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  15. <link>https://dailyyonder.com</link>
  16. <description>Rural News and Information</description>
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  32. <title>Rural Counties Set Record for New Cases 6 out of Last 10 Days</title>
  33. <link>https://dailyyonder.com/rural-counties-set-records-for-new-cases-6-out-of-last-10-days/2020/07/04/</link>
  34. <comments>https://dailyyonder.com/rural-counties-set-records-for-new-cases-6-out-of-last-10-days/2020/07/04/#respond</comments>
  35. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Tim Marema]]></dc:creator>
  36. <pubDate>Sat, 04 Jul 2020 13:54:06 +0000</pubDate>
  37. <category><![CDATA[Rural Voters]]></category>
  38. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://dailyyonder.com/?p=61080</guid>
  39.  
  40. <description><![CDATA[<figure><img width="760" height="509" src="https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/june-1-new-cases-covid-19-rural.jpg?fit=760%2C509&amp;ssl=1" class="attachment-medium size-medium wp-post-image" alt="" srcset="https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/june-1-new-cases-covid-19-rural.jpg?w=1200&amp;ssl=1 1200w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/june-1-new-cases-covid-19-rural.jpg?resize=760%2C509&amp;ssl=1 760w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/june-1-new-cases-covid-19-rural.jpg?resize=768%2C514&amp;ssl=1 768w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/june-1-new-cases-covid-19-rural.jpg?resize=706%2C472&amp;ssl=1 706w" sizes="(max-width: 34.9rem) calc(100vw - 2rem), (max-width: 53rem) calc(8 * (100vw / 12)), (min-width: 53rem) calc(6 * (100vw / 12)), 100vw" /></figure>
  41. <p>Explore full-page version of the map. Like the rest of America, small cities and rural areas will celebrate the Independence Day weekend with record numbers of new cases of Covid-19. Nonmetropolitan counties reported an all-time high of 6,452 new cases of Covid-19 on Thursday, July 2, the most recent day for which we have national [&#8230;]</p>
  42. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://dailyyonder.com/rural-counties-set-records-for-new-cases-6-out-of-last-10-days/2020/07/04/">Rural Counties Set Record for New Cases 6 out of Last 10 Days</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://dailyyonder.com">Daily Yonder</a>.</p>
  43. ]]></description>
  44. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<figure><img width="760" height="509" src="https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/june-1-new-cases-covid-19-rural.jpg?fit=760%2C509&amp;ssl=1" class="attachment-medium size-medium wp-post-image" alt="" srcset="https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/june-1-new-cases-covid-19-rural.jpg?w=1200&amp;ssl=1 1200w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/june-1-new-cases-covid-19-rural.jpg?resize=760%2C509&amp;ssl=1 760w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/june-1-new-cases-covid-19-rural.jpg?resize=768%2C514&amp;ssl=1 768w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/june-1-new-cases-covid-19-rural.jpg?resize=706%2C472&amp;ssl=1 706w" sizes="(max-width: 34.9rem) calc(100vw - 2rem), (max-width: 53rem) calc(8 * (100vw / 12)), (min-width: 53rem) calc(6 * (100vw / 12)), 100vw" /></figure>
  45. <iframe title="New Case Rate Since June 1, Nonmetropolitan Counties" aria-label="map" id="datawrapper-chart-xDfzP" src="https://datawrapper.dwcdn.net/xDfzP/2/" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" style="width: 900; min-width: 100% !important; border: none;" height="500"></iframe><script type="text/javascript">!function(){"use strict";window.addEventListener("message",(function(a){if(void 0!==a.data["datawrapper-height"])for(var e in a.data["datawrapper-height"]){var t=document.getElementById("datawrapper-chart-"+e)||document.querySelector("iframe[src*='"+e+"']");t&&(t.style.height=a.data["datawrapper-height"][e]+"px")}}))}();
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  47.  
  48.  
  49.  
  50. <p class="has-text-align-center"><em><a href="https://datawrapper.dwcdn.net/xDfzP/2/" target="_blank" aria-label="undefined (opens in a new tab)" rel="noreferrer noopener">Explore full-page version of the map.</a></em></p>
  51.  
  52.  
  53.  
  54. <p>Like the rest of America, small cities and rural areas will celebrate the Independence Day weekend with record numbers of new cases of Covid-19.</p>
  55.  
  56.  
  57.  
  58. <p>Nonmetropolitan counties reported an all-time high of 6,452 new cases of Covid-19 on Thursday, July 2, the most recent day for which we have national data. That surpasses the previous single-day record, set only two days earlier, by nearly 1,800 cases.</p>
  59.  
  60.  
  61.  
  62. <p>The seven-day average of new cases was also at an all-time high on Thursday. The seven-day rolling average smooths out short-term factors and shows the longer-term trend.</p>
  63.  
  64.  
  65.  
  66. <figure class="wp-block-image size-large"><img src="https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/new-rural-covid-cases-june.jpg?w=960&#038;ssl=1" alt="" class="wp-image-61081" srcset="https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/new-rural-covid-cases-june.jpg?w=1254&amp;ssl=1 1254w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/new-rural-covid-cases-june.jpg?resize=760%2C330&amp;ssl=1 760w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/new-rural-covid-cases-june.jpg?resize=768%2C333&amp;ssl=1 768w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/new-rural-covid-cases-june.jpg?resize=1200%2C521&amp;ssl=1 1200w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/new-rural-covid-cases-june.jpg?resize=706%2C306&amp;ssl=1 706w" sizes="(max-width: 960px) 100vw, 960px" data-recalc-dims="1" /><figcaption>The vertical bars show the number of new cases per day, with record-setting days shown in red. The red line is the seven-day rolling average of new cases per day. (Daily Yonder)</figcaption></figure>
  67.  
  68.  
  69.  
  70. <p>The graph above shows both the daily new cases (the vertical bars) and the seven-day rolling average (the red dotted line).</p>
  71.  
  72.  
  73.  
  74. <p>For six out of the last 10 days, nonmetropolitan counties have set records for new cases in nonmetropolitan counties. The red vertical bars in the graph show the days when nonmetro counties had a record-setting number of new cases in a single day.</p>
  75. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://dailyyonder.com/rural-counties-set-records-for-new-cases-6-out-of-last-10-days/2020/07/04/">Rural Counties Set Record for New Cases 6 out of Last 10 Days</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://dailyyonder.com">Daily Yonder</a>.</p>
  76. ]]></content:encoded>
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  78. <slash:comments>0</slash:comments>
  79. </item>
  80. <item>
  81. <title>Down Yonder: Black Land Ownership, Alaska&#8217;s Unheard, White Gatekeeper of Southern Food, Democratic Climate Plan, Guide to Covid-19 Therapies</title>
  82. <link>https://dailyyonder.com/down-yonder-black-land-ownership-alaskas-unheard-white-gatekeeper-of-southern-food-democratic-climate-plan-guide-to-covid-19-therapies/2020/07/04/</link>
  83. <comments>https://dailyyonder.com/down-yonder-black-land-ownership-alaskas-unheard-white-gatekeeper-of-southern-food-democratic-climate-plan-guide-to-covid-19-therapies/2020/07/04/#respond</comments>
  84. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Staff]]></dc:creator>
  85. <pubDate>Sat, 04 Jul 2020 10:00:00 +0000</pubDate>
  86. <category><![CDATA[Media]]></category>
  87. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://dailyyonder.com/?p=60975</guid>
  88.  
  89. <description><![CDATA[<figure><img width="760" height="428" src="https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/DownYonder-attached-arrow.jpg?fit=760%2C428&amp;ssl=1" class="attachment-medium size-medium wp-post-image" alt="" srcset="https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/DownYonder-attached-arrow.jpg?w=1920&amp;ssl=1 1920w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/DownYonder-attached-arrow.jpg?resize=760%2C428&amp;ssl=1 760w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/DownYonder-attached-arrow.jpg?resize=1296%2C729&amp;ssl=1 1296w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/DownYonder-attached-arrow.jpg?resize=768%2C432&amp;ssl=1 768w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/DownYonder-attached-arrow.jpg?resize=1536%2C864&amp;ssl=1 1536w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/DownYonder-attached-arrow.jpg?resize=750%2C422&amp;ssl=1 750w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/DownYonder-attached-arrow.jpg?resize=250%2C141&amp;ssl=1 250w" sizes="(max-width: 34.9rem) calc(100vw - 2rem), (max-width: 53rem) calc(8 * (100vw / 12)), (min-width: 53rem) calc(6 * (100vw / 12)), 100vw" /></figure>
  90. <p>Welcome to Down Yonder – our weekly roundup of good reads we&#8217;ve found around the web. Our goal is to showcase more perspectives on national and global issues through a rural lens. Expect Down Yonder on Saturdays. Enjoy! Mother Jones: White People Own 98 Percent of Rural Land. Young Black Farmers Want to Reclaim Their [&#8230;]</p>
  91. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://dailyyonder.com/down-yonder-black-land-ownership-alaskas-unheard-white-gatekeeper-of-southern-food-democratic-climate-plan-guide-to-covid-19-therapies/2020/07/04/">Down Yonder: Black Land Ownership, Alaska&#8217;s Unheard, White Gatekeeper of Southern Food, Democratic Climate Plan, Guide to Covid-19 Therapies</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://dailyyonder.com">Daily Yonder</a>.</p>
  92. ]]></description>
  93. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<figure><img width="760" height="428" src="https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/DownYonder-attached-arrow.jpg?fit=760%2C428&amp;ssl=1" class="attachment-medium size-medium wp-post-image" alt="" srcset="https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/DownYonder-attached-arrow.jpg?w=1920&amp;ssl=1 1920w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/DownYonder-attached-arrow.jpg?resize=760%2C428&amp;ssl=1 760w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/DownYonder-attached-arrow.jpg?resize=1296%2C729&amp;ssl=1 1296w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/DownYonder-attached-arrow.jpg?resize=768%2C432&amp;ssl=1 768w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/DownYonder-attached-arrow.jpg?resize=1536%2C864&amp;ssl=1 1536w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/DownYonder-attached-arrow.jpg?resize=750%2C422&amp;ssl=1 750w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/DownYonder-attached-arrow.jpg?resize=250%2C141&amp;ssl=1 250w" sizes="(max-width: 34.9rem) calc(100vw - 2rem), (max-width: 53rem) calc(8 * (100vw / 12)), (min-width: 53rem) calc(6 * (100vw / 12)), 100vw" /></figure>
  94. <hr class="wp-block-separator is-style-wide"/>
  95.  
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  97.  
  98. <div class="wp-block-media-text alignwide is-stacked-on-mobile" style="grid-template-columns:28% auto"><figure class="wp-block-media-text__media"><img src="https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/ARROW_Y.jpg?resize=960%2C540&#038;ssl=1" alt="" class="wp-image-59211" srcset="https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/ARROW_Y.jpg?resize=1296%2C729&amp;ssl=1 1296w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/ARROW_Y.jpg?resize=760%2C428&amp;ssl=1 760w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/ARROW_Y.jpg?resize=768%2C432&amp;ssl=1 768w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/ARROW_Y.jpg?resize=1536%2C864&amp;ssl=1 1536w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/ARROW_Y.jpg?resize=750%2C422&amp;ssl=1 750w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/ARROW_Y.jpg?resize=250%2C141&amp;ssl=1 250w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/ARROW_Y.jpg?w=1920&amp;ssl=1 1920w" sizes="(max-width: 960px) 100vw, 960px" data-recalc-dims="1" /></figure><div class="wp-block-media-text__content">
  99. <p>Welcome to <strong>Down Yonder</strong> – our weekly roundup of good reads we&#8217;ve found around the web.</p>
  100.  
  101.  
  102.  
  103. <p>Our goal is to showcase more perspectives on national and global issues through a rural lens. Expect Down Yonder on Saturdays. Enjoy!</p>
  104. </div></div>
  105.  
  106.  
  107.  
  108. <hr class="wp-block-separator is-style-wide"/>
  109.  
