Congratulations!

[Valid RSS] This is a valid RSS feed.

Recommendations

This feed is valid, but interoperability with the widest range of feed readers could be improved by implementing the following recommendations.

Source: http://feeds.feedburner.com/DocovaTechincalBlog

  1. <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
  2. <?xml-stylesheet type="text/xsl" media="screen" href="/~d/styles/rss2full.xsl"?><?xml-stylesheet type="text/css" media="screen" href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~d/styles/itemcontent.css"?><rss xmlns:content="http://purl.org/rss/1.0/modules/content/" xmlns:wfw="http://wellformedweb.org/CommentAPI/" xmlns:dc="http://purl.org/dc/elements/1.1/" xmlns:atom="http://www.w3.org/2005/Atom" xmlns:sy="http://purl.org/rss/1.0/modules/syndication/" xmlns:slash="http://purl.org/rss/1.0/modules/slash/" xmlns:feedburner="http://rssnamespace.org/feedburner/ext/1.0" version="2.0">
  3.  
  4. <channel>
  5. <title>Technical – DOCOVA.com</title>
  6. <link>http://www.docova.com</link>
  7. <description>DOCOVA.com Website</description>
  8. <lastBuildDate>Tue, 09 Jan 2018 15:59:15 +0000</lastBuildDate>
  9. <language>en-US</language>
  10. <sy:updatePeriod>hourly</sy:updatePeriod>
  11. <sy:updateFrequency>1</sy:updateFrequency>
  12. <generator>https://wordpress.org/?v=4.8.4</generator>
  13. <atom10:link xmlns:atom10="http://www.w3.org/2005/Atom" rel="self" type="application/rss+xml" href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/DocovaTechincalBlog" /><feedburner:info uri="docovatechincalblog" /><atom10:link xmlns:atom10="http://www.w3.org/2005/Atom" rel="hub" href="http://pubsubhubbub.appspot.com/" /><feedburner:browserFriendly></feedburner:browserFriendly><item>
  14. <title>Domino – Often Still the Best</title>
  15. <link>http://www.docova.com/domino-often-still-best/</link>
  16. <pubDate>Thu, 09 Nov 2017 18:23:59 +0000</pubDate>
  17. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Gary Walsh]]></dc:creator>
  18. <category><![CDATA[Technical]]></category>
  19.  
  20. <guid isPermaLink="false">http://www.docova.com/?p=6340</guid>
  21. <description><![CDATA[<p>In many cases, from a technical and financial standpoint, Domino is still hands down the best choice in terms of a platform.  The Domino server, with the database, messaging, web server and application server all tightly integrated makes it affordable and easy to work with. Its replication capabilities simply cannot be found in other platforms.  If you have any level of technical knowledge you can see why it is so hard to replace as an application platform. It drives me nuts when I read articles like the most recent one posted in the UK Register around the arrangement between IBM and HCL and the continued development of Notes and Domino.  Especially the comments.  Sure, there is some love there, but the article itself and the majority of the comments are negative and show the authors are misinformed.  As Alan Lepovsky points out on his LinkedIn post around this same topic,  &#8220;I get pitches every week for new products that can&#8217;t do a fraction of what Notes could do a decade ago.&#8221; Notes and Domino did and still do provide incredible business value.  IBM purchased the technology for an astounding 3.52 billion dollars, and for good reason.  I have heard it reported that at one point in time it held an estimated 60% of the  Enterprise Messaging market. It was more than email, and as a result thousands of customers still have a huge inventory of applications running on Notes and Domino. Rewind to 2006. DOCOVA came to life as a demo to show how customers could use our Web App Dev tools for Domino to create powerful browser based business applications.  IBM customers worldwide were purchasing our tools, but the applications they were building were [&#8230;]</p>
  22. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com/domino-often-still-best/">Domino &#8211; Often Still the Best</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com">DOCOVA.com</a>.</p>
  23. ]]></description>
  24. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>In many cases, from a technical and financial standpoint, Domino is still hands down the best choice in terms of a platform.  The Domino server, with the database, messaging, web server and application server all tightly integrated makes it affordable and easy to work with. Its replication capabilities simply cannot be found in other platforms.  If you have any level of technical knowledge you can see why it is so hard to replace as an application platform.</p>
  25. <p>It drives me nuts when I read articles like the most recent one posted in the <a href="https://www.theregister.co.uk/2017/10/30/ibm_hcl_notes_domino_partnership/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">UK Register around the arrangement between IBM and HCL </a>and the continued development of Notes and Domino.  Especially the comments.  Sure, there is some love there, but the article itself and the majority of the comments are negative and show the authors are misinformed.  As <a href="http://www.alanlepofsky.com/alepofsky/alanblog.nsf/dx/ibm-forms-strategic-partnership-with-hcl-technologies-for-future-of-notes-and-domino" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Alan Lepovsky points out on his LinkedIn post </a>around this same topic,</p>
  26. <p><strong><em> &#8220;I get pitches every week for new products that can&#8217;t do a fraction of what Notes could do a decade ago.&#8221;</em></strong></p>
  27. <p>Notes and Domino did and still do provide incredible business value.  IBM purchased the technology for an astounding 3.52 billion dollars, and for good reason.  I have heard it reported that at one point in time it held an estimated 60% of the  Enterprise Messaging market. It was more than email, and as a result thousands of customers still have a huge inventory of applications running on Notes and Domino.</p>
  28. <p>Rewind to 2006. DOCOVA came to life as a demo to show how customers could use our Web App Dev tools for Domino to create powerful browser based business applications.  IBM customers worldwide were purchasing our tools, but the applications they were building were not leveraging all of the capabilities.  DOCOVA proved there was a demand for good browser based document management system, and when Domino.Doc and Quickr were discontinued we found ourselves in the migration game and DOCOVA became our flagship product.</p>
  29. <p>Unfortunately, despite all of its benefits from a technical point of view, Domino started to become a barrier when it came to closing sales.  We also found that existing DOCOVA customers were looking to move to other solutions because Domino was no longer being supported in their organizations.  For many of our customers DOCOVA was the only product left running on Domino. To mitigate our risk, we invested heavily in the creation of DOCOVA SE, the SQL Edition.  We retained several DOCOVA customers by migrating them from our Domino to SQL version.</p>
  30. <p>The SQL platform has advantages, especially when it comes to large quantities of data and reporting, but Domino remains as one of the best platforms for DOCOVA.  The process of creating the SQL version really reinforced for us how good Domino is.</p>
  31. <p>If the IBM arrangement with HCL works out, and Domino once again becomes a dominant player, nothing would make us happier.  It&#8217;s where we grew up.</p>
  32. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  33. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  34. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  35. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com/domino-often-still-best/">Domino &#8211; Often Still the Best</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com">DOCOVA.com</a>.</p>
  36. ]]></content:encoded>
  37. </item>
  38. <item>
  39. <title>IBM Announcement – HCL to take over Notes and Domino Development</title>
  40. <link>http://www.docova.com/ibm-announcement-hcl-take-notes-domino-development/</link>
  41. <comments>http://www.docova.com/ibm-announcement-hcl-take-notes-domino-development/#comments</comments>
  42. <pubDate>Tue, 31 Oct 2017 17:22:35 +0000</pubDate>
  43. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Gary Walsh]]></dc:creator>
  44. <category><![CDATA[Technical]]></category>
  45.  
  46. <guid isPermaLink="false">http://www.docova.com/?p=6319</guid>
  47. <description><![CDATA[<p>Last week IBM made the announcement they were entering into an arrangement with HCL. The gist of it is that they are using HCL to do future development on Notes and Domino and a few other collaboration products. This news appeared on several blogs after it was announced by HCL.  IBM delivered the news to IBM partners October 26.  There were rumors floating around Social Connections 2017 that IBM was preparing to sell off Notes and Domino.  This seems to be the basis of those rumors. Frankly, I do no think it really matters what IBM does at this point.  This could help customers and partners who are sitting on the fence about staying with the platform.  The problem is that most of the investment for a product is driven by new license sales, and when it comes to Notes and Domino there is not much of that going on. It will be interesting to see how this announcement is interpreted.  The four year flip flop message around V10 cannot be helping customers or partners. Notes and Domino are great products, which is the reason so many customers are still running critical business applications on the platform.  For DOCOVA, Domino provides significant advantages over SQL in a lot of ways.  Replication for example. DOCOVA was originally delivered on Domino.  We invested in the development of DOCOVA SE, the SQL Edition, in reaction to the fear, uncertainty and doubt that surrounds the IBM platform.  Make no mistake, Domino is still an excellent platform.  The reason we now have a focus on converting Notes apps to SQL is not because of a technology limitation.  It is a reaction to demand from Notes and Domino community. If the partnership [&#8230;]</p>
  48. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com/ibm-announcement-hcl-take-notes-domino-development/">IBM Announcement &#8211; HCL to take over Notes and Domino Development</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com">DOCOVA.com</a>.</p>
  49. ]]></description>
  50. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Last week <a href="https://www.ibm.com/blogs/social-business/2017/10/25/ibm-announces-investment-notes-domino-version-10-beyond/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">IBM made the announcement </a>they were entering into an arrangement with HCL. The gist of it is that they are using HCL to do future development on Notes and Domino and a few other collaboration products.</p>
  51. <p>This news appeared on several blogs after it was announced by HCL.  IBM delivered the news to IBM partners October 26.  There were rumors floating around Social Connections 2017 that IBM was preparing to sell off Notes and Domino.  This seems to be the basis of those rumors.</p>
  52. <p>Frankly, I do no think it really matters what IBM does at this point.  This could help customers and partners who are sitting on the fence about staying with the platform.  The problem is that most of the investment for a product is driven by new license sales, and when it comes to Notes and Domino there is not much of that going on.</p>
  53. <p>It will be interesting to see how this announcement is interpreted.  The four year flip flop message around V10 cannot be helping customers or partners.</p>
  54. <p>Notes and Domino are great products, which is the reason so many customers are still running critical business applications on the platform.  For DOCOVA, Domino provides significant advantages over SQL in a lot of ways.  Replication for example.</p>
  55. <p>DOCOVA was originally delivered on Domino.  We invested in the development of DOCOVA SE, the SQL Edition, in reaction to the fear, uncertainty and doubt that surrounds the IBM platform.  Make no mistake, Domino is still an excellent platform.  The reason we now have a focus on converting <strong><a href="http://www.docova.com/migrationmethodology/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Notes apps to SQL</a></strong> is not because of a technology limitation.  It is a reaction to demand from Notes and Domino community.</p>
  56. <p>If the partnership with HCL results in Domino once again becoming a market leader, well, nothing would please us more. Time will tell.</p>
  57. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com/ibm-announcement-hcl-take-notes-domino-development/">IBM Announcement &#8211; HCL to take over Notes and Domino Development</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com">DOCOVA.com</a>.</p>
  58. ]]></content:encoded>
  59. <wfw:commentRss>http://www.docova.com/ibm-announcement-hcl-take-notes-domino-development/feed/</wfw:commentRss>
  60. <slash:comments>1</slash:comments>
  61. </item>
  62. <item>
  63. <title>Moving to Microsoft – Sharing Notes Apps from the O365 Portal</title>
  64. <link>http://www.docova.com/moving-microsoft-sharing-notes-apps-o365-portal/</link>
  65. <pubDate>Tue, 31 Oct 2017 15:31:31 +0000</pubDate>
  66. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Gary Walsh]]></dc:creator>
  67. <category><![CDATA[Technical]]></category>
  68.  
