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  12. <title>Humane Society International</title>
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  32. <title>BREAKING: California bans the sale of fur</title>
  33. <link>https://www.hsi.org/news-media/california-bans-sale-fur-adds-pressure-uk-ban/</link>
  34. <pubDate>Sat, 12 Oct 2019 23:16:59 +0000</pubDate>
  35. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Nancy Hwa]]></dc:creator>
  36. <category><![CDATA[Press Release]]></category>
  37. <category><![CDATA[#FurFreeBritain]]></category>
  38. <category><![CDATA[3.1 Phillip Lim]]></category>
  39. <category><![CDATA[ban]]></category>
  40. <category><![CDATA[beaver]]></category>
  41. <category><![CDATA[Berkeley]]></category>
  42. <category><![CDATA[Burberry]]></category>
  43. <category><![CDATA[California]]></category>
  44. <category><![CDATA[Chanel]]></category>
  45. <category><![CDATA[chinchilla]]></category>
  46. <category><![CDATA[coyote]]></category>
  47. <category><![CDATA[Des Kohan]]></category>
  48. <category><![CDATA[Diane von Furstenberg]]></category>
  49. <category><![CDATA[DKNY]]></category>
  50. <category><![CDATA[electrocution]]></category>
  51. <category><![CDATA[Farfetch]]></category>
  52. <category><![CDATA[fashion]]></category>
  53. <category><![CDATA[fox]]></category>
  54. <category><![CDATA[fur]]></category>
  55. <category><![CDATA[GAP]]></category>
  56. <category><![CDATA[gassing]]></category>
  57. <category><![CDATA[Gucci]]></category>
  58. <category><![CDATA[H&M]]></category>
  59. <category><![CDATA[Hawaii]]></category>
  60. <category><![CDATA[Hiraeth]]></category>
  61. <category><![CDATA[HUGO BOSS]]></category>
  62. <category><![CDATA[Inditex/Zara]]></category>
  63. <category><![CDATA[InStyle]]></category>
  64. <category><![CDATA[Islington]]></category>
  65. <category><![CDATA[J.Crew]]></category>
  66. <category><![CDATA[Jimmy Choo]]></category>
  67. <category><![CDATA[Jo Swinson]]></category>
  68. <category><![CDATA[John McDonnell]]></category>
  69. <category><![CDATA[Judi Dench]]></category>
  70. <category><![CDATA[Laura Friedman]]></category>
  71. <category><![CDATA[Los Angeles]]></category>
  72. <category><![CDATA[lynx]]></category>
  73. <category><![CDATA[Madewell]]></category>
  74. <category><![CDATA[Michael Kors]]></category>
  75. <category><![CDATA[mink]]></category>
  76. <category><![CDATA[Net-a-porter]]></category>
  77. <category><![CDATA[New York]]></category>
  78. <category><![CDATA[otter]]></category>
  79. <category><![CDATA[Paloma Faith]]></category>
  80. <category><![CDATA[Patagonia]]></category>
  81. <category><![CDATA[Prada]]></category>
  82. <category><![CDATA[rabbit]]></category>
  83. <category><![CDATA[raccoon]]></category>
  84. <category><![CDATA[raccoon dog]]></category>
  85. <category><![CDATA[Ricky Gervais]]></category>
  86. <category><![CDATA[San Francisco]]></category>
  87. <category><![CDATA[Stella McCartney]]></category>
  88. <category><![CDATA[Thandie Newton]]></category>
  89. <category><![CDATA[Versace]]></category>
  90. <category><![CDATA[West Hollywood]]></category>
  91. <category><![CDATA[Zac Goldsmith]]></category>
  92.  
  93. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://www.hsi.org/?p=16711</guid>
  94. <description><![CDATA[<p>LONDON—California has made history today by becoming the first U.S. State to ban the sale of animal fur. Governor Gavin...</p>
  95. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.hsi.org/news-media/california-bans-sale-fur-adds-pressure-uk-ban/">BREAKING: California bans the sale of fur</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.hsi.org">Humane Society International</a>.</p>
  96. ]]></description>
  97. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<figure id="attachment_16713" aria-describedby="caption-attachment-16713" style="width: 300px" class="wp-caption alignleft"><img src="https://i2.wp.com/www.hsi.org/wp-content/uploads/975x-for-press-releases/fur/MINK-ISTOCK-842004778_401685-975x-e1570834149946-300x201.jpg?resize=300%2C201&#038;ssl=1" alt="" width="300" height="201" data-recalc-dims="1" /><figcaption id="caption-attachment-16713" class="wp-caption-text"><span class="section__credit">Jillian Cooper/iStock.com </span> <span class="section__caption">Wild mink</span></figcaption></figure>
  98. <p>LONDON—California has made history today by becoming the first U.S. State to ban the sale of animal fur. Governor Gavin Newsom signed Assembly Bill 44 into law, banning all new fur sales and manufacturing in California. The law, which comes into effect in January 2023, has been welcomed by Humane Society International which hopes it will inspire fur sales bans around the world. In the United Kingdom, Humane Society International’s #FurFreeBritain campaign is urging the UK to follow in California’s footsteps by becoming the first country in the world to ban the sale of animal fur.</p>
  99. <p>The United Kingdom, which was the first country in the world to ban fur farming on ethical grounds back in 2000, still allows imports of animal fur from other countries such as Finland, Poland and China.</p>
  100. <p>Claire Bass, Executive Director of Humane Society International/UK, says, “<em>California has made history by becoming the first U.S state to ban the sale of animal fur, signifying the growing distaste for fur products by consumers who want to see compassion in fashion. It is deeply immoral for animals to suffer miserable lives and painful deaths just to end up as a bobble hat or coat trim, and this ban sends a powerful message to the fur trade that its business model is unethical and its days are numbered. Now is the time for the UK to join the trailblazing to shut down markets for this cruel and outdated industry. We banned fur farming here two decades ago for being inhumane, but now we allow tens of millions of pounds of fur to be imported; by effectively outsourcing cruelty we’ve only done half the job. Our #FurFreeBritain campaign is calling on the British government to follow in California’s footsteps, and make the UK the first country in the world to ban the sale of animal fur.”</em></p>
  101. <p>California’s bill was introduced by Assemblymember Laura Friedman last December and sponsored by HSI/UK’s sister organisation the Humane Society of the United States, and Animal Hope and Wellness. It passed six committees and the full Assembly and Senate with overwhelming support. It had many notable supporters among the fashion industry, including InStyle magazine, Stella McCartney, Diane von Furstenberg, 3.1 Phillip Lim, HUGO BOSS, Patagonia, H&amp;M, GAP, J.Crew, Madewell, Des Kohan, Hiraeth and Inditex/Zara.</p>
  102. <p>California’s ban increases the pressure on the UK government to ban the sale of animal fur in Britain. The #FurFreeBritain campaign, launched by HSI/UK, argues that if fur is too cruel to produce in Britain, it is too cruel to sell in Britain. The campaign, backed by celebrities such as Dame Judi Dench, Paloma Faith, Ricky Gervais and Thandie Newton, has strong cross-party political support with MPs Zac Goldsmith, John McDonnell and Jo Swinson in favour of a ban. A UK fur sales ban is also included in the Labour party’s animal welfare plan, published last month. Earlier this month Islington became the first London Borough to ban the sale of fur.</p>
  103. <p>Kitty Block, president and CEO of the Humane Society of the United States, says, “<em>“The signing of AB 44 underscores the point that today’s consumers simply don’t want wild animals to suffer extreme pain and fear for the sake of fashion. More cities, states and countries are expected to follow California’s lead, and the few brands and retailers that still sell fur will no doubt take a closer look at innovative alternatives that don’t involve animal cruelty.” </em></p>
  104. <p>Humane Society International expects more state-wide bans to follow quickly, as similar bills have been introduced in Hawaii and New York. Los Angeles, San Francisco, West Hollywood and Berkeley have already implemented fur sales bans.</p>
  105. <p>Fur facts:</p>
  106. <ul>
  107. <li>More than 100 million animals globally are reported to be killed every year for their fur. In addition to the physical and psychological torment of being confined in small, barren cages for their entire lives, the killing methods typically used on fur farms are equally distressing. Mink are killed by gassing, and fox and raccoon dogs are killed by anal electrocution.</li>
  108. <li>An increasing number of fashion designers and retailers are dropping fur cruelty. In the last two years alone Prada, Gucci, Versace, Michael Kors, Jimmy Choo, DKNY, Burberry, Chanel and other high-profile brands have announced fur-free policies. In addition, online fashion retail platforms Net-a-porter and Farfetch have introduced no-fur policies.</li>
  109. <li>Britain imports and sells the fur of a variety of species, including fox, rabbit, mink, coyote, raccoon dog and chinchilla. Fur imports from dogs, cats and seals killed during commercial hunts are banned across the EU, and HSI wants those existing bans extended to protect all fur-bearing species. In 2016 the value of fur imported into the UK was £55.6 million. A provisional estimate of the number of animal skins that equates to in that year is approximately 2,000,000 (1,720,000 mink, 110,000 fox, 90,000 raccoon dog and 80,000 skins from animals trapped in the wild, such as  coyote, lynx, beaver and otter).</li>
  110. </ul>
  111. <p><u>Download fur farm photos and video here: </u></p>
  112. <p>China fox and raccoon dog, December 2015: <a href="https://newsroom.humanesociety.org/video/video.php?bctid=4752416793001&amp;channel=973092892001">https://newsroom.humanesociety.org/video/video.php?bctid=4752416793001&amp;channel=973092892001</a></p>
  113. <p>Fur: China rabbit fur farm, December 2015: <a href="https://newsroom.humanesociety.org/fetcher/index.php?searchMerlin=1&amp;searchBrightcove=1&amp;submitted=1&amp;mw=d&amp;q=ChinaRabbit0719">https://newsroom.humanesociety.org/fetcher/index.php?searchMerlin=1&amp;searchBrightcove=1&amp;submitted=1&amp;mw=d&amp;q=ChinaRabbit0719</a></p>
  114. <p>ENDS</p>
  115. <p>Media contact:</p>
  116. <p>United Kingdom – Wendy Higgins <a href="mailto:[email protected]">[email protected]</a></p>
  117. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  118. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.hsi.org/news-media/california-bans-sale-fur-adds-pressure-uk-ban/">BREAKING: California bans the sale of fur</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.hsi.org">Humane Society International</a>.</p>
  119. ]]></content:encoded>
  120. <post-id xmlns="com-wordpress:feed-additions:1">16711</post-id> </item>
  121. <item>
  122. <title>On World Egg Day, Humane Society International urges consumers to buy responsibly and consider animal welfare</title>
  123. <link>https://www.hsi.org/news-media/world-egg-day-2019-mexico-english/</link>
  124. <pubDate>Fri, 11 Oct 2019 12:00:58 +0000</pubDate>
  125. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Nancy Hwa]]></dc:creator>
  126. <category><![CDATA[Press Release]]></category>
  127. <category><![CDATA[100% Natural]]></category>
  128. <category><![CDATA[ban]]></category>
  129. <category><![CDATA[Bhutan]]></category>
  130. <category><![CDATA[cage-free]]></category>
  131. <category><![CDATA[cages]]></category>
  132. <category><![CDATA[California]]></category>
  133. <category><![CDATA[chicken]]></category>
  134. <category><![CDATA[CMR]]></category>
  135. <category><![CDATA[confinement]]></category>
  136. <category><![CDATA[dust-bathing]]></category>
  137. <category><![CDATA[eggs]]></category>
  138. <category><![CDATA[european union]]></category>
  139. <category><![CDATA[Grupo Bimbo]]></category>
  140. <category><![CDATA[hens]]></category>
  141. <category><![CDATA[india]]></category>
  142. <category><![CDATA[intensive]]></category>
  143. <category><![CDATA[laying]]></category>
  144. <category><![CDATA[McDonalds]]></category>
  145. <category><![CDATA[mexico]]></category>
  146. <category><![CDATA[New Zealand]]></category>
  147. <category><![CDATA[pecking]]></category>
  148. <category><![CDATA[Toks]]></category>
  149. <category><![CDATA[Washington]]></category>
  150. <category><![CDATA[World Egg Day]]></category>
  151.  