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  112. <div class="wp-block-media-text alignwide is-stacked-on-mobile" style="grid-template-columns:28% auto"><figure class="wp-block-media-text__media"><img src="https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Screen-Shot-2020-06-30-at-8.16.05-AM.png?w=960&#038;ssl=1" alt="" class="wp-image-60979" data-recalc-dims="1"/></figure><div class="wp-block-media-text__content">
  113. <p style="font-size:17px"><strong>Mother Jones: </strong><a href="https://www.motherjones.com/food/2020/06/black-farmers-soul-fire-farm-reparations-african-legacy-agriculture/"><strong>White People Own 98 Percent of Rural Land.</strong> <strong>Young Black Farmers Want to Reclaim Their Share.</strong> </a></p>
  114.  
  115.  
  116.  
  117. <p style="font-size:17px">Innovations by Black farmers remain at the core of sustainable agriculture today.</p>
  118. </div></div>
  119.  
  120.  
  121.  
  122. <hr class="wp-block-separator is-style-wide"/>
  123.  
  124.  
  125.  
  126. <div class="wp-block-media-text alignwide is-stacked-on-mobile" style="grid-template-columns:28% auto"><figure class="wp-block-media-text__media"><img src="https://i2.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Screen-Shot-2020-06-30-at-8.40.51-AM.png?w=960&#038;ssl=1" alt="" class="wp-image-60983" data-recalc-dims="1"/></figure><div class="wp-block-media-text__content">
  127. <p style="font-size:17px"><strong>ProPublica: </strong><a href="https://features.propublica.org/alaska-sexual-assault/unheard-survivor-stories/"><strong>Unheard</strong></a></p>
  128.  
  129.  
  130.  
  131. <p style="font-size:17px">Alaska has the highest rate of sexual assault in the nation. These women and men did not choose to be violated, but they now choose to speak about what happened.</p>
  132. </div></div>
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  136. <hr class="wp-block-separator is-style-wide"/>
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  140. <div class="wp-block-media-text alignwide is-stacked-on-mobile" style="grid-template-columns:29% auto"><figure class="wp-block-media-text__media"><img src="https://i2.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Screen-Shot-2020-06-30-at-10.50.19-AM-1.png?w=960&#038;ssl=1" alt="" class="wp-image-60999" data-recalc-dims="1"/></figure><div class="wp-block-media-text__content">
  141. <p style="font-size:17px"><strong>New York Times: <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2020/06/29/dining/john-t-edge-southern-foodways-alliance.html">A White Gatekeeper of Southern Food Faces Calls to Resign</a></strong></p>
  142.  
  143.  
  144.  
  145. <p style="font-size:17px">John T. Edge, the director of the Southern Foodways Alliance, is urged to step down after longstanding concerns about his leadership.</p>
  146. </div></div>
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  150. <hr class="wp-block-separator is-style-wide"/>
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  154. <div class="wp-block-media-text alignwide is-stacked-on-mobile" style="grid-template-columns:29% auto"><figure class="wp-block-media-text__media"><img src="https://i2.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/Screen-Shot-2020-07-01-at-1.04.19-PM.png?w=960&#038;ssl=1" alt="" class="wp-image-61035" data-recalc-dims="1"/></figure><div class="wp-block-media-text__content">
  155. <p style="font-size:17px"><strong>Grist: <a href="https://grist.org/politics/house-democrats-finally-have-a-goddamn-climate-plan/">House Democrats Finally Have a Goddamn Climate Plan</a></strong> </p>
  156.  
  157.  
  158.  
  159. <p style="font-size:17px">On Tuesday, the House Select Committee on the Climate Crisis released a&nbsp;<a href="https://climatecrisis.house.gov/sites/climatecrisis.house.gov/files/Climate%20Crisis%20Action%20Plan.pdf">report</a>&nbsp;that it has been working on since January 2019.&nbsp;</p>
  160. </div></div>
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  168. <div class="wp-block-media-text alignwide is-stacked-on-mobile" style="grid-template-columns:30% auto"><figure class="wp-block-media-text__media"><img src="https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/Screen-Shot-2020-07-01-at-1.15.29-PM.png?w=960&#038;ssl=1" alt="" class="wp-image-61037" data-recalc-dims="1"/></figure><div class="wp-block-media-text__content">
  169. <p style="font-size:17px"><strong>The Conversation: <a href="https://theconversation.com/which-drugs-and-therapies-are-proven-to-work-and-which-ones-dont-for-covid-19-141513">Which Drugs and Therapies Are Proven to Work, and Which Ones Don’t, for&nbsp;Covid-19?</a></strong> </p>
  170.  
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  173. <p style="font-size:17px"><a href="https://uvahealth.com/findadoctor/profile/william-petri">William Petri, a physician and a scientist</a>&nbsp;at the University of Virginia conducts research to find better ways to diagnose and treat infectious diseases, including Covid-19. He&#8217;s sharing what is known about which treatments work, and which don’t, for the new coronavirus infection.</p>
  174. </div></div>
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  182. <div class="wp-block-media-text alignwide is-stacked-on-mobile" style="grid-template-columns:36% auto"><figure class="wp-block-media-text__media"><img src="https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/ARROW_Y.jpg?resize=960%2C540&#038;ssl=1" alt="" class="wp-image-59211" srcset="https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/ARROW_Y.jpg?resize=1296%2C729&amp;ssl=1 1296w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/ARROW_Y.jpg?resize=760%2C428&amp;ssl=1 760w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/ARROW_Y.jpg?resize=768%2C432&amp;ssl=1 768w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/ARROW_Y.jpg?resize=1536%2C864&amp;ssl=1 1536w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/ARROW_Y.jpg?resize=750%2C422&amp;ssl=1 750w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/ARROW_Y.jpg?resize=250%2C141&amp;ssl=1 250w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/ARROW_Y.jpg?w=1920&amp;ssl=1 1920w" sizes="(max-width: 960px) 100vw, 960px" data-recalc-dims="1" /></figure><div class="wp-block-media-text__content">
  183. <p class="has-text-align-center" style="font-size:28px"><strong>P</strong>ublic<strong> S</strong>ervice<strong> A</strong>nnouncement</p>
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  192. <div class="wp-block-media-text alignwide is-stacked-on-mobile" style="grid-template-columns:17% auto"><figure class="wp-block-media-text__media"><img src="https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Screen-Shot-2020-06-30-at-4.26.10-PM.png?w=960&#038;ssl=1" alt="" class="wp-image-61014" data-recalc-dims="1"/></figure><div class="wp-block-media-text__content">
  193. <p style="font-size:17px"><strong>Institute for Local Self Reliance: <a href="https://muninetworks.org/content/dont-miss-out-broadband-funding-ntia-has-tool-you">Don’t Miss Out On Broadband Funding — The NTIA Has a Tool For You</a></strong> </p>
  194.  
  195.  
  196.  
  197. <p style="font-size:17px">Funding can seem like an insurmountable barrier to expanding Internet access and adoption. But for states, local communities, nonprofits, or other organizations looking for some help, the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) has updated its&nbsp;<a href="https://broadbandusa.ntia.doc.gov/new-fund-search">federal funding search tool</a>&nbsp;for 2020.</p>
  198. </div></div>
  199.  
  200.  
  201.  
  202. <hr class="wp-block-separator is-style-wide"/>
  203.  
  204.  
  205.  
  206. <hr class="wp-block-separator is-style-wide"/>
  207. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://dailyyonder.com/down-yonder-black-land-ownership-alaskas-unheard-white-gatekeeper-of-southern-food-democratic-climate-plan-guide-to-covid-19-therapies/2020/07/04/">Down Yonder: Black Land Ownership, Alaska&#8217;s Unheard, White Gatekeeper of Southern Food, Democratic Climate Plan, Guide to Covid-19 Therapies</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://dailyyonder.com">Daily Yonder</a>.</p>
  208. ]]></content:encoded>
  209. <wfw:commentRss>https://dailyyonder.com/down-yonder-black-land-ownership-alaskas-unheard-white-gatekeeper-of-southern-food-democratic-climate-plan-guide-to-covid-19-therapies/2020/07/04/feed/</wfw:commentRss>
  210. <slash:comments>0</slash:comments>
  211. </item>
  212. <item>
  213. <title>Commentary: Fixing Democracy</title>
  214. <link>https://dailyyonder.com/commentary-fixing-democracy/2020/07/03/</link>
  215. <comments>https://dailyyonder.com/commentary-fixing-democracy/2020/07/03/#respond</comments>
  216. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Dee Davis]]></dc:creator>
  217. <pubDate>Fri, 03 Jul 2020 10:00:00 +0000</pubDate>
  218. <category><![CDATA[Election 2020]]></category>
  219. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://dailyyonder.com/?p=61053</guid>
  220.  
  221. <description><![CDATA[<figure><img width="760" height="507" src="https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/clean-up-democracy-ok-early-voting-scaled.jpg?fit=760%2C507&amp;ssl=1" class="attachment-medium size-medium wp-post-image" alt="" srcset="https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/clean-up-democracy-ok-early-voting-scaled.jpg?w=2560&amp;ssl=1 2560w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/clean-up-democracy-ok-early-voting-scaled.jpg?resize=760%2C507&amp;ssl=1 760w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/clean-up-democracy-ok-early-voting-scaled.jpg?resize=1296%2C864&amp;ssl=1 1296w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/clean-up-democracy-ok-early-voting-scaled.jpg?resize=768%2C512&amp;ssl=1 768w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/clean-up-democracy-ok-early-voting-scaled.jpg?resize=1536%2C1024&amp;ssl=1 1536w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/clean-up-democracy-ok-early-voting-scaled.jpg?resize=2048%2C1365&amp;ssl=1 2048w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/clean-up-democracy-ok-early-voting-scaled.jpg?resize=1200%2C800&amp;ssl=1 1200w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/clean-up-democracy-ok-early-voting-scaled.jpg?resize=1568%2C1045&amp;ssl=1 1568w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/clean-up-democracy-ok-early-voting-scaled.jpg?resize=706%2C471&amp;ssl=1 706w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/clean-up-democracy-ok-early-voting-scaled.jpg?w=1920&amp;ssl=1 1920w" sizes="(max-width: 34.9rem) calc(100vw - 2rem), (max-width: 53rem) calc(8 * (100vw / 12)), (min-width: 53rem) calc(6 * (100vw / 12)), 100vw" /></figure>
  222. <p>The country is a mess. Don’t think it can’t get worse. And don’t think you can’t make it better. </p>
  223. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://dailyyonder.com/commentary-fixing-democracy/2020/07/03/">Commentary: Fixing Democracy</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://dailyyonder.com">Daily Yonder</a>.</p>
  224. ]]></description>
  225. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<figure><img width="760" height="507" src="https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/clean-up-democracy-ok-early-voting-scaled.jpg?fit=760%2C507&amp;ssl=1" class="attachment-medium size-medium wp-post-image" alt="" srcset="https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/clean-up-democracy-ok-early-voting-scaled.jpg?w=2560&amp;ssl=1 2560w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/clean-up-democracy-ok-early-voting-scaled.jpg?resize=760%2C507&amp;ssl=1 760w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/clean-up-democracy-ok-early-voting-scaled.jpg?resize=1296%2C864&amp;ssl=1 1296w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/clean-up-democracy-ok-early-voting-scaled.jpg?resize=768%2C512&amp;ssl=1 768w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/clean-up-democracy-ok-early-voting-scaled.jpg?resize=1536%2C1024&amp;ssl=1 1536w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/clean-up-democracy-ok-early-voting-scaled.jpg?resize=2048%2C1365&amp;ssl=1 2048w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/clean-up-democracy-ok-early-voting-scaled.jpg?resize=1200%2C800&amp;ssl=1 1200w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/clean-up-democracy-ok-early-voting-scaled.jpg?resize=1568%2C1045&amp;ssl=1 1568w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/clean-up-democracy-ok-early-voting-scaled.jpg?resize=706%2C471&amp;ssl=1 706w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/clean-up-democracy-ok-early-voting-scaled.jpg?w=1920&amp;ssl=1 1920w" sizes="(max-width: 34.9rem) calc(100vw - 2rem), (max-width: 53rem) calc(8 * (100vw / 12)), (min-width: 53rem) calc(6 * (100vw / 12)), 100vw" /></figure>
  226. <p>I don’t know who in rural America thinks American democracy is working. Country people who grew up trying their best and playing by the rules have seen jobs go away, schools and post offices close, poverty and addiction encroach into daily life. Though small towns do not live in perpetual despair, more and more I get a sense of, “I plucked my eyebrows and shaved my legs for this?” But maybe democracy is something we can fix.</p>
  227.  