  69. <guid isPermaLink="false">http://www.docova.com/?p=6302</guid>
  70. <description><![CDATA[<p>If you have many complex Notes applications, and you have an understanding of both Notes and Microsoft development, you know you cannot move them to SharePoint without some serious business process re-engineering.  SharePoint and Notes are too different. The applications are going to have to change and in many cases it is not even doable. DOCOVA will allow you to migrate those custom Notes apps to SQL, and provide the same level of functionality you had in the Notes and Domino environment.  For the most part you get what you had, functionality wise, but on the SQL platform. Sound too good to be true?  Check out this link. DOCOVA apps do not have to live within the DOCOVA interface. You can present them standalone via a URL. That means users can access them via their O365 portal using a custom tile.  That provides an all Microsoft solution, at least from the user point of view. Microsoft provides the following documentation and video clip on how to create a custom tile on O365.  That will get you there&#8230;well almost.  I spent several hours with Microsoft tech support getting it to work.  Hopefully I can save you some time. The high level tasks are as follows: login to the O365 portal at http://portal.office.com click on the ADMIN icon click on settings click on organizational portal scroll down to add a custom tile and fill in the fields on the form click on the 9 dots icon go to the new tab and hover over the tile pin the tile to home I say almost because there are a couple of things you need to be aware of in order to get the tile to appear.   In step 5 [&#8230;]</p>
  71. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com/moving-microsoft-sharing-notes-apps-o365-portal/">Moving to Microsoft &#8211; Sharing Notes Apps from the O365 Portal</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com">DOCOVA.com</a>.</p>
  72. ]]></description>
  73. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-6309" src="http://www.docova.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/O365_2.png" alt="" width="1238" height="437" srcset="http://www.docova.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/O365_2.png 1238w, http://www.docova.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/O365_2-300x106.png 300w, http://www.docova.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/O365_2-768x271.png 768w, http://www.docova.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/O365_2-1024x361.png 1024w" sizes="(max-width: 1238px) 100vw, 1238px" />If you have many complex Notes applications, and you have an understanding of both Notes and Microsoft development, you know you cannot move them to SharePoint without some serious business process re-engineering.  SharePoint and Notes are too different. The applications are going to have to change and in many cases it is not even doable.</p>
  74. <p>DOCOVA will allow you to migrate those custom Notes apps to SQL, and provide the same level of functionality you had in the Notes and Domino environment.  For the most part you get what you had, functionality wise, but on the SQL platform. Sound too good to be true?  Check out <a href="http://www.docova.com/migrationmethodology/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">this link</a>.</p>
  75. <p>DOCOVA apps do not have to live within the DOCOVA interface. You can present them standalone via a URL. That means users can access them via their O365 portal using a <strong>custom tile</strong>.  That provides an all Microsoft solution, at least from the user point of view.</p>
  76. <p>Microsoft provides the following <a href="https://support.office.com/en-us/article/Add-custom-tiles-to-the-app-launcher-1136115a-75af-4497-b693-640c4ce70bc6" target="_blank" rel="noopener">documentation and video clip</a> on how to create a custom tile on O365.  That will get you there&#8230;well <strong>almost</strong>.  I spent several hours with Microsoft tech support getting it to work.  Hopefully I can save you some time.</p>
  77. <p>The high level tasks are as follows:</p>
  78. <ol>
  79. <li>login to the O365 portal at http://portal.office.com</li>
  80. <li>click on the ADMIN icon</li>
  81. <li>click on settings</li>
  82. <li>click on organizational portal</li>
  83. <li>scroll down to add a custom tile and fill in the fields on the form</li>
  84. <li>click on the 9 dots icon</li>
  85. <li>go to the new tab and hover over the tile</li>
  86. <li>pin the tile to home</li>
  87. </ol>
  88. <p>I say <strong>almost</strong> because there are a couple of things you need to be aware of in order to get the tile to appear.   In step 5 one of the fields on the form that defines the tile is a link to a graphic image. It has to be a valid link that your users can get to, and<strong> O365 will not tell you if it is or not</strong>. It will not display the tile until you get it right.  Since you are using O365 a logical place to put the image would be SharePoint.</p>
  89. <p>Follow these steps to add a graphic image for the tile to SharePoint:</p>
  90. <ol>
  91. <li>create a SharePoint site or open an existing site</li>
  92. <li>click on documents</li>
  93. <li>click on upload to upload an image</li>
  94. <li>select the image</li>
  95. <li>click on share</li>
  96. <li>click on the anyone option</li>
  97. </ol>
  98. <p>Great&#8230;but you may see that the &#8220;anyone&#8221; option in step 6 is grayed out.   If users are external to your organization, then you will have to generate an <strong>anonymous guest lin</strong>k, and to do  that you may need to <strong>enable external anonymous sharing</strong> on the SharePoint site, if your security policy will allow that of course.</p>
  99. <p>To enable external sharing in SharePoint  do this:</p>
  100. <ol>
  101. <li>click on Admin from the main O365 portal</li>
  102. <li>cick on Admin Centers</li>
  103. <li>click on SharePoint</li>
  104. <li>select your SharePoint site</li>
  105. <li>click on Sharing</li>
  106. <li>click the option &#8220;allow sharing with all external users, and using anonymous access links&#8221;</li>
  107. </ol>
  108. <p>A good way to determine if you have a valid link is to send the URL to a user. They can paste it into a browser and confirm that they can see the image.  To get the guest link for the image, highlight the image from your SharePoint site and click Share and Copy Link.</p>
  109. <p>Is the tile still not showing?  Give it some time.  It is not instantaneous. In fact, you will probably have to log out of the portal and back in again before it will appear.</p>
  110. <p>If you find this topic of interest and want to learn more, check out this <a href="https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/rt/7405318951633587201" target="_blank" rel="noopener">weekly webinar</a>.</p>
  111. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  112. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  113. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com/moving-microsoft-sharing-notes-apps-o365-portal/">Moving to Microsoft &#8211; Sharing Notes Apps from the O365 Portal</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com">DOCOVA.com</a>.</p>
  114. ]]></content:encoded>
  115. </item>
  116. <item>
  117. <title>MWLUG 2017 – Recap</title>
  118. <link>http://www.docova.com/mwlug-2017-believe/</link>
  119. <comments>http://www.docova.com/mwlug-2017-believe/#comments</comments>
  120. <pubDate>Thu, 07 Sep 2017 17:22:45 +0000</pubDate>
  121. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Gary Walsh]]></dc:creator>
  122. <category><![CDATA[Events]]></category>
  123. <category><![CDATA[Technical]]></category>
  124.  
  125. <guid isPermaLink="false">http://www.docova.com/?p=6210</guid>
  126. <description><![CDATA[<p>MWLUG 2017 in Virginia this past August, like most of the Lotus User Group type events,  was a gathering of the Notes Nation.   The theme this year was &#8220;Moving Collaboration Forward&#8221;. This year the event saw record attendance, according to event champion Richard Moy.  The event was well organized and well run. As was the case in past years DOCOVA was a sponsor, although this time at the 11th hour. IBM was the primary sponsor. I have been involved with this technology for more than two decades.  Like many others in this community I have a great deal invested both financially and emotionally. In my original recap I vented my frustration with the continued decay of Notes and Domino in the market in a post entitled &#8220;We Believe&#8221;.  Linking that frustration to MWLUG was a mistake, and for that I would like to apologize to Richard and the members of his team who put so much effort year after year to bring it event to life. It was not my intent to cast a shadow on MWLUG, and I am sorry if that is how it was perceived. &#160; &#160; &#160; &#160; &#160;</p>
  127. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com/mwlug-2017-believe/">MWLUG 2017 &#8211; Recap</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com">DOCOVA.com</a>.</p>
  128. ]]></description>
  129. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-6279" src="http://www.docova.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/MWLUG.png" alt="" width="947" height="179" srcset="http://www.docova.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/MWLUG.png 947w, http://www.docova.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/MWLUG-300x57.png 300w, http://www.docova.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/MWLUG-768x145.png 768w, http://www.docova.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/MWLUG-940x179.png 940w" sizes="(max-width: 947px) 100vw, 947px" /></p>
  130. <p><a href="http://mwlug.com/mwlug/mwlug2017.nsf/home.xsp" target="_blank" rel="noopener">MWLUG 2017</a> in Virginia this past August, like most of the Lotus User Group type events,  was a gathering of the Notes Nation.   The theme this year was &#8220;Moving Collaboration Forward&#8221;.</p>
  131. <p>This year the event saw record attendance, according to event champion Richard Moy.  The event was well organized and well run. As was the case in past years DOCOVA was a sponsor, although this time at the 11th hour. IBM was the primary sponsor.</p>
  132. <p>I have been involved with this technology for more than two decades.  Like many others in this community I have a great deal invested both financially and emotionally. In my original recap I vented my frustration with the continued decay of Notes and Domino in the market in a post entitled <a href="http://www.docova.com/we-believe/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">&#8220;We Believe&#8221;</a>.  Linking that frustration to MWLUG was a mistake, and for that I would like to apologize to Richard and the members of his team who put so much effort year after year to bring it event to life.</p>
  133. <p>It was not my intent to cast a shadow on MWLUG, and I am sorry if that is how it was perceived.</p>
  134. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  135. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  136. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  137. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  138. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  139. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com/mwlug-2017-believe/">MWLUG 2017 &#8211; Recap</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com">DOCOVA.com</a>.</p>
  140. ]]></content:encoded>
  141. <wfw:commentRss>http://www.docova.com/mwlug-2017-believe/feed/</wfw:commentRss>
  142. <slash:comments>2</slash:comments>
  143. </item>
  144. <item>
  145. <title>Why we DO migrate code.</title>
  146. <link>http://www.docova.com/why-we-do-migrate-code/</link>
  147. <comments>http://www.docova.com/why-we-do-migrate-code/#comments</comments>
  148. <pubDate>Tue, 27 Jun 2017 13:28:54 +0000</pubDate>
  149. <dc:creator><![CDATA[John Ryan]]></dc:creator>
  150. <category><![CDATA[Notes Migration]]></category>
  151. <category><![CDATA[Technical]]></category>
  152.  