  152. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://www.hsi.org/?p=16606</guid>
  153. <description><![CDATA[<p>MEXICO CITY—Friday, October 11, is World Egg Day, and Humane Society International, one of the world&#8217;s largest animal protection organizations,...</p>
  154. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.hsi.org/news-media/world-egg-day-2019-mexico-english/">On World Egg Day, Humane Society International urges consumers to buy responsibly and consider animal welfare</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.hsi.org">Humane Society International</a>.</p>
  155. ]]></description>
  156. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<figure id="attachment_16578" aria-describedby="caption-attachment-16578" style="width: 300px" class="wp-caption alignleft"><img src="https://i0.wp.com/www.hsi.org/wp-content/uploads/975x-for-press-releases/farm-animals/IMG_20190117_112557088_HDR_490949-cage-free-hens-Mexico-975x-e1570572776348-300x225.jpg?resize=300%2C225&#038;ssl=1" alt="" width="300" height="225" data-recalc-dims="1" /><figcaption id="caption-attachment-16578" class="wp-caption-text"><span class="section__credit">Vivian Argüelles/HSI</span> <span class="section__caption">Cage-free hens in Mexico</span></figcaption></figure>
  157. <p>MEXICO CITY—Friday, October 11, is World Egg Day, and Humane Society International, one of the world&#8217;s largest animal protection organizations, wants to draw the attention of Mexicans to the reality of egg production – in Mexico and globally – and inform consumers how they can help improve the welfare of millions of hens. Watch our World Egg Day <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ROmi_ELL28s" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">video</a>.</p>
  158. <p>Around the world, more than 7 billion hens are raised per year. Mexico is the fourth largest egg producer in the world with <a href="http://www.una.org.mx/index.php/panorama/situacion-de-la-avicultura-mexicana">156 million laying hens</a>.</p>
  159. <p>In Mexico, the vast majority of hens spend their entire lives crammed in metal cages, where they cannot stretch their wings or walk. The space per hen in these cages is less than a letter-sized sheet of paper, and the restriction is so severe that hens usually develop <a href="https://www.researchgate.net/publication/15258498_The_welfare_problems_of_laying_hens_in_battery_cages">abnormalities in their bones due to their inability to move, and experience stress and frustration by not being able to perform their natural behaviors</a>.</p>
  160. <p>Hens are sentient, intelligent and sociable animals. Scientific studies have shown that <a href="https://www.researchgate.net/publication/236168065_Can_domestic_fowl_Gallus_gallus_domesticus_show_self-control">they can count; they anticipate the future, which in turn affects their decision-making; they empathize with their chicks</a>; and they enjoy social activities such as dust-bathing.</p>
  161. <p>Vivian Argüelles, animal behavior and welfare specialist for HSI/Mexico, said, “In the wild, chickens spend their day scratching and pecking the ground in search of food. They dust-bathe to keep their feathers clean and healthy. They look for different places to  lay their eggs, and at night they sleep on tree branches to keep themselves protected from predators. In cages, hens cannot do any of these things.”</p>
  162. <p>Several countries have totally or partially banned the use of cages for egg-laying hens, including the members of the European Union, Bhutan, India and New Zealand. In the United States, several states, such as California and Washington, have passed their own bans.</p>
  163. <p>&#8220;In recent years, growing concern about and the rejection of the intensive confinement of egg-laying hens have mobilized companies, governments, universities and organizations to develop and implement alternatives that offer better welfare conditions to these animals,&#8221; Argüelles said.</p>
  164. <p>Among the alternatives available in the Mexican market, there are cage-free production systems, where hens live in closed sheds and have nests in which to lay their eggs, elevated perches where they can rest, litter to scratch, peck and dust-bathe and enough space to walk, stretch their wings and fly. In free-range systems, hens also have access to an outside area where they can exercise, sunbathe and receive greater stimulation from their environment.</p>
  165. <p>In Mexico, cage-free eggs are already available in supermarkets, and dozens of companies in the food industry have  made commitments to buy only cage-free eggs in their supply chains by 2020, 2022 or 2025 at the latest. These companies include Grupo Bimbo, Toks, CMR, McDonalds and 100% Natural, to name a few.</p>
  166. <p>Humane Society International works with food industry companies on the adoption and implementation of their cage-free policies and with poultry farmers to achieve a successful transition. The shift towards systems of greater animal welfare will continue, as  more consumers say, &#8220;No” to cages and, if they consume eggs, choose cage-free.</p>
  167. <p>END</p>
  168. <p><strong>Media contact</strong>: Laura Bravo, <a href="mailto:[email protected]">[email protected]</a>, 04455 54556 1476</p>
  169. <p><em>About Humane Society International<br />
  170. Humane Society International and its partner organizations together constitute one of the world’s largest animal protection organizations. For more than 25 years, HSI has been working for the protection of all animals through the use of science, advocacy, education and hands on programs. Celebrating animals and confronting cruelty worldwide – on the Web at hsi.org</em></p>
  171. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.hsi.org/news-media/world-egg-day-2019-mexico-english/">On World Egg Day, Humane Society International urges consumers to buy responsibly and consider animal welfare</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.hsi.org">Humane Society International</a>.</p>
  172. ]]></content:encoded>
  173. <post-id xmlns="com-wordpress:feed-additions:1">16606</post-id> </item>
  174. <item>
  175. <title>Animal protection organizations roar to shun South Africa’s “Snuggle Scam” this World Animal Day</title>
  176. <link>https://www.hsi.org/news-media/shun-snuggle-scam-world-animal-day-2019/</link>
  177. <pubDate>Fri, 04 Oct 2019 19:10:32 +0000</pubDate>
  178. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Nancy Hwa]]></dc:creator>
  179. <category><![CDATA[Press Release]]></category>
  180. <category><![CDATA[attractions]]></category>
  181. <category><![CDATA[big cat]]></category>
  182. <category><![CDATA[captive]]></category>
  183. <category><![CDATA[captive-bred]]></category>
  184. <category><![CDATA[cub]]></category>
  185. <category><![CDATA[cub petting]]></category>
  186. <category><![CDATA[ethical]]></category>
  187. <category><![CDATA[FOUR PAWS]]></category>
  188. <category><![CDATA[lion]]></category>
  189. <category><![CDATA[lion bone]]></category>
  190. <category><![CDATA[LIONSROCK]]></category>
  191. <category><![CDATA[photo opp]]></category>
  192. <category><![CDATA[profit]]></category>
  193. <category><![CDATA[sanctuary]]></category>
  194. <category><![CDATA[selfies]]></category>
  195. <category><![CDATA[snuggle scam]]></category>
  196. <category><![CDATA[South Africa]]></category>
  197. <category><![CDATA[tourists]]></category>
  198. <category><![CDATA[World Animal Day]]></category>
  199.  