  228.  
  229.  
  230. <p>Growing up in East Kentucky, politics made a difference. Like in a lot of poor communities, the right party, the right friend in office could get you a job when you were down on your luck. That was local democracy, and of course the right to vote early and often. I started working elections before I could drive: keeping party headquarters open, handing out candidate cards on election day. I worked for Republicans at first, then Democrats. I listened to stories of stuffing ballot boxes, buying votes, strange bedfellows, and convenient political assignations. I loved the story my Uncle Don told about how he and Ray Gene Johnson were supposed to hand out half pints on election day for police judge Farmer Johnson, Ray Gene’s dad. They filched a case of the whiskey and lit out on a three-day bender hiding from the judge. What they did wasn’t strictly legal, but it was a crime for which the aggrieved could not bring charges in his own court. Don said his head hurt for a week.</p>
  231.  
  232.  
  233.  
  234. <div class="wp-block-image"><figure class="alignleft size-large"><a href="https://www.amacad.org/ourcommonpurpose"><img src="https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/democracy-report-link.jpg?w=960&#038;ssl=1" alt="" class="wp-image-61078" data-recalc-dims="1"/></a><figcaption><a href="https://www.amacad.org/ourcommonpurpose" target="_blank" aria-label="undefined (opens in a new tab)" rel="noreferrer noopener">https://www.amacad.org/ourcommonpurpose</a></figcaption></figure></div>
  235.  
  236.  
  237.  
  238. <p>When I got older I kept a day job but had a side business with my pals of making political ads for candidates. Often the candidates were reformers, though sometimes they were just the better option. We made TV and radio spots, gave wise counsel, and got more good people beat than elected. Politics is not beanbag. The best ones paid you, and full disclosure, the profit we made from a heartbreakingly narrow defeat in a Magoffin County Commonwealth’s Attorney race gave us the seed money to start the Center for Rural Strategies 19 years ago. My current employment.</p>
  239.  
  240.  
  241.  
  242. <p>Now the country is a mess. Millions are sick and tens of thousands are dying. More people are out of work than we’ve ever counted. Each night in quarantine we watch videos of the actual murders of Black men killed by police and by those the legal system has tried to shield. If this democratic system was fraying at the hems before the sickness, we are tattered now. Whenever things went south before, we knew we could vote in a better police judge, or senator, or president. But this moment is telling us the old remedies aren’t working. There is more to do than elect one for reform or toss out one who wants to stay the course.</p>
  243.  
  244.  
  245.  
  246. <p>For the last couple of years, I have served on the <a href="https://www.amacad.org/project/practice-democratic-citizenship">Commission on the Practice of Democratic Citizenship</a>. It is a bipartisan group of 35 scholars, journalists, office holders, and activists charged with the job of naming what would fix this system, a democracy that we care about and despair for. We have all signed on to a <a href="https://www.amacad.org/ourcommonpurpose/report">set of recommendations</a> that we think would make a fundamental difference. Not everybody is going to like everything, but democracy is not beanbag. Thirty percent of Americans under 40 now don’t think living in a democracy makes a difference. That’s discouraging. It also is an indicator that we are on the clock.</p>
  247.  
  248.  
  249.  
  250. <p>Some of the recommendations are to make voting easier, like holding elections on a national holiday like Veterans Day, early voting, and no-excuse vote by mail. Other recommendations are to make elections more representative of who we are and what we hope. That includes no gerrymandering and expanding the House to give us more representation per citizen and to make the Electoral College fairer. One change is rank-choice voting so primaries are less of one-plurality-fits-all. Another set of reforms covers ways to tamp down the way big money looms and intimidates every time we go to the polls.&nbsp;</p>
  251.  
  252.  
  253.  
  254. <p>To that point my favorite recommendation is that everybody votes. If you register, you have to cast a ballot, even if it is none of the above. This is what they do in other democracies like Australia and Switzerland, and if we can change that here, it fixes a lot quickly. I know from my media days that about half of what campaigns raise to get elected is spent on media buys. So if a candidate for president in 2020 spends a billion dollars, likely half of that will go to media. What makes that anti-democratic is that the primary purpose of most political media is vilification, pushing voters to sour on their own candidates. The task is to disgust Americans in the middle so they will throw up their hands and say a pox on both houses, I’m staying home. At least with half-pints you had to show up. The same media that depresses turnout also depresses voters who want something better. You watch much of that stuff on TV, and you want a shower. If voters are going to show up anyway, it’s pointless to simply discourage voters, so the messages change.</p>
  255.  
  256.  
  257.  
  258. <p>This is our moment. This is a good time to do something. Don’t think it can’t get worse. And don’t think you can’t make it better. The other day I went to the Whitesburg courthouse. Our town sign says home of 1,534 friendly people and two grouches. We may be 97% white, but 200 assembled in solidarity with the Black Lives Matter movement and others exhausted with injustice. Those gathered, and I knew enough of them even in their masks, have never much been to cities like Minneapolis or Houston, but they chanted George Floyd’s name just the same. “Momma, Momma, I can’t breathe.” And our town’s chanting was echoed in other rural coalfield communities up and down the ridge: Hazard, Harlan, Norton, Pikeville, Prestonsburg, Paintsville. Democracy may look different from one part of the country to the next, but people know a mess when they see it. And if we own it together, maybe we can clean it up.</p>
  259.  
  260.  
  261.  
  262. <p><em>Dee Davis is president of the Center for Rural Strategies, which publishes the Daily Yonder. He is a member of the Commission on the Practice of Democratic Leadership and (full disclosure) was born on the Fourth of July.</em></p>
  263. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://dailyyonder.com/commentary-fixing-democracy/2020/07/03/">Commentary: Fixing Democracy</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://dailyyonder.com">Daily Yonder</a>.</p>
  264. ]]></content:encoded>
  265. <wfw:commentRss>https://dailyyonder.com/commentary-fixing-democracy/2020/07/03/feed/</wfw:commentRss>
  266. <slash:comments>0</slash:comments>
  267. </item>
  268. <item>
  269. <title>Analysis: How Covid-19 in Prisons and Jails Threatens the Surrounding Community</title>
  270. <link>https://dailyyonder.com/analysis-how-covid-19-in-prisons-and-jails-threatens-the-surrounding-community/2020/07/02/</link>
  271. <comments>https://dailyyonder.com/analysis-how-covid-19-in-prisons-and-jails-threatens-the-surrounding-community/2020/07/02/#respond</comments>
  272. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Michael Ollove]]></dc:creator>
  273. <pubDate>Thu, 02 Jul 2020 16:00:11 +0000</pubDate>
  274. <category><![CDATA[Coronavirus]]></category>
  275. <category><![CDATA[Health]]></category>
  276. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://dailyyonder.com/?p=61044</guid>
  277.  
  278. <description><![CDATA[<figure><img width="760" height="457" src="https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/trousdale-state-prison-tn-covid-scaled.jpg?fit=760%2C457&amp;ssl=1" class="attachment-medium size-medium wp-post-image" alt="" srcset="https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/trousdale-state-prison-tn-covid-scaled.jpg?w=2560&amp;ssl=1 2560w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/trousdale-state-prison-tn-covid-scaled.jpg?resize=760%2C457&amp;ssl=1 760w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/trousdale-state-prison-tn-covid-scaled.jpg?resize=1296%2C780&amp;ssl=1 1296w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/trousdale-state-prison-tn-covid-scaled.jpg?resize=768%2C462&amp;ssl=1 768w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/trousdale-state-prison-tn-covid-scaled.jpg?resize=1536%2C924&amp;ssl=1 1536w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/trousdale-state-prison-tn-covid-scaled.jpg?resize=2048%2C1232&amp;ssl=1 2048w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/trousdale-state-prison-tn-covid-scaled.jpg?resize=1200%2C722&amp;ssl=1 1200w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/trousdale-state-prison-tn-covid-scaled.jpg?resize=1568%2C943&amp;ssl=1 1568w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/trousdale-state-prison-tn-covid-scaled.jpg?resize=706%2C425&amp;ssl=1 706w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/trousdale-state-prison-tn-covid-scaled.jpg?w=1920&amp;ssl=1 1920w" sizes="(max-width: 34.9rem) calc(100vw - 2rem), (max-width: 53rem) calc(8 * (100vw / 12)), (min-width: 53rem) calc(6 * (100vw / 12)), 100vw" /></figure>
  279. <p>This article was first published by Stateline, an initiative of The Pew Charitable Trusts. Covid-19 has raged throughout U.S. jails and prisons, where people live together in close quarters and there is little opportunity for social distancing, a lack of basic sanitary supplies and high rates of chronic disease. While inmates mostly stay behind concrete [&#8230;]</p>
  280. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://dailyyonder.com/analysis-how-covid-19-in-prisons-and-jails-threatens-the-surrounding-community/2020/07/02/">Analysis: How Covid-19 in Prisons and Jails Threatens the Surrounding Community</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://dailyyonder.com">Daily Yonder</a>.</p>
  281. ]]></description>
  282. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<figure><img width="760" height="457" src="https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/trousdale-state-prison-tn-covid-scaled.jpg?fit=760%2C457&amp;ssl=1" class="attachment-medium size-medium wp-post-image" alt="" srcset="https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/trousdale-state-prison-tn-covid-scaled.jpg?w=2560&amp;ssl=1 2560w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/trousdale-state-prison-tn-covid-scaled.jpg?resize=760%2C457&amp;ssl=1 760w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/trousdale-state-prison-tn-covid-scaled.jpg?resize=1296%2C780&amp;ssl=1 1296w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/trousdale-state-prison-tn-covid-scaled.jpg?resize=768%2C462&amp;ssl=1 768w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/trousdale-state-prison-tn-covid-scaled.jpg?resize=1536%2C924&amp;ssl=1 1536w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/trousdale-state-prison-tn-covid-scaled.jpg?resize=2048%2C1232&amp;ssl=1 2048w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/trousdale-state-prison-tn-covid-scaled.jpg?resize=1200%2C722&amp;ssl=1 1200w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/trousdale-state-prison-tn-covid-scaled.jpg?resize=1568%2C943&amp;ssl=1 1568w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/trousdale-state-prison-tn-covid-scaled.jpg?resize=706%2C425&amp;ssl=1 706w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/trousdale-state-prison-tn-covid-scaled.jpg?w=1920&amp;ssl=1 1920w" sizes="(max-width: 34.9rem) calc(100vw - 2rem), (max-width: 53rem) calc(8 * (100vw / 12)), (min-width: 53rem) calc(6 * (100vw / 12)), 100vw" /></figure>
  283. <p><em>This article was first published by <a href="https://www.pewtrusts.org/en/research-and-analysis/blogs/stateline/2020/07/01/how-covid-19-in-jails-and-prisons-threatens-nearby-communities">Stateline</a>, an initiative of The Pew Charitable Trusts.</em></p>
  284.  
  285.  
  286.  
  287. <p>Covid-19 has raged throughout U.S. jails and prisons, where people live together in close quarters and there is little opportunity for social distancing, a lack of basic sanitary supplies and high rates of chronic disease.</p>
  288.  
  289.  
  290.  
  291. <p>While inmates mostly stay behind concrete walls and barbed wire, those barriers can’t contain an infectious disease like Covid-19. Not only can the virus be brought into jails and prisons, but it also can leave those facilities and spread widely into surrounding communities and beyond.</p>
  292.  
  293.  
  294.  
  295. <p>The effect may be most pronounced in jails, which mainly house those who are awaiting trial or inmates serving short sentences. Those facilities tend to have more churn than state and federal penitentiaries, with greater numbers of people entering and leaving, thereby increasing opportunities for the disease to disseminate.</p>
  296.  
  297.  
  298.  
  299. <p>Two new studies show that jails can contribute enormously to coronavirus case totals outside their walls. While Covid-19’s spread inside the facilities has been widely reported, the research demonstrates just how great an impact it can have in communities outside.</p>
  300.  
  301.  
  302.  