  153. <guid isPermaLink="false">http://www.docova.com/?p=5931</guid>
  154. <description><![CDATA[<p>I decided to write a blog entry on the issue of migrating Notes application code when migrating Notes applications to DOCOVA.  When I say &#8220;code&#8221;, I mean the LotusScript and @formula language that is contained in Notes applications. Now, I&#8217;ve seen some blogs and vendor web pages that espouse how you should NOT attempt to migrate the code.  These vendors typically want to convince you that you should re-develop your Notes applications on their platforms.  I get it.  That represents a lot in terms of billable services.  The bottom line, really, is that they simply lack the tools capable of migrating the code, so they try to convince you that you shouldn&#8217;t do it. Part of the DOCOVA Migration Methodology includes the task of migrating Notes applications, including the code, to the DOCOVA platform.  Developing the tools to convert LotusScript and @formula language to other languages like JavaScript and PHP is not easy.  But, we&#8217;ve done the work. In our research of business partners and organizations that still consult in or have Lotus Notes and Domino environments, we&#8217;ve found that they are looking for viable platforms to move their Notes applications to.  In companies that are still using Notes and Domino, the overwhelming consensus is that THE number one activity they DO NOT want to engage in is process re-engineering their Notes applications.  They want an efficient, cost effective way to convert their Notes applications to a new platform with as little interruption to their business as possible.  Once migrated, they want to be able to continue enhancing these applications while building new ones when they can properly plan the time, cost and resources to do so. We have found that across the board, the [&#8230;]</p>
  155. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com/why-we-do-migrate-code/">Why we DO migrate code.</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com">DOCOVA.com</a>.</p>
  156. ]]></description>
  157. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>I decided to write a blog entry on the issue of migrating Notes application code when migrating Notes applications to DOCOVA.  When I say &#8220;code&#8221;, I mean the LotusScript and @formula language that is contained in Notes applications.</p>
  158. <p>Now, I&#8217;ve seen some blogs and vendor web pages that espouse how you should NOT attempt to migrate the code.  These vendors typically want to convince you that you should re-develop your Notes applications on their platforms.  I get it.  That represents a lot in terms of billable services.  The bottom line, really, is that <strong>they simply lack the tools capable of migrating the code</strong>, so they try to convince you that you shouldn&#8217;t do it.</p>
  159. <p>Part of the <strong><a href="http://www.docova.com/migrationmethodology/" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">DOCOVA Migration Methodology</a></strong> includes the task of migrating Notes applications, including the code, to the DOCOVA platform.  Developing the tools to convert LotusScript and @formula language to other languages like JavaScript and PHP is not easy.  But,<strong> we&#8217;ve done the work</strong>.</p>
  160. <p>In our research of business partners and organizations that still consult in or have Lotus Notes and Domino environments, we&#8217;ve found that they are looking for viable platforms to move their Notes applications to.  In companies that are still using Notes and Domino, the <strong>overwhelming consensus</strong> is that THE number one activity <strong>they DO NOT want to engage in is process re-engineering their Notes applications</strong>.  They want an efficient, cost effective way to convert their Notes applications to a new platform with as little interruption to their business as possible.  Once migrated, they want to be able to continue enhancing these applications while building new ones when they can properly plan the time, cost and resources to do so.</p>
  161. <p>We have found that across the board, the vast majority of companies still on Notes and Domino have staff with skills that encompass the most popular browser application development languages in use today, that being JavaScript, Java, PHP and Python.  They all need their applications to be browser based and cross-device.  Also, the majority of these organizations already have and use Microsoft SQL Server, MySQL, Oracle or PostgreSQL as database management solutions somewhere in their organization.  <strong>This market reality is exactly what we have catered to in developing DOCOVA.</strong></p>
  162. <p>The companies we talk to often have hundreds or sometimes into the thousands of Notes applications that they need to migrate.  To sit down with staff, dig through, revisit, re-engineer and re-develop these applications is a nightmare in terms of time and money.  The VPs, CIOs and Directors of these organizations understand that fact.</p>
  163. <p>The vendors that don&#8217;t have code conversion solutions will argue that you can&#8217;t convert &#8220;old&#8221; LotusScript code to a new modern development language, like JavaScript or PHP, because you&#8217;d miss out on &#8220;new capabilities&#8221;, syntax and patterns.  Well two things.  First off, I agree, and of course this is why when LotusScript and @formula code is converted from your Notes application to DOCOVA, it is <strong>transformed into DOCOVA&#8217;s modern JavaScript/PHP object oriented API</strong> which leverages modern language constructs.  Secondly,  the last time I looked, LotusScript declared variables, used functions, conditional statements, looping constructs and class structures.  This hasn&#8217;t gone away in any language&#8230;and yes, DOCOVA converts all of this.  Moving forward, DOCOVA&#8217;s development environment is flexible enough to allow developers to implement whatever &#8220;modern&#8221; programming approaches they deem fit to leverage for their applications.</p>
  164. <p>Vendors will also argue that companies shouldn&#8217;t try to convert their old, tired, bug-ridden applications to a new platform.  I kind of resent these pejorative assumptions. Although the Notes client interface for applications is dated, most of our customers take the workflow and business logic, &#8220;the code&#8221; of their Notes applications very seriously.  They use their applications on a daily basis to run their businesses.  To treat them as if they were &#8220;throw-away&#8221; is misguided.  That said though, it is true that sometimes, for some applications, companies would rather re-develop them.  This too is perfect for DOCOVA as it offers a comprehensive drag and drop, WYSIWYM (what-you-see-is-what-you-mean) browser integrated application design environment for building applications super fast.</p>
  165. <p><strong>With DOCOVA and our migration methodology, it’s NOT about keeping the old stuff old.</strong>  The import is about modernizing your legacy Notes apps into a new modern platform in an automated fashion.  Notes UI elements are transformed into new modern browser based UI elements and LotusScript and @formula language are converted to JavaScript/PHP and DOCOVA’s modern object oriented API.</p>
  166. <p>So yes, if you&#8217;re looking to move off of Notes and Domino and are wondering what to do with your applications, we of course encourage you to seek out and review all of the Notes and Domino &#8220;migration&#8221; solutions you can find.  Then come and see DOCOVA.  Using this approach will help you truly appreciate what it has to offer!</p>
  167. <p>Let us give you a demonstration.  Our experience in Notes application migrations will quickly become evident and you will gain an understanding as to why we boast the most complete end-to-end migration solution for your Notes applications.</p>
  168. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com/why-we-do-migrate-code/">Why we DO migrate code.</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com">DOCOVA.com</a>.</p>
  169. ]]></content:encoded>
  170. <wfw:commentRss>http://www.docova.com/why-we-do-migrate-code/feed/</wfw:commentRss>
  171. <slash:comments>2</slash:comments>
  172. </item>
  173. <item>
  174. <title>Migrate Notes to DOCOVA Blog Series Part 17: Input translation and input validation formulas</title>
  175. <link>http://www.docova.com/migrate-notes-to-docova-blog-series-part-17-input-translation-and-input-validation-formulas/</link>
  176. <pubDate>Thu, 25 May 2017 12:51:27 +0000</pubDate>
  177. <dc:creator><![CDATA[John Ryan]]></dc:creator>
  178. <category><![CDATA[Notes Migration]]></category>
  179. <category><![CDATA[Technical]]></category>
  180.  
  181. <guid isPermaLink="false">http://www.docova.com/?p=5361</guid>
  182. <description><![CDATA[<p>Welcome to blog series part 17 of 17 on migrating Notes apps to DOCOVA.  The subject of this blog is Input translation and input validation formulas (formulae if you prefer). Right.  So, one day I hear this argument coming from down the hall here at DOCOVA.  The dev team embroiled in some discussion.  Oh the controversy.  Fisticuffs? Naw.  Heated?  Maybe that would be a bit of a stretch.  The debate?  How should input translation and input validation formulas be handled in DOCOVA? In a Notes developer client, you can click on a field on a form and provide a formula for translating or validating values for that field. Should DOCOVA do it the same way?  On the one hand, from a migration point of view, it&#8217;s one to one, it&#8217;s easier to migrate the formulae over to DOCOVA associated with the fields on the forms.  The way Notes did it, it was convenient and pretty easy to find, add, edit, what have you. On the other hand, it&#8217;s a bit disjointed especially on the validation side of things.  The save/submit process stops for each problem encountered rather than summarize the issues and present them to the user so that the user can fix them all and save again. So, the question becomes, should DOCOVA implement these formulae the way Notes did? Well, as of the writing of this blog post I can say, when it comes to input translation formulas, we went ahead and added the option to fields in the App Builder.  Kinda makes sense for that. However, for input validation, again as at the time of my writing this blog, remains outstanding.  I will come back and update this later but for now, [&#8230;]</p>
  183. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com/migrate-notes-to-docova-blog-series-part-17-input-translation-and-input-validation-formulas/">Migrate Notes to DOCOVA Blog Series Part 17: Input translation and input validation formulas</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com">DOCOVA.com</a>.</p>
  184. ]]></description>
  185. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Welcome to blog series part 17 of 17 on migrating Notes apps to DOCOVA.  The subject of this blog is Input translation and input validation formulas (formulae if you prefer).</p>
  186. <p>Right.  So, one day I hear this argument coming from down the hall here at DOCOVA.  The dev team embroiled in some discussion.  Oh the controversy.  Fisticuffs? Naw.  Heated?  Maybe that would be a bit of a stretch.  The debate?  How should input translation and input validation formulas be handled in DOCOVA?</p>
  187. <p>In a Notes developer client, you can click on a field on a form and provide a formula for translating or validating values for that field.</p>
  188. <p>Should DOCOVA do it the same way?  On the one hand, from a migration point of view, it&#8217;s one to one, it&#8217;s easier to migrate the formulae over to DOCOVA associated with the fields on the forms.  The way Notes did it, it was convenient and pretty easy to find, add, edit, what have you.</p>
  189. <p>On the other hand, it&#8217;s a bit disjointed especially on the validation side of things.  The save/submit process stops for each problem encountered rather than summarize the issues and present them to the user so that the user can fix them all and save again.</p>
  190. <p>So, the question becomes, should DOCOVA implement these formulae the way Notes did?</p>
  191. <p>Well, as of the writing of this blog post I can say, when it comes to input translation formulas, we went ahead and added the option to fields in the App Builder.  Kinda makes sense for that.</p>
  192. <p>However, for input validation, again as at the time of my writing this blog, remains outstanding.  I will come back and update this later but for now, there are two trains of thought.  First, just bring the formulas over and have them the same way as Notes does, as an attribute of a field.  With this approach, migration is easier and the simplicity of it remains.  Alternatively, when importing a form, we gather up all validation formulas and combine them into one function that gets executed on submit.  This approach would lend itself to being more easily converted into something it should be. Stay tuned.  The bottom line though, is that input validation formulas can easily be converted over to DOCOVA and implemented with a field or in your own .js, we&#8217;re  just looking to make it a bit more automated.</p>
  193. <p>Comments?</p>
  194. <p>You can fast-track and get <strong><a href="http://www.docova.com/migrationmethodology/">all the whitepapers on our migration methodology</a> </strong>and everything that is being discussed in this series of posts.  Specifically, you can get the DOCOVA Notes/Domino Migration Methodology &#8211; MIGRATE whitepaper.</p>
  195. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com/migrate-notes-to-docova-blog-series-part-17-input-translation-and-input-validation-formulas/">Migrate Notes to DOCOVA Blog Series Part 17: Input translation and input validation formulas</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com">DOCOVA.com</a>.</p>
  196. ]]></content:encoded>
  197. </item>
  198. <item>
  199. <title>Migrate Notes to DOCOVA Blog Series Part 16: Form events</title>
  200. <link>http://www.docova.com/migrate-notes-to-docova-blog-series-part-16-form-events/</link>
  201. <pubDate>Tue, 23 May 2017 12:24:52 +0000</pubDate>
  202. <dc:creator><![CDATA[John Ryan]]></dc:creator>
  203. <category><![CDATA[Notes Migration]]></category>
  204. <category><![CDATA[Technical]]></category>
  205.  
  206. <guid isPermaLink="false">http://www.docova.com/?p=5359</guid>
  207. <description><![CDATA[<p>Welcome to blog series part 16 of 17 on migrating Notes apps to DOCOVA.  In this entry I&#8217;m going to talk about form events. Okay, so the talk about form events usually starts of with the question: Does DOCOVA have document events like onLoad, onUnload, QueryOpen, QuerySave and WebQueryOpen? Yes.  DOCOVA supports both typical browser events like onLoad and onUnload but has also been extended to handle similar events that were found in Notes forms like QueryOpen, QuerySave, PostSave and so forth.  Many Notes applications made heavy use of these events, we couldn&#8217;t just leave them out now, could we? DOCOVA implements these events in a similar fashion because they are useful and it makes migrating Notes application to DOCOVA much easier.  I mean, could you imagine having to try to implement these events in some other target collaboration platform aside from DOCOVA?  Good luck with that. Comment below. You can fast-track and get all the whitepapers on our migration methodology and everything that is being discussed in this series of posts.  Specifically, you can get the DOCOVA Notes/Domino Migration Methodology &#8211; MIGRATE whitepaper</p>
  208. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com/migrate-notes-to-docova-blog-series-part-16-form-events/">Migrate Notes to DOCOVA Blog Series Part 16: Form events</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com">DOCOVA.com</a>.</p>
  209. ]]></description>
  210. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Welcome to blog series part 16 of 17 on migrating Notes apps to DOCOVA.  In this entry I&#8217;m going to talk about form events.</p>
  211. <p>Okay, so the talk about form events usually starts of with the question:</p>
  212. <p><strong>Does DOCOVA have document events like onLoad, onUnload, QueryOpen, QuerySave and WebQueryOpen?</strong></p>
  213. <p>Yes.  DOCOVA supports both typical browser events like onLoad and onUnload but has also been extended to handle similar events that were found in Notes forms like QueryOpen, QuerySave, PostSave and so forth.  Many Notes applications made heavy use of these events, we couldn&#8217;t just leave them out now, could we?</p>
  214. <p>DOCOVA implements these events in a similar fashion because they are useful and it makes migrating Notes application to DOCOVA much easier.  I mean, could you imagine having to try to implement these events in some other target collaboration platform aside from DOCOVA?  Good luck with that.</p>
  215. <p>Comment below.</p>
  216. <p>You can fast-track and get <strong><a href="http://www.docova.com/migrationmethodology/">all the whitepapers on our migration methodology</a> </strong>and everything that is being discussed in this series of posts.  Specifically, you can get the DOCOVA Notes/Domino Migration Methodology &#8211; MIGRATE whitepaper</p>
  217. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com/migrate-notes-to-docova-blog-series-part-16-form-events/">Migrate Notes to DOCOVA Blog Series Part 16: Form events</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com">DOCOVA.com</a>.</p>
  218. ]]></content:encoded>
  219. </item>
  220. <item>
  221. <title>Migrate Notes to DOCOVA Blog Series Part 15: Private on first use folders</title>
  222. <link>http://www.docova.com/migrate-notes-to-docova-blog-series-part-15-private-on-first-use-folders/</link>
  223. <pubDate>Thu, 18 May 2017 12:38:43 +0000</pubDate>
  224. <dc:creator><![CDATA[John Ryan]]></dc:creator>
  225. <category><![CDATA[Notes Migration]]></category>
  226. <category><![CDATA[Technical]]></category>
  227.  