  200. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://www.hsi.org/?p=16488</guid>
  201. <description><![CDATA[<p>JOHANNESBURG—Animal protection organisations Humane Society International/Africa and FOUR PAWS South Africa join forces this World Animal Day with a roaring...</p>
  202. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.hsi.org/news-media/shun-snuggle-scam-world-animal-day-2019/">Animal protection organizations roar to shun South Africa’s “Snuggle Scam” this World Animal Day</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.hsi.org">Humane Society International</a>.</p>
  203. ]]></description>
  204. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<figure id="attachment_16472" aria-describedby="caption-attachment-16472" style="width: 300px" class="wp-caption alignleft"><img src="https://i0.wp.com/www.hsi.org/wp-content/uploads/975x-for-press-releases/lions-tigers-other-big-cats/DSCF6031_487376-snuggle-scam-975x-e1570209742676-300x200.jpg?resize=300%2C200&#038;ssl=1" alt="" width="300" height="200" data-recalc-dims="1" /><figcaption id="caption-attachment-16472" class="wp-caption-text"><span class="section__credit">Leozette Roode/HSI</span> <span class="section__caption">A captive-bred lion cub at a captive lion breeding facility in South Africa that offers &#8220;cub petting.&#8221; </span></figcaption></figure>
  205. <p>JOHANNESBURG—Animal protection organisations Humane Society International/Africa and FOUR PAWS South Africa join forces this World Animal Day with a roaring call to protect lions in South Africa from tourist exploitation. The organisations are urging travellers, travel guides and tour operators to fight lion exploitation by refusing to participate in or promote human-lion interactions, such as cub bottle-feeding or petting, walking with lions or canned trophy hunting. HSI/Africa and FOUR PAWS urge tourists to support ethical sanctuaries and wildlife game drives instead as a natural and cruelty-free alternative to see lions roaming freely in their natural habitat. Ethical tourists can also sign a petition <a href="http://hsi.org/snugglescam">hsi.org/snugglescam</a> and take the <a href="https://help.four-paws.org/en-ZA/lion-longevity-oath">#lionlongevityoath</a>.</p>
  206. <p>South Africa has an estimated 8,000 – 11,000 captive-bred lions being held in over 260 lion farms across the country. These lions suffer from a vicious cycle of exploitation, from cradle to grave. Unsuspecting visitors are often fooled into supporting and funding what HSI/Africa and FOUR PAWS call the ‘‘Snuggle Scam” by paying for selfie photo opportunities, including petting and bottle-feeding with very young lion cubs, or walking experiences with captive older lions. These lions are eventually offered to be shot as trophies or slaughtered in masses to meet the demand of the international lion-bone trade.</p>
  207. <p>Audrey Delsink, wildlife director of HSI/Africa, said, “Most people come to South Africa because they love lions and other wild animals. They would be shocked to learn that the cute lion cubs they pose with for selfies will one day be killed for profit as trophies or bogus medicines. Lack of awareness of the suffering behind every cub photo or pay-to-pet experience, is one of the biggest drivers of this industry that ultimately ends with lions being sold to canned hunts to be shot by trophy hunters and their bones destined for the lion bone trade in Asia. We are thrilled to work with FOUR PAWS South Africa to raise awareness of the ‘Snuggle Scam’, to urge people to stay away from these facilities, and instead to see these magnificent animals in the wild where they belong.&#8221;</p>
  208. <p>In the wild, lion cubs remain with their mothers for 18 months, and adult females don’t produce another litter for at least 15 to 24 months after giving birth. By contrast, cubs born on breeding farms are taken from their mothers when they are just a few days or even hours old, forcing the mother into an exhausting and continuous breeding cycle. These captive breeding females are incarcerated in enclosures their entire lives, sometimes without adequate food, hygiene or the ability to express their natural behaviours. The cubs are hand-reared by volunteers from around the globe paying thousands of dollars who are misled into believing the cubs are orphans.</p>
  209. <p>Fiona Miles, director of FOUR PAWS in South Africa, said, “It is time for all of us to realise the part we play in the welfare of animals – especially in the instance of lions. We are happy to join forces with HSI/Africa and encourage tourists not to feed the cruel industry of captive breeding exploitation. We need the public’s help to end the #BigCatScam by vowing never to participate in any activity that exploit lions for commercial purposes. The FOUR PAWS project LIONSROCK Big Cat Sanctuary provides a true ethical experience, where no interaction or breeding is allowed. We provide a lifelong home for previously captive-bred and rescued big cats from across the globe, with more than 100 of these iconic animals in our care.”</p>
  210. <p>The South African government sanctions the captive lion breeding industry and has established an export quota for the international lion bone trade, despite growing global outrage. In August this year, the Pretoria High Court declared the South African government&#8217;s 2017 and 2018 lion bone export quotas as “unlawful and constitutionally invalid”. South Africa is a popular tourist destination that welcomed approximately 10.3 million foreign tourists and facilitated 17.2 million domestic tourism trips in 2017 (South Africa Tourism Report 2017). The top 10 tourist arrivals in South Africa are from the United Kingdom, United States of America, Germany, France, Netherlands, Australia, India, China, Brazil and Canada.</p>
  211. <p><strong>ENDS</strong></p>
  212. <p>Key facts:</p>
  213. <ul>
  214. <li>Only about 20,000 lions remain in the wild in Africa.</li>
  215. <li>Between 8,000 – 11,000 captive-bred lions are suffering in captivity in some 260 facilities across South Africa, marketed to tourists as lion interaction experiences. With fewer than 3,000 wild lions, South Africa has more lions languishing in captivity than in the wild.</li>
  216. <li>Lions are a threatened species, listed as Vulnerable by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature. While the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora prohibits the trade of bones from wild lions, it does allow South Africa to export bones from captive ones.</li>
  217. <li>It is impossible to differentiate body parts from wild vs. captive lions, so the legal export of captive lion bones facilitates the illegal export of wild lion bones.</li>
  218. </ul>
  219. <p><strong>MEDIA CONTACTS:</strong></p>
  220. <p><strong>Humane Society International/Africa</strong>: Leozette Roode, media and outreach manager,  0713601104, <a href="mailto:[email protected]">[email protected]</a></p>
  221. <p><strong>FOUR PAWS South Africa</strong>: MJ Lourens, head of communications, 082 922 9046, <a href="mailto:[email protected]">[email protected]</a></p>
  222. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  223. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  224. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.hsi.org/news-media/shun-snuggle-scam-world-animal-day-2019/">Animal protection organizations roar to shun South Africa’s “Snuggle Scam” this World Animal Day</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.hsi.org">Humane Society International</a>.</p>
  225. ]]></content:encoded>
  226. <post-id xmlns="com-wordpress:feed-additions:1">16488</post-id> </item>
  227. <item>
  228. <title>Five ways to be an animal defender this World Animal Day</title>
  229. <link>https://www.hsi.org/news-media/five-ways-animal-defender-world-animal-day-2019/</link>
  230. <pubDate>Fri, 04 Oct 2019 04:01:36 +0000</pubDate>
  231. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Nancy Hwa]]></dc:creator>
  232. <category><![CDATA[Press Release]]></category>
  233. <category><![CDATA[#BeCrueltyFree]]></category>
  234. <category><![CDATA[Animal testing]]></category>
  235. <category><![CDATA[attractions]]></category>
  236. <category><![CDATA[battery]]></category>
  237. <category><![CDATA[beauty]]></category>
  238. <category><![CDATA[bludgeon]]></category>
  239. <category><![CDATA[bullfighting]]></category>
  240. <category><![CDATA[cage]]></category>
  241. <category><![CDATA[calves]]></category>
  242. <category><![CDATA[camel]]></category>
  243. <category><![CDATA[captive]]></category>
  244. <category><![CDATA[captive-bred]]></category>
  245. <category><![CDATA[captivity]]></category>
  246. <category><![CDATA[cat meat]]></category>
  247. <category><![CDATA[chain]]></category>
  248. <category><![CDATA[chemicals]]></category>
  249. <category><![CDATA[cholera]]></category>
  250. <category><![CDATA[circus]]></category>
  251. <category><![CDATA[cock fighting]]></category>
  252. <category><![CDATA[confinement]]></category>
  253. <category><![CDATA[consumer]]></category>
  254. <category><![CDATA[cosmetics]]></category>
  255. <category><![CDATA[cows]]></category>
  256. <category><![CDATA[coyotes]]></category>
  257. <category><![CDATA[crates]]></category>
  258. <category><![CDATA[cub petting]]></category>
  259. <category><![CDATA[dairy]]></category>
  260. <category><![CDATA[dog meat]]></category>
  261. <category><![CDATA[dolphins]]></category>
  262. <category><![CDATA[donkey]]></category>
  263. <category><![CDATA[electrocution]]></category>
  264. <category><![CDATA[elephant]]></category>
  265. <category><![CDATA[entertainment]]></category>
  266. <category><![CDATA[ethical]]></category>
  267. <category><![CDATA[eye]]></category>
  268. <category><![CDATA[fox]]></category>
  269. <category><![CDATA[fur]]></category>
  270. <category><![CDATA[gestation]]></category>
  271. <category><![CDATA[guinea pigs]]></category>
  272. <category><![CDATA[hanging]]></category>
  273. <category><![CDATA[hens]]></category>
  274. <category><![CDATA[horses]]></category>
  275. <category><![CDATA[laying]]></category>
  276. <category><![CDATA[lion]]></category>
  277. <category><![CDATA[meat]]></category>
  278. <category><![CDATA[mice]]></category>
  279. <category><![CDATA[mink]]></category>
  280. <category><![CDATA[pigs]]></category>
  281. <category><![CDATA[Plant-based eating]]></category>
  282. <category><![CDATA[rabbits]]></category>
  283. <category><![CDATA[rabies]]></category>
  284. <category><![CDATA[raccoon dogs]]></category>
  285. <category><![CDATA[rats]]></category>
  286. <category><![CDATA[selfie]]></category>
  287. <category><![CDATA[shark finning]]></category>
  288. <category><![CDATA[skin]]></category>
  289. <category><![CDATA[sows]]></category>
  290. <category><![CDATA[Taiji]]></category>
  291. <category><![CDATA[training]]></category>
  292. <category><![CDATA[trichinellosis]]></category>
  293. <category><![CDATA[veal]]></category>
  294. <category><![CDATA[veterinary]]></category>
  295. <category><![CDATA[whales]]></category>
  296. <category><![CDATA[World Animal Day]]></category>
  297.  
