to type on. It folds up quickly to throw in a bag and sets up easily to reduce friction between you and your work. It&#8217;s the kind of accessory that doesn&#8217;t get in your way while your using it, but reminds you of how well-built and handsome it is every time you set it up or snap it closed.</p>
  201. <p>At $40, the Canopy might seem like an expensive product, especially since you have to purchase the keyboard separately. But I think it offers enough utility in such a slim package that it&#8217;s more than worth the cost. If you&#8217;re looking for an iPad typing solution that doesn&#8217;t add much bulk to your bag, <a href="https://www.studioneat.com/products/canopy">the Canopy</a> is a great solution.</p>
  202. ]]></content:encoded>
  203. </item>
  204. <item>
  205. <title><![CDATA[Apple Unveils Smart Home Experiences in Its Retail Stores ➝]]></title>
  206. <link><![CDATA[https://techcrunch.com/2017/07/12/apple-unveils-smart-home-experiences-in-its-retail-stores-worldwide/]]></link>
  207. <pubDate>Sat, 15 Jul 2017 23:57:00 +0000</pubDate>
  208. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Michael Rockwell]]></dc:creator>
  209. <category><![CDATA[Linked List]]></category>
  210. <category><![CDATA[Apple]]></category>
  211. <category><![CDATA[HomeKit]]></category>
  212. <category><![CDATA[Megan Rose Dickey]]></category>
  213. <category><![CDATA[Retail]]></category>
  214. <category><![CDATA[TechCrunch]]></category>
  215.  
  216. <guid isPermaLink="false">http://initialcharge.net/?p=16930</guid>
  217. <description><![CDATA[Megan Rose Dickey, reporting for TechCrunch: Now, when you go into Apple’s new retail stores, you’ll be able to use the Home app from either an Apple Watch, iPhone or iPad to control devices like the Philips Hue light bulb, the Hunter ceiling fan and many others. If you tap to lower the shades in [&#8230;]<p><a href="http://initialcharge.net/feeder/?FeederAction=clicked&amp;feed=Articles+%28RSS2%29&amp;seed=http%3A%2F%2Finitialcharge.net%2F2017%2F07%2Fhomekit-retail-displays%2F&amp;seed_title=%3C%21%5BCDATA%5BApple+Unveils+Smart+Home+Experiences+in+Its+Retail+Stores+%E2%9E%9D%5D%5D%3E" rel="bookmark" title="Permanent link to 'Apple Unveils Smart Home Experiences in Its Retail Stores'" class="glyph">∞ Permalink</a></p>
  218. ]]></description>
  219. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Megan Rose Dickey, reporting for TechCrunch:</p>
  220. <blockquote>
  221. <p>Now, when you go into Apple’s new retail stores, you’ll be able to use the Home app from either an Apple Watch, iPhone or iPad to control devices like the Philips Hue light bulb, the Hunter ceiling fan and many others. If you tap to lower the shades in the living room, for example, you’ll see the shades lower in the house shown on the screen.</p>
  222. </blockquote>
  223. <p>It&#8217;s disappointing that the devices aren&#8217;t controlling any <em>actual</em> HomeKit products, but building a mock living room inside each Apple Store might not be a practical solution.</p>
  224. <p><a href="http://initialcharge.net/feeder/?FeederAction=clicked&amp;feed=Articles+%28RSS2%29&amp;seed=http%3A%2F%2Finitialcharge.net%2F2017%2F07%2Fhomekit-retail-displays%2F&amp;seed_title=%3C%21%5BCDATA%5BApple+Unveils+Smart+Home+Experiences+in+Its+Retail+Stores+%E2%9E%9D%5D%5D%3E" rel="bookmark" title="Permanent link to 'Apple Unveils Smart Home Experiences in Its Retail Stores'" class="glyph">∞ Permalink</a></p>
  225. ]]></content:encoded>
  226. </item>
  227. <item>
  228. <title><![CDATA[The iPhone Is the Camera I&#8217;ve Used to Capture My Life ➝]]></title>
  229. <link><![CDATA[https://birchtree.me/blog/the-iphone-is-the-camera-ive-used-to-capture-my-life/]]></link>
  230. <pubDate>Fri, 14 Jul 2017 19:52:00 +0000</pubDate>
  231. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Michael Rockwell]]></dc:creator>
  232. <category><![CDATA[Linked List]]></category>
  233. <category><![CDATA[Austin Mann]]></category>
  234. <category><![CDATA[iPhone]]></category>
  235. <category><![CDATA[Matt Birchler]]></category>
  236. <category><![CDATA[Photography]]></category>
  237.  
  238. <guid isPermaLink="false">http://initialcharge.net/?p=16928</guid>
  239. <description><![CDATA[Matt Birchler, regarding Austin Mann&#8217;s 10 Years of iPhone: People have not always photographed their lives like we do today. I take pictures of everything and I don’t do it because I think every moment of life is worth framing on a wall, but because every little moment might be worth remembering down the line. [&#8230;]<p><a href="http://initialcharge.net/feeder/?FeederAction=clicked&amp;feed=Articles+%28RSS2%29&amp;seed=http%3A%2F%2Finitialcharge.net%2F2017%2F07%2Fbirchler-over-documenting%2F&amp;seed_title=%3C%21%5BCDATA%5BThe+iPhone+Is+the+Camera+I%26%238217%3Bve+Used+to+Capture+My+Life+%E2%9E%9D%5D%5D%3E" rel="bookmark" title="Permanent link to 'The iPhone Is the Camera I&#8217;ve Used to Capture My Life'" class="glyph">∞ Permalink</a></p>
  240. ]]></description>
  241. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Matt Birchler, regarding Austin Mann&#8217;s <a href="http://austinmann.com/trek/10-years-of-iphone">10 Years of iPhone</a>:</p>
  242. <blockquote>
  243. <p>People have not always photographed their lives like we do today. I take pictures of everything and I don’t do it because I think every moment of life is worth framing on a wall, but because every little moment might be worth remembering down the line. And I don’t worry about taking too many pictures because storage is (essentially) unlimited, and it costs me nothing to over-document my life. This was not possible to any previous generation, and we are quick to forget this fact.</p>
  244. </blockquote>
  245. <p>The iPhone is <a href="http://initialcharge.net/2017/06/iphone-anniversary/">the most important consumer product of our generation</a>.</p>
  246. <p><a href="http://initialcharge.net/feeder/?FeederAction=clicked&amp;feed=Articles+%28RSS2%29&amp;seed=http%3A%2F%2Finitialcharge.net%2F2017%2F07%2Fbirchler-over-documenting%2F&amp;seed_title=%3C%21%5BCDATA%5BThe+iPhone+Is+the+Camera+I%26%238217%3Bve+Used+to+Capture+My+Life+%E2%9E%9D%5D%5D%3E" rel="bookmark" title="Permanent link to 'The iPhone Is the Camera I&#8217;ve Used to Capture My Life'" class="glyph">∞ Permalink</a></p>
  247. ]]></content:encoded>
  248. </item>
  249. <item>
  250. <title><![CDATA[The Right Mac Laptop to Buy for a Student ➝]]></title>
  251. <link><![CDATA[https://sixcolors.com/post/2017/07/the-right-mac-laptop-to-buy-for-a-student/]]></link>
  252. <pubDate>Fri, 14 Jul 2017 19:01:00 +0000</pubDate>
  253. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Michael Rockwell]]></dc:creator>
  254. <category><![CDATA[Linked List]]></category>
  255. <category><![CDATA[Apple]]></category>
  256. <category><![CDATA[College]]></category>
  257. <category><![CDATA[Jason Snell]]></category>
  258. <category><![CDATA[MacBook]]></category>
  259. <category><![CDATA[MacBook Pro]]></category>
  260. <category><![CDATA[Student]]></category>
  261.  