  228. <guid isPermaLink="false">http://www.docova.com/?p=5357</guid>
  229. <description><![CDATA[<p>Welcome to blog series part 15 of 17 on migrating Notes apps to DOCOVA..  In this entry I&#8217;m going to talk about good &#8216;ol Private on first use folders. This is another one of those &#8220;interesting&#8221; Notes application design constructs.  In my journeys I don&#8217;t think I&#8217;ve ever come across this same sort of construct in any other application environment.  Anywhere.  Ever.  Sure, a private folder, but &#8220;&#8230;on first use&#8221; is the kicker.  Interestingly, this construct can be implemented with some creativity behind it. DOCOVA supports “Private on first use folders”, depicted as “Content personal to each user”.  So, when a person accesses a “view” as a folder, it will be treated as though this folder is private to the user. This is most useful when selecting documents manually.  One way that Notes applications leveraged this design construct in the past was that sometimes a search was performed to gather documents together and then present them to the specific User doing the search via this folder type. There you go.  Supported. Comment below. You can fast-track and get all the whitepapers on our migration methodology and everything that is being discussed in this series of posts.  Specifically, you can get the DOCOVA Notes/Domino Migration Methodology &#8211; MIGRATE whitepaper</p>
  230. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com/migrate-notes-to-docova-blog-series-part-15-private-on-first-use-folders/">Migrate Notes to DOCOVA Blog Series Part 15: Private on first use folders</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com">DOCOVA.com</a>.</p>
  231. ]]></description>
  232. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Welcome to blog series part 15 of 17 on migrating Notes apps to DOCOVA..  In this entry I&#8217;m going to talk about good &#8216;ol Private on first use folders.</p>
  233. <p>This is another one of those &#8220;interesting&#8221; Notes application design constructs.  In my journeys I don&#8217;t think I&#8217;ve ever come across this same sort of construct in any other application environment.  Anywhere.  Ever.  Sure, a private folder, but &#8220;&#8230;on first use&#8221; is the kicker.  Interestingly, this construct can be implemented with some creativity behind it.</p>
  234. <p>DOCOVA supports “Private on first use folders”, depicted as “Content personal to each user”.  So, when a person accesses a “view” as a folder, it will be treated as though this folder is private to the user.</p>
  235. <p>This is most useful when selecting documents manually.  One way that Notes applications leveraged this design construct in the past was that sometimes a search was performed to gather documents together and then present them to the specific User doing the search via this folder type.</p>
  236. <p>There you go.  Supported.</p>
  237. <p>Comment below.</p>
  238. <p>You can fast-track and get <strong><a href="http://www.docova.com/migrationmethodology/">all the whitepapers on our migration methodology</a> </strong>and everything that is being discussed in this series of posts.  Specifically, you can get the DOCOVA Notes/Domino Migration Methodology &#8211; MIGRATE whitepaper</p>
  239. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com/migrate-notes-to-docova-blog-series-part-15-private-on-first-use-folders/">Migrate Notes to DOCOVA Blog Series Part 15: Private on first use folders</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com">DOCOVA.com</a>.</p>
  240. ]]></content:encoded>
  241. </item>
  242. <item>
  243. <title>Migrate Notes to DOCOVA Blog Series Part 14: Column sorting and categorizing</title>
  244. <link>http://www.docova.com/migrate-notes-to-docova-blog-series-part-14-column-sorting-and-categorizing/</link>
  245. <pubDate>Tue, 16 May 2017 12:18:04 +0000</pubDate>
  246. <dc:creator><![CDATA[John Ryan]]></dc:creator>
  247. <category><![CDATA[Notes Migration]]></category>
  248. <category><![CDATA[Technical]]></category>
  249.  
  250. <guid isPermaLink="false">http://www.docova.com/?p=5355</guid>
  251. <description><![CDATA[<p>Welcome to blog series part 14 of 17 on migrating Notes apps to DOCOVA..  In this entry I&#8217;m going to talk about view column sorting and categorizing. All view sorting and categorizing functionality is supported in DOCOVA.  Additionally, other properties like “Show multiple values as separate entries” and showing response docs in a hierarchy are also supported. I mean, as you get more in depth with DOCOVA, you&#8217;ll learn the breadth of the view object model and all the cool stuff you can do, even switching to Calendar and Gantt style views. So ya, what can I tell ya.  That&#8217;s it for now.  Supported!  Bam! Comment below! You can fast-track and get all the whitepapers on our migration methodology and everything that is being discussed in this series of posts.  Specifically, you can get the DOCOVA Notes/Domino Migration Methodology &#8211; MIGRATE whitepaper</p>
  252. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com/migrate-notes-to-docova-blog-series-part-14-column-sorting-and-categorizing/">Migrate Notes to DOCOVA Blog Series Part 14: Column sorting and categorizing</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com">DOCOVA.com</a>.</p>
  253. ]]></description>
  254. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Welcome to blog series part 14 of 17 on migrating Notes apps to DOCOVA..  In this entry I&#8217;m going to talk about view column sorting and categorizing.</p>
  255. <p>All view sorting and categorizing functionality is supported in DOCOVA.  Additionally, other properties like “Show multiple values as separate entries” and showing response docs in a hierarchy are also supported.</p>
  256. <p>I mean, as you get more in depth with DOCOVA, you&#8217;ll learn the breadth of the view object model and all the cool stuff you can do, even switching to Calendar and Gantt style views.</p>
  257. <p>So ya, what can I tell ya.  That&#8217;s it for now.  Supported!  Bam!</p>
  258. <p>Comment below!</p>
  259. <p>You can fast-track and get <strong><a href="http://www.docova.com/migrationmethodology/">all the whitepapers on our migration methodology</a> </strong>and everything that is being discussed in this series of posts.  Specifically, you can get the DOCOVA Notes/Domino Migration Methodology &#8211; MIGRATE whitepaper</p>
  260. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com/migrate-notes-to-docova-blog-series-part-14-column-sorting-and-categorizing/">Migrate Notes to DOCOVA Blog Series Part 14: Column sorting and categorizing</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com">DOCOVA.com</a>.</p>
  261. ]]></content:encoded>
  262. </item>
  263. <item>
  264. <title>Migrate Notes to DOCOVA Blog Series Part 13: Shared columns and fields</title>
  265. <link>http://www.docova.com/migrate-notes-to-docova-blog-series-part-13-shared-columns-and-fields/</link>
  266. <pubDate>Thu, 11 May 2017 12:52:29 +0000</pubDate>
  267. <dc:creator><![CDATA[John Ryan]]></dc:creator>
  268. <category><![CDATA[Notes Migration]]></category>
  269. <category><![CDATA[Technical]]></category>
  270.  
  271. <guid isPermaLink="false">http://www.docova.com/?p=5353</guid>
  272. <description><![CDATA[<p>Welcome to blog series part 13 of 17 on migrating Notes apps to DOCOVA.  This entry is dedicated to shared columns and fields.  It&#8217;s short and sweet. DOCOVA does not support the concept of shared columns and fields between applications at this time. Say what?  I know, right?  DOCOVA is so over the top, so chalk full of functionality&#8230;it&#8217;s crazy, alas at the time of writing this blog entry, it doesn&#8217;t support shared columns and fields.  Well, that&#8217;s the reason right there&#8230;we&#8217;ve been busy with the other stuff.  &#8220;It&#8217;s on the list&#8221;.  &#8220;It&#8217;s coming&#8221;.  For our &#8220;library&#8221; templates, we actually do have view column definitions that are shared across any library as well as custom search fields that can be defined and used across libraries and applications when using DOCOVA&#8217;s advanced searching features.  The problem right now is that we have a few ideas around how we&#8217;d like to implement this functionality, and it may be different than how we are currently doing it, or not.  So, stay tuned. For now, when Notes app views are imported via the DOCOVA App Importer, if they are using a shared column, then the column is treated as though it is specifically part of the view in that app. When a form or subform is imported, shared fields that may have been used are treated as if they were specific to the form or subform. Comments? You can fast-track and get all the whitepapers on our migration methodology and everything that is being discussed in this series of posts.  Specifically, you can get the DOCOVA Notes/Domino Migration Methodology &#8211; MIGRATE whitepaper</p>
  273. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com/migrate-notes-to-docova-blog-series-part-13-shared-columns-and-fields/">Migrate Notes to DOCOVA Blog Series Part 13: Shared columns and fields</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com">DOCOVA.com</a>.</p>
  274. ]]></description>
  275. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Welcome to blog series part 13 of 17 on migrating Notes apps to DOCOVA.  This entry is dedicated to shared columns and fields.  It&#8217;s short and sweet.</p>
  276. <p>DOCOVA does not support the concept of shared columns and fields between applications at this time.</p>
  277. <p>Say what?  I know, right?  DOCOVA is so over the top, so chalk full of functionality&#8230;it&#8217;s crazy, alas at the time of writing this blog entry, it doesn&#8217;t support shared columns and fields.  Well, that&#8217;s the reason right there&#8230;we&#8217;ve been busy with the other stuff.  &#8220;It&#8217;s on the list&#8221;.  &#8220;It&#8217;s coming&#8221;.  For our &#8220;library&#8221; templates, we actually do have view column definitions that are shared across any library as well as custom search fields that can be defined and used across libraries and applications when using DOCOVA&#8217;s advanced searching features.  The problem right now is that we have a few ideas around how we&#8217;d like to implement this functionality, and it may be different than how we are currently doing it, or not.  So, stay tuned.</p>
  278. <p>For now, when Notes app views are imported via the DOCOVA App Importer, if they are using a shared column, then the column is treated as though it is specifically part of the view in that app.</p>
  279. <p>When a form or subform is imported, shared fields that may have been used are treated as if they were specific to the form or subform.</p>
  280. <p>Comments?</p>
  281. <p>You can fast-track and get <strong><a href="http://www.docova.com/migrationmethodology/">all the whitepapers on our migration methodology</a> </strong>and everything that is being discussed in this series of posts.  Specifically, you can get the DOCOVA Notes/Domino Migration Methodology &#8211; MIGRATE whitepaper</p>
  282. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com/migrate-notes-to-docova-blog-series-part-13-shared-columns-and-fields/">Migrate Notes to DOCOVA Blog Series Part 13: Shared columns and fields</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com">DOCOVA.com</a>.</p>
  283. ]]></content:encoded>
  284. </item>
  285. <item>
  286. <title>Migrate Notes to DOCOVA Blog Series Part 12: Multi-value fields</title>
  287. <link>http://www.docova.com/migrate-notes-to-docova-blog-series-part-12-multi-value-fields/</link>
  288. <pubDate>Tue, 09 May 2017 12:01:37 +0000</pubDate>
  289. <dc:creator><![CDATA[John Ryan]]></dc:creator>
  290. <category><![CDATA[Notes Migration]]></category>
  291. <category><![CDATA[Technical]]></category>
  292.  