  298. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://www.hsi.org/?p=16403</guid>
  299. <description><![CDATA[<p>LONDON–Around the world, billions of animals suffer for our food, fashion, beauty and entertainment. Many of them lead deprived, miserable...</p>
  300. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.hsi.org/news-media/five-ways-animal-defender-world-animal-day-2019/">Five ways to be an animal defender this World Animal Day</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.hsi.org">Humane Society International</a>.</p>
  301. ]]></description>
  302. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<figure id="attachment_16404" aria-describedby="caption-attachment-16404" style="width: 300px" class="wp-caption alignleft"><img src="https://i2.wp.com/www.hsi.org/wp-content/uploads/975x-for-press-releases/farm-animals/PIG-SHEEP-C2H017_336866_975X-e1570146203907-300x200.jpg?resize=300%2C200&#038;ssl=1" alt="" width="300" height="200" data-recalc-dims="1" /><figcaption id="caption-attachment-16404" class="wp-caption-text"><span class="section__credit">Guy Harrop/Alamy</span></figcaption></figure>
  303. <p>LONDON–Around the world, billions of animals suffer for our food, fashion, beauty and entertainment. Many of them lead deprived, miserable lives confined in unnatural conditions or are subjected to deliberate cruelty. It doesn’t have to be that way. By changing our lifestyles to make more compassionate choices, we can all be animal defenders. This World Animal Day on 4<sup>th</sup> October, global animal charity Humane Society International shares its top tips for preventing animal suffering.</p>
  304. <p><strong> 1. Eat less / no meat and dairy </strong></p>
  305. <p>With more than 80 billion land animals reared and slaughtered globally for food every year, not to mention the nearly 3 trillion fish pulled from the ocean and countless more raised on aquatic factory farms, industrial scale animal agriculture is not only one of the biggest animal welfare issues on our planet, it is also one of the leading contributors to climate change and deforestation. For example more than a third of all British egg-laying hens are still locked up in cages, confined to a space not much bigger than a sheet of A4 paper.</p>
  306. <p>By switching to a more plant-based diet, we can spare animals from suffering on factory farms, reduce water and air pollution, as well as help combat climate change through reducing the carbon footprint of our food choices, and conserve precious planetary resources. Moving towards a more plant-based plate also benefits our health as diets high in fruit and vegetables reduce the risk of developing cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and obesity.</p>
  307. <p><strong> 2. Choose cruelty-free cosmetics </strong></p>
  308. <p>Hundreds of thousands of animals still suffer and die each year around the world to test shampoo, mascara and other cosmetic products and their chemical ingredients. Terrified mice, rabbits, rats and guinea pigs have substances forced down their throats, dripped into their eyes or smeared onto their skin before they are killed. Cosmetic animal tests are archaic chemical-poisoning experiments devised more than half a century ago, such as rodent “acute toxicity” tests (1920s), rabbit eye and skin irritation tests (1940s) and guinea pig skin allergy tests (1950s). By contrast, modern non-animal methods are faster, more accurate at predicting human responses, and less expensive than the animal tests they replace.</p>
  309. <p>HSI and our partners are leading the global effort to ban cosmetic animal testing in the world’s largest and most influential beauty markets. Our #BeCrueltyFree campaign has been instrumental in driving the European Union to become the world’s largest cruelty-free cosmetic market, and in securing subsequent bans in India, Taiwan, New Zealand, South Korea, Guatemala, Australia and in seven states in Brazil. Nearly 40 countries so far have banned cosmetics animal testing.</p>
  310. <p><strong>3. Say no to exploiting animals for entertainment</strong></p>
  311. <p>Around the world, many thousands of animals are exploited for entertainment, from the slow-death sadism of bullfights and cockfights to the neglect and mistreatment of captive marine and land-dwelling wildlife kept for display. The suffering of animals only continues for as long as the public pays to watch, so we can all help by not participating. Bullfights are not “fair fights,” but highly staged forms of government-subsidized animal cruelty that perpetuate the idea that the torment and killing of animals for amusement is acceptable, so please don’t attend these events when in Spain, France or elsewhere. Up to 8,000 lions suffer in captivity in South Africa, bred in appalling conditions for the lion cub petting industry in which tourists pay to bottle feed and take selfies with cubs. Ethical tourists have the power to shut down this industry by removing their custom. Wild animals in circuses, traveling shows and attractions often receive insufficient water, food and shelter, lack veterinary care, can be subjected to repetitive and stressful training, and can spend hours chained or confined. Camels, elephants, donkeys and horses used for tourist rides and safaris are often malnourished and physically abused, and suffer open wounds. Elephants are often stolen from the wild when young, illegally trafficked, broken after capture and punished with bullhooks. They are forced to carry excessive weight, suffer sores and diseases, and receive inadequate care. Whales and dolphins also suffer for entertainment – the natural habitat of orcas and other marine mammals simply cannot be replicated in captivity, and swimming with dolphins increases demand for captive animals, including from brutal “drive fisheries” such as the Taiji hunt in Japan.</p>
  312. <p><strong> 4. Reject ‘delicacy’ meat </strong></p>
  313. <p>Across Asia, around 30 million dogs and 10 million cats are brutally killed for meat, most of them stolen pets or strays grabbed from the streets. In South Korea dogs are raised on farms and killed by electrocution; elsewhere in Asia they are usually bludgeoned, hanged or more rarely, boiled alive. In China, Vietnam and Indonesia, hundreds of dogs and cats can be crammed onto a single truck, driven for hours or days without water, food, protection from the extremes of cold and heat, and many suffering broken limbs, shock and disease. The World Health Organization warns that the trade, slaughter and consumption of dogs poses human health risks from trichinellosis, cholera and rabies. More than 70 million sharks are also killed annually for shark fin soup. The trade involves cutting off a shark’s fin, often while it is still alive, and dumping the animal back into the sea to die slowly. Don’t be tempted to eat shark fin soup, or dog or cat meat as “bucket list” items when travelling, as it merely perpetuates this brutal and often illegal trade.</p>
  314. <p><strong> 5. Don’t wear fur </strong></p>
  315. <p>Millions of foxes, mink, raccoon dogs, rabbits and coyotes die every year for fashion. Confined in small, wire-mesh cages on factory farms or captured by painful metal traps in the wild, their fur is turned into frivolous keychain trinkets or trim on coats and hats. The average life span of an animal intensively farmed for fur is just eight months, after which mink will be gassed and foxes and raccoon dogs will be electrocuted. These terrible conditions can create psychological disorders, causing the animals to constantly pace and circle the boundaries of their cramped space, as well as fighting between cage mates and even cannibalism. Fur – and leather &#8211; are also incredibly polluting industries. The dressing and tanning processes, which stop the animal’s skin and pelt from decomposing as they would naturally do, use toxic chemicals such as formaldehyde, cyanide, lead and chromium which can be released into waterways and devastate wildlife. These products are only natural whilst they are still on a living animal, after that the processes used to preserve and dress leather and fur are anything but earth-friendly. For the estimated 100 million animals killed for fur, life is typically a miserable existence. The future of fashion is compassion, with cruelty-free alternatives becoming more popular than ever with ethical consumers.</p>
  316. <p>ENDS</p>
  317. <p>Media contact: United Kingdom – Wendy Higgins <a href="mailto:[email protected]">[email protected]</a></p>
  318. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.hsi.org/news-media/five-ways-animal-defender-world-animal-day-2019/">Five ways to be an animal defender this World Animal Day</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.hsi.org">Humane Society International</a>.</p>
  319. ]]></content:encoded>
  320. <post-id xmlns="com-wordpress:feed-additions:1">16403</post-id> </item>
  321. <item>
  322. <title>Eat plant-based to help save wildlife this #WorldAnimalDay!</title>
  323. <link>https://www.hsi.org/news-media/lionsrock-joins-green-monday-world-animal-day-2019/</link>
  324. <pubDate>Wed, 02 Oct 2019 04:01:13 +0000</pubDate>
  325. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Nancy Hwa]]></dc:creator>
  326. <category><![CDATA[Press Release]]></category>
  327. <category><![CDATA[agriculture]]></category>
  328. <category><![CDATA[algal blooms]]></category>
  329. <category><![CDATA[Bethlehem]]></category>
  330. <category><![CDATA[big cat]]></category>
  331. <category><![CDATA[carbon dioxide]]></category>
  332. <category><![CDATA[carbon footprint]]></category>
  333. <category><![CDATA[chefs]]></category>
  334. <category><![CDATA[climate change]]></category>
  335. <category><![CDATA[deforestation]]></category>
  336. <category><![CDATA[diet]]></category>
  337. <category><![CDATA[eutrophication]]></category>
  338. <category><![CDATA[fish]]></category>
  339. <category><![CDATA[FOUR PAWS]]></category>
  340. <category><![CDATA[Green Monday]]></category>
  341. <category><![CDATA[greenhouse]]></category>
  342. <category><![CDATA[industrial]]></category>
  343. <category><![CDATA[LIONSROCK]]></category>
  344. <category><![CDATA[livestock]]></category>
  345. <category><![CDATA[marine mammals]]></category>
  346. <category><![CDATA[meals]]></category>
  347. <category><![CDATA[meat]]></category>
  348. <category><![CDATA[methane]]></category>
  349. <category><![CDATA[nitrous oxide]]></category>
  350. <category><![CDATA[plant-based]]></category>
  351. <category><![CDATA[sanctuary]]></category>
  352. <category><![CDATA[South Africa]]></category>
  353. <category><![CDATA[trapping]]></category>
  354. <category><![CDATA[vegan]]></category>
  355. <category><![CDATA[water]]></category>
  356. <category><![CDATA[World Animal Day]]></category>
  357.  