  262. <guid isPermaLink="false">http://initialcharge.net/?p=16926</guid>
  263. <description><![CDATA[I couldn&#8217;t agree more with Jason Snell&#8217;s recommendations. The 12-inch MacBook and 13-inch MacBook Pro are the two best notebooks available. Buy the MacBook if you care more about portability and the MacBook Pro if you care more about performance. If price sensitivity has you considering the MacBook Air, do your best to avoid it, [&#8230;]<p><a href="http://initialcharge.net/feeder/?FeederAction=clicked&amp;feed=Articles+%28RSS2%29&amp;seed=http%3A%2F%2Finitialcharge.net%2F2017%2F07%2Fsnell-student-laptop%2F&amp;seed_title=%3C%21%5BCDATA%5BThe+Right+Mac+Laptop+to+Buy+for+a+Student+%E2%9E%9D%5D%5D%3E" rel="bookmark" title="Permanent link to 'The Right Mac Laptop to Buy for a Student'" class="glyph">∞ Permalink</a></p>
  264. ]]></description>
  265. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>I couldn&#8217;t agree more with Jason Snell&#8217;s recommendations. The 12-inch MacBook and 13-inch MacBook Pro are the two best notebooks available. Buy the MacBook if you care more about portability and the MacBook Pro if you care more about performance. If price sensitivity has you considering the MacBook Air, do your best to avoid it, the low-resolution display is just offensive at this point.</p>
  266. <p><a href="http://initialcharge.net/feeder/?FeederAction=clicked&amp;feed=Articles+%28RSS2%29&amp;seed=http%3A%2F%2Finitialcharge.net%2F2017%2F07%2Fsnell-student-laptop%2F&amp;seed_title=%3C%21%5BCDATA%5BThe+Right+Mac+Laptop+to+Buy+for+a+Student+%E2%9E%9D%5D%5D%3E" rel="bookmark" title="Permanent link to 'The Right Mac Laptop to Buy for a Student'" class="glyph">∞ Permalink</a></p>
  267. ]]></content:encoded>
  268. </item>
  269. <item>
  270. <title><![CDATA[Introducing Backup and Sync for Google Photos and Google Drive ➝]]></title>
  271. <link><![CDATA[https://www.blog.google/products/photos/introducing-backup-and-sync-google-photos-and-google-drive/]]></link>
  272. <pubDate>Thu, 13 Jul 2017 17:21:00 +0000</pubDate>
  273. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Michael Rockwell]]></dc:creator>
  274. <category><![CDATA[Linked List]]></category>
  275. <category><![CDATA[Application]]></category>
  276. <category><![CDATA[Google]]></category>
  277. <category><![CDATA[Google Photos]]></category>
  278. <category><![CDATA[Photography]]></category>
  279. <category><![CDATA[Plex]]></category>
  280.  
  281. <guid isPermaLink="false">http://initialcharge.net/?p=16924</guid>
  282. <description><![CDATA[My wife and I utilize Google&#8217;s free, &#8220;high quality&#8221; backup feature in Google Photos. It&#8217;s been rock solid for us and I highly recommend it. If anything ever happened to our devices, we&#8217;d still have copies of all our photos. But, of course, it doesn&#8217;t save full resolution copies. For that, we use Plex&#8217;s camera [&#8230;]<p><a href="http://initialcharge.net/feeder/?FeederAction=clicked&amp;feed=Articles+%28RSS2%29&amp;seed=http%3A%2F%2Finitialcharge.net%2F2017%2F07%2Fgoogle-photos-backup-sync%2F&amp;seed_title=%3C%21%5BCDATA%5BIntroducing+Backup+and+Sync+for+Google+Photos+and+Google+Drive+%E2%9E%9D%5D%5D%3E" rel="bookmark" title="Permanent link to 'Introducing Backup and Sync for Google Photos and Google Drive'" class="glyph">∞ Permalink</a></p>
  283. ]]></description>
  284. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>My wife and I utilize Google&#8217;s free, &#8220;high quality&#8221; backup feature in Google Photos. It&#8217;s been rock solid for us and I highly recommend it. If anything ever happened to our devices, we&#8217;d still have copies of all our photos. But, of course, it doesn&#8217;t save full resolution copies. For that, we use Plex&#8217;s camera roll upload capabilities to backup our our photos to an external hard drive attached to our Mac Mini.</p>
  285. <p>This setup gives us a &#8220;high quality&#8221; offsite backup and a full resolution local copy. But our devices are stuck uploading the photos twice, which isn&#8217;t exactly ideal. What I&#8217;d like to do is turn off automatic backups in Google Photos on our iOS devices and rely on Plex to backup our photos to the Mac. From there, Google&#8217;s new Backup and Sync app would see the changes in our Photos folder and backup to Google Photos.</p>
  286. <p>I tried this setup with Google&#8217;s previous desktop uploader, but it didn&#8217;t work well. Sometimes it would fail to upload photos or wait too long between refreshes and we&#8217;d be stuck waiting for them to appear in Google Photos on iOS. Hopefully, this new app solves those problems.</p>
  287. <p><a href="http://initialcharge.net/feeder/?FeederAction=clicked&amp;feed=Articles+%28RSS2%29&amp;seed=http%3A%2F%2Finitialcharge.net%2F2017%2F07%2Fgoogle-photos-backup-sync%2F&amp;seed_title=%3C%21%5BCDATA%5BIntroducing+Backup+and+Sync+for+Google+Photos+and+Google+Drive+%E2%9E%9D%5D%5D%3E" rel="bookmark" title="Permanent link to 'Introducing Backup and Sync for Google Photos and Google Drive'" class="glyph">∞ Permalink</a></p>
  288. ]]></content:encoded>
  289. </item>
  290. <item>
  291. <title><![CDATA[Amazon&#8217;s Next Echo Will Be More Like Apple&#8217;s HomePod ➝]]></title>
  292. <link><![CDATA[https://www.engadget.com/2017/07/12/amazon-echo-homepod/]]></link>
  293. <pubDate>Thu, 13 Jul 2017 15:24:00 +0000</pubDate>
  294. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Michael Rockwell]]></dc:creator>
  295. <category><![CDATA[Linked List]]></category>
  296. <category><![CDATA[Amazon]]></category>
  297. <category><![CDATA[Apple]]></category>
  298. <category><![CDATA[Devindra Hardawar]]></category>
  299. <category><![CDATA[Echo]]></category>
  300. <category><![CDATA[Engadget]]></category>
  301. <category><![CDATA[HomePod]]></category>
  302. <category><![CDATA[Ming-Chi Kuo]]></category>
  303.  