  303. <p>Depending on the social distancing measures put in place, community spread from infections in jails could add&nbsp;<a href="https://www.aclu.org/sites/default/files/field_document/aclu_covid19-jail-report_2020-8_1.pdf" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">between 99,000 and 188,000</a>&nbsp;people to the virus’ U.S. death toll, according to a modeling study recently published by the American Civil Liberties Union in conjunction with researchers from the University of Pennsylvania, the University of Tennessee and Washington State University.</p>
  304.  
  305.  
  306.  
  307. <p>The report was released in April, when some experts were predicting that the U.S. death toll would remain below 100,000. As of June 30, more than 125,800 people have died of Covid-19 in the United States.</p>
  308.  
  309.  
  310.  
  311. <p>A peer-reviewed study set to appear in the health policy journal&nbsp;<em>Health Affairs&nbsp;</em>echoes that finding. The researchers found that cycling through Cook County Jail was associated with 15.9% of Covid-19 cases in Chicago and 15.7% in Illinois as of late April.</p>
  312.  
  313.  
  314.  
  315. <p>“Although currently available data are inadequate to establish a clear causal relation,” the study’s authors write, “these provisional findings are consistent with the hypothesis that arrest and jailing practices are augmenting infection rates in highly policed neighborhoods.”</p>
  316.  
  317.  
  318.  
  319. <p>Cook County officials, including officials from the Chicago Department of Public Health, have pushed back hard on the report, calling it a “fantasy filled with assumptions bordering on lies.” They say it is based on old data that did not account for&nbsp;<a href="https://www.cookcountysheriff.org/covid-19-cases-at-ccdoc/" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">changes the jail had made</a>&nbsp;to stop the spread of the virus, including testing and allowing for quarantining.</p>
  320.  
  321.  
  322.  
  323. <p>According to the county sheriff’s office, as of last week, 778 inmates at the county jail and 362 of its workers tested positive for the virus.&nbsp;<a href="https://www.cookcountysheriff.org/covid-19-cases-at-ccdoc/" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">Seven inmates and three employees have died</a>.</p>
  324.  
  325.  
  326.  
  327. <p>The authors of the&nbsp;<em>Health Affairs</em>&nbsp;paper said they stand by their conclusions.</p>
  328.  
  329.  
  330.  
  331. <p><strong>‘Correctional Health Is Public Health’</strong></p>
  332.  
  333.  
  334.  
  335. <p>Covid-19 already has infected about 60,000 prisoners and correctional staff and killed more than 600 of them, according to the Marshall Project, which&nbsp;<a href="https://www.themarshallproject.org/2020/05/01/a-state-by-state-look-at-coronavirus-in-prisons">tracks the virus’ toll</a>&nbsp;in correctional facilities. Many jails and prisons have reduced their inmate populations to reduce exposures.</p>
  336.  
  337.  
  338.  
  339. <p>The results of the ACLU and&nbsp;<em>Health Affairs</em>&nbsp;studies underline a point that many in public health have long advanced: Public health in the wider world is tethered to the health of those who are incarcerated.</p>
  340.  
  341.  
  342.  
  343. <p>“This is why public health officials say correctional health is public health,” said Dr. Brie Williams, a professor and researcher at the University of California San Francisco School of Medicine and director of Amend, a group that works to improve inmate health.</p>
  344.  
  345.  
  346.  
  347. <p>It’s not only released inmates, many of whom end up in crowded homeless shelters, who might carry the virus into communities. There are also risks of infection from inmates making court appearances or receiving medical care at hospitals in the community.</p>
  348.  
  349.  
  350.  
  351. <p>Infectious diseases move back and forth between communities and prisons. That was the case with tuberculosis in the 19th and 20th centuries and with HIV/AIDS in the 1980s and beyond.</p>
  352.  
  353.  
  354.  
  355. <p>In recent years, that point was made again in relation to hepatitis C, a communicable disease with high rates of infection in prisons because of the large numbers of incarcerated intravenous drug users. Sharing needles is one of the primary means of hepatitis C transmission.</p>
  356.  
  357.  
  358.  
  359. <p>One of the arguments public health experts used to urge local, state and federal governments to treat&nbsp;<a href="https://www.pewtrusts.org/en/research-and-analysis/blogs/stateline/2018/09/25/courts-force-states-to-provide-costly-hep-c-treatment" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">inmates with hepatitis C</a>&nbsp;with highly effective but expensive medications was that knocking out the infection in prisons would prevent its spread beyond those walls. The difference between this pandemic and those other diseases, epidemiologists say, is that because Covid-19 is transmitted through respiratory droplets in the air, it spreads much more easily.</p>
  360.  
  361.  
  362.  
  363. <p><strong>The Other U.S. Epidemic</strong></p>
  364.  
  365.  
  366.  
  367. <p>The United States is particularly vulnerable to diseases spreading near correctional institutions. Its incarceration rate is the highest in the world, at 655 people out of every 100,000, according to World Prison Brief. With 2.1 million inmates, the United States also imprisons more people than any other country, nearly 412,000 more than China, which ranks second.</p>
  368.  
  369.  
  370.  
  371. <p>About 738,000 of those prisoners are in&nbsp;<a href="https://www.bjs.gov/index.cfm?ty=pbdetail&amp;iid=6826" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">local jails</a>, according to the federal Bureau of Justice Statistics. But that number is just a point-in-time snapshot. During the course of a year,&nbsp;<a href="https://www.prisonpolicy.org/blog/2019/08/26/arrests-report/" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">4.9 million people cycle through local jails</a>, according to the Prison Policy Initiative, a Massachusetts think tank.</p>
  372.  
  373.  
  374.  
  375. <p>Additionally,&nbsp;<a href="https://www.bls.gov/oes/2018/may/oes333012.htm" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">federal labor statistics show</a>&nbsp;that jails employ about 151,000 correctional officers who can bring infections into facilities or take them home.</p>
  376.  
  377.  
  378.  
  379. <p>Most cases in jails have not originated with inmates, said Dr. Alysse Wurcel, an infectious disease physician at Tufts Medical Center who sees patients at six area jails and is a consultant to the Massachusetts Sheriffs’ Association. “We’ve discussed with the sheriffs’ association that early on, clusters were initiated by people working in the jails, not by those newly incarcerated.”</p>
  380.  
  381.  
  382.  
  383. <p>There is a racial component to the concern about prisons and the pandemic. Disproportionate numbers of inmates are people of color, and the coronavirus is&nbsp;<a href="https://www.pewtrusts.org/en/research-and-analysis/blogs/stateline/2020/05/27/covid-19-is-crushing-black-communities-some-states-are-paying-attention" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">killing Black</a>&nbsp;and Hispanic people at higher rates than their shares of the overall population. Those two data points have not escaped the notice of public health experts.</p>
  384.  
  385.  
  386.  
  387. <p>“We’re in an epidemic of mass incarceration of Black people at the same time as a disease epidemic that is disproportionately affecting minorities,” said Dr. Liz Barnert, an assistant professor of pediatrics at the UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine, who studies correctional health.</p>
  388.  
  389.  
  390.  
  391. <p>The pandemic has lent impetus to the growing movement to depopulate jails and prisons. Since the pandemic began, many states and local jurisdictions have taken&nbsp;<a href="https://www.prisonpolicy.org/virus/virusresponse.html" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">steps to reduce inmate populations</a>, releasing nonviolent offenders, granting more compassionate-releases and issuing citations rather than arresting alleged offenders.</p>
  392.  
  393.  
  394.  
  395. <p>Jails in California, Michigan, Massachusetts and North Dakota have released hundreds of prisoners. So have state prisons in those and other states. Many jurisdictions report large decreases in arrests.</p>
  396.  
  397.  
  398.  
  399. <p>Other states have done relatively little. Just last week, the&nbsp;<em>Omaha World-Herald</em>&nbsp;reported that the Nebraska prison system is&nbsp;<a href="https://www.omaha.com/news/local/prison-overcrowding-emergency-begins-july-1-in-nebraska-will-much-change/article_8509ee94-9cfb-525c-bb9f-535066a97f44.html#1" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">51% above capacity</a>.</p>
  400.  
  401.  
  402.  
  403. <p>Public health experts insist that reducing jail and prison populations must continue, for the greater good of all.</p>
  404.  
  405.  
  406.  
  407. <p>“Decreasing the risk of spread of Covid-19 in jails and prisons decreases the risk of spread out in communities,” Williams said. “And increasing the spread in jails and prisons increases the risk of spread in communities.”</p>
  408.  
  409.  
  410.  
  411. <p><em><a href="https://www.pewtrusts.org/en/research-and-analysis/blogs/stateline/about/michael-ollove">Michael Ollove</a> is a staff writer for Stateline.</em></p>
  412. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://dailyyonder.com/analysis-how-covid-19-in-prisons-and-jails-threatens-the-surrounding-community/2020/07/02/">Analysis: How Covid-19 in Prisons and Jails Threatens the Surrounding Community</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://dailyyonder.com">Daily Yonder</a>.</p>
  413. ]]></content:encoded>
  414. <wfw:commentRss>https://dailyyonder.com/analysis-how-covid-19-in-prisons-and-jails-threatens-the-surrounding-community/2020/07/02/feed/</wfw:commentRss>
  415. <slash:comments>0</slash:comments>
  416. </item>
  417. <item>
  418. <title>2020 Census Rural Count Adapts to Covid-19</title>
  419. <link>https://dailyyonder.com/2020-census-rural-count-adapts-to-covid-19/2020/07/02/</link>
  420. <comments>https://dailyyonder.com/2020-census-rural-count-adapts-to-covid-19/2020/07/02/#respond</comments>
  421. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Donna Kallner]]></dc:creator>
  422. <pubDate>Thu, 02 Jul 2020 10:00:00 +0000</pubDate>
  423. <category><![CDATA[Politics and Government]]></category>
  424. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://dailyyonder.com/?p=61005</guid>
  425.  
  426. <description><![CDATA[<figure><img width="760" height="570" src="https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/IMG_20200630_120147-scaled.jpg?fit=760%2C570&amp;ssl=1" class="attachment-medium size-medium wp-post-image" alt="" srcset="https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/IMG_20200630_120147-scaled.jpg?w=2560&amp;ssl=1 2560w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/IMG_20200630_120147-scaled.jpg?resize=760%2C570&amp;ssl=1 760w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/IMG_20200630_120147-scaled.jpg?resize=1296%2C972&amp;ssl=1 1296w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/IMG_20200630_120147-scaled.jpg?resize=768%2C576&amp;ssl=1 768w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/IMG_20200630_120147-scaled.jpg?resize=1536%2C1152&amp;ssl=1 1536w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/IMG_20200630_120147-scaled.jpg?resize=2048%2C1536&amp;ssl=1 2048w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/IMG_20200630_120147-scaled.jpg?resize=1200%2C900&amp;ssl=1 1200w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/IMG_20200630_120147-scaled.jpg?resize=800%2C600&amp;ssl=1 800w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/IMG_20200630_120147-scaled.jpg?resize=400%2C300&amp;ssl=1 400w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/IMG_20200630_120147-scaled.jpg?resize=200%2C150&amp;ssl=1 200w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/IMG_20200630_120147-scaled.jpg?resize=1568%2C1176&amp;ssl=1 1568w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/IMG_20200630_120147-scaled.jpg?resize=706%2C530&amp;ssl=1 706w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/IMG_20200630_120147-scaled.jpg?w=1920&amp;ssl=1 1920w" sizes="(max-width: 34.9rem) calc(100vw - 2rem), (max-width: 53rem) calc(8 * (100vw / 12)), (min-width: 53rem) calc(6 * (100vw / 12)), 100vw" /></figure>
  427. <p>For most people, replying to the 2020 census is surprisingly quick and easy. Except when it&#8217;s not. And rural areas are particularly prone to conditions that can hinder getting a complete and accurate count &#8212; things like limited high-speed internet access, addressing and mail delivery challenges, and resistance to perceived government nosiness. As if that [&#8230;]</p>
  428. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://dailyyonder.com/2020-census-rural-count-adapts-to-covid-19/2020/07/02/">2020 Census Rural Count Adapts to Covid-19</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://dailyyonder.com">Daily Yonder</a>.</p>
  429. ]]></description>
  430. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<figure><img width="760" height="570" src="https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/IMG_20200630_120147-scaled.jpg?fit=760%2C570&amp;ssl=1" class="attachment-medium size-medium wp-post-image" alt="" srcset="https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/IMG_20200630_120147-scaled.jpg?w=2560&amp;ssl=1 2560w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/IMG_20200630_120147-scaled.jpg?resize=760%2C570&amp;ssl=1 760w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/IMG_20200630_120147-scaled.jpg?resize=1296%2C972&amp;ssl=1 1296w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/IMG_20200630_120147-scaled.jpg?resize=768%2C576&amp;ssl=1 768w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/IMG_20200630_120147-scaled.jpg?resize=1536%2C1152&amp;ssl=1 1536w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/IMG_20200630_120147-scaled.jpg?resize=2048%2C1536&amp;ssl=1 2048w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/IMG_20200630_120147-scaled.jpg?resize=1200%2C900&amp;ssl=1 1200w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/IMG_20200630_120147-scaled.jpg?resize=800%2C600&amp;ssl=1 800w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/IMG_20200630_120147-scaled.jpg?resize=400%2C300&amp;ssl=1 400w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/IMG_20200630_120147-scaled.jpg?resize=200%2C150&amp;ssl=1 200w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/IMG_20200630_120147-scaled.jpg?resize=1568%2C1176&amp;ssl=1 1568w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/IMG_20200630_120147-scaled.jpg?resize=706%2C530&amp;ssl=1 706w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/IMG_20200630_120147-scaled.jpg?w=1920&amp;ssl=1 1920w" sizes="(max-width: 34.9rem) calc(100vw - 2rem), (max-width: 53rem) calc(8 * (100vw / 12)), (min-width: 53rem) calc(6 * (100vw / 12)), 100vw" /></figure>
  431. <p>For most people, replying to the 2020 census is surprisingly quick and easy. Except when it&#8217;s not. And rural areas are particularly prone to conditions that can hinder getting a complete and accurate count &#8212; things like limited high-speed internet access, addressing and mail delivery challenges, and resistance to perceived government nosiness. As if that isn&#8217;t enough, factor in concerns about Covid-19, widespread social unrest, and economic worries that make the Great Recession feel like <em>Happy Days</em> in comparison. No wonder many of us want to be left alone while we wait for better days to return.</p>
  432.  