  358. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://www.hsi.org/?p=16433</guid>
  359. <description><![CDATA[<p>JOHANNESBURG—FOUR PAWS South Africa and LIONSROCK Big Cat Sanctuary have teamed up with Humane Society International/Africa to join the global...</p>
  360. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.hsi.org/news-media/lionsrock-joins-green-monday-world-animal-day-2019/">Eat plant-based to help save wildlife this #WorldAnimalDay!</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.hsi.org">Humane Society International</a>.</p>
  361. ]]></description>
  362. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<figure id="attachment_16435" aria-describedby="caption-attachment-16435" style="width: 300px" class="wp-caption alignleft"><img src="https://i0.wp.com/www.hsi.org/wp-content/uploads/975x-for-press-releases/food/191004-Lions-Rock-Green-Monday-975x-e1570195562240-300x200.jpg?resize=300%2C200&#038;ssl=1" alt="" width="300" height="200" data-recalc-dims="1" /><figcaption id="caption-attachment-16435" class="wp-caption-text"><span class="section__credit">Daniel Born/FOUR PAWS</span> <span class="section__caption">Plant-based food on display at LIONSROCK in South Africa to celebrate joining the Green Monday movement. </span></figcaption></figure>
  363. <p>JOHANNESBURG—FOUR PAWS South Africa and LIONSROCK Big Cat Sanctuary have teamed up with Humane Society International/Africa to join the global movement towards more plant-based, sustainable food by launching a meat-free Monday campaign alongside the opening of the sanctuary’s new restaurant.</p>
  364. <p>The restaurant will offer 100% meat-free meals (of which 80% will be vegan) every Monday, and a selection of these plant-based dishes will be available on a daily basis. The new earth-friendly menu will launch on World Animal Day, 4 October 2019, to raise awareness of the destructive impact large-scale animal agriculture has on the planet and our wildlife, such as deforestation, drought, pollution and climate change.</p>
  365. <p>The restaurant’s decision to introduce more plant-based options was inspired by HSI/Africa’s Green Monday SA meat-reduction initiative, encouraging South Africans to eat plant-based at least one day every week to improve their health, reduce their carbon footprint and make a positive difference to the lives of farm animals. HSI/Africa provided plant-based culinary training to LIONSROCK Big Cat Sanctuary’s chefs to help develop the new green menus.</p>
  366. <p>Leozette Roode, media and outreach manager for HSI/Africa, said: “Many South Africans are aware of the negative impacts of a meat-based diet on their health and the planet, but most have not considered the implications of their food-choices on our wildlife. Animal agriculture is a leading cause of habit destruction and wildlife extinction, so reducing our meat consumption and eating more plant-based meals is something everyone can do every day to help the planet. Reducing or replacing meat allows us to farm more sustainably, reduce our carbon and water footprints, and help save animals &#8211;  including farm animals, aquatic species and wildlife. By joining HSI/Africa’s Green Monday SA campaign and serving 100% meat-free meals, FOUR PAWS and LIONSROCK Big Cat Sanctuary are spreading the vital message that we can stand up for animals every time we sit down to eat.”</p>
  367. <p>LIONSROCK Big Cat Sanctuary in Bethlehem was established by the animal welfare organization FOUR PAWS South Africa in 2006. Fiona Miles, director of FOUR PAWS, said: “We are committed to joining the Green Monday SA movement and reducing meat consumption at LIONSROCK Big Cat Sanctuary &#8211; giving our guests the opportunity to help even more animals. We are extremely excited to add plant-based dishes to our menu that are not only tasty, but healthy and sustainable too.”</p>
  368. <p><strong>Animal agriculture is one of the leading contributors to climate change and deforestation which impacts the survival of wildlife globally.</strong> With more than 1 billion land animals reared and slaughtered in South Africa for the food industry every year, industrial scale animal agriculture impacts our wildlife in detrimental ways.</p>
  369. <p>Four ways in which a meat-based diet kills wildlife:</p>
  370. <ul>
  371. <li>Raising livestock and growing the crops used to feed farm animals require vast amounts of arable land. Often wildlife-rich areas (such as the Amazon rainforest, that homes over 3 million species of plants and animals) are destroyed to create space for monocrops like soy and maize. This deforestation leads to habitat loss and destruction of wildlife species.</li>
  372. <li>Greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide are released during meat, egg and milk production. In South Africa, animal agriculture accounts for <a href="https://www.greenagri.org.za/assets/documents-/Projects-Research/AnimalsLivestock-/Sustainability-of-the-South-African-Livestock-Sector-towards-2050-Part-2-Challenges-changes-and-required-implementations.pdf">60%</a> of total agricultural carbon dioxide. These gases increase the chances for severe weather events like droughts and fires. Many wildlife species are suffering due to a lack of water in the extreme droughts South Africa has faced over the past couple of years.</li>
  373. <li>Animal agriculture pollutes our water when animal manure, leftover animal feed and chemicals used to grow crops are flushed into our water systems. In some areas, this causes <a href="http://www.dwa.gov.za/iwqs/eutrophication/NEMP/02Eutrophication.pdf">eutrophication</a> in our water – an increased production of algae and phytoplankton that leads to algal blooms. These blooms produce deadly toxins that kill fish, marine mammals and seabirds and harm humans and wildlife.</li>
  374. <li>To protect their livestock from being hunted by big cats and other carnivores, farmers often implementcruel lethal predator control methods using traps and poison. Many predators are also shot or trapped and killed when approaching livestock farms.</li>
  375. </ul>
  376. <p>We can all stand up for animals every time we sit down to eat by reducing the number of animal products we eat.</p>
  377. <p>For more information about Green Monday SA and the programs implemented in South Africa, visit <a href="http://greenmondayza.org">greenmondayza.org</a>.</p>
  378. <p><strong>ENDS</strong></p>
  379. <p><strong>MEDIA CONTACTS:</strong></p>
  380. <p><strong>Humane Society International/Africa:</strong> Leozette Roode, media and outreach manager, 0713601104, <a href="mailto:[email protected]">[email protected]</a></p>
  381. <p><strong>FOUR PAWS South Africa:</strong> MJ Lourens, head of communications, 082 922 9046, <a href="mailto:[email protected]">[email protected]</a></p>
  382. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.hsi.org/news-media/lionsrock-joins-green-monday-world-animal-day-2019/">Eat plant-based to help save wildlife this #WorldAnimalDay!</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.hsi.org">Humane Society International</a>.</p>
  383. ]]></content:encoded>
  384. <post-id xmlns="com-wordpress:feed-additions:1">16433</post-id> </item>
  385. <item>
  386. <title>From South Korea to the UK</title>
  387. <link>https://www.hsi.org/news-media/from-south-korea-to-the-uk/</link>
  388. <pubDate>Thu, 26 Sep 2019 18:47:49 +0000</pubDate>
  389. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Kristin Stone]]></dc:creator>
  390. <category><![CDATA[Resource]]></category>
  391.  
  392. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://www.hsi.org/?p=16120</guid>
  393. <description><![CDATA[<p>Rescuing dogs and cats from the dog meat trade is a small but important part of our work to end...</p>
  394. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.hsi.org/news-media/from-south-korea-to-the-uk/">From South Korea to the UK</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.hsi.org">Humane Society International</a>.</p>
  395. ]]></description>
  396. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Rescuing dogs and cats from the dog meat trade is a small but important part of our work to end this cruelty. In China, through our amazing partner groups, we’ve helped rescue thousands of dogs and cats from slaughter trucks and slaughterhouses. In South Korea, we’ve permanently shut down 15 dog meat farms since 2015, and rescued nearly 2,000 dogs flown to the USA, UK, Canada and the Netherlands for adoption. So far, 38 dogs and 2 cats have been re-homed in the UK, many of whom act as ambassadors for our campaign.</p>
  397. <p>Our South Korean dog farm closures are a key part of our broader strategy to demonstrate to the South Korean government a working model for a state-sponsored, nationwide closure of farms. We have been working directly with farmers who have expressed a desire to end their involvement in the industry, identifying ways to shut down the farms and transition to humane livelihoods, such as sustainable crop-growing businesses. See the latest updates on our <a href="https://www.facebook.com/HSIUnitedKingdom/" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">Facebook page</a>.</p>
  398. <h3>How to volunteer</h3>
  399. <p>HSI does not deploy volunteers to assist with dog meat farm closures (nor disaster aid), as we have specialists and trained teams to carry out this work. At our emergency shelter in Montreal, volunteers help HSI/Canada rehabilitate rescued animals, clean their cages on a daily basis and socialize them so they can be ready for placement through our partners.</p>
  400. <p>HSI’s partner groups, VShine and Capital Animal Welfare Association, run animal hospital or shelter facilities in Beijing and Dalian, China, and accept volunteers for a minimum of 2 weeks. Volunteers with specific animal care, shelter management, animal behaviour or veterinary skills are ideal, but generalist volunteers are also welcome to apply to help clean out, feed and walk the animals. Accommodation may be provided. Apply by emailing <a href="mailto:[email protected]" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">[email protected]</a> with the subject line: Application for Volunteer Work.</p>
  401. <h3>How to adopt</h3>
  402. <p>We have seven dogs rescued from our 15th South Korean dog meat farm closure due to fly to the UK for adoption in late November/early December. To see the dogs who will be looking for their forever homes, please visit our re-homing partners, <a href="https://www.chimneyfarmrescue.com/available-for-adoption.html" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">Chimney Farm</a> (scroll to bottom of page). You can express interest in adoption via their online form <a href="https://www.chimneyfarmrescue.com/korean-application-form.html" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">here</a>. Another of our regular partner shelters is All Dogs Matter, who have dogs and cats looking for homes all year round. Check them out <a href="https://alldogsmatter.co.uk/rehome/meet-our-dogs/" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">here</a>.</p>
  403. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.hsi.org/news-media/from-south-korea-to-the-uk/">From South Korea to the UK</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.hsi.org">Humane Society International</a>.</p>
  404. ]]></content:encoded>
  405. <post-id xmlns="com-wordpress:feed-additions:1">16120</post-id> </item>
  406. <item>
  407. <title>VIDEO: TV dog experts Marc Abraham and Victoria Stilwell help charity rescue 90+ dogs from South Korean dog meat farm, seven pups to seek UK homes</title>
  408. <link>https://www.hsi.org/news-media/sk-dog-meat-farm-15-closure-uk-release/</link>
  409. <pubDate>Thu, 26 Sep 2019 09:00:09 +0000</pubDate>
  410. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Nancy Hwa]]></dc:creator>
  411. <category><![CDATA[Press Release]]></category>
  412. <category><![CDATA[Abraham]]></category>
  413. <category><![CDATA[ambassador]]></category>
  414. <category><![CDATA[Bella]]></category>
  415. <category><![CDATA[Boston Terrier]]></category>
  416. <category><![CDATA[celebrity]]></category>
  417. <category><![CDATA[Chimney Farm Rescue]]></category>
  418. <category><![CDATA[closure]]></category>
  419. <category><![CDATA[contract]]></category>
  420. <category><![CDATA[dog]]></category>
  421. <category><![CDATA[dogfighting]]></category>
  422. <category><![CDATA[England]]></category>
  423. <category><![CDATA[farm]]></category>
  424. <category><![CDATA[gallery]]></category>
  425. <category><![CDATA[jindo]]></category>
  426. <category><![CDATA[Labrador]]></category>
  427. <category><![CDATA[livelihood]]></category>
  428. <category><![CDATA[Lucy's Law]]></category>
  429. <category><![CDATA[Maisy]]></category>
  430. <category><![CDATA[meat]]></category>
  431. <category><![CDATA[mixes]]></category>
  432. <category><![CDATA[Molly]]></category>
  433. <category><![CDATA[Oscar]]></category>
  434. <category><![CDATA[photo]]></category>
  435. <category><![CDATA[Pumpkin]]></category>
  436. <category><![CDATA[puppies]]></category>
  437. <category><![CDATA[rescue]]></category>
  438. <category><![CDATA[Scooby]]></category>
  439. <category><![CDATA[Scotland]]></category>
  440. <category><![CDATA[south korea]]></category>
  441. <category><![CDATA[spaniel]]></category>
  442. <category><![CDATA[Stilwell]]></category>
  443. <category><![CDATA[Surrey]]></category>
  444. <category><![CDATA[terrier]]></category>
  445. <category><![CDATA[tosa]]></category>
  446. <category><![CDATA[trainer]]></category>
  447. <category><![CDATA[vet]]></category>
  448. <category><![CDATA[veterinarian]]></category>
  449. <category><![CDATA[Wales]]></category>
  450. <category><![CDATA[Winston]]></category>
  451.  