  304. <guid isPermaLink="false">http://initialcharge.net/?p=16922</guid>
  305. <description><![CDATA[Devindra Hardawar, reporting for Engadget: Amazon is working on a new Echo that will improve on the first speaker in practically every way, a source tells Engadget. And, not surprisingly, it&#8217;s aiming to take some of the hype away from Apple&#8217;s HomePod. The new Echo will be both shorter and slimmer than the original, almost [&#8230;]<p><a href="http://initialcharge.net/feeder/?FeederAction=clicked&amp;feed=Articles+%28RSS2%29&amp;seed=http%3A%2F%2Finitialcharge.net%2F2017%2F07%2Fsecond-gen-echo-rumor%2F&amp;seed_title=%3C%21%5BCDATA%5BAmazon%26%238217%3Bs+Next+Echo+Will+Be+More+Like+Apple%26%238217%3Bs+HomePod+%E2%9E%9D%5D%5D%3E" rel="bookmark" title="Permanent link to 'Amazon&#8217;s Next Echo Will Be More Like Apple&#8217;s HomePod'" class="glyph">∞ Permalink</a></p>
  306. ]]></description>
  307. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Devindra Hardawar, reporting for Engadget:</p>
  308. <blockquote>
  309. <p>Amazon is working on a new Echo that will improve on the first speaker in practically every way, a source tells Engadget. And, not surprisingly, it&#8217;s aiming to take some of the hype away from Apple&#8217;s HomePod.</p>
  310. <p>The new Echo will be both shorter and slimmer than the original, almost as if it were three or four Echo Dots stacked on top of each other, our source claims. Amazon is also softening its design with rounded edges and a cloth-like covering, rather than the current Echo&#8217;s plastic shell and flat ends. And yes, it should sound better, too. The company is packing in several tweeters this time around, instead of just relying on one large tweeter and a woofer (for low end).</p>
  311. </blockquote>
  312. <p>Perhaps <em>this</em> is the Amazon Echo that <a href="https://www.macrumors.com/2017/05/01/apple-siri-smart-speaker-kgi-wwdc/">Ming-Chi Kuo</a> claimed the HomePod was aiming to compete with. Instead of the Echo Show, which <a href="http://initialcharge.net/2017/05/echo-competitor-thoughts/">I assumed</a> he was referring to.</p>
  313. <p><a href="http://initialcharge.net/feeder/?FeederAction=clicked&amp;feed=Articles+%28RSS2%29&amp;seed=http%3A%2F%2Finitialcharge.net%2F2017%2F07%2Fsecond-gen-echo-rumor%2F&amp;seed_title=%3C%21%5BCDATA%5BAmazon%26%238217%3Bs+Next+Echo+Will+Be+More+Like+Apple%26%238217%3Bs+HomePod+%E2%9E%9D%5D%5D%3E" rel="bookmark" title="Permanent link to 'Amazon&#8217;s Next Echo Will Be More Like Apple&#8217;s HomePod'" class="glyph">∞ Permalink</a></p>
  314. ]]></content:encoded>
  315. </item>
  316. <item>
  317. <title>The New Initial Charge</title>
  318. <link>http://initialcharge.net/feeder/?FeederAction=clicked&amp;feed=Articles+%28RSS2%29&amp;seed=http%3A%2F%2Finitialcharge.net%2F2017%2F07%2Frecharge%2F&amp;seed_title=The+New+Initial+Charge</link>
  319. <pubDate>Wed, 12 Jul 2017 18:32:00 +0000</pubDate>
  320. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Michael Rockwell]]></dc:creator>
  321. <category><![CDATA[Feature]]></category>
  322. <category><![CDATA[Avenir Next]]></category>
  323. <category><![CDATA[CSS HTML]]></category>
  324. <category><![CDATA[Fonts]]></category>
  325. <category><![CDATA[Initial Charge]]></category>
  326. <category><![CDATA[Palatino]]></category>
  327. <category><![CDATA[Treehouse]]></category>
  328. <category><![CDATA[Type]]></category>
  329. <category><![CDATA[Web Design]]></category>
  330.  