  433.  
  434.  
  435. <p>But like voting and jury duty, the census is an important (if not beloved) civic duty. Despite multiplying complications, the 2020 census is getting done. As of June 18, 61.5% of households had responded to the census.</p>
  436.  
  437.  
  438.  
  439. <p>As a census worker, I&#8217;ve done my best to comply with the Covid-19 no-contact order. But it&#8217;s hard to avoid making contact when dogs announce your presence, or the dust from a gravel road beats you to the driveway. And to be honest, I announce &#8220;Census Worker&#8221; loudly when approaching where it appears someone might be home: I wouldn&#8217;t appreciate knowing someone was here when I never heard them come or go. I also know that in rural areas, we don&#8217;t ignore a strange vehicle going from house to house. And it&#8217;s pretty easy to maintain social distancing when you&#8217;re pulled up facing opposite directions in the middle of a country road talking to someone who wants to make sure you aren&#8217;t casing the neighborhood.</p>
  440.  
  441.  
  442.  
  443. <p>These may not be the best of times in the world, but out here in the Yonder we haven&#8217;t forgotten to love our neighbor. Many people blessed me with a &#8220;Stay safe&#8221; as I left after making an unintended contact. Whether we stand together or on opposite sides of politics and policies, we all have a right to be counted.</p>
  444.  
  445.  
  446.  
  447. <p><a href="https://www.archives.gov/founding-docs/constitution-transcript">Article 1, Section 2 of the U.S. Constitution</a> mandates that the country conduct a count of its population once every 10 years. The census helps determine the number of seats each state gets in the House of Representatives and provides data for redrawing legislative districts. It&#8217;s also used to help determine funding for rural education, rural business enterprise grants, rural home rental assistance, water and waste disposal systems for rural communities, rural housing preservation grants, hunter education and safety programs, state wildlife grants, and more. We have to live with the count from this census for 10 years.</p>
  448.  
  449.  
  450.  
  451. <p>Update Leave (UL) is one of the <a href="https://gis-portal.data.census.gov/arcgis/apps/webappviewer/index.html?id=cbf242acb9f849f381090cf144715340">census enumeration area types</a>. That&#8217;s the operation I worked in March, before my state&#8217;s Covid-19 shutdown, and again in May and June. Most households in the United States (95.45%) receive a census form in the mail. Where mail delivery to an actual street address isn&#8217;t feasible, Census workers deliver the census questionnaires in person. So your rural area may be in a UL unit if your only mail delivery option is via Post Office boxes. The Census Bureau does not mail census forms to P.O. boxes because each census response must be associated with the physical location where people live, not where they receive mail.&nbsp;</p>
  452.  
  453.  
  454.  
  455. <p>Other rural areas are divided into &#8220;blocks&#8221; that are analyzed for their &#8220;mailability.&#8221; <a href="https://www.census.gov/library/stories/2019/12/counting-people-in-rural-and-remote-locations.html">According to the Census Bureau</a>:</p>
  456.  
  457.  
  458.  
  459. <p>Typically, if the post office delivers to 50% or more of the addresses in the block, that block is considered part of self-response (people respond on their own). If there is less than 50% ‘mailability’ in a block, meaning they might not have a typical mailing address, they are considered for the Update Leave field operation.</p>
  460.  
  461.  
  462.  
  463. <p>The yellow areas of the map show the 4.5% of U.S. housing units in the UL operation.</p>
  464.  
  465.  
  466.  
  467. <figure class="wp-block-image size-large"><img src="https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Screen-Shot-2020-06-30-at-3.27.35-PM.png?fit=960%2C501&amp;ssl=1" alt="" class="wp-image-61010" srcset="https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Screen-Shot-2020-06-30-at-3.27.35-PM.png?w=2864&amp;ssl=1 2864w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Screen-Shot-2020-06-30-at-3.27.35-PM.png?resize=760%2C396&amp;ssl=1 760w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Screen-Shot-2020-06-30-at-3.27.35-PM.png?resize=1296%2C676&amp;ssl=1 1296w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Screen-Shot-2020-06-30-at-3.27.35-PM.png?resize=768%2C401&amp;ssl=1 768w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Screen-Shot-2020-06-30-at-3.27.35-PM.png?resize=1536%2C801&amp;ssl=1 1536w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Screen-Shot-2020-06-30-at-3.27.35-PM.png?resize=2048%2C1068&amp;ssl=1 2048w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Screen-Shot-2020-06-30-at-3.27.35-PM.png?resize=1200%2C626&amp;ssl=1 1200w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Screen-Shot-2020-06-30-at-3.27.35-PM.png?resize=1568%2C818&amp;ssl=1 1568w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Screen-Shot-2020-06-30-at-3.27.35-PM.png?resize=706%2C368&amp;ssl=1 706w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Screen-Shot-2020-06-30-at-3.27.35-PM.png?w=1920&amp;ssl=1 1920w" sizes="(max-width: 960px) 100vw, 960px" /></figure>
  468.  
  469.  
  470.  
  471. <p class="has-text-align-center"><strong>Exp<em>lore the full screen <a href="http://cbf242acb9f849f381090cf144715340/">interactive map</a></em></strong></p>
  472.  
  473.  
  474.  
  475. <p>If you live in one of those areas, here&#8217;s what was <em>supposed</em> to happen:&nbsp;</p>
  476.  
  477.  
  478.  
  479. <ul><li>A census worker would come to your address and knock on your door.</li><li>They would check the location and address in the Census geographic data system and update it if necessary.</li><li>They would record the ID barcode number on a paper census form, then leave that paper form for the resident to fill out and mail or answer via phone or internet.</li></ul>
  480.  
  481.  
  482.  
  483. <p>When Covid-19 precautions went into effect, UL became a no-contact operation. No more knocking on doors or ringing bells. Instead, Census workers were expected to simply leave the form &#8212; preferably in a plastic bag, but those door hangers were in short supply in some areas.</p>
  484.  
  485.  
  486.  
  487. <p>In an effort to make sure everyone has a chance to be counted, some people said they received census forms more than once &#8212; both by mail and via a UL census worker. With Covid-19 shutdowns, some people went online to respond weeks before their census form was delivered. I did that, and my household later received a postcard urging me to respond to a form we never received.&nbsp;</p>
  488.  
  489.  
  490.  
  491. <p>On June 24 the U.S. Census Bureau announced it will send additional reminder postcards to households that have not yet responded to the 2020 Census. The postcards are scheduled to arrive between July 22 and July 28, a few weeks before census takers are set to begin visiting most households that haven’t yet responded.</p>
  492.  
  493.  
  494.  
  495. <p>The Census Bureau also <a href="https://www.census.gov/newsroom/press-releases/2020/2020-postcards.html">announced plans</a> to send postcards to about 1.3 million Post Office boxes in communities that are required to use P.O. boxes for mail delivery. The postcards – planned to be sent between June 24 and July 3 – alert households that a census taker may drop off a census form or visit later to interview them.</p>
  496.  
  497.  
  498.  
  499. <p>Theoretically, residents in UL areas who didn&#8217;t receive a usable form or respond online without an ID code will still be counted in the next phase of Census operations &#8212; Non-Response Follow Up (NRFU). But how Covid-19 precautions may alter NRFU operations is still anybody&#8217;s guess.&nbsp;</p>
  500.  
  501.  
  502.  
  503. <p>If the comments on the Census Bureau&#8217;s Facebook ads are any indication, some people are grateful for the persistence of efforts to get a complete count. Others are frustrated that they keep getting notices when they&#8217;ve already responded. Or they&#8217;re frustrated at unsuccessful attempts to respond online and just want a paper form. Some appreciate the effort to hand deliver census forms, even if they don&#8217;t know they&#8217;re in a special Update Leave area. Others are upset about census workers coming onto their property. Period.&nbsp;</p>
  504.  
  505.  
  506.  
  507. <p>But all deserve to be counted. So if you haven&#8217;t already, please respond now. <a href="https://2020census.gov/en/ways-to-respond.html">This link</a> has information about how to do that by phone as well as online. So if you didn&#8217;t receive or can&#8217;t find your paper form, it&#8217;s not too late.</p>
  508.  
  509.  
  510.  
  511. <p><em>Donna Kallner writes from rural northern Wisconsin.</em></p>
  512. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://dailyyonder.com/2020-census-rural-count-adapts-to-covid-19/2020/07/02/">2020 Census Rural Count Adapts to Covid-19</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://dailyyonder.com">Daily Yonder</a>.</p>
  513. ]]></content:encoded>
  514. <wfw:commentRss>https://dailyyonder.com/2020-census-rural-count-adapts-to-covid-19/2020/07/02/feed/</wfw:commentRss>
  515. <slash:comments>0</slash:comments>
  516. </item>
  517. <item>
  518. <title>McGrath Wins Ky. Dem. Senate Nomination with Rural, Suburban Support</title>
  519. <link>https://dailyyonder.com/mcgrath-wins-ky-dem-senate-nomination-with-rural-suburban-support/2020/07/01/</link>
  520. <comments>https://dailyyonder.com/mcgrath-wins-ky-dem-senate-nomination-with-rural-suburban-support/2020/07/01/#respond</comments>
  521. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Tim Marema]]></dc:creator>
  522. <pubDate>Wed, 01 Jul 2020 14:30:51 +0000</pubDate>
  523. <category><![CDATA[Rural Voters]]></category>
  524. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://dailyyonder.com/?p=61021</guid>
  525.  