  452. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://www.hsi.org/?p=16194</guid>
  453. <description><![CDATA[<p>London–Humane Society International’s rescue team is on the ground in South Korea to save more than 90 dogs and puppies...</p>
  454. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.hsi.org/news-media/sk-dog-meat-farm-15-closure-uk-release/">VIDEO: TV dog experts Marc Abraham and Victoria Stilwell help charity rescue 90+ dogs from South Korean dog meat farm, seven pups to seek UK homes</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.hsi.org">Humane Society International</a>.</p>
  455. ]]></description>
  456. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>London–Humane Society International’s rescue team is on the ground in South Korea to save more than 90 dogs and puppies from the horrors of a dog meat farm, with seven lucky pups destined to fly to the United Kingdom to seek adoptive homes. The remaining dogs are being flown to the United States and Canada. TV vet, animal welfare campaigner, and founder of PupAid Marc Abraham, and world-respected dog trainer and star of Animal Planet’s “It’s Me or the Dog” and Channel 5’s “Dogs With Extraordinary Jobs”, Victoria Stilwell, flew out to South Korea with HSI to witness the rescue first-hand.</p>
  457. <p>During their trip, Victoria and Marc also joined the HSI team as special guests of the British Ambassador Simon Smith for a gallery exhibition about the charity’s dog farm rescue work, at which the Ambassador praised the charity for working collaboratively with dog farmers wanting to exit the cruel trade.</p>
  458. <p>Download broll video and photos of the rescue <a href="https://newsroom.humanesociety.org/fetcher/index.php?searchMerlin=1&amp;searchBrightcove=1&amp;submitted=1&amp;mw=d&amp;q=Farm15UK0919">here</a>.</p>
  459. <p>The dogs were living on a dog meat farm in Gyeonggi-do province that is closing thanks to HSI’s pioneering program that sees the charity help dog farmers who want to leave the increasingly controversial industry. This is the 15th dog farm HSI has permanently closed, and one of thousands of such farms across the country supplying live dogs to slaughterhouses and markets for human consumption.</p>
  460. <p>Seven of the rescued dogs will fly to the UK where they will begin their search for adoptive homes. Winston the Boston Terrier, Labrador mixes Pumpkin and Oscar, spaniel mix Maisy, terrier Scooby, and Jindo mixes Bella and Molly, were among the more than 90 dogs destined to be sold to the butcher before the dog farmer &#8211; 40-year old Kwon Tae-young &#8211; had a change of heart and asked to join HSI’s dog farm closure program, the only campaign of its kind in South Korea helping farmers leave dog farming behind them to set up more humane and profitable livelihoods.</p>
  461. <p>Victoria Stilwell said: “It’s been a real privilege to join Humane Society International’s team in South Korea and see their dog meat farm closure program for myself. I’ve seen all breeds of dogs here suffering the same, kept in filthy cages with no environmental enrichment whatsoever. It’s little wonder that they seem so desperate to escape. The agreement that HSI reaches with the dog farmer truly is a lifeline for these dogs.”</p>
  462. <p>Vet Marc Abraham, who campaigned successfully to achieve a ban on puppy farming in England, Wales and Scotland (known as Lucy’s Law), said: “I’m really in awe of the resilience of these beautiful dogs. They endure miserable lives in squalid conditions with just the bare minimum to keep them alive, and no veterinary care whatsoever, and yet so many of them still wag their tails and jump with excitement when shown the slightest bit of affection. Any factory farm for dogs is a hellish place, bethat for the pet trade or the meat trade, and HSI’s program is making a massive difference here to pave the way to end this cruel industry for good.”</p>
  463. <p>The tosa and jindo breeds more typical of the trade were kept at the farm alongside a chow-chow, golden retriever, several terrier mixes and two Boston terriers, all destined for the cooking pot, with most enduring a miserable life in cramped and barren wire frame cages, while others were chained up alone.</p>
  464. <p>Like all the dog farmers with whom HSI has worked, Farmer Kwon Tae-young is eager to leave his dog breeding days behind him. His business is increasingly unprofitable as fewer people in South Korea wish to eat dogs, and he feels happy to know that his remaining dogs will escape the grim fate of fighting or slaughter.</p>
  465. <p>Farmer Kwon Tae-young said: &#8220;I&#8217;ve thought about closing my dog farm for a while now for various reasons, but never actually did anything about it. I have lost more money on this dog farm than I have made, and I feel like the dog meat industry in South Korea has already ended really because it&#8217;s the worst of the worst times for dog farmers I think. One day I talked to a former dog farmer who had worked with HSI and he recommended I work with the charity to help me leave the dog meat industry. When I heard that HSI would help find forever homes for the dogs instead of them being euthanized, that&#8217;s when I decided to do it. Rather than selling them off to traders, I thought it would be so much better if they can live their life and not die for meat or live the life of a fighting dog. That is why I’m working with HSI.”</p>
  466. <p>HSI’s unique program sees the charity work with dog farmers to rescue their dogs and transition their businesses to more humane and profitable enterprises such as crop growing or service trades like water delivery. A 20-year contract is signed by each farmer stipulating they must not breed dogs or any animals again, and the cages are demolished to ensure that no animals will suffer on the property in future. As political and public momentum grows in South Korea to end the dog meat trade, HSI’s strategy points to the cultural need for a solution that works for both people and dogs caught up in the industry. The charity hopes its program will demonstrate to the government that its phase-out model can be adopted nationwide with state support, and buy-in rather than opposition from farmers.</p>
  467. <p>Nara Kim, HSI/Korea’s dog meat campaigner says: “All animals can suffer for the meat trade, but we have a unique set of social and political circumstances in South Korea that means we have a chance of ending that suffering for millions of dogs, as appetites and attitudes towards dog meat are changing. More Koreans than ever before are speaking out against the dog meat industry, and pressure is building on the government to make a plan to phase out this cruel business. As a Korean myself, I know what a difference HSI’s dog farm transition program can make in hastening an end to the suffering. ”</p>
  468. <p>Dog meat consumption is declining rapidly in South Korea, particularly among younger generations, with a survey by Gallup Korea in June 2018 showing that 70 percent of South Koreans say they will not eat dog meat in future. A series of recent moves by authorities to curb the dog meat trade reflects how Korean society is increasingly ill at ease with the industry. In November last year, HSI/Korea assisted Seongnam City Council in shutting down Taepyeong, the largest dog slaughterhouse in the country, and in July this year HSI/Korea worked with fellow Korean animal groups and Busan city council to close down Gupo dog meat market.</p>
  469. <p>Speaking at the British Embassy dog meat rescue gallery exhibition, Ambassador Smith said: “We have been delighted to host a reception for Humane Society International at the Embassy, to bring attention to their work tackling the animal welfare problems of the dog meat trade. HSI’s approach is commendable and clearly effective, working collaboratively with dog farmers keen to leave the trade behind them, and supporting their willing transition to alternative humane livelihoods. We also congratulate the city councils of Seongnam and Busan with whom HSI have worked recently to close dog meat markets, a move that we understand has been welcomed by the local communities. Improving animal welfare is a global challenge and opportunity, for all animals, and we welcome the progress that has been made for dogs here in Korea.”</p>
  470. <p>Download photos of the British Ambassador with a jindo puppy, saved by HSI from the dog meat trade, <a href="https://newsroom.humanesociety.org/fetcher/index.php?searchMerlin=1&amp;searchBrightcove=1&amp;submitted=1&amp;mw=d&amp;q=DogMeatEvent0919">here</a>.</p>
  471. <p>The seven dogs destined for the UK will first complete their quarantine at Humane Society International’s shelter partner in South Korea, after which they will be flown to the UK at the end of November to be placed in foster families by HSI shelter partner Chimney Farm Rescue in Surrey. Prospective adopters can apply to Chimney Farm Rescue via <a href="https://www.chimneyfarmrescue.com/">https://www.chimneyfarmrescue.com/</a></p>
  472. <p>Facts:</p>
  473. <ul>
  474. <li>An estimated 2 million dogs a year are reared on thousands of dog meat farms across South Korea.</li>
  475. <li>Most people in South Korea don’t regularly eat dog, but it remains popular during the Bok days of summer (Bok Nal) in July and August, when it is eaten as a soup called bosintang.</li>
  476. <li>In advance of Bok Nal this year, HSI/Korea launched an online public voting campaign called #NameMe. Thousands of Korean citizens voted on the new name of “Nuri” to replace the derogatory term “meat dogs” that has served to normalise the concept that such a type of dog exists. HSI believes that tosas, jindos and other dogs should not be defined by the abusive industry they find themselves in, and that by renaming them we are promoting our core message that all dogs are equally capable of becoming pet dogs, and are deserving of equal protection under the law.</li>
  477. <li>Dogs are mainly killed by electrocution, taking up to five minutes to die. Hanging is also practiced despite being illegal.</li>