  331. <guid isPermaLink="false">http://initialcharge.net/?p=16920</guid>
  332. <description><![CDATA[I&#8217;ve spent a great deal of my free time over the past five-and-a-half months working on a new design for Initial Charge. I have done major redesigns in the past, but this was the first time I ever tackled a ground-up rewrite of the site&#8217;s design. Every single line of CSS and HTML was written [&#8230;]]]></description>
  333. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>I&#8217;ve spent a great deal of my free time over the past <a href="https://twitter.com/mdrockwell/status/824476451495940097">five-and-a-half months</a> working on a new design for Initial Charge. I have done major redesigns in the past, but this was the first time I ever tackled a ground-up rewrite of the site&#8217;s design. <em>Every single line</em> of CSS and HTML was written from scratch.</p>
  334. <p>A year or two ago, that wouldn&#8217;t have been possible. But I spent last fall learning as much HTML and CSS as I could from <a href="https://teamtreehouse.com/">Treehouse</a>. Before then, my knowledge of web design was fairly rudimentary — never able to do much more than minor changes to existing WordPress themes. Now, I can build an entire WordPress theme with minimal web searching.</p>
  335. <p>This is how Initial Charge looked from <a href="http://initialcharge.net/2015/12/redesign/">December 2015</a> until today:</p>
  336. <p><img src="http://initialcharge.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/initial-charge-2015-design.jpeg" alt="Initial Charge&#x2019;s 2015 Design"/></p>
  337. <p>The new site design, which I&#8217;m calling <em>Recharge</em>, fixes many of the annoyances I had with the previous design — the first being typography. The previous design&#8217;s titles were set in <a href="https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georgia_(typeface)">Georgia</a> with the body text in <a href="https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Avenir_(typeface)">Avenir</a>. And while these typeface had served me well, it was time for a refresh. Titles are now set in <a href="https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Palatino">Palatino</a> with <a href="https://www.fonts.com/font/linotype/avenir-next">Avenir Next</a> as the body font.</p>
  338. <p>The next major, site-wide change is the way images are displayed. The silly outline is gone and images now fit the full width of the viewport on mobile and the full width of the text column on desktop and tablets. This had been something I wanted to do ever since I saw <a href="https://twitter.com/Alvaro_Serrano">Álvaro Serrano</a> make the change on <a href="http://www.analogsenses.com/2016/01/21/a-new-design/">Analog Senses</a> early last year. It should make the site&#8217;s use of images much more impactful and allow readers to see more detail in screenshots.</p>
  339. <p>If you&#8217;re viewing this on mobile, as most of the site&#8217;s visitors do, you might not have noticed this next change — a two column, responsive layout. When the browser window becomes 768 pixels or wider, the top navigation bar disappears and a sidebar surfaces that may be familiar to long-time readers. Prior to the site&#8217;s redesign in 2015, Initial Charge had a two-column layout with navigation in the sidebar. When I moved to the more mobile-friendly 2015 design, the sidebar was completely replaced by the top navigation bar. With Recharge, you get the best of both worlds.</p>
  340. <p>The <a href="http://initialcharge.net/archive/">archive page</a> has been restyled with all of the feature articles grouped beneath month headers — I was <em>overjoyed</em> when I figured out how to do that. But the most exciting change is the restructuring of the <a href="http://initialcharge.net/">homepage</a>. Reverse-chronological works when everything you publish has the same weight, but on site&#8217;s like Initial Charge, with feature articles and links, it wasn&#8217;t a great fit.</p>
  341. <p>It may be a bit trendy to say this, but Initial Charge&#8217;s homepage is now algorithmic. Although, the homepage algorithm is a bit more simplistic than what the fine folks at Twitter and Instagram have built. Entries on the homepage are now in the following order:</p>
  342. <ul>
  343. <li>The most recent feature article.</li>
  344. <li>The eight most recent Linked List entries.</li>
  345. <li>The second most recent feature article.</li>
  346. <li>A list of the six most recent feature articles that haven&#8217;t already appeared on the homepage.</li>
  347. </ul>
  348. <p>Long time readers are unlikely to visit the homepage — most of them use RSS, Twitter, or <a href="http://initialcharge.net/subscribe/">some other means</a> to be notified when something is published. The vast majority of people that hit the homepage are new readers and this structure will allow Initial Charge to put its best foot forward, hopefully turning those first timers into repeat visitors.</p>
  349. <h4>The Rest</h4>
  350. <p>There are several other, small design details that I think are worth pointing out:</p>
  351. <ul>
  352. <li>A yellow underline now highlights feature article titles.</li>
  353. <li>Square bullet points are used in unordered lists.</li>
  354. <li>The site&#8217;s &#8220;bolt&#8221; icon now appears alongside the date below articles and links.</li>
  355. <li>The site&#8217;s search bar has been completely restyled.</li>
  356. <li>The webclip icon now appears at the bottom of each page and links to the homepage.</li>
  357. <li>There&#8217;s now a touch of green in the design. The color appears as an underline on subheadings within articles and a handful of other locations throughout the site.</li>
  358. </ul>
  359. <p>I never expected the site redesign to take as long as it did — maybe a month or two, but definitely not <em>five-and-a-half months</em>. But I couldn&#8217;t be happier with the results. I may get the itch to write some HTML and CSS sooner, but my hope is that this new design will last for many years to come.</p>
  360. <p>I obsessed over every page before hitting the &#8220;Activate&#8221; button in the WordPress dashboard, but there&#8217;s certainly the possibility that I overlooked something. If you notice anything that doesn&#8217;t look quite right, please let me know — either by <a href="mailto:[email protected]">email</a> or on <a href="http://twitter.com/initialcharge">Twitter</a> with a mention or direct message.</p>
  361. ]]></content:encoded>
  362. </item>
  363. <item>
  364. <title>Using Workflow as a Site-Specific Browser</title>
  365. <link>http://initialcharge.net/feeder/?FeederAction=clicked&amp;feed=Articles+%28RSS2%29&amp;seed=http%3A%2F%2Finitialcharge.net%2F2017%2F07%2Fworkflow-site-specific-browser%2F&amp;seed_title=Using+Workflow+as+a+Site-Specific+Browser</link>
  366. <comments>http://initialcharge.net/feeder/?FeederAction=clicked&#038;feed=Articles+%28RSS2%29&#038;seed=http%3A%2F%2Finitialcharge.net%2F2017%2F07%2Fworkflow-site-specific-browser%2F&#038;seed_title=Using+Workflow+as+a+Site-Specific+Browser#comments</comments>
  367. <pubDate>Wed, 12 Jul 2017 13:12:00 +0000</pubDate>
  368. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Michael Rockwell]]></dc:creator>
  369. <category><![CDATA[Feature]]></category>
  370. <category><![CDATA[Application]]></category>
  371. <category><![CDATA[Fluid]]></category>
  372. <category><![CDATA[Instagram]]></category>
  373. <category><![CDATA[iOS]]></category>
  374. <category><![CDATA[iPad]]></category>
  375. <category><![CDATA[iPhone]]></category>
  376. <category><![CDATA[Web Apps]]></category>
  377. <category><![CDATA[Workflow]]></category>
  378.  