  526. <description><![CDATA[<figure><img width="760" height="443" src="https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/kysenateFINAL.jpg?fit=760%2C443&amp;ssl=1" class="attachment-medium size-medium wp-post-image" alt="" srcset="https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/kysenateFINAL.jpg?w=1295&amp;ssl=1 1295w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/kysenateFINAL.jpg?resize=760%2C443&amp;ssl=1 760w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/kysenateFINAL.jpg?resize=768%2C447&amp;ssl=1 768w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/kysenateFINAL.jpg?resize=1200%2C699&amp;ssl=1 1200w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/kysenateFINAL.jpg?resize=706%2C411&amp;ssl=1 706w" sizes="(max-width: 34.9rem) calc(100vw - 2rem), (max-width: 53rem) calc(8 * (100vw / 12)), (min-width: 53rem) calc(6 * (100vw / 12)), 100vw" /></figure>
  527. <p>Former Marine Corps pilot Amy McGrath took the Democratic nomination for U.S. Senate in Kentucky by winning in rural counties, small metropolitan areas, and the suburbs of the state’s two largest cities, Lexington and Louisville.  McGrath defeated State Representative Charles Booker by 11,100 votes, which amounted to about 3 percentage points of the record-breaking turnout. [&#8230;]</p>
  528. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://dailyyonder.com/mcgrath-wins-ky-dem-senate-nomination-with-rural-suburban-support/2020/07/01/">McGrath Wins Ky. Dem. Senate Nomination with Rural, Suburban Support</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://dailyyonder.com">Daily Yonder</a>.</p>
  529. ]]></description>
  530. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<figure><img width="760" height="443" src="https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/kysenateFINAL.jpg?fit=760%2C443&amp;ssl=1" class="attachment-medium size-medium wp-post-image" alt="" srcset="https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/kysenateFINAL.jpg?w=1295&amp;ssl=1 1295w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/kysenateFINAL.jpg?resize=760%2C443&amp;ssl=1 760w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/kysenateFINAL.jpg?resize=768%2C447&amp;ssl=1 768w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/kysenateFINAL.jpg?resize=1200%2C699&amp;ssl=1 1200w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/kysenateFINAL.jpg?resize=706%2C411&amp;ssl=1 706w" sizes="(max-width: 34.9rem) calc(100vw - 2rem), (max-width: 53rem) calc(8 * (100vw / 12)), (min-width: 53rem) calc(6 * (100vw / 12)), 100vw" /></figure>
  531. <p>Former Marine Corps pilot Amy McGrath took the Democratic nomination for U.S. Senate in Kentucky by winning in rural counties, small metropolitan areas, and the suburbs of the state’s two largest cities, Lexington and Louisville. </p>
  532.  
  533.  
  534.  
  535. <p>McGrath defeated State Representative Charles Booker by 11,100 votes, which amounted to about 3 percentage points of the record-breaking turnout.</p>
  536.  
  537.  
  538.  
  539. <p>To help tell the story, we have one graph and two maps.</p>
  540.  
  541.  
  542.  
  543. <p>First, the graph at the top of the page. This shows the actual vote (not percentage of vote). Blue represents McGrath; red, Booker.</p>
  544.  
  545.  
  546.  
  547. <p>Let’s look at Booker’s winning categories, first. He had a decisive victory in the state’s only major metropolitan core county, Jefferson, which is the heart of the Louisville metropolitan area. There, he had a margin of 24 points, or 36,000 votes.</p>
  548.  
  549.  
  550.  
  551. <p>Booker also won the core county of Kentucky’s only medium-sized metropolitan area, Lexington. In Fayette County, Booker had a much slimmer margin of 6 points or 3,500 votes.</p>
  552.  
  553.  
  554.  
  555. <p>The rest of the state belonged to McGrath, and it was enough to take her over the top.&nbsp;</p>
  556.  
  557.  
  558.  
  559. <p>In rural areas, which constituted about a third of the Democratic turnout, McGrath pulled out an 18 point victory (50% to 32%) and a 31,000 vote margin (nearly three times the size of her statewide margin).&nbsp;</p>
  560.  
  561.  
  562.  
  563. <p>Now let’s look a little deeper into the nonmetropolitan vote. The graph at the top of the page breaks rural, or nonmetropolitan, counties into two categories: those that are adjacent to a metropolitan area, and those that are not.</p>
  564.  
  565.  
  566.  
  567. <p>McGrath performed best in the most remote counties, nonadjacent to metros, where she won by 20,000 votes, or 21 points. (Those are the columns on the right side of the graph.)</p>
  568.  
  569.  
  570.  
  571. <p>In the nonmetro counties that abut a metropolitan area, she won by a closer margin of 14 points or about 12,000 votes.</p>
  572.  
  573.  
  574.  
  575. <p>McGrath’s advantage continued to hold in small metropolitan areas (those with populations of under 250,000). In those counties, which are in the Paducah, Bowling Green, and Owensboro metros, she won by 10 points, but with smaller turnout there, her raw vote advantage was only 4,400.</p>
  576.  
  577.  
  578.  
  579. <p>McGrath’s other victories came in the suburbs. She took suburbs of major metros (those with a population of 1 million or more) by nearly 15 points (8,900 votes) and suburbs of medium sized metros (population of 250,000 to 999,999) by 14 points (7,300 votes).</p>
  580.  
  581.  
  582.  
  583. <p>To help you see how the various types of county categories lie across the Commonwealth of Kentucky, here’s a map that shows those categories. This is not a map of the vote; it simply shows where our various categories of counties are in the state.</p>
  584.  
  585.  
  586.  
  587. <figure class="wp-block-image size-large is-resized"><a href="https://i2.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/kentucky-county-categories-scaled.jpg?ssl=1"><img src="https://i2.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/kentucky-county-categories-scaled.jpg?fit=960%2C414&amp;ssl=1" alt="" class="wp-image-61023" width="952" height="410" srcset="https://i2.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/kentucky-county-categories-scaled.jpg?w=2560&amp;ssl=1 2560w, https://i2.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/kentucky-county-categories-scaled.jpg?resize=760%2C328&amp;ssl=1 760w, https://i2.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/kentucky-county-categories-scaled.jpg?resize=1296%2C559&amp;ssl=1 1296w, https://i2.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/kentucky-county-categories-scaled.jpg?resize=768%2C331&amp;ssl=1 768w, https://i2.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/kentucky-county-categories-scaled.jpg?resize=1536%2C662&amp;ssl=1 1536w, https://i2.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/kentucky-county-categories-scaled.jpg?resize=2048%2C883&amp;ssl=1 2048w, https://i2.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/kentucky-county-categories-scaled.jpg?resize=1200%2C517&amp;ssl=1 1200w, https://i2.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/kentucky-county-categories-scaled.jpg?resize=1568%2C676&amp;ssl=1 1568w, https://i2.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/kentucky-county-categories-scaled.jpg?resize=706%2C304&amp;ssl=1 706w, https://i2.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/kentucky-county-categories-scaled.jpg?w=1920&amp;ssl=1 1920w" sizes="(max-width: 952px) 100vw, 952px" /></a><figcaption>CLICK MAP TO ENLARGE</figcaption></figure>
  588.  
  589.  
  590.  
  591. <p>And finally, below, is an interactive map with vote totals for the two top candidates and a sum of votes going to the remaining candidates.</p>
  592.  
  593.  
  594.  
  595. <iframe title="Kentucky Democratic Primary, U.S. Senate" aria-label="map" id="datawrapper-chart-cNwNS" src="https://datawrapper.dwcdn.net/cNwNS/2/" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" style="width: 0; min-width: 100% !important; border: none;" height="332"></iframe><script type="text/javascript">!function(){"use strict";window.addEventListener("message",(function(a){if(void 0!==a.data["datawrapper-height"])for(var e in a.data["datawrapper-height"]){var t=document.getElementById("datawrapper-chart-"+e)||document.querySelector("iframe[src*='"+e+"']");t&&(t.style.height=a.data["datawrapper-height"][e]+"px")}}))}();
  596. </script>
  597.  
  598.  
  599.  
  600. <p class="has-text-align-center"><strong><em><a href="https://datawrapper.dwcdn.net/cNwNS/2/">Explore full screen version of the map</a></em></strong></p>
  601. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://dailyyonder.com/mcgrath-wins-ky-dem-senate-nomination-with-rural-suburban-support/2020/07/01/">McGrath Wins Ky. Dem. Senate Nomination with Rural, Suburban Support</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://dailyyonder.com">Daily Yonder</a>.</p>
  602. ]]></content:encoded>
  603. <wfw:commentRss>https://dailyyonder.com/mcgrath-wins-ky-dem-senate-nomination-with-rural-suburban-support/2020/07/01/feed/</wfw:commentRss>
  604. <slash:comments>0</slash:comments>
  605. </item>
  606. <item>
  607. <title>Drew Hastings – From Fast Life to Farm Life</title>
  608. <link>https://dailyyonder.com/drew-hastings-from-fast-life-to-farm-life/2020/07/01/</link>
  609. <comments>https://dailyyonder.com/drew-hastings-from-fast-life-to-farm-life/2020/07/01/#respond</comments>
  610. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Liz Carey]]></dc:creator>
  611. <pubDate>Wed, 01 Jul 2020 10:00:00 +0000</pubDate>
  612. <category><![CDATA[Rural By Choice]]></category>
  613. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://dailyyonder.com/?p=60965</guid>
  614.  
  615. <description><![CDATA[<figure><img width="760" height="556" src="https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/image0.jpeg?fit=760%2C556&amp;ssl=1" class="attachment-medium size-medium wp-post-image" alt="" srcset="https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/image0.jpeg?w=1280&amp;ssl=1 1280w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/image0.jpeg?resize=760%2C556&amp;ssl=1 760w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/image0.jpeg?resize=768%2C562&amp;ssl=1 768w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/image0.jpeg?resize=1200%2C878&amp;ssl=1 1200w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/image0.jpeg?resize=706%2C516&amp;ssl=1 706w" sizes="(max-width: 34.9rem) calc(100vw - 2rem), (max-width: 53rem) calc(8 * (100vw / 12)), (min-width: 53rem) calc(6 * (100vw / 12)), 100vw" /></figure>
  616. <p>Warning: The video contains profanity that some readers may find offensive. After decades as a stand-up comedian, when Drew Hastings turned 50, he bought the farm.  Well, not the farm, but a farm anyway.&#160; An urban guy all his life, Hastings grew up in Kettering, Ohio, before moving to Cincinnati and eventually the west coast. [&#8230;]</p>
  617. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://dailyyonder.com/drew-hastings-from-fast-life-to-farm-life/2020/07/01/">Drew Hastings – From Fast Life to Farm Life</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://dailyyonder.com">Daily Yonder</a>.</p>
  618. ]]></description>
  619. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<figure><img width="760" height="556" src="https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/image0.jpeg?fit=760%2C556&amp;ssl=1" class="attachment-medium size-medium wp-post-image" alt="" srcset="https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/image0.jpeg?w=1280&amp;ssl=1 1280w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/image0.jpeg?resize=760%2C556&amp;ssl=1 760w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/image0.jpeg?resize=768%2C562&amp;ssl=1 768w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/image0.jpeg?resize=1200%2C878&amp;ssl=1 1200w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/image0.jpeg?resize=706%2C516&amp;ssl=1 706w" sizes="(max-width: 34.9rem) calc(100vw - 2rem), (max-width: 53rem) calc(8 * (100vw / 12)), (min-width: 53rem) calc(6 * (100vw / 12)), 100vw" /></figure>
  620. <iframe width="800" height="450" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/2K8KJVuhnH0" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen=""></iframe>
  621.  
  622.  
  623.  
  624. <p class="has-text-align-center"><em>Warning: The video contains profanity that some readers may find offensive</em>. </p>
  625.  
  626.  
  627.  
  628. <p>After decades as a stand-up comedian, when Drew Hastings turned 50, he bought the farm. </p>
  629.  
  630.  
  631.  
  632. <p>Well, not <em>the </em>farm, but <em>a</em> farm anyway.&nbsp;</p>
  633.  
  634.  
  635.  
  636. <p>An urban guy all his life, Hastings grew up in Kettering, Ohio, before moving to Cincinnati and eventually the west coast. He was living in Los Angeles and working as a comedian as the big 5-0 neared, he said. A regular on a nationally syndicated radio program &#8220;The Bob and Tom Show,&#8221; he performed in two Bob Odenkirk-directed movies and was even in talks with Hollywood studios to be in his own sit-com.&nbsp;</p>
  637.  
  638.  
  639.  
  640. <p>But something was nagging at him to leave the city life behind.&nbsp;</p>
  641.  
  642.  
  643.  