  478. <li>The dog meat industry is in legal limbo in South Korea, neither legal nor illegal. Many provisions of the Animal Protection Act are routinely breached, such as the ban on killing animals in a brutal way including hanging by the neck, and on killing them in public areas or in front of other animals of the same species.</li>
  479. <li>At each dog meat farm closure, HSI’s veterinarian vaccinates all the dogs against the H3N2 (dog flu) virus, rabies, DHPP, corona virus, distemper and parvo. HSI then quarantines the dogs on the farm or at a temporary shelter with no dogs permitted in or out for at least 30 days prior to transport overseas.</li>
  480. </ul>
  481. <p>Download broll video and photos of the rescue <a href="https://newsroom.humanesociety.org/fetcher/index.php?searchMerlin=1&amp;searchBrightcove=1&amp;submitted=1&amp;mw=d&amp;q=Farm15UK0919">here</a>.</p>
  482. <p>ENDS</p>
  483. <p>Media contact: Wendy Higgins: <a href="mailto:[email protected]">[email protected]</a></p>
  484. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.hsi.org/news-media/sk-dog-meat-farm-15-closure-uk-release/">VIDEO: TV dog experts Marc Abraham and Victoria Stilwell help charity rescue 90+ dogs from South Korean dog meat farm, seven pups to seek UK homes</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.hsi.org">Humane Society International</a>.</p>
  485. ]]></content:encoded>
  486. <post-id xmlns="com-wordpress:feed-additions:1">16194</post-id> </item>
  487. <item>
  488. <title>Humane Society International saves 90 dogs from slaughter in South Korea, 64 headed to Canada for adoption</title>
  489. <link>https://www.hsi.org/news-media/sk-dog-meat-farm-15-closure-canada-release/</link>
  490. <pubDate>Wed, 25 Sep 2019 15:52:23 +0000</pubDate>
  491. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Nancy Hwa]]></dc:creator>
  492. <category><![CDATA[Press Release]]></category>
  493. <category><![CDATA[closure]]></category>
  494. <category><![CDATA[contract]]></category>
  495. <category><![CDATA[dog]]></category>
  496. <category><![CDATA[dogfighting]]></category>
  497. <category><![CDATA[farm]]></category>
  498. <category><![CDATA[livelihood]]></category>
  499. <category><![CDATA[meat]]></category>
  500. <category><![CDATA[puppies]]></category>
  501. <category><![CDATA[rescue]]></category>
  502. <category><![CDATA[shelter]]></category>
  503. <category><![CDATA[south korea]]></category>
  504.  
  505. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://www.hsi.org/?p=16134</guid>
  506. <description><![CDATA[<p>MONTREAL—Humane Society International’s rescue team is on the ground in South Korea during National Dog Week to save 90 dogs...</p>
  507. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.hsi.org/news-media/sk-dog-meat-farm-15-closure-canada-release/">Humane Society International saves 90 dogs from slaughter in South Korea, 64 headed to Canada for adoption</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.hsi.org">Humane Society International</a>.</p>
  508. ]]></description>
  509. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<figure id="attachment_16109" aria-describedby="caption-attachment-16109" style="width: 300px" class="wp-caption alignleft"><img src="https://i2.wp.com/www.hsi.org/wp-content/uploads/975x-for-press-releases/dog-meat/JC_KOREA_YEOJU_FARM_079_488649-Farm-15-Canada-975x-e1569351047128-300x200.jpg?resize=300%2C200&#038;ssl=1" alt="" width="300" height="200" data-recalc-dims="1" /><figcaption id="caption-attachment-16109" class="wp-caption-text"><span class="section__credit">Jean Chung for HSI</span> <span class="section__caption">A dog is shown locked in a cage at a dog meat farm in Yeoju, South Korea, on Sunday, August 11, 2019. <br /></span></figcaption></figure>
  510. <p>MONTREAL—Humane Society International’s rescue team is on the ground in South Korea during National Dog Week to save 90 dogs and puppies from the horrors of the dog meat trade. Sixty-four of them will be flown to Toronto and immediately transported to the HSI/Canada–Friends of HSI emergency shelter in Montreal where they will be cared for and rehabilitated prior to adoption.</p>
  511. <p>This is the 15<sup>th</sup> dog farm HSI has permanently closed thanks to a <a href="https://www.hsi.org/news-media/closing-south-koreas-dog-meat-farms/">pioneering program</a> that helps dog farmers who want to leave this increasingly controversial industry. This particular facility is located in Gyeonggi-do province, just one of thousands of such farms across the country supplying live dogs to slaughterhouses and markets for human consumption.</p>
  512. <p>HSI/Canada executive director Rebecca Aldworth stated: “These poor dogs have spent the entirety of their lives locked up and neglected in this appalling dog meat facility, forced to live without even the most basic of care. Many of them were found dehydrated, malnourished, and exhibiting untreated injuries and skin conditions. Here in Canada, our team of experts and volunteers will give these deserving dogs the love and care they so badly need. Hope is finally here.”</p>
  513. <p>Rescuers encountered several breeds typical of the trade, such as tosas and jindos, alongside a chow-chow, golden retriever, several terrier mixes and two Boston terriers, all destined for slaughter. Most had endured miserable lives in cramped and barren wire frame cages, while others were chained alone. The farmer admitted to selling puppies to dog fighters; despite being illegal, dog fighting persists in South Korea.</p>
  514. <p>Nara Kim, HSI/Korea’s dog meat campaigner added: “More Koreans than ever before are speaking out against the dog meat industry, and pressure is building on the government to phase out this cruel business. As a Korean and an adopter of a dog meat trade survivor, I know what a difference HSI’s program can make in hastening an end to the suffering.”</p>
  515. <p>HSI’s unique program works with dog farmers to rescue their dogs and transition their businesses to more humane and profitable enterprises such as crop growing or water delivery. The farmer signs a 20-year contract, stipulating they must not breed dogs or any animals again, and the cages are demolished to ensure that no animals will suffer on the property in future.</p>
  516. <p>Recent moves by authorities to curb the dog meat trade reflect how Korean society is increasingly ill at ease with the industry. In November 2018, HSI/Korea assisted the Seongnam city council in shutting down <a href="https://www.hsi.org/news-media/sk-slaughterhouse-shutdown-112218/">Taepyeong</a>, the largest dog slaughterhouse in the country, and in July this year HSI/Korea worked with other Korean animal groups and the Busan city council to close down the <a href="https://www.hsi.org/news-media/south-korea-shuts-down-gupo-dog-meat-market/">Gupo</a> dog meat market. HSI’s voluntary phase-out model can be adopted nationwide with state support and end the industry for good.</p>
  517. <p><strong>Facts: </strong></p>
  518. <ul>
  519. <li>An estimated 2 million dogs a year are reared on thousands of dog meat farms across South Korea.</li>
  520. <li>Dogs are mainly killed by electrocution, taking up to five minutes to die. Hanging is also practiced despite being illegal.</li>
  521. <li>Dog meat consumption is declining rapidly in South Korea, particularly among younger generations. According to a June 2018 <a href="http://www.topstarnews.net/news/articleView.html?idxno=454226#08e1">survey</a> by Gallup Korea, 70 percent of South Koreans say they will not eat dog meat in future.</li>
  522. <li>Most people in South Korea don’t regularly eat dog, but it remains popular during the Bok days of summer (Bok Nal) in July and August, when it is eaten as a soup called bosintang.</li>
  523. <li>The dog meat industry is in legal limbo in South Korea, neither legal nor illegal. Many provisions of the Animal Protection Act are routinely breached, such as the ban on killing animals in a brutal way including hanging by the neck, and on killing them in public areas or in front of other animals of the same species.</li>
  524. <li>At each dog meat farm closure, HSI’s veterinarian vaccinates all the dogs against the H3N2 (dog flu) virus, rabies, DHPP, corona virus, distemper and parvo. HSI then quarantines the dogs on the farm or at a temporary shelter with no dogs permitted in or out for at least 30 days prior to transport overseas.</li>
  525. </ul>
  526. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.hsi.org/news-media/sk-dog-meat-farm-15-closure-canada-release/">Humane Society International saves 90 dogs from slaughter in South Korea, 64 headed to Canada for adoption</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.hsi.org">Humane Society International</a>.</p>
  527. ]]></content:encoded>
  528. <post-id xmlns="com-wordpress:feed-additions:1">16134</post-id> </item>
  529. <item>
  530. <title>Humane Society International saves 90 dogs from slaughter in South Korea</title>
  531. <link>https://www.hsi.org/news-media/sk-dog-meat-farm-15-closure-us-release/</link>
  532. <pubDate>Wed, 25 Sep 2019 14:10:32 +0000</pubDate>
  533. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Nancy Hwa]]></dc:creator>
  534. <category><![CDATA[Press Release]]></category>
  535. <category><![CDATA[chow-chow]]></category>
  536. <category><![CDATA[closure]]></category>
  537. <category><![CDATA[contract]]></category>
  538. <category><![CDATA[dog]]></category>
  539. <category><![CDATA[dogfighting]]></category>
  540. <category><![CDATA[farm]]></category>
  541. <category><![CDATA[golden retriever]]></category>
  542. <category><![CDATA[jindo]]></category>
  543. <category><![CDATA[livelihood]]></category>
  544. <category><![CDATA[meat]]></category>
  545. <category><![CDATA[mixes]]></category>
  546. <category><![CDATA[puppies]]></category>
  547. <category><![CDATA[rescue]]></category>
  548. <category><![CDATA[shelter]]></category>
  549. <category><![CDATA[south korea]]></category>
  550. <category><![CDATA[terrier]]></category>
  551. <category><![CDATA[tosa]]></category>
  552.  