  379. <guid isPermaLink="false">http://initialcharge.net/?p=16913</guid>
  380. <description><![CDATA[On macOS, there&#8217;s an application available called Fluid, which lets you create site-specific web browsers. Many of us use web apps everyday and Fluid allows you to run them side-by-side with your native applications without being sequestered inside of a web browser. Fluid is a handy little tool that every Mac user should have in [&#8230;]]]></description>
  381. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>On macOS, there&#8217;s an application available called <a href="http://fluidapp.com/">Fluid</a>, which lets you create site-specific web browsers. Many of us use web apps everyday and Fluid allows you to run them side-by-side with your native applications without being sequestered inside of a web browser. Fluid is a handy little tool that every Mac user should have in their arsenal.</p>
  382. <p>I&#8217;ve setup a Fluid instance of Overcast on my MacBook Air, complete with a <a href="https://www.google.com/search?tbm=isch&amp;q=overcast%20app%20icon&amp;tbs=imgo:1">proper icon</a>, which let&#8217;s me treat Overcast just like any other Mac application. I didn&#8217;t have to wait for the developer, <a href="https://twitter.com/marcoarment">Marco Arment</a>, to build a native app, I can just use Fluid to bridge the gap for me.</p>
  383. <p><img src="http://initialcharge.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/workflow-web-apps.jpeg" alt="Shortcuts to my Site-Specific Browser Workflows"/></p>
  384. <p>On iOS, Apple has built similar functionality right into Safari. From any webpage, you can tap on the share button and choose &#8220;Add to Home Screen&#8221;. Most websites have even setup a custom icon for this purpose, making sure their site&#8217;s shortcut doesn&#8217;t feel out of place alongside your native apps. But it&#8217;s not exactly a <a href="http://www.macintosh.fm/episodes/2">sweet solution</a>.</p>
  385. <p>Apple does offer developers a way to force these web apps to open in full screen without all of Safari&#8217;s browser chrome, but almost no one uses it. This functionality has fallen out of favor because it&#8217;s poorly supported by the system. These full screen web apps don&#8217;t use Apple&#8217;s latest JavaScript engine, which means they run much slower than they would if you visited them from within Safari, and they don&#8217;t save state between launches, which makes multitasking with these apps a nightmare.</p>
  386. <p>Of course, you could always just save these website shortcuts to your Home Screen and let them open up in Safari, but that makes for a pretty mediocre experience. I want to treat these web apps like native applications and I don&#8217;t want to be forced to close a browser tab when I&#8217;m done using them — I <em>always</em> close my browser tabs when I&#8217;m done with them, it&#8217;s a sickness. But there is a solution and it&#8217;s made possible because of every iOS power users&#8217; favorite utility — <a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/workflow/id915249334?mt=8&amp;uo=4&amp;at=11lctu">Workflow</a>.</p>
  387. <p><img src="http://initialcharge.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/workflow-site-specific-shortcuts.png" alt="Site-Specific Browser Shortcuts in Workflow"/></p>
  388. <p>To build these site-specific browsers, it just takes two simple actions — a URL action with the web app&#8217;s address and the Show Web Page action. When run, Workflow will open up the URL in a Safari View Controller, which gives you access to your action extensions alongside forward, back, and refresh buttons. From there you can give the workflow a name, set an icon color, and a glyph to fit the website or web application&#8217;s functionality.</p>
  389. <p>You can run the workflow from within the Workflow app itself or you can add it to Workflow&#8217;s Today Widget. But if you want the web app to live alongside your native apps, I suggest adding a custom icon in the Home Screen tab and adding the workflow to your iOS device&#8217;s home screen. A simple DuckDuckGo or Google Image search for the site&#8217;s name and either &#8220;icon&#8221; or &#8220;logo&#8221; should turn up several options.</p>
  390. <p>I&#8217;ve already built a handful of these site-specific browser workflows and I expect I&#8217;ll find more websites and web apps that I&#8217;d like to build them for in the future. Here&#8217;s just a few of my favorites:</p>
  391. <ul>
  392. <li><a href="https://workflow.is/workflows/7970e31451914d81b75b4f3ca8a5d573">Mint</a>, Initial Charge&#8217;s analytics software.</li>
  393. <li><a href="https://workflow.is/workflows/dfc08bd34e8a4d8cb1060a8b07614975">Media Temple</a>, the site&#8217;s hosting dashboard.</li>
  394. <li><a href="https://workflow.is/workflows/7d4a0f8d42b74ee09cde2499ed54579d">Instagram</a>, because they <em>still</em> haven&#8217;t built a native iPad app.</li>
  395. </ul>
  396. <p><img src="http://initialcharge.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/instagram-safari-view-controller.jpeg" alt="Instagram in Safari View Controller"/></p>
  397. <p>There is one major caveat with these workflows — they don&#8217;t scale well. You can use them while multitasking with native apps, but you can&#8217;t run more than one of these site-specific workflows at a time. Once you launch the second, it tosses out the first one.</p>
  398. <p>You could open some of your web apps in <a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/sidefari-web-browsing-companion-for-safari/id1046968235?mt=8&amp;uo=4&amp;at=11lctu">Sidefari</a> with its URL scheme as a workaround — letting you run one web app in Sidefari and another in Workflow. But in my testing, Sidefari often fails to load the web page if the app isn&#8217;t already in memory. It happens often enough that this workaround probably isn&#8217;t worth exploring. But if you&#8217;d like to test it yourself, just replace &#8220;http://&#8221; or &#8220;https://&#8221; at the beginning of the URL with with &#8220;sidefarihttp://&#8221; or &#8220;sidefarihttps://&#8221;, respectively, and swap the Show Web Page action for the Open URLs action.</p>
  399. <p>But even with the multitasking limitations, being able to run web apps side-by-side with native applications is a neat experience. I hope you&#8217;ll find some utility in these workflows, even if you&#8217;re just looking for a better way to view Instagram on your iPad. </p>
  400. ]]></content:encoded>
  401. <wfw:commentRss>http://initialcharge.net/feeder/?FeederAction=clicked&#038;feed=Articles+%28RSS2%29&#038;seed=http%3A%2F%2Finitialcharge.net%2F2017%2F07%2Fworkflow-site-specific-browser%2F&#038;seed_title=Using+Workflow+as+a+Site-Specific+Browser/feed/</wfw:commentRss>
  402. <slash:comments>1</slash:comments>
  403. </item>
  404. <item>
  405. <title><![CDATA[Every Default macOS Wallpaper ➝]]></title>
  406. <link><![CDATA[https://512pixels.net/projects/default-mac-wallpapers-in-5k/]]></link>
  407. <pubDate>Mon, 10 Jul 2017 19:57:00 +0000</pubDate>
  408. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Michael Rockwell]]></dc:creator>
  409. <category><![CDATA[Linked List]]></category>
  410. <category><![CDATA[Forgotten Towel]]></category>
  411. <category><![CDATA[Mac]]></category>
  412. <category><![CDATA[macOS]]></category>
  413. <category><![CDATA[Stephen Hackett]]></category>
  414. <category><![CDATA[Wallpaper]]></category>
  415.  