  644. <p>“I never really liked Hollywood… I&#8217;m a Midwest guy. I like the change of seasons. I like people to say &#8216;hi&#8217; when they walk down the street,” he said.&nbsp;</p>
  645.  
  646.  
  647.  
  648. <p>So, he packed all of his stuff into a U-Haul, headed back to Ohio, and started looking for a place to live.</p>
  649.  
  650.  
  651.  
  652. <p>“And then I just drove around in curlicues &#8211;&nbsp; kinda like &#8216;Where&#8217;s Waldo?&#8217; all over southern Ohio for two months,” he said. “I was looking at towns and villages when I happened to pull in to Hillsboro. I&#8217;m in a diner, having coffee, and I open up the newspaper and there&#8217;s this 50-acre farm for sale, and I&#8217;m like… maybe I could afford that…”</p>
  653.  
  654.  
  655.  
  656. <p>So he bought it. And for three months, he lived on the farm pondering his next move. Finally, it occurred to him he might not be doing it right.&nbsp;</p>
  657.  
  658.  
  659.  
  660. <p>“I realized, you know, you can’t have a farm and not farm. If you don’t farm, you’re not a farmer, you’re just this guy with a huge f****** overgrown yard,” he said.&nbsp;</p>
  661.  
  662.  
  663.  
  664. <p>Now, with his cattle and calf operation, Hastings spends his days farming, writing, and perfecting his comedy. He even spent a few years as the mayor of Hillsboro, where he worked on economic development and helping the town he’d come to love reinvigorate itself. Although elected in a landslide, he came up against opposition who succeeded in having charges brought against him for things like dumping personal trash into a city dumpster. All four charges were ultimately dismissed.&nbsp;</p>
  665.  
  666.  
  667.  
  668. <p>On stage, dressed all in black with thick black glasses and spikey hair, Hastings looks more like a middle-aged hipster than a cattle farmer, and his comedy reflects it. He talks about getting into the routine of farm life, barn cats, and living too far out of town to get a pizza delivered.</p>
  669.  
  670.  
  671.  
  672. <p>“I’m in the swing of it now, I’m up every morning at 10:30 and 11:00, come hell or high water,” he says during his farm routine. “I’m just like every other Ohio farmer. We all do it the same…get up in the morning, take off our sleep mask… We pull our little silk kimonos tight against the cold and make some strong coffee.”</p>
  673.  
  674.  
  675.  
  676. <p>That kind of self-deprecating humor is a hit at the shows he does around the country. Mostly performing at corporate banquets and agricultural association shows, he plays on the idea of a city boy experiencing rural life for the first time.&nbsp;</p>
  677.  
  678.  
  679.  
  680. <p>“I don’t know how many of you have lived rural or out in the country, but it is creepy out there. At night, when the sun goes down, it’s pitch black,” he says during his bit. “Did you know, at night, a possum walking through a cornfield sounds exactly like three men with an ax?”</p>
  681.  
  682.  
  683.  
  684. <p>While his shows are canceled now due to the coronavirus, Hastings is working on a book about his life and his time in public office, and scheduling shows into 2022. Still, he said, not being on the road has its downside.</p>
  685.  
  686.  
  687.  
  688. <p>“I don&#8217;t miss (touring). What I do miss is being out traveling and having my finger or ear on the pulse of what is going on in this country,” he said. “There is no better way, almost, to do that then to go from here to Versailles (Kentucky), and then to Muncie, Indiana, and the next night to Peoria, and you just listen to the people in coffee shops and talk to audiences. You just get a sense of where people are and what they’re thinking about…. I miss that. I miss that aspect of going out and being connected to the American people.&#8221;&nbsp;</p>
  689.  
  690.  
  691.  
  692. <p>Now over 65, with a wife and a year-old child, he’s pondering how many years he’ll still be doing the comedy that he loves.&nbsp;</p>
  693.  
  694.  
  695.  
  696. <p>Regardless, he still has his farm &#8211; even if his Extension agent once told him the best thing he could plant on it was a “For Sale” sign.&nbsp;</p>
  697. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://dailyyonder.com/drew-hastings-from-fast-life-to-farm-life/2020/07/01/">Drew Hastings – From Fast Life to Farm Life</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://dailyyonder.com">Daily Yonder</a>.</p>
  698. ]]></content:encoded>
  699. <wfw:commentRss>https://dailyyonder.com/drew-hastings-from-fast-life-to-farm-life/2020/07/01/feed/</wfw:commentRss>
  700. <slash:comments>0</slash:comments>
  701. </item>
  702. <item>
  703. <title>Commentary: Why ‘Crisis Schooling’ Shouldn’t Be Part of Our New Normal</title>
  704. <link>https://dailyyonder.com/commentary-why-crisis-schooling-shouldnt-be-part-of-our-new-normal/2020/06/30/</link>
  705. <comments>https://dailyyonder.com/commentary-why-crisis-schooling-shouldnt-be-part-of-our-new-normal/2020/06/30/#respond</comments>
  706. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Amy Valentine]]></dc:creator>
  707. <pubDate>Tue, 30 Jun 2020 18:12:15 +0000</pubDate>
  708. <category><![CDATA[Coronavirus]]></category>
  709. <category><![CDATA[Education]]></category>
  710. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://dailyyonder.com/?p=60941</guid>
  711.  
  712. <description><![CDATA[<figure><img width="760" height="506" src="https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/AP_20081690806505-scaled.jpg?fit=760%2C506&amp;ssl=1" class="attachment-medium size-medium wp-post-image" alt="" srcset="https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/AP_20081690806505-scaled.jpg?w=2560&amp;ssl=1 2560w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/AP_20081690806505-scaled.jpg?resize=760%2C506&amp;ssl=1 760w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/AP_20081690806505-scaled.jpg?resize=1296%2C864&amp;ssl=1 1296w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/AP_20081690806505-scaled.jpg?resize=768%2C512&amp;ssl=1 768w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/AP_20081690806505-scaled.jpg?resize=1536%2C1023&amp;ssl=1 1536w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/AP_20081690806505-scaled.jpg?resize=2048%2C1365&amp;ssl=1 2048w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/AP_20081690806505-scaled.jpg?resize=1200%2C800&amp;ssl=1 1200w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/AP_20081690806505-scaled.jpg?resize=1568%2C1045&amp;ssl=1 1568w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/AP_20081690806505-scaled.jpg?resize=706%2C470&amp;ssl=1 706w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/AP_20081690806505-scaled.jpg?w=1920&amp;ssl=1 1920w" sizes="(max-width: 34.9rem) calc(100vw - 2rem), (max-width: 53rem) calc(8 * (100vw / 12)), (min-width: 53rem) calc(6 * (100vw / 12)), 100vw" /></figure>
  713. <p>When asked if schools would be able to go back to “normal,” a superintendent recently quipped, “Normal is a setting on a washing machine.” (In actuality, this is such an insightful response.) Here’s why. Covid-19 shattered our paradigm of normality in education. It became a catalyst for change within our schools and K-12 education system [&#8230;]</p>
  714. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://dailyyonder.com/commentary-why-crisis-schooling-shouldnt-be-part-of-our-new-normal/2020/06/30/">Commentary: Why ‘Crisis Schooling’ Shouldn’t Be Part of Our New Normal</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://dailyyonder.com">Daily Yonder</a>.</p>
  715. ]]></description>
  716. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<figure><img width="760" height="506" src="https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/AP_20081690806505-scaled.jpg?fit=760%2C506&amp;ssl=1" class="attachment-medium size-medium wp-post-image" alt="" srcset="https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/AP_20081690806505-scaled.jpg?w=2560&amp;ssl=1 2560w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/AP_20081690806505-scaled.jpg?resize=760%2C506&amp;ssl=1 760w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/AP_20081690806505-scaled.jpg?resize=1296%2C864&amp;ssl=1 1296w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/AP_20081690806505-scaled.jpg?resize=768%2C512&amp;ssl=1 768w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/AP_20081690806505-scaled.jpg?resize=1536%2C1023&amp;ssl=1 1536w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/AP_20081690806505-scaled.jpg?resize=2048%2C1365&amp;ssl=1 2048w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/AP_20081690806505-scaled.jpg?resize=1200%2C800&amp;ssl=1 1200w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/AP_20081690806505-scaled.jpg?resize=1568%2C1045&amp;ssl=1 1568w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/AP_20081690806505-scaled.jpg?resize=706%2C470&amp;ssl=1 706w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/AP_20081690806505-scaled.jpg?w=1920&amp;ssl=1 1920w" sizes="(max-width: 34.9rem) calc(100vw - 2rem), (max-width: 53rem) calc(8 * (100vw / 12)), (min-width: 53rem) calc(6 * (100vw / 12)), 100vw" /></figure>
  717. <p>When asked if schools would be able to go back to “normal,” a superintendent recently quipped, “Normal is a setting on a washing machine.” (In actuality, this is such an insightful response.)</p>
  718.  
  719.  
  720.  
  721. <p>Here’s why. Covid-19 shattered our paradigm of normality in education. It became a catalyst for change within our schools and K-12 education system as a whole. Seemingly overnight, homes were turned into classrooms, teachers transitioned to remote instructors, and parents were thrust into the role of learning coach for their children.</p>
  722.  
  723.  
  724.  
  725. <p>The goals were the same: to keep kids engaged in school, focused on learning while keeping them safe and protected from the coronavirus. Using technology was new to many educators, students and their families, and it all happened so quickly. Too quickly to educate people on what they were experiencing.</p>
  726.  
  727.  
  728.  
  729. <p>As such, the pandemic caused America to move into a state of crisis schooling.</p>
  730.  
  731.  
  732.  
  733. <figure class="wp-block-table alignleft is-style-stripes"><table class="has-subtle-pale-pink-background-color has-background"><tbody><tr><td><strong>Homeschooling</strong> involves families intentionally choosing to educate their children at home instead of in a traditional school setting. This is not to be confused with schooling at home.&nbsp;</td></tr><tr><td><strong>Remote learning</strong> is a guided learning experience taking place in a location separate from an instructor or teacher. It can be live or asynchronous, one-on-one or with peers, happening online or offline.&nbsp;</td></tr><tr><td><strong>Online schools</strong>, programs or strategies are intentionally designed to provide a quality educational option in a virtual setting. They have certified teachers, offer direct instruction, wrap-around support, onboarding orientations, and more.&nbsp;</td></tr><tr><td><strong>Crisis schooling</strong> is the immediate transfer of K-12 schools to another learning environment due to emergency circumstances. It can involve online tools, but it is not synonymous with organized online education.&nbsp;</td></tr></tbody></table></figure>
  734.  
  735.  
  736.  
  737. <p>Crisis schooling is very different from online education, virtual schools, blended learning and homeschooling. Crisis schooling was born from exigent circumstances and empowered everyone to embrace a ‘whatever it takes’ mentality to support the needs of children—from delivering meals to preparing remote learning packets to transitioning over to the use of technology as a means of communication. During this time, 70% of teachers indicated that their main modality of communicating with families was through e-mail.</p>
  738.  
  739.  
  740.  
  741. <p>Yet online education is so much more than e-mail messaging back and forth.</p>
  742.  
  743.  
  744.  
  745. <p>K-12 online schools have been around for two decades. They are actual schools, with learning experiences that have been developed and designed to be delivered fully online. Administrators set policies; certified, qualified teachers design course content and teach students; opportunities abound for peer collaboration, and high-quality special education services are provided, among other supports.</p>
  746.  
  747.  
  748.  
  749. <p>My experiences as both an in-class and online educator of students in grades 6-12 and at the university level have given me keen insight into the different types of educational models out there. There are benefits to all of them. But if we lump them all together into one category, we will never appreciate what makes them unique, or relevant for different types of learning styles.</p>
  750.  
  751.  
  752.  
  753. <p>Online and virtual schools are getting a bad rap right now. While these types of innovative schools are not new to America, they are new to most Americans. Think about it—the average school in America has existed, relatively unchanged, since one-room schoolhouses emerged in the 1600s. How can we expect that people, especially teachers and students, would be able to adopt such major operational changes, in such a short period of time?</p>
  754.  
  755.  
  756.  
  757. <p>Covid-19 has changed all of that. Due to the swiftness by which decisions were made, we did not stop to talk about this shift at the time. Now, as districts and schools across the country work to determine what school will look like this coming year, there is an imperative need to educate our country about the difference.</p>
  758.  