  293. <guid isPermaLink="false">http://www.docova.com/?p=5351</guid>
  294. <description><![CDATA[<p>Welcome to blog series part 12 of 17 on migrating Notes apps to DOCOVA.  In this entry it&#8217;s all about multi-value fields. Notes had the concept of multi-value fields on forms.  All fields were basically treated as arrays of values.  For example when addressing field values in LotusScript, you might write some code like; Dim myval = doc.myfield(0)  (where doc is a NotesDocument) Although it&#8217;s a bit of an odd duck, DOCOVA supports the same type of addressing when it comes to form fields.  It&#8217;s easier to migrate the code over and easy for Notes developers to quickly understand and use. Thus something like doc.myfield(0) is translated into doc.getfield(“myfield”)[0] in JavaScript. Or, for a list of fields; Var myfields = doc.getFields(myfieldlist) and get the field with myfields.myfieldname[0] One additional important note as it relates to multi-value fields is that if a multi-value field is used in a view column, DOCOVA &#8220;views&#8221; support the “Show multiple values as separate entries” option.  From a techy point of view, in a relational database environment, I should be able to hear people saying &#8220;wow&#8221; right about now. Comment below! You can fast-track and get all the whitepapers on our migration methodology and everything that is being discussed in this series of posts.  Specifically, you can get the DOCOVA Notes/Domino Migration Methodology &#8211; MIGRATE whitepaper &#160;</p>
  295. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com/migrate-notes-to-docova-blog-series-part-12-multi-value-fields/">Migrate Notes to DOCOVA Blog Series Part 12: Multi-value fields</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com">DOCOVA.com</a>.</p>
  296. ]]></description>
  297. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Welcome to blog series part 12 of 17 on migrating Notes apps to DOCOVA.  In this entry it&#8217;s all about multi-value fields.</p>
  298. <p>Notes had the concept of multi-value fields on forms.  All fields were basically treated as arrays of values.  For example when addressing field values in LotusScript, you might write some code like;</p>
  299. <p><span style="color: #339966;">Dim myval = doc.myfield(0)  (where doc is a NotesDocument)<br />
  300. </span></p>
  301. <p>Although it&#8217;s a bit of an odd duck, DOCOVA supports the same type of addressing when it comes to form fields.  It&#8217;s easier to migrate the code over and easy for Notes developers to quickly understand and use. Thus something like <span style="color: #339966;">doc.myfield(0)</span> is translated into <span style="color: #339966;">doc.getfield(“myfield”)[0]</span> in JavaScript.</p>
  302. <p>Or, for a list of fields;<br />
  303. <span style="color: #339966;">Var myfields = doc.getFields(myfieldlist) and get the field with myfields.myfieldname[0]</span></p>
  304. <p>One additional important note as it relates to multi-value fields is that if a multi-value field is used in a view column, DOCOVA &#8220;views&#8221; support the “Show multiple values as separate entries” option.  From a techy point of view, in a relational database environment, I should be able to hear people saying &#8220;wow&#8221; right about now.</p>
  305. <p>Comment below!</p>
  306. <p>You can fast-track and get <strong><a href="http://www.docova.com/migrationmethodology/">all the whitepapers on our migration methodology</a> </strong>and everything that is being discussed in this series of posts.  Specifically, you can get the DOCOVA Notes/Domino Migration Methodology &#8211; MIGRATE whitepaper</p>
  307. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  308. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com/migrate-notes-to-docova-blog-series-part-12-multi-value-fields/">Migrate Notes to DOCOVA Blog Series Part 12: Multi-value fields</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com">DOCOVA.com</a>.</p>
  309. ]]></content:encoded>
  310. </item>
  311. <item>
  312. <title>Migrate Notes to DOCOVA Blog Series Part 11: Pass-thru HTML and Generate HTML for all fields</title>
  313. <link>http://www.docova.com/migrate-notes-to-docova-blog-series-part-11-pass-thru-html-and-generate-html-for-all-fields/</link>
  314. <pubDate>Thu, 04 May 2017 13:02:41 +0000</pubDate>
  315. <dc:creator><![CDATA[John Ryan]]></dc:creator>
  316. <category><![CDATA[Notes Migration]]></category>
  317. <category><![CDATA[Technical]]></category>
  318.  
  319. <guid isPermaLink="false">http://www.docova.com/?p=5349</guid>
  320. <description><![CDATA[<p>Welcome to blog series part 11 of 17 on migrating Notes apps to DOCOVA. In this entry I&#8217;m going to talk about &#8220;Pass-thru HTML and Generate HTML for all fields&#8221;. A neat aspect of forms development in Notes was the ability to treat text on a form as pass-thru HTML.  This meant that you could add HTML and inline JavaScript directly onto your forms and mark it as pass-thru so that the Domino server would let the text “pass-thru” as HTML/JavaScript when the form was being rendered via a browser. DOCOVA’s App Builder allows developers to achieve the same thing so that they can put HTML and inline JavaScript directly onto a form/subform.  Aside from a typical “block” of HTML, DOCOVA allows the developer to surround other elements, like Computed Text as an example.  Hence something like ComputedText can be leveraged in the pass-thru HTML or JavaScript.  For example, a developer can hide or show content based on an @formula placed in Computed Text in the style of an HTML element. This functionality opens up a huge variety of permutation around mixing HTML/JavaScript and elemental constructs. When importing Notes applications into DOCOVA, text marked as pass-thru HTML/JavaScript is treated in a similar fashion and supported in DOCOVA. On Notes forms, when rendered in a browser, if a field was computed, computed for display or computed when composed, there was no “id” or “name” attributes assigned to those fields, meaning, there was no way to address those fields.  So, turn on &#8220;Generate HTML for all fields&#8221; and voila, now you had a way to address these fields. Since DOCOVA supports computed, computed for display and computed when composed fields, we felt it was fitting for DOCOVA [&#8230;]</p>
  321. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com/migrate-notes-to-docova-blog-series-part-11-pass-thru-html-and-generate-html-for-all-fields/">Migrate Notes to DOCOVA Blog Series Part 11: Pass-thru HTML and Generate HTML for all fields</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com">DOCOVA.com</a>.</p>
  322. ]]></description>
  323. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Welcome to blog series part 11 of 17 on migrating Notes apps to DOCOVA. In this entry I&#8217;m going to talk about &#8220;Pass-thru HTML and Generate HTML for all fields&#8221;.</p>
  324. <p>A neat aspect of forms development in Notes was the ability to treat text on a form as pass-thru HTML.  This meant that you could add HTML and inline JavaScript directly onto your forms and mark it as pass-thru so that the Domino server would let the text “pass-thru” as HTML/JavaScript when the form was being rendered via a browser.</p>
  325. <p>DOCOVA’s App Builder allows developers to achieve the same thing so that they can put HTML and inline JavaScript directly onto a form/subform.  Aside from a typical “block” of HTML, DOCOVA allows the developer to surround other elements, like Computed Text as an example.  Hence something like ComputedText can be leveraged in the pass-thru HTML or JavaScript.  For example, a developer can hide or show content based on an @formula placed in Computed Text in the style of an HTML element.</p>
  326. <p>This functionality opens up a huge variety of permutation around mixing HTML/JavaScript and elemental constructs.</p>
  327. <p>When importing Notes applications into DOCOVA, text marked as pass-thru HTML/JavaScript is treated in a similar fashion and supported in DOCOVA.</p>
  328. <p>On Notes forms, when rendered in a browser, if a field was computed, computed for display or computed when composed, there was no “id” or “name” attributes assigned to those fields, meaning, there was no way to address those fields.  So, turn on &#8220;Generate HTML for all fields&#8221; and voila, now you had a way to address these fields.</p>
  329. <p>Since DOCOVA supports computed, computed for display and computed when composed fields, we felt it was fitting for DOCOVA to <em>always</em> auto-generate the relevant HTML for those types of fields so that they are always accessible in the browser for whatever your functionality needs are.</p>
  330. <p>Comment below.</p>
  331. <p>You can fast-track and get <strong><a href="http://www.docova.com/migrationmethodology/">all the whitepapers on our migration methodology</a> </strong>and everything that is being discussed in this series of posts.  Specifically, you can get the DOCOVA Notes/Domino Migration Methodology &#8211; MIGRATE whitepaper</p>
  332. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com/migrate-notes-to-docova-blog-series-part-11-pass-thru-html-and-generate-html-for-all-fields/">Migrate Notes to DOCOVA Blog Series Part 11: Pass-thru HTML and Generate HTML for all fields</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com">DOCOVA.com</a>.</p>
  333. ]]></content:encoded>
  334. </item>
  335. <item>
  336. <title>Migrate Notes to DOCOVA Blog Series Part 10: Refresh fields on keyword change</title>
  337. <link>http://www.docova.com/migrate-notes-to-docova-blog-series-part-10-refresh-fields-on-keyword-change/</link>
  338. <pubDate>Tue, 02 May 2017 12:11:35 +0000</pubDate>
  339. <dc:creator><![CDATA[John Ryan]]></dc:creator>
  340. <category><![CDATA[Notes Migration]]></category>
  341. <category><![CDATA[Technical]]></category>
  342.  
  343. <guid isPermaLink="false">http://www.docova.com/?p=5347</guid>
  344. <description><![CDATA[<p>Welcome to blog series part 10 of 17 on migrating Notes apps to DOCOVA.  In this entry it&#8217;s all about &#8220;Refresh fields on keyword change&#8221;. Ya, let&#8217;s take a moment to just love this one.  Have you ever used it in your Notes apps?  Refresh fields on keyword change was a bit of an odd beast, no?  The purpose of this operation was to enable field options (or values) to be recalculated based on the change of a selection field. For example, if you had one keyword field on a form named [State] and another keyword field on your form named [City] when you open the form you could get all the States as options to choose from in the State field keyword field, however if the City field was based on what State was selected, then you need to have the City field recalculate what list of cities to show to the user. Notes forms accomplished this by using the “Refresh fields on keyword change” option.  Although maybe you could argue that it worked fine in a Notes client, in a browser, the page reload, aside from super inefficient, would cause the page/form to jump back to the top of the page as due to the refresh.  Traditionally, with JavaScript, you&#8217;d typically load up all possible options in some multi-dimensional array&#8230;fast&#8230;and not too complicated unless you needed to add a third or more selection fields to the mix. Ugh.  A better way is to use an AJAX or JSON call to retrieve the new options. In DOCOVA, keyword type fields like selection dropdown fields, checkboxes and radio buttons can all be hooked together in the App Builder so that they track each other and [&#8230;]</p>
  345. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com/migrate-notes-to-docova-blog-series-part-10-refresh-fields-on-keyword-change/">Migrate Notes to DOCOVA Blog Series Part 10: Refresh fields on keyword change</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com">DOCOVA.com</a>.</p>
  346. ]]></description>
  347. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Welcome to blog series part 10 of 17 on migrating Notes apps to DOCOVA.  In this entry it&#8217;s all about &#8220;Refresh fields on keyword change&#8221;.</p>
  348. <p>Ya, let&#8217;s take a moment to just love this one.  Have you ever used it in your Notes apps?  Refresh fields on keyword change was a bit of an odd beast, no?  The purpose of this operation was to enable field options (or values) to be recalculated based on the change of a selection field.</p>
  349. <p>For example, if you had one keyword field on a form named [State] and another keyword field on your form named [City] when you open the form you could get all the States as options to choose from in the State field keyword field, however if the City field was based on what State was selected, then you need to have the City field recalculate what list of cities to show to the user.</p>
  350. <p>Notes forms accomplished this by using the “Refresh fields on keyword change” option.  Although maybe you could argue that it worked fine in a Notes client, in a browser, the page reload, aside from super inefficient, would cause the page/form to jump back to the top of the page as due to the refresh.  Traditionally, with JavaScript, you&#8217;d typically load up all possible options in some multi-dimensional array&#8230;fast&#8230;and not too complicated unless you needed to add a third or more selection fields to the mix. Ugh.  A better way is to use an AJAX or JSON call to retrieve the new options.</p>
  351. <p>In DOCOVA, keyword type fields like selection dropdown fields, checkboxes and radio buttons can all be hooked together in the App Builder so that they track each other and can independently get the options lists they need dynamically with no need for a “Refresh fields” option.  DOCOVA leverages AJAX to accomplish this but the real convenience is the ease with which a developer can hook up this common form control functionality.</p>
  352. <p>It&#8217;s a super convenient option in DOCOVA that I love.  Chime in with your &#8220;Refresh fields on keyword change&#8221; encounters in the comments below.</p>
  353. <p>You can fast-track and get <strong><a href="http://www.docova.com/migrationmethodology/">all the whitepapers on our migration methodology</a> </strong>and everything that is being discussed in this series of posts.  Specifically, you can get the DOCOVA Notes/Domino Migration Methodology &#8211; MIGRATE whitepaper which goes over these technical aspects.</p>
  354. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com/migrate-notes-to-docova-blog-series-part-10-refresh-fields-on-keyword-change/">Migrate Notes to DOCOVA Blog Series Part 10: Refresh fields on keyword change</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com">DOCOVA.com</a>.</p>
  355. ]]></content:encoded>
  356. </item>
  357. <item>
  358. <title>Calendar View Integration in DOCOVA V5</title>
  359. <link>http://www.docova.com/calendar-view-integration-in-docova-v5/</link>
  360. <pubDate>Mon, 01 May 2017 21:50:03 +0000</pubDate>
  361. <dc:creator><![CDATA[David Wice]]></dc:creator>
  362. <category><![CDATA[Announcements]]></category>
  363. <category><![CDATA[Technical]]></category>
  364.  