  416. <guid isPermaLink="false">http://initialcharge.net/?p=16904</guid>
  417. <description><![CDATA[If, like me, you&#8217;ve spent the past couple of days reorganizing your iPad&#8217;s home screen around all of the changes in iOS 11, you might find this wallpaper pack useful. I don&#8217;t think I&#8217;ll decide on a wallpaper until I come up with a better layout for my app icons, but I expect I&#8217;ll use [&#8230;]<p><a href="http://initialcharge.net/feeder/?FeederAction=clicked&amp;feed=Articles+%28RSS2%29&amp;seed=http%3A%2F%2Finitialcharge.net%2F2017%2F07%2Fmacos-wallpapers%2F&amp;seed_title=%3C%21%5BCDATA%5BEvery+Default+macOS+Wallpaper+%E2%9E%9D%5D%5D%3E" rel="bookmark" title="Permanent link to 'Every Default macOS Wallpaper'" class="glyph">∞ Permalink</a></p>
  418. ]]></description>
  419. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>If, like me, you&#8217;ve spent the past couple of days reorganizing your iPad&#8217;s home screen around all of the changes in iOS 11, you might find this wallpaper pack useful. I don&#8217;t think I&#8217;ll decide on a wallpaper until I come up with a better layout for my app icons, but I expect I&#8217;ll use one of these.</p>
  420. <p><a href="http://initialcharge.net/feeder/?FeederAction=clicked&amp;feed=Articles+%28RSS2%29&amp;seed=http%3A%2F%2Finitialcharge.net%2F2017%2F07%2Fmacos-wallpapers%2F&amp;seed_title=%3C%21%5BCDATA%5BEvery+Default+macOS+Wallpaper+%E2%9E%9D%5D%5D%3E" rel="bookmark" title="Permanent link to 'Every Default macOS Wallpaper'" class="glyph">∞ Permalink</a></p>
  421. ]]></content:encoded>
  422. </item>
  423. <item>
  424. <title><![CDATA[Inadvertent Activation of Emergency SOS on Apple Watch ➝]]></title>
  425. <link><![CDATA[http://blog.chrishannah.me/emergency-sos-on-apple-watch/]]></link>
  426. <pubDate>Sun, 09 Jul 2017 20:02:00 +0000</pubDate>
  427. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Michael Rockwell]]></dc:creator>
  428. <category><![CDATA[Linked List]]></category>
  429. <category><![CDATA[Apple]]></category>
  430. <category><![CDATA[Apple Watch]]></category>
  431. <category><![CDATA[Chris Hannah]]></category>
  432.  
  433. <guid isPermaLink="false">http://initialcharge.net/?p=16902</guid>
  434. <description><![CDATA[When Emergency SOS was first announced, I was a little concerned that it was too easy to trigger. Luckily, I haven&#8217;t activated it accidentally yet, but Chris Hannah has done so on more than one occasion. ∞ Permalink<p><a href="http://initialcharge.net/feeder/?FeederAction=clicked&amp;feed=Articles+%28RSS2%29&amp;seed=http%3A%2F%2Finitialcharge.net%2F2017%2F07%2Fsos-watch%2F&amp;seed_title=%3C%21%5BCDATA%5BInadvertent+Activation+of+Emergency+SOS+on+Apple+Watch+%E2%9E%9D%5D%5D%3E" rel="bookmark" title="Permanent link to 'Inadvertent Activation of Emergency SOS on Apple Watch'" class="glyph">∞ Permalink</a></p>
  435. ]]></description>
  436. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>When Emergency SOS was first announced, I was a little concerned that it was too easy to trigger. Luckily, I haven&#8217;t activated it accidentally yet, but Chris Hannah has done so on more than one occasion.</p>
  437. <p><a href="http://initialcharge.net/feeder/?FeederAction=clicked&amp;feed=Articles+%28RSS2%29&amp;seed=http%3A%2F%2Finitialcharge.net%2F2017%2F07%2Fsos-watch%2F&amp;seed_title=%3C%21%5BCDATA%5BInadvertent+Activation+of+Emergency+SOS+on+Apple+Watch+%E2%9E%9D%5D%5D%3E" rel="bookmark" title="Permanent link to 'Inadvertent Activation of Emergency SOS on Apple Watch'" class="glyph">∞ Permalink</a></p>
  438. ]]></content:encoded>
  439. </item>
  440. <item>
  441. <title><![CDATA[&#8216;This Is the iPad Size That Should Have Always Been&#8217; ➝]]></title>
  442. <link><![CDATA[https://brooksreview.net/2017/07/the-ipad-that-should-have-been/]]></link>
  443. <pubDate>Sun, 09 Jul 2017 16:34:00 +0000</pubDate>
  444. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Michael Rockwell]]></dc:creator>
  445. <category><![CDATA[Linked List]]></category>
  446. <category><![CDATA[Apple]]></category>
  447. <category><![CDATA[Ben Brooks]]></category>
  448. <category><![CDATA[iPad]]></category>
  449. <category><![CDATA[iPad Pro]]></category>
  450.  