  553. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://www.hsi.org/?p=16127</guid>
  554. <description><![CDATA[<p>WASHINGTON—Humane Society International’s rescue team is on the ground in South Korea to save 90 dogs and puppies from the...</p>
  555. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.hsi.org/news-media/sk-dog-meat-farm-15-closure-us-release/">Humane Society International saves 90 dogs from slaughter in South Korea</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.hsi.org">Humane Society International</a>.</p>
  556. ]]></description>
  557. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<figure id="attachment_16101" aria-describedby="caption-attachment-16101" style="width: 300px" class="wp-caption alignleft"><img src="https://i0.wp.com/www.hsi.org/wp-content/uploads/975x-for-press-releases/dog-meat/JC_KOREA_YEOJU_FARM_067_488625-Farm-15-US-975x-e1569351119898-300x200.jpg?resize=300%2C200&#038;ssl=1" alt="" width="300" height="200" data-recalc-dims="1" /><figcaption id="caption-attachment-16101" class="wp-caption-text"><span class="section__credit">Jean Chung for HSI</span> <span class="section__caption">A puppy locked in a cage at a dog meat farm in Yeoju, South Korea, on Sunday, August 11, 2019. <br /></span></figcaption></figure>
  558. <p>WASHINGTON—Humane Society International’s rescue team is on the ground in South Korea to save 90 dogs and puppies from the horrors of the <a href="https://www.hsi.org/issues/dog-meat-trade/">dog meat trade</a> and to bring them to the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom. Fifteen puppies will be arriving in the D.C. area on September 26 and 27, where they will be taken in by local shelter and rescue partners, such as the <a href="https://alexandriaanimals.org/">Animal Welfare League of Alexandria</a>, the <a href="https://www.fairfaxcounty.gov/animalshelter/">Fairfax County Animal Shelter</a> and <a href="https://www.homewardtrails.org/">Homeward Trails Animal Rescue</a>, to find new homes.</p>
  559. <p>The dogs were living on a dog meat farm in Gyeonggi-do province that is closing thanks to HSI’s <a href="https://www.hsi.org/news-media/closing-south-koreas-dog-meat-farms/">pioneering program</a> that helps dog farmers who want to leave the increasingly controversial industry. This is the 15<sup>th</sup> dog farm HSI has permanently closed, and one of thousands of such farms across the country supplying live dogs to slaughterhouses and markets for human consumption.</p>
  560. <p>The tosa and jindo breeds typical of the trade were kept at the farm alongside a chow-chow, golden retriever, several terrier mixes and two Boston terriers, all destined for slaughter. Most were enduring miserable lives in cramped and barren wire frame cages, while others were chained alone. The farmer, 40-year old Kwon Tae-young also admits to having sold puppies to dogfighters. Despite being illegal, dogfighting persists in South Korea, and HSI has discovered dogfighting rings at a number of the farms closed by the organization since the program began in 2015.</p>
  561. <p>The farmer said: &#8220;<em>I&#8217;ve thought about closing my dog farm for a while now for various reasons, but never actually did anything about it. I have lost more money on this dog farm than I have made, and I feel like the dog meat industry in South Korea has already ended really because it&#8217;s the worst of times for dog farmers I think. One day I talked to a former dog farmer who had worked with HSI and he recommended I work with them to help me leave the dog meat industry. Rather than selling them off to traders, I thought it would be so much better if they can live their life and not die for meat or live the life of a fighting dog. That why I’m working with HSI.”</em></p>
  562. <p>HSI’s unique program works with dog farmers to rescue their dogs and transition their businesses to more humane and profitable enterprises such as crop growing or water delivery. The farmer signs a 20-year contract, stipulating they must not breed dogs or any animals again, and the cages are demolished to ensure that no animals will suffer on the property in future.</p>
  563. <p>Nara Kim, HSI/Korea’s dog meat campaigner said: “<em>More Koreans than ever before are speaking out against the dog meat industry, and pressure is building on the government to phase out this cruel business. As a Korean and an adopter of a dog meat trade survivor, I know what a difference HSI’s program can make in hastening an end to the suffering and what wonderful pets dog meat farm survivors can be when given a chance.</em><em>”  </em></p>
  564. <p>Recent moves by authorities to curb the dog meat trade reflect how Korean society is increasingly ill at ease with the industry. In November 2018, HSI/Korea assisted the Seongnam city council in shutting down <a href="https://www.hsi.org/news-media/sk-slaughterhouse-shutdown-112218/">Taepyeong</a>, the largest dog slaughterhouse in the country, and in July this year HSI/Korea worked with other Korean animal groups and the Busan city council to close down the <a href="https://www.hsi.org/news-media/south-korea-shuts-down-gupo-dog-meat-market/">Gupo</a> dog meat market.</p>
  565. <p>As political and public momentum grows in South Korea to end the dog meat trade, HSI’s strategy points to the need for a solution that works for both people and dogs caught up in the industry. The organization hopes its program will demonstrate to the government that the group’s voluntary phase-out model can be adopted nationwide with state support and can end the industry for good.</p>
  566. <p><strong>Facts:    </strong></p>
  567. <ul>
  568. <li>An estimated 2 million dogs a year are reared on thousands of dog meat farms across South Korea.</li>
  569. <li>Dogs are mainly killed by electrocution, taking up to five minutes to die. Hanging is also practiced despite being illegal.</li>
  570. <li>Dog meat consumption is declining rapidly in South Korea, particularly among younger generations. According to a June 2018 <a href="http://www.topstarnews.net/news/articleView.html?idxno=454226#08e1">survey</a> by Gallup Korea, 70% of South Koreans say they will not eat dog meat in future.</li>
  571. <li>Most people in South Korea don’t regularly eat dog, but it remains popular during the Bok days of summer (Bok Nal) in July and August, when it is eaten as a soup called bosintang.</li>
  572. <li>The dog meat industry is in legal limbo in South Korea, neither legal nor illegal. Many provisions of the Animal Protection Act are routinely breached, such as the ban on killing animals in a brutal way including hanging by the neck, and on killing them in public areas or in front of other animals of the same species.</li>
  573. <li>At each dog meat farm closure, HSI’s veterinarian vaccinates all the dogs against the H3N2 (dog flu) virus, rabies, DHPP, corona virus, distemper and parvo. HSI then quarantines the dogs on the farm or at a temporary shelter with no dogs permitted in or out for at least 30 days prior to transport overseas.</li>
  574. </ul>
  575. <p><strong>Video and photos of the dogs on the farm are available </strong><a href="https://newsroom.humanesociety.org/fetcher/index.php?searchMerlin=1&amp;searchBrightcove=1&amp;submitted=1&amp;mw=d&amp;q=Farm15US0919"><strong>here</strong></a><strong> and </strong><a href="https://newsroom.humanesociety.org/fetcher/index.php?searchMerlin=1&amp;searchBrightcove=1&amp;submitted=1&amp;mw=d&amp;q=Farm15Global0919"><strong>here</strong></a><strong>.  </strong></p>
  576. <p>END</p>
  577. <p><strong><u>Media contacts:</u></strong></p>
  578. <ul>
  579. <li><strong>Humane Society International: </strong>Nancy Hwa in Washington, D.C., <a href="mailto:[email protected]">[email protected]</a>, 202-676-2337 (direct), 202-596-0808 (cell)</li>
  580. <li><strong>Animal Welfare League of Alexandria</strong>: Gina Hardter, Director of Marketing &amp; Communications, <a href="mailto:[email protected]">[email protected]</a>, 703-746-5662</li>
  581. <li><strong>Fairfax County Animal Shelter</strong>: Karen Diviney, <a href="mailto:[email protected]">[email protected]</a></li>
  582. <li><strong>Homeward Trails Animal Rescue</strong>: <a href="mailto:[email protected]">[email protected]</a></li>
  583. </ul>
  584. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.hsi.org/news-media/sk-dog-meat-farm-15-closure-us-release/">Humane Society International saves 90 dogs from slaughter in South Korea</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.hsi.org">Humane Society International</a>.</p>
  585. ]]></content:encoded>
  586. <post-id xmlns="com-wordpress:feed-additions:1">16127</post-id> </item>
  587. <item>
  588. <title>Dorian&#8217;s Destruction: Hurricane Survivors</title>
  589. <link>https://www.hsi.org/news-media/dorians-destruction-hurricane-survivors/</link>
  590. <pubDate>Wed, 18 Sep 2019 18:33:05 +0000</pubDate>
  591. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Kristin Stone]]></dc:creator>
  592. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://www.hsi.org/?p=15989</guid>
  593. <description><![CDATA[<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.hsi.org/news-media/dorians-destruction-hurricane-survivors/">Dorian&#8217;s Destruction: Hurricane Survivors</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.hsi.org">Humane Society International</a>.</p>
  594. ]]></description>
  595. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.hsi.org/news-media/dorians-destruction-hurricane-survivors/">Dorian&#8217;s Destruction: Hurricane Survivors</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.hsi.org">Humane Society International</a>.</p>
  596. ]]></content:encoded>
  597. <post-id xmlns="com-wordpress:feed-additions:1">15989</post-id> </item>
  598. </channel>
  599. </rss>
  600.  

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