  365. <guid isPermaLink="false">http://www.docova.com/?p=5897</guid>
  366. <description><![CDATA[<p>You&#8217;ve built a new application for your client and they love it. You&#8217;re their hero. Two weeks later, they&#8217;re back with a list of enhancement questions and new ideas. This can happen regardless how many requirements gathering sessions you have. Once the system is in Production and all the users start accessing it, the requests start to come in. One of these requests may be &#8220;Can we see the data in a Calendar format?&#8221;. For those of us that have spent many years building Notes applications, this was a fairly simple request, just create a new view and set the view style to Calendar and add your fields. With DOCOVA, we wanted to make sure that it was a simple request in DOCOVA App Builder as well, and we&#8217;ve done it! Thanks to the jQuery platform and the FullCalendar open source plug-in (https://fullcalendar.io/), we have been able to provide a powerful calendar layout that is completely integrated with App Builder.  A Calendar view can be added as easily as adding a standard grid view. A configuration option toggles between the two layouts. When Calendar is selected, the available options are shown on the Calendar Settings tab From there, you just need to assign your date fields to applicable view columns This allows you to show the same data in a grid layout &#8230;and a calendar layout For more information on building applications in DOCOVA App Builder, visit http://www.docova.com/home-application-development/</p>
  367. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com/calendar-view-integration-in-docova-v5/">Calendar View Integration in DOCOVA V5</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com">DOCOVA.com</a>.</p>
  368. ]]></description>
  369. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>You&#8217;ve built a new application for your client and they love it. You&#8217;re their hero. Two weeks later, they&#8217;re back with a list of enhancement questions and new ideas. This can happen regardless how many requirements gathering sessions you have. Once the system is in Production and all the users start accessing it, the requests start to come in.</p>
  370. <p>One of these requests may be &#8220;Can we see the data in a Calendar format?&#8221;. For those of us that have spent many years building Notes applications, this was a fairly simple request, just create a new view and set the view style to Calendar and add your fields. With DOCOVA, we wanted to make sure that it was a simple request in DOCOVA App Builder as well, and we&#8217;ve done it!</p>
  371. <p>Thanks to the jQuery platform and the FullCalendar open source plug-in (<a href="https://fullcalendar.io/" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">https://fullcalendar.io/</a>), we have been able to provide a powerful calendar layout that is completely integrated with App Builder.  A Calendar view can be added as easily as adding a standard grid view. A configuration option toggles between the two layouts.</p>
  372. <p><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-5898" src="http://www.docova.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Cal1.png" alt="" width="452" height="280" srcset="http://www.docova.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Cal1.png 452w, http://www.docova.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Cal1-300x186.png 300w" sizes="(max-width: 452px) 100vw, 452px" /></p>
  373. <p>When Calendar is selected, the available options are shown on the Calendar Settings tab<br />
  374. <img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-5899" src="http://www.docova.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Cal2.png" alt="" width="658" height="189" srcset="http://www.docova.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Cal2.png 658w, http://www.docova.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Cal2-300x86.png 300w" sizes="(max-width: 658px) 100vw, 658px" /></p>
  375. <p>From there, you just need to assign your date fields to applicable view columns<br />
  376. <img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-5900" src="http://www.docova.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Cal3.png" alt="" width="796" height="205" srcset="http://www.docova.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Cal3.png 796w, http://www.docova.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Cal3-300x77.png 300w, http://www.docova.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Cal3-768x198.png 768w" sizes="(max-width: 796px) 100vw, 796px" /></p>
  377. <p>This allows you to show the same data in a grid layout<br />
  378. <img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-5901" src="http://www.docova.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Cal4.png" alt="" width="535" height="86" srcset="http://www.docova.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Cal4.png 535w, http://www.docova.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Cal4-300x48.png 300w" sizes="(max-width: 535px) 100vw, 535px" /></p>
  379. <p>&#8230;and a calendar layout<br />
  380. <img class="alignnone size-large wp-image-5902" src="http://www.docova.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Cal5-1024x564.png" alt="" width="1000" height="551" srcset="http://www.docova.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Cal5-1024x564.png 1024w, http://www.docova.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Cal5-300x165.png 300w, http://www.docova.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Cal5-768x423.png 768w, http://www.docova.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Cal5.png 1100w" sizes="(max-width: 1000px) 100vw, 1000px" /></p>
  381. <p>For more information on building applications in DOCOVA App Builder, visit <a href="http://www.docova.com/home-application-development/">http://www.docova.com/home-application-development/</a></p>
  382. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com/calendar-view-integration-in-docova-v5/">Calendar View Integration in DOCOVA V5</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com">DOCOVA.com</a>.</p>
  383. ]]></content:encoded>
  384. </item>
  385. <item>
  386. <title>Migrate Notes to DOCOVA Blog Series Part 9: Response Documents</title>
  387. <link>http://www.docova.com/migrating-notes-to-docova-part-9-response-documents/</link>
  388. <comments>http://www.docova.com/migrating-notes-to-docova-part-9-response-documents/#comments</comments>
  389. <pubDate>Thu, 27 Apr 2017 09:00:24 +0000</pubDate>
  390. <dc:creator><![CDATA[John Ryan]]></dc:creator>
  391. <category><![CDATA[Notes Migration]]></category>
  392. <category><![CDATA[Technical]]></category>
  393.  
  394. <guid isPermaLink="false">http://www.docova.com/?p=5345</guid>
  395. <description><![CDATA[<p>Welcome to blog series part 9 of 17 on migrating Notes apps to DOCOVA..  In this entry I&#8217;m going to talk about how DOCOVA handles response or child documents. First let me take a second to praise response documents in IBM Notes.  You know, they seem like such a simple thing but I think it&#8217;s surprising how many systems don&#8217;t include this type of construct out of the box.  With their ability to inherit field info from their parent on creation and deep hierarchical depiction in views, they were great in my opinion.  Ya, sure, there were oddities here and there in views, but overall I think they were really useful and easy to implement. THAT SAID.  Yes, DOCOVA supports the design construct of response/child documents.  And, yes, column totals in a categorized view look correct in that the category total disappears when the category is expanded and shows up at the bottom as you&#8217;d expect.  Why they never got around to that, I&#8217;ll never know!  Also, in case you&#8217;re wondering about the obvious, yes, when creating response or child documents from a parent, you have the option to have fields automatically inherited from the parent onto the child just as Notes had done. I&#8217;m quite happy that we have this feature in DOCOVA, it&#8217;s really useful&#8230;and built right in. You can fast-track and get all the whitepapers on our migration methodology and everything that is being discussed in this series of posts.  Specifically, you can get the DOCOVA Notes/Domino Migration Methodology &#8211; MIGRATE whitepaper which goes over these technical aspects. Comments below!  Ya&#8230;tell me how much you like response docs!</p>
  396. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com/migrating-notes-to-docova-part-9-response-documents/">Migrate Notes to DOCOVA Blog Series Part 9: Response Documents</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com">DOCOVA.com</a>.</p>
  397. ]]></description>
  398. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Welcome to blog series part 9 of 17 on migrating Notes apps to DOCOVA..  In this entry I&#8217;m going to talk about how DOCOVA handles response or child documents.</p>
  399. <p>First let me take a second to praise response documents in IBM Notes.  You know, they seem like such a simple thing but I think it&#8217;s surprising how many systems don&#8217;t include this type of construct out of the box.  With their ability to inherit field info from their parent on creation and deep hierarchical depiction in views, they were great in my opinion.  Ya, sure, there were oddities here and there in views, but overall I think they were really useful and easy to implement.</p>
  400. <p>THAT SAID.  Yes, DOCOVA supports the design construct of response/child documents.  And, yes, column totals in a categorized view look correct in that the category total disappears when the category is expanded and shows up at the bottom as you&#8217;d expect.  Why they never got around to that, I&#8217;ll never know!  Also, in case you&#8217;re wondering about the obvious, yes, when creating response or child documents from a parent, you have the option to have fields automatically inherited from the parent onto the child just as Notes had done.</p>
  401. <p>I&#8217;m quite happy that we have this feature in DOCOVA, it&#8217;s really useful&#8230;and built right in.</p>
  402. <p>You can fast-track and get <strong><a href="http://www.docova.com/migrationmethodology/">all the whitepapers on our migration methodology</a> </strong>and everything that is being discussed in this series of posts.  Specifically, you can get the DOCOVA Notes/Domino Migration Methodology &#8211; MIGRATE whitepaper which goes over these technical aspects.</p>
  403. <p>Comments below!  Ya&#8230;tell me how much you like response docs!</p>
  404. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com/migrating-notes-to-docova-part-9-response-documents/">Migrate Notes to DOCOVA Blog Series Part 9: Response Documents</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com">DOCOVA.com</a>.</p>
  405. ]]></content:encoded>
  406. <wfw:commentRss>http://www.docova.com/migrating-notes-to-docova-part-9-response-documents/feed/</wfw:commentRss>
  407. <slash:comments>2</slash:comments>
  408. </item>
  409. <item>
  410. <title>12 Apps in 18 Days – A Notes Migration Project</title>
  411. <link>http://www.docova.com/12-apps-in-18-days-a-notes-migration-project/</link>
  412. <pubDate>Wed, 26 Apr 2017 16:09:27 +0000</pubDate>
  413. <dc:creator><![CDATA[David Wice]]></dc:creator>
  414. <category><![CDATA[Notes Migration]]></category>
  415. <category><![CDATA[Technical]]></category>
  416.  