  451. <guid isPermaLink="false">http://initialcharge.net/?p=16900</guid>
  452. <description><![CDATA[Ben Brooks: The 12.9” is amazing, but it’s cumbersome to use for just about any non-desk task. It’s too big to really use on a plane, or in any crowded coffee shops. But, it is a fantastic screen size which leaves little want when you work all day with it. If I only had to [&#8230;]<p><a href="http://initialcharge.net/feeder/?FeederAction=clicked&amp;feed=Articles+%28RSS2%29&amp;seed=http%3A%2F%2Finitialcharge.net%2F2017%2F07%2Fbrooks-ten-point-five%2F&amp;seed_title=%3C%21%5BCDATA%5B%26%238216%3BThis+Is+the+iPad+Size+That+Should+Have+Always+Been%26%238217%3B+%E2%9E%9D%5D%5D%3E" rel="bookmark" title="Permanent link to '&#8216;This Is the iPad Size That Should Have Always Been&#8217;'" class="glyph">∞ Permalink</a></p>
  453. ]]></description>
  454. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Ben Brooks:</p>
  455. <blockquote>
  456. <p>The 12.9” is amazing, but it’s cumbersome to use for just about any <em>non-desk</em> task. It’s too big to really use on a plane, or in any crowded coffee shops. But, it is a fantastic screen size which leaves little want when you work all day with it.</p>
  457. <p>If I only had to pick one, it’d be the 10.5” without hesitation.</p>
  458. <p>There’s a sense of freedom you gain with the 10.5” model that I never had with the 9.7” or the 12.9”. The sense that if I want to take my iPad away from my desk for any reason, taking the 10.5” gives me next to no tradeoffs. I can go read for hours, or write for hours, or anything in between.</p>
  459. </blockquote>
  460. <p>When the iPad Air 2 was released, I knew there was something special about it. The massive increase in horse power couldn&#8217;t have been coincidental, Apple had a plan for all that extra performance. And the following year, Split View multitasking was announced.</p>
  461. <p>I&#8217;m starting to get a similar feeling about the 10.5-inch iPad Pro. I&#8217;m not sure if it&#8217;s the ProMotion display, the screen size, the performance improvements, or something else, but I think the 10.5 is <em>the</em> iPad to buy right now. And I expect it to age well — like the Air 2 has — holding its own against new iPad models for the next few years.</p>
  462. <p><a href="http://initialcharge.net/feeder/?FeederAction=clicked&amp;feed=Articles+%28RSS2%29&amp;seed=http%3A%2F%2Finitialcharge.net%2F2017%2F07%2Fbrooks-ten-point-five%2F&amp;seed_title=%3C%21%5BCDATA%5B%26%238216%3BThis+Is+the+iPad+Size+That+Should+Have+Always+Been%26%238217%3B+%E2%9E%9D%5D%5D%3E" rel="bookmark" title="Permanent link to '&#8216;This Is the iPad Size That Should Have Always Been&#8217;'" class="glyph">∞ Permalink</a></p>
  463. ]]></content:encoded>
  464. </item>
  465. <item>
  466. <title><![CDATA[The Strategy Behind This Year&#8217;s iPhone Pricing ➝]]></title>
  467. <link><![CDATA[https://daringfireball.net/2017/07/speculation_on_new_iphone_pricing]]></link>
  468. <pubDate>Sat, 08 Jul 2017 20:52:00 +0000</pubDate>
  469. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Michael Rockwell]]></dc:creator>
  470. <category><![CDATA[Linked List]]></category>
  471. <category><![CDATA[Apple]]></category>
  472. <category><![CDATA[iPhone]]></category>
  473. <category><![CDATA[iPhone Pro]]></category>
  474. <category><![CDATA[John Gruber]]></category>
  475.  
  476. <guid isPermaLink="false">http://initialcharge.net/?p=16898</guid>
  477. <description><![CDATA[John Gruber: You can’t talk about iPhone specs and pricing without considering scale. It’s not enough for Apple to create a phone that can be sold for $649/749/849 with 35 percent profit margins. They have to create a phone that can be sold at those prices, with those margins, and which can be manufactured at [&#8230;]<p><a href="http://initialcharge.net/feeder/?FeederAction=clicked&amp;feed=Articles+%28RSS2%29&amp;seed=http%3A%2F%2Finitialcharge.net%2F2017%2F07%2Fscale-supply-demand%2F&amp;seed_title=%3C%21%5BCDATA%5BThe+Strategy+Behind+This+Year%26%238217%3Bs+iPhone+Pricing+%E2%9E%9D%5D%5D%3E" rel="bookmark" title="Permanent link to 'The Strategy Behind This Year&#8217;s iPhone Pricing'" class="glyph">∞ Permalink</a></p>
  478. ]]></description>
  479. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>John Gruber:</p>
  480. <blockquote>
  481. <p>You can’t talk about iPhone specs and pricing without considering scale. It’s not enough for Apple to create a phone that can be sold for $649/749/849 with 35 percent profit margins. They have to create a phone that can be sold at those prices, with those margins, and <em>which can be manufactured at scale</em>. And for Apple that scale is massive: anything less than 60–70 million in the first quarter in which it goes on sale is a failure — possibly a catastrophic failure.</p>
  482. </blockquote>
  483. <p>It&#8217;ll be a bummer if Apple announces the iPhone Pro with a starting price point above $1,000. But Apple&#8217;s scale is just too massive to put a bunch of brand new technology in their least expensive models. If they can only manufacture 20 million units of some new part each quarter, they only have three options:</p>
  484. <ol>
  485. <li>Not put the technology into their device until it can be manufactured at scale.</li>
  486. <li>Put the new technology in and sell it at the same price as the current iPhones.</li>
  487. <li>Raise the price of that model to a point where the demand shrinks and they can manufacture enough of the devices.</li>
  488. </ol>
  489. <p>Nobody wants option one because we all want technology to continue improving. Option two would be a catastrophe because Apple would be sold out of these new iPhones <em>instantly</em> and customers would be stuck waiting months for their new device to arrive.</p>
  490. <p>Option three is the only sensible solution. Some customers will be pissed about not being able to afford the best iPhone and I&#8217;ll be right there with them, but Apple needs to manufacture new parts at a smaller scale to perfect the process. Eventually those new technologies will find their way into the entry-level product, but sometimes that just isn&#8217;t possible right out of the gate.</p>
  491. <p><a href="http://initialcharge.net/feeder/?FeederAction=clicked&amp;feed=Articles+%28RSS2%29&amp;seed=http%3A%2F%2Finitialcharge.net%2F2017%2F07%2Fscale-supply-demand%2F&amp;seed_title=%3C%21%5BCDATA%5BThe+Strategy+Behind+This+Year%26%238217%3Bs+iPhone+Pricing+%E2%9E%9D%5D%5D%3E" rel="bookmark" title="Permanent link to 'The Strategy Behind This Year&#8217;s iPhone Pricing'" class="glyph">∞ Permalink</a></p>
  492. ]]></content:encoded>
  493. </item>
  494. <item>
  495. <title><![CDATA[The New Dash iPad Sleeve ➝]]></title>
  496. <link><![CDATA[https://www.macsparky.com/blog/2017/7/the-new-dash-ipad-sleeve]]></link>
  497. <pubDate>Fri, 07 Jul 2017 19:03:00 +0000</pubDate>
  498. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Michael Rockwell]]></dc:creator>
  499. <category><![CDATA[Linked List]]></category>
  500. <category><![CDATA[David Sparks]]></category>
  501. <category><![CDATA[iPad]]></category>
  502. <category><![CDATA[Sleeve]]></category>
  503. <category><![CDATA[Waterfield]]></category>
  504.  
  505. <guid isPermaLink="false">http://initialcharge.net/?p=16893</guid>
  506. <description><![CDATA[David Sparks, on the Waterfield Dash Sleeve for iPad: Like the prior Dash sleeve, there is a simple bit of elastic on one side that you can pull over the top to secure your iPad in the sleeve. New to version 2.0 is a zippered pocket to securely add a few accessories. The pocket is [&#8230;]<p><a href="http://initialcharge.net/feeder/?FeederAction=clicked&amp;feed=Articles+%28RSS2%29&amp;seed=http%3A%2F%2Finitialcharge.net%2F2017%2F07%2Fsparks-dash-sleeve%2F&amp;seed_title=%3C%21%5BCDATA%5BThe+New+Dash+iPad+Sleeve+%E2%9E%9D%5D%5D%3E" rel="bookmark" title="Permanent link to 'The New Dash iPad Sleeve'" class="glyph">∞ Permalink</a></p>
  507. ]]></description>
  508. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>David Sparks, on the <a href="https://www.sfbags.com/products/dash-sleeve-for-ipad-pro">Waterfield Dash Sleeve</a> for iPad:</p>
  509. <blockquote>
  510. <p>Like the prior Dash sleeve, there is a simple bit of elastic on one side that you can pull over the top to secure your iPad in the sleeve. New to version 2.0 is a zippered pocket to securely add a few accessories. The pocket is tall enough to hold an Apple Pencil and there’s even a little slot inside the zippered compartment to hold the Pencil. Once you stow your Pencil in the slot and zip up the compartment, it’s not going anywhere. The compartment is also big enough to hold my plus-sized iPhone.</p>
  511. </blockquote>
  512. <p>I&#8217;ve been on the lookout for a simple iPad sleeve with a small accessory pocket. I want something as slim as possible that I can throw in the back seat of the car when my wife and I visit her parents or take a day trip. This looks like exactly the product I&#8217;ve been looking for.</p>
  513. <p><a href="http://initialcharge.net/feeder/?FeederAction=clicked&amp;feed=Articles+%28RSS2%29&amp;seed=http%3A%2F%2Finitialcharge.net%2F2017%2F07%2Fsparks-dash-sleeve%2F&amp;seed_title=%3C%21%5BCDATA%5BThe+New+Dash+iPad+Sleeve+%E2%9E%9D%5D%5D%3E" rel="bookmark" title="Permanent link to 'The New Dash iPad Sleeve'" class="glyph">∞ Permalink</a></p>
  514. ]]></content:encoded>
  515. </item>
  516. <item>
  517. <title><![CDATA[Documenting the Tasks That Require macOS ➝]]></title>
  518. <link><![CDATA[https://chambersdaily.com/bradleychambers/2017/7/6/initial-129-ipad-thoughts]]></link>
  519. <pubDate>Thu, 06 Jul 2017 15:20:00 +0000</pubDate>
  520. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Michael Rockwell]]></dc:creator>
  521. <category><![CDATA[Linked List]]></category>
  522. <category><![CDATA[Apple]]></category>
  523. <category><![CDATA[Bradley Chambers]]></category>
  524. <category><![CDATA[iOS]]></category>
  525. <category><![CDATA[iPad]]></category>
  526. <category><![CDATA[Mac]]></category>
  527.  
  528. <guid isPermaLink="false">http://initialcharge.net/?p=16890</guid>
  529. <description><![CDATA[Bradley Chambers: I recently switched from a 9.7” iPad Pro to a 12.9” iPad Pro (first generation model). I have often struggled with feeling 100% productive on an iPad. It’s not that I couldn’t get work done, but it often felt like a bigger iPhone to me. Within a few hours, I knew this size [&#8230;]<p><a href="http://initialcharge.net/feeder/?FeederAction=clicked&amp;feed=Articles+%28RSS2%29&amp;seed=http%3A%2F%2Finitialcharge.net%2F2017%2F07%2Fchambers-mac-ios%2F&amp;seed_title=%3C%21%5BCDATA%5BDocumenting+the+Tasks+That+Require+macOS+%E2%9E%9D%5D%5D%3E" rel="bookmark" title="Permanent link to 'Documenting the Tasks That Require macOS'" class="glyph">∞ Permalink</a></p>
  530. ]]></description>
  531. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Bradley Chambers:</p>
  532. <blockquote>
  533. <p>I recently switched from a 9.7” iPad Pro to a 12.9” iPad Pro (first generation model). I have often struggled with feeling 100% productive on an iPad. It’s not that I couldn’t get work done, but it often felt like a bigger iPhone to me. Within a few hours, I knew this size was something special. […]</p>
  534. <p>My new goal: go as long as possible each day without pulling out my laptop. I am going to document what tasks trigger the need.</p>
  535. </blockquote>
  536. <p>This is a <em>great</em> idea and I think I&#8217;ll join him. Every time I reach for my MacBook Air or remotely access my Mac Mini with <a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/screens-remote-desktop-vnc-screen-sharing/id655890150?mt=8&amp;uo=4&amp;at=11lctu">Screens</a>, I’ll take note of what task triggered it.</p>
  537. <p><a href="http://initialcharge.net/feeder/?FeederAction=clicked&amp;feed=Articles+%28RSS2%29&amp;seed=http%3A%2F%2Finitialcharge.net%2F2017%2F07%2Fchambers-mac-ios%2F&amp;seed_title=%3C%21%5BCDATA%5BDocumenting+the+Tasks+That+Require+macOS+%E2%9E%9D%5D%5D%3E" rel="bookmark" title="Permanent link to 'Documenting the Tasks That Require macOS'" class="glyph">∞ Permalink</a></p>
  538. ]]></content:encoded>
  539. </item>
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