  417. <guid isPermaLink="false">http://www.docova.com/?p=5853</guid>
  418. <description><![CDATA[<p>Jamesway Incubator, located in Cambridge Ontario, manufactures and sells incubators worldwide.   For years they have used IBM Notes and Domino collaboration products to automate business processes and share information with a staff located all over the world.  However, like many in the Notes and Domino community, a corporate decision was recently made to switch to Microsoft based technologies. Replacing Notes based email is relatively easy, since the migration tools and processes are well defined.  Migrating Notes based applications is much more difficult.  Fortunately, Jamesway implemented DOCOVA as a document management system almost a decade ago to manage corporate documents, and the new version of DOCOVA (V5), has been specifically designed to migrate Notes based applications to SQL. DOCOVA V5 understands the design elements that were unique to Notes, and knows how to handle them when moving to SQL based technologies. Jamesway contracted DLI to perform the Notes application migration.  DOCOVA App Importer did the heavy lifting by automatically migrating the application design from Lotus Domino to DOCOVA, leaving the developer free to adjust and tweak the migrated applications. Without App Importer to take care of the grunt work it would have taken 6 months instead of 3 weeks to transform these applications. The DOCOVA migration methodology (Analyze, Plan, Migrate, Manage) has guided this project.  The initial analysis provided us with key information so that we could provide a quote for the migration and identify resource requirements. In discussions with Jamesway, the migration plan was developed, which in this case was to migrate off the Notes client first, keeping the Domino backend, then move the migrated applications and existing Document Management system to the DOCOVA SQL platform.   Since the DOCOVA UI is the same regardless of the [&#8230;]</p>
  419. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com/12-apps-in-18-days-a-notes-migration-project/">12 Apps in 18 Days &#8211; A Notes Migration Project</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com">DOCOVA.com</a>.</p>
  420. ]]></description>
  421. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p><strong><a href="http:///www.jamesway.com" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">Jamesway Incubator</a></strong>, located in Cambridge Ontario, manufactures and sells incubators worldwide.   For years they have used IBM Notes and Domino collaboration products to automate business processes and share information with a staff located all over the world.  However, like many in the Notes and Domino community, a corporate decision was recently made to switch to Microsoft based technologies.</p>
  422. <p>Replacing Notes based email is relatively easy, since the migration tools and processes are well defined.  Migrating Notes based applications is much more difficult.  Fortunately, Jamesway implemented <strong><a href="http://www.docova.com/is-docova-right-for-you/" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">DOCOVA</a></strong> as a document management system almost a decade ago to manage corporate documents, and the new version of <strong><a href="https://youtu.be/Bsm4t02k7ZI" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">DOCOVA (V5)</a></strong>, has been specifically designed to migrate Notes based applications to SQL. <strong><a href="https://youtu.be/Bsm4t02k7ZI" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">DOCOVA V5</a></strong> understands the design elements that were unique to Notes, and knows how to handle them when moving to SQL based technologies.</p>
  423. <p>Jamesway contracted DLI to perform the Notes application migration.  DOCOVA App Importer did the heavy lifting by automatically migrating the application design from Lotus Domino to DOCOVA, leaving the developer free to adjust and tweak the migrated applications. Without App Importer to take care of the grunt work it would have taken 6 months instead of 3 weeks to transform these applications.</p>
  424. <p><strong><a href="http://www.docova.com/migrationmethodology/" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">The DOCOVA migration methodology </a></strong>(Analyze, Plan, Migrate, Manage) has guided this project.  The initial analysis provided us with key information so that we could provide a quote for the migration and identify resource requirements. In discussions with Jamesway, the migration plan was developed, which in this case was to migrate off the Notes client first, keeping the Domino backend, then move the migrated applications and existing Document Management system to the DOCOVA SQL platform.   Since the DOCOVA UI is the same regardless of the backend platform, Jamesway could spread the migration out over time to be better able to handle the resource requirements on their end.</p>
  425. <p>The applications migrated included maintenance management, requisition systems (purchase order, cheque, etc), as well as reference/document repository applications.  Utilizing App Importer, the developer doing the migration didn&#8217;t need to know what the application did or the business logic behind it, as it was all migrated intact.</p>
  426. <p><img class="alignnone size-large wp-image-5856" src="http://www.docova.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/JWWorkspace-1024x563.png" alt="" width="1000" height="550" srcset="http://www.docova.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/JWWorkspace-1024x563.png 1024w, http://www.docova.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/JWWorkspace-300x165.png 300w, http://www.docova.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/JWWorkspace-768x422.png 768w, http://www.docova.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/JWWorkspace.png 1103w" sizes="(max-width: 1000px) 100vw, 1000px" /></p>
  427. <p>All aspects of the design were migrated (Layouts, Pages, Views, Calendar Views, Forms, Subforms, Agents, Script Libraries, Images, Folders) as well as the data, including profile documents.  What about security? Yes, that was migrated too, including document level security (authors/readers/controlled access sections). As for the LotusScript, that was automatically translated to Javascript.</p>
  428. <p>Being an early release of DOCOVA V5 there were hurdles to be crossed and issues to be addressed. In some cases application logic just doesn&#8217;t flow the same way in a browser as it does in a local Notes client (eg. dialogs, prompt boxes, etc), requiring some adjustments/tweaking by the developer post migration. Luckily the DOCOVA Application Analysis process flags these cases for us.  We are also constantly improving App Importer to address new scenarios, which means that if we were to repeat the project with the current version of <strong><a href="https://youtu.be/Bsm4t02k7ZI" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">DOCOVA V5</a></strong>, it could be completed in even less time.</p>
  429. <p>The Jamesway project has now moved into UAT. After we showed IT management the migrated applications and they saw how the business logic and UI have been maintained, they were quite comfortable taking on the UAT step, since there is little to no training required. Users just need to be shown how to access the new platform and add their applications to the workspace.</p>
  430. <p>While we still have some work to do to complete the <strong><a href="http://www.docova.com/migrationmethodology/" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">migration to the SQL platform</a></strong>, we&#8217;ve been able to take what could have been a very costly re-development project and deliver results in a short period of time, at a reasonable cost.</p>
  431. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com/12-apps-in-18-days-a-notes-migration-project/">12 Apps in 18 Days &#8211; A Notes Migration Project</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com">DOCOVA.com</a>.</p>
  432. ]]></content:encoded>
  433. </item>
  434. <item>
  435. <title>Migrate Notes to DOCOVA Blog Series Part 8: Profile Docs</title>
  436. <link>http://www.docova.com/migrate-notes-to-docova-blog-series-part-8-profile-docs/</link>
  437. <pubDate>Wed, 26 Apr 2017 12:35:37 +0000</pubDate>
  438. <dc:creator><![CDATA[John Ryan]]></dc:creator>
  439. <category><![CDATA[Notes Migration]]></category>
  440. <category><![CDATA[Technical]]></category>
  441.  
  442. <guid isPermaLink="false">http://www.docova.com/?p=5444</guid>
  443. <description><![CDATA[<p>Welcome to blog series part 8 of 17 on migrating Notes apps to DOCOVA.  In this entry I&#8217;m going to go over profile documents. In Notes apps, profile docs were convenient for, and typically used for, holding application settings type information.  The information on profile docs was easily gotten with @formula commands like @GetProfileField. The question is: Does DOCOVA support profile documents? Yes.  If a Notes application used profile documents then they will be supported in the migrated application in DOCOVA.  When migrating, of course the related profile document’s form will get migrated.  DOCOVA knows, based on how the form is edited, that the generated/updated document is to be treated as a profile document and saves it as such, similar to the way Domino handled profile docs. When the data of a Notes application is migrated, DOCOVA App Importer™ knows when a document is is a profile type document and will handle the conversion on the DOCOVA side. @Formula methods like @GetProfileField and @SetProfileField are supported in DOCOVAScript™ as $$GetProfileField and $$SetProfileField as well as $$Command([EditProfile]). If you&#8217;ve used profile documents in any of your Notes applications, when they are migrated over to DOCOVA, you can still use them in the same fashion as you did in Notes, and use them in any newly created DOCOVA apps too. You can fast-track and get all the whitepapers on our migration methodology and everything that is being discussed in this series of posts.  Specifically, you can get the DOCOVA Notes/Domino Migration Methodology &#8211; MIGRATE whitepaper which goes over these technical aspects. Post comments and questions below!</p>
  444. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com/migrate-notes-to-docova-blog-series-part-8-profile-docs/">Migrate Notes to DOCOVA Blog Series Part 8: Profile Docs</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com">DOCOVA.com</a>.</p>
  445. ]]></description>
  446. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Welcome to blog series part 8 of 17 on migrating Notes apps to DOCOVA.  In this entry I&#8217;m going to go over profile documents.</p>
  447. <p>In Notes apps, profile docs were convenient for, and typically used for, holding application settings type information.  The information on profile docs was easily gotten with @formula commands like @GetProfileField.</p>
  448. <p>The question is: Does DOCOVA support profile documents?</p>
  449. <p>Yes.  If a Notes application used profile documents then they will be supported in the migrated application in DOCOVA.  When migrating, of course the related profile document’s form will get migrated.  DOCOVA knows, based on how the form is edited, that the generated/updated document is to be treated as a profile document and saves it as such, similar to the way Domino handled profile docs.</p>
  450. <p>When the data of a Notes application is migrated, DOCOVA App Importer™ knows when a document is is a profile type document and will handle the conversion on the DOCOVA side.</p>
  451. <p>@Formula methods like @GetProfileField and @SetProfileField are supported in DOCOVAScript™ as $$GetProfileField and $$SetProfileField as well as $$Command([EditProfile]).</p>
  452. <p>If you&#8217;ve used profile documents in any of your Notes applications, when they are migrated over to DOCOVA, you can still use them in the same fashion as you did in Notes, and use them in any newly created DOCOVA apps too.</p>
  453. <p>You can fast-track and get <strong><a href="http://www.docova.com/migrationmethodology/">all the whitepapers on our migration methodology</a> </strong>and everything that is being discussed in this series of posts.  Specifically, you can get the DOCOVA Notes/Domino Migration Methodology &#8211; MIGRATE whitepaper which goes over these technical aspects.</p>
  454. <p>Post comments and questions below!</p>
  455. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com/migrate-notes-to-docova-blog-series-part-8-profile-docs/">Migrate Notes to DOCOVA Blog Series Part 8: Profile Docs</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com">DOCOVA.com</a>.</p>
  456. ]]></content:encoded>
  457. </item>
  458. <item>
  459. <title>Migrate Notes to DOCOVA Blog Series Part 7: XPages</title>
  460. <link>http://www.docova.com/migrate-notes-to-docova-blog-series-part-7-xpages/</link>
  461. <pubDate>Thu, 20 Apr 2017 14:17:28 +0000</pubDate>
  462. <dc:creator><![CDATA[John Ryan]]></dc:creator>
  463. <category><![CDATA[Notes Migration]]></category>
  464. <category><![CDATA[Technical]]></category>
  465.  
  466. <guid isPermaLink="false">http://www.docova.com/?p=5442</guid>
  467. <description><![CDATA[<p>Welcome to blog series part 7 of 17 on migrating Notes apps to DOCOVA.  In this entry I&#8217;m going to discuss XPages. So, the simple question is: Does DOCOVA migrate and support XPages? Annnnd, the answer is: No. For DOCOVA’s development we pretty much stayed away from XPages for two reasons.  First, although we might have been able to leverage it on the Domino side, it wasn’t a good fit for the SQL edition of DOCOVA which caters to several different relational platforms.  Second, we never really got a good feeling about XPages.  We always felt it was a bit of an odd design construct slapped on a platform that IBM wasn&#8217;t giving much attention to anymore.  For those reasons, we did not invest any time in it except to use it for DOCOVA&#8217;s Public File Access (PFA) component for Domino installed instances. As it turns out, based on the comments coming out of IBM Connect 2017, it appears that IBM has all but abandoned XPages. The good news is that the DOCOVA App Builder is a powerful drag-and-drop, point-and-click IDE that enables businesses to quickly rebuild forms/pages that used XPages.  So, that might be helpful for some. Also, although it might be a bit of a stretch, if you still have the forms and such that you may have redeveloped in XPages then those can/will be migrated and modernized in DOCOVA. Aside from XPages, if you&#8217;ve built Notes applications that are web enabled through passthru HTML/inline JavaScript, DOCOVA does support the migration of all that and will be the topic of another blog post. You can fast-track and get all the whitepapers on our migration methodology and everything that is being discussed in this [&#8230;]</p>
  468. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com/migrate-notes-to-docova-blog-series-part-7-xpages/">Migrate Notes to DOCOVA Blog Series Part 7: XPages</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com">DOCOVA.com</a>.</p>
  469. ]]></description>
  470. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Welcome to blog series part 7 of 17 on migrating Notes apps to DOCOVA.  In this entry I&#8217;m going to discuss XPages.</p>
  471. <p>So, the simple question is: Does DOCOVA migrate and support XPages?</p>
  472. <p>Annnnd, the answer is: No.</p>
  473. <p>For DOCOVA’s development we pretty much stayed away from XPages for two reasons.  First, although we might have been able to leverage it on the Domino side, it wasn’t a good fit for the SQL edition of DOCOVA which caters to several different relational platforms.  Second, we never really got a good feeling about XPages.  We always felt it was a bit of an odd design construct slapped on a platform that IBM wasn&#8217;t giving much attention to anymore.  For those reasons, we did not invest any time in it except to use it for DOCOVA&#8217;s Public File Access (PFA) component for Domino installed instances.</p>
  474. <p>As it turns out, based on the comments coming out of IBM Connect 2017, it appears that IBM has all but abandoned XPages.</p>
  475. <p>The good news is that the DOCOVA App Builder is a powerful drag-and-drop, point-and-click IDE that enables businesses to quickly rebuild forms/pages that used XPages.  So, that might be helpful for some.</p>
  476. <p>Also, although it might be a bit of a stretch, if you still have the forms and such that you may have redeveloped in XPages then those can/will be migrated and modernized in DOCOVA.</p>
  477. <p>Aside from XPages, if you&#8217;ve built Notes applications that are web enabled through passthru HTML/inline JavaScript, DOCOVA does support the migration of all that and will be the topic of another blog post.</p>
  478. <p>You can fast-track and get <strong><a href="http://www.docova.com/migrationmethodology/">all the whitepapers on our migration methodology</a> </strong>and everything that is being discussed in this series of posts.  Specifically, you can get the DOCOVA Notes/Domino Migration Methodology &#8211; MIGRATE whitepaper which goes over these technical aspects.</p>
  479. <p>Post comments and questions below!</p>
  480. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com/migrate-notes-to-docova-blog-series-part-7-xpages/">Migrate Notes to DOCOVA Blog Series Part 7: XPages</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com">DOCOVA.com</a>.</p>
  481. ]]></content:encoded>
  482. </item>
  483. <item>
  484. <title>Migrate Notes to DOCOVA Blog Series Part 6: Security</title>
  485. <link>http://www.docova.com/migrate-notes-to-docova-blog-series-part-6-security/</link>
  486. <pubDate>Wed, 19 Apr 2017 13:00:22 +0000</pubDate>
  487. <dc:creator><![CDATA[John Ryan]]></dc:creator>
  488. <category><![CDATA[Notes Migration]]></category>
  489. <category><![CDATA[Technical]]></category>
  490.  
  491. <guid isPermaLink="false">http://www.docova.com/?p=5343</guid>
  492. <description><![CDATA[<p>Welcome to blog series part 6 of 17 on migrating Notes apps to DOCOVA.  In this entry I&#8217;m going to talk about three things. Security, security and security. We thought the security in Notes/Domino was pretty good.  It was clear, easy to manage and provided for a lot of variable implementation.  DOCOVA’s enhanced security capabilities were made so that it is flexible enough to support the Notes/Domino approach to security. DOCOVA application access control is handled similarly to Notes database ACLs.  They are managed through the UI of the DOCOVA App Builder integrated development environment (yes, all browser based) in the Properties of an application.  People, groups and roles can be added and created in the access control of an application and specific functionality can be assigned like the ability to delete documents/records and more. DOCOVA also supports Authors and Readers fields and yes, in conjunction with the access control of the application, similar to how Notes/Domino did.  Additionally, things like controlled access sections and document modes like read mode and edit mode are also supported. From a directory/address book perspective, DOCOVA connects to Address Books and Directories via  LDAP for things like authentication.  For DOCOVA instances that are on non-Domino platforms, DOCOVA allows for the creation of its own self-contained Directory which can be used to manage users and authentication services.  What&#8217;s cool is that both internal directories and the DOCOVA directory can be used simultaneously to do things like manage internal staff in your own internal directories like Active Directory while managing external users via DOCOVA&#8217;s directory. You can fast-track and get all the whitepapers on our migration methodology and everything that is being discussed in this series of posts.  Specifically, you can [&#8230;]</p>
  493. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com/migrate-notes-to-docova-blog-series-part-6-security/">Migrate Notes to DOCOVA Blog Series Part 6: Security</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com">DOCOVA.com</a>.</p>
  494. ]]></description>
  495. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Welcome to blog series part 6 of 17 on migrating Notes apps to DOCOVA.  In this entry I&#8217;m going to talk about three things. Security, security and security.</p>
  496. <p>We thought the security in Notes/Domino was pretty good.  It was clear, easy to manage and provided for a lot of variable implementation.  DOCOVA’s enhanced security capabilities were made so that it is flexible enough to support the Notes/Domino approach to security.</p>
  497. <p>DOCOVA application access control is handled similarly to Notes database ACLs.  They are managed through the UI of the DOCOVA App Builder integrated development environment (yes, all browser based) in the Properties of an application.  People, groups and roles can be added and created in the access control of an application and specific functionality can be assigned like the ability to delete documents/records and more.</p>
  498. <p>DOCOVA also supports Authors and Readers fields and yes, in conjunction with the access control of the application, similar to how Notes/Domino did.  Additionally, things like controlled access sections and document modes like read mode and edit mode are also supported.</p>
  499. <p>From a directory/address book perspective, DOCOVA connects to Address Books and Directories via  LDAP for things like authentication.  For DOCOVA instances that are on non-Domino platforms, DOCOVA allows for the creation of its own self-contained Directory which can be used to manage users and authentication services.  What&#8217;s cool is that both internal directories and the DOCOVA directory can be used simultaneously to do things like manage internal staff in your own internal directories like Active Directory while managing external users via DOCOVA&#8217;s directory.</p>
  500. <p>You can fast-track and get <strong><a href="http://www.docova.com/migrationmethodology/">all the whitepapers on our migration methodology</a> </strong>and everything that is being discussed in this series of posts.  Specifically, you can get the DOCOVA Notes/Domino Migration Methodology &#8211; MIGRATE whitepaper which goes over these technical aspects.</p>
  501. <p>If you have any questions or comments, post &#8217;em below.</p>
  502. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com/migrate-notes-to-docova-blog-series-part-6-security/">Migrate Notes to DOCOVA Blog Series Part 6: Security</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com">DOCOVA.com</a>.</p>
  503. ]]></content:encoded>
  504. </item>
  505. <item>
  506. <title>Migrate Notes to DOCOVA Blog Series Part 5: File attachments</title>
  507. <link>http://www.docova.com/migrate-notes-to-docova-blog-series-part-5-file-attachments/</link>
  508. <pubDate>Tue, 18 Apr 2017 15:33:01 +0000</pubDate>
  509. <dc:creator><![CDATA[John Ryan]]></dc:creator>
  510. <category><![CDATA[Notes Migration]]></category>
  511. <category><![CDATA[Technical]]></category>
  512.  
  513. <guid isPermaLink="false">http://www.docova.com/?p=5341</guid>
  514. <description><![CDATA[<p>Welcome to blog series part 5 of 17 on migrating Notes apps to DOCOVA.  In this entry I&#8217;m going to talk about how file attachments are migrated over to DOCOVA. When it comes to the importing of data from a Notes application to a DOCOVA application, the DOCOVA App Importer initially scans and detects all file attachments in the source nsf and keeps track of what form design elements contain an attachment. As the import of form designs occurs, if a form had an attachment, not only will the App Importer import the form design element, but it will also add the DOCOVA file attachment element to that form.  The DOCOVA file attachment element is one of the most powerful file attachment handlers available for browser applications and allows for things like editing files in-place, renaming files and much more. If you&#8217;re using DOCOVA on Domino then attachments remain with their newly created associated document in DOCOVA.  In non-Domino DOCOVA instances the file attachments are moved and stored on the new server’s file system and associated to their parent document/record.  No matter what the backend platform is, Domino or SQL, from a user&#8217;s perspective the DOCOVA interface is always the same, showing the attachments on their documents via the DOCOVA file attachment element. All attachments in DOCOVA are full-text indexed regardless of platform so that all attachments are part of the full-text searching capabilities of DOCOVA. You can fast-track and get all the whitepapers on our migration methodology and everything that is being discussed in this series of posts.  Specifically, you can get the DOCOVA Notes/Domino Migration Methodology &#8211; MIGRATE whitepaper which goes over these technical aspects. Comment below!</p>
  515. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com/migrate-notes-to-docova-blog-series-part-5-file-attachments/">Migrate Notes to DOCOVA Blog Series Part 5: File attachments</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com">DOCOVA.com</a>.</p>
  516. ]]></description>
  517. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Welcome to blog series part 5 of 17 on migrating Notes apps to DOCOVA.  In this entry I&#8217;m going to talk about how file attachments are migrated over to DOCOVA.</p>
  518. <p>When it comes to the importing of data from a Notes application to a DOCOVA application, the DOCOVA App Importer initially scans and detects all file attachments in the source nsf and keeps track of what form design elements contain an attachment.</p>
  519. <p>As the import of form designs occurs, if a form had an attachment, not only will the App Importer import the form design element, but it will also add the DOCOVA file attachment element to that form.  The DOCOVA file attachment element is one of the most powerful file attachment handlers available for browser applications and allows for things like editing files in-place, renaming files and much more.</p>
  520. <p><a href="http://www.docova.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/files.jpg"><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-5404" src="http://www.docova.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/files.jpg" alt="files" width="1036" height="285" srcset="http://www.docova.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/files.jpg 1036w, http://www.docova.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/files-300x83.jpg 300w, http://www.docova.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/files-768x211.jpg 768w, http://www.docova.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/files-1024x282.jpg 1024w" sizes="(max-width: 1036px) 100vw, 1036px" /></a></p>
  521. <p>If you&#8217;re using DOCOVA on Domino then attachments remain with their newly created associated document in DOCOVA.  In non-Domino DOCOVA instances the file attachments are moved and stored on the new server’s file system and associated to their parent document/record.  No matter what the backend platform is, Domino or SQL, from a user&#8217;s perspective the DOCOVA interface is always the same, showing the attachments on their documents via the DOCOVA file attachment element.</p>
  522. <p>All attachments in DOCOVA are full-text indexed regardless of platform so that all attachments are part of the full-text searching capabilities of DOCOVA.</p>
  523. <p>You can fast-track and get <strong><a href="http://www.docova.com/migrationmethodology/">all the whitepapers on our migration methodology</a> </strong>and everything that is being discussed in this series of posts.  Specifically, you can get the DOCOVA Notes/Domino Migration Methodology &#8211; MIGRATE whitepaper which goes over these technical aspects.</p>
  524. <p>Comment below!</p>
  525. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com/migrate-notes-to-docova-blog-series-part-5-file-attachments/">Migrate Notes to DOCOVA Blog Series Part 5: File attachments</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.docova.com">DOCOVA.com</a>.</p>
  526. ]]></content:encoded>
  527. </item>
  528. </channel>
  529. </rss>
  530.  

If you would like to create a banner that links to this page (i.e. this validation result), do the following:

  1. Download the "valid RSS" banner.

  2. Upload the image to your own server. (This step is important. Please do not link directly to the image on this server.)

  3. Add this HTML to your page (change the image src attribute if necessary):

If you would like to create a text link instead, here is the URL you can use:

http://www.feedvalidator.org/check.cgi?url=http%3A//feeds.feedburner.com/DocovaTechincalBlog

Copyright © 2002-9 Sam Ruby, Mark Pilgrim, Joseph Walton, and Phil Ringnalda