  759.  
  760.  
  761. <p>What most kids in our country experienced this past spring was<em> not</em> online, virtual or blended education. It was crisis schooling at best. And the time has come to shift from reactive to proactive regarding how we use technology and innovative practices to most effectively reach our students.</p>
  762.  
  763.  
  764.  
  765. <p>Understanding the nature of crisis schooling will help everyone, especially those leading brick-and-mortar schools that were catapulted into new ways of functioning. When we look forward at what the future of school will be in our country, we must do exactly that: look forward, not back.</p>
  766.  
  767.  
  768.  
  769. <p>Crisis schooling has undoubtedly challenged our education system, and now, we have an amazing opportunity to support the redesign of school to better serve the needs of all students. But this cannot be done with a frantic mindset. We must shift to the next phase of ‘new school’ in order to make this happen. Together, we can thoughtfully craft an approach toward a new normal that will get us there.</p>
  770.  
  771.  
  772.  
  773. <p><em>Amy Valentine is the Chief Executive Officer and Education Evangelist of <a href="https://www.futureof.school/" target="_blank" aria-label="undefined (opens in a new tab)" rel="noreferrer noopener">Future of School</a>, a national public charity designed to support the growth of innovative school models integrating blended and online learning.</em></p>
  774. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://dailyyonder.com/commentary-why-crisis-schooling-shouldnt-be-part-of-our-new-normal/2020/06/30/">Commentary: Why ‘Crisis Schooling’ Shouldn’t Be Part of Our New Normal</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://dailyyonder.com">Daily Yonder</a>.</p>
  775. ]]></content:encoded>
  776. <wfw:commentRss>https://dailyyonder.com/commentary-why-crisis-schooling-shouldnt-be-part-of-our-new-normal/2020/06/30/feed/</wfw:commentRss>
  777. <slash:comments>0</slash:comments>
  778. </item>
  779. <item>
  780. <title>Covid-19 at Rural Hospitals Is Nothing Like the Movie Version</title>
  781. <link>https://dailyyonder.com/covid-19-at-rural-hospitals-is-nothing-like-hollywood-makes-it-to-be/2020/06/30/</link>
  782. <comments>https://dailyyonder.com/covid-19-at-rural-hospitals-is-nothing-like-hollywood-makes-it-to-be/2020/06/30/#respond</comments>
  783. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Liz Carey]]></dc:creator>
  784. <pubDate>Tue, 30 Jun 2020 10:00:00 +0000</pubDate>
  785. <category><![CDATA[Coronavirus]]></category>
  786. <category><![CDATA[Health]]></category>
  787. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://dailyyonder.com/?p=60905</guid>
  788.  
  789. <description><![CDATA[<figure><img width="760" height="430" src="https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Lexington-Nebraska.jpg?fit=760%2C430&amp;ssl=1" class="attachment-medium size-medium wp-post-image" alt="" srcset="https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Lexington-Nebraska.jpg?w=1894&amp;ssl=1 1894w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Lexington-Nebraska.jpg?resize=760%2C430&amp;ssl=1 760w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Lexington-Nebraska.jpg?resize=1296%2C734&amp;ssl=1 1296w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Lexington-Nebraska.jpg?resize=768%2C435&amp;ssl=1 768w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Lexington-Nebraska.jpg?resize=1536%2C869&amp;ssl=1 1536w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Lexington-Nebraska.jpg?resize=1200%2C679&amp;ssl=1 1200w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Lexington-Nebraska.jpg?resize=1568%2C887&amp;ssl=1 1568w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Lexington-Nebraska.jpg?resize=706%2C400&amp;ssl=1 706w" sizes="(max-width: 34.9rem) calc(100vw - 2rem), (max-width: 53rem) calc(8 * (100vw / 12)), (min-width: 53rem) calc(6 * (100vw / 12)), 100vw" /></figure>
  790. <p>The Hollywood vision of a pandemic’s surge typically involves hundreds of angry patients crowded into emergency rooms, screaming and pleading for help. Then the hospital staff gets overwhelmed and chaos ensues.&#160; But the reality for the Lexington Regional Health Center in Lexington, Nebraska, was far different.&#160; The only hospital for the town of just over [&#8230;]</p>
  791. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://dailyyonder.com/covid-19-at-rural-hospitals-is-nothing-like-hollywood-makes-it-to-be/2020/06/30/">Covid-19 at Rural Hospitals Is Nothing Like the Movie Version</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://dailyyonder.com">Daily Yonder</a>.</p>
  792. ]]></description>
  793. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<figure><img width="760" height="430" src="https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Lexington-Nebraska.jpg?fit=760%2C430&amp;ssl=1" class="attachment-medium size-medium wp-post-image" alt="" srcset="https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Lexington-Nebraska.jpg?w=1894&amp;ssl=1 1894w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Lexington-Nebraska.jpg?resize=760%2C430&amp;ssl=1 760w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Lexington-Nebraska.jpg?resize=1296%2C734&amp;ssl=1 1296w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Lexington-Nebraska.jpg?resize=768%2C435&amp;ssl=1 768w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Lexington-Nebraska.jpg?resize=1536%2C869&amp;ssl=1 1536w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Lexington-Nebraska.jpg?resize=1200%2C679&amp;ssl=1 1200w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Lexington-Nebraska.jpg?resize=1568%2C887&amp;ssl=1 1568w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Lexington-Nebraska.jpg?resize=706%2C400&amp;ssl=1 706w" sizes="(max-width: 34.9rem) calc(100vw - 2rem), (max-width: 53rem) calc(8 * (100vw / 12)), (min-width: 53rem) calc(6 * (100vw / 12)), 100vw" /></figure>
  794. <p>The Hollywood vision of a pandemic’s surge typically involves hundreds of angry patients crowded into emergency rooms, screaming and pleading for help. Then the hospital staff gets overwhelmed and chaos ensues.&nbsp;</p>
  795.  
  796.  
  797.  
  798. <p>But the reality for the Lexington Regional Health Center in Lexington, Nebraska, was far different.&nbsp;</p>
  799.  
  800.  
  801.  
  802. <p>The only hospital for the town of just over 10,000, Lexington Regional works to provide a wide array of services to an incredibly diverse town.&nbsp;</p>
  803.  
  804.  
  805.  
  806. <p>Tara Naprstek, the hospital’s director of finance, said the community has residents who speak 40 different languages. Mostly younger and mostly Hispanic, the town’s demographics are rooted in the Tyson meatpacking plant located on the outskirts.&nbsp;</p>
  807.  
  808.  
  809.  
  810. <p>Providing service for more than 18,000 people in the surrounding area, the 25-bed hospital has an interpreter and systems in place to communicate with the different nationalities located in its service area.&nbsp;</p>
  811.  
  812.  
  813.  
  814. <p>“Besides English, the other primary languages spoken at the plant are Spanish, Somali, and Arabic,” Naprstek said. “And we have a platform that is like a telehealth platform for the other languages&#8230; We want to do the best that we can to make sure that they understand what’s going on and what we’re doing.”</p>
  815.  
  816.  
  817.  
  818. <p>Before the Covid-19 pandemic, the hospital was breaking even. Despite a few years in the red, the hospital was working its way back to being in the black. When Covid-19 hit, the effects were quick and dramatic, said Wade Eschenbrenner, the hospital’s CFO.&nbsp;</p>
  819.  
  820.  
  821.  
  822. <p>While hospitals in cities in New York, California, and Washington were seeing an influx of patients, by mid-March Lexington Regional wasn’t seeing any.&nbsp; It wasn&#8217;t until mid-April that the surge hit. When Covid-19 finally arrived, Eschenbrenner said, things looked bleak.&nbsp;</p>
  823.  
  824.  
  825.  
  826. <p>On April 11, two Covid-19 positive patients came to the hospital, said hospital CEO Leslie Marsh. But between April 19 and April 26, the hospital was seeing its surge – four patients a day, nearly one-sixth of its available beds.</p>
  827.  
  828.  
  829.  
  830. <p>The panicked Hollywood version was an idea still running through the community, Marsh said, but not anything close to reality.&nbsp;</p>
  831.  
  832.  
  833.  
  834. <p>“I tried really hard to help dispel (that stereotype) in the community because that was a narrative that was popular and being spread,” she said. “And it was unnecessarily panicking people. What it looked like for us was four people being admitted during the day. Over three weeks, I think it was on average five to eight patients a week that were always in the hospital that were Covid-19 positive… but during that week about four patients were being transferred out as well.”&nbsp;</p>
  835.  
  836.  
  837.  
  838. <p>While the hospital has ventilators, she said, it wasn’t equipped to handle so many Covid-19 patients at one time. Once a patient reached a certain threshold, they would be transferred to a hospital with more ability to administer to the patient’s needs.&nbsp;</p>
  839.  
  840.  
  841.  
  842. <p>All the while, the hospital had to deal with regular patients. One night, Marsh said, not only did the emergency department have three cases of Covid-19, but patients who had been in a two-car collision.</p>
  843.  
  844.  
  845.  
  846. <p>Through meetings on an almost daily basis, the hospital staff prepared for the worst. They put new procedures in place, sometimes changing from one day to the next based on the latest guidance from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and Prevention. The hospital’s leadership took stock of what they had and what they needed, Marsh said.&nbsp;</p>
  847.  
  848.  
  849.  
  850. <p>“From the PPE (personal protective equipment) standpoint, that was something we monitored twice daily,” she said. “A lot of the stuff was on restriction so we couldn&#8217;t necessarily get more than we had previously been getting. That was a stressful time in the backside of the hospital.”&nbsp;</p>
  851.  
  852.  
  853.  
  854. <p>New systems were put in place to reduce the use of PPEs, she said. And the leadership of the hospital tracked how many days of gloves they had, how many days of N-95 masks they had.&nbsp;</p>
  855.  
  856.  
  857.  
  858. <p>The pandemic meant re-thinking parts of the hospital too. With only three emergency department bays and two isolation rooms, the hospital staff had to figure out how to create pressure rooms and rooms specifically designed to treat Covid patients.&nbsp;</p>
  859.  
  860.  
  861.  
  862. <p>“You innovate on the spot and figure out what to do,” Marsh said.&nbsp;</p>
  863.  
  864.  
  865.  
  866. <p>The cause behind the surge looked to be the local Tyson meatpacking plant.&nbsp;</p>
  867.  
  868.  
  869.  
  870. <p>Lexington is home to a Tyson meatpacking plant, and the very nature of their work environment is naturally set up to spread the disease.&nbsp;</p>
  871.  
  872.  
  873.  
  874. <p>“They wanted to do well by their&nbsp;employees,” Naprstek said. “We had an entirely different experience to some of the things that I&#8217;ve read.&nbsp;There&#8217;s no denying that the work environment just was set up to spread infection,&nbsp;but as soon as they knew what&nbsp;to do, they worked with us.&nbsp;They hired social monitors&nbsp;to ensure employees&nbsp;were using sanitizer.&nbsp;They had signs that were spread out about the virus.&nbsp;They had dividers in their cafeteria.&nbsp;We had weekly, if not more frequent, communications with Tyson and really learned from them.”&nbsp;</p>
  875.  
  876.  
  877.  
  878. <p>Even though the surge subsided at the end of April, the hospital remains on alert.&nbsp;</p>
  879.  
  880.  
  881.  
  882. <p>Now somewhat stable financially with help from the Paycheck Protection Program and Small Business Loans, as well as money from the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act, staff is working to incorporate some of the precautions taken for Covid-19 into permanent features of the hospital.&nbsp;</p>
  883.  
  884.  
  885.  
  886. <p>But the future remains unclear. Like many rural hospitals, finances are a struggle. And with no projections of what virus will do in the future, it’s hard to plan financially, Eschenbrenner said.&nbsp;</p>
  887.  
  888.  
  889.  
  890. <p>“You know, from a planning perspective, it is a small hospital. We have more flexible budgeting type of scenarios,” he said. “So we&#8217;re always evaluating what our needs are and how those fit from a finance perspective.”</p>
  891. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://dailyyonder.com/covid-19-at-rural-hospitals-is-nothing-like-hollywood-makes-it-to-be/2020/06/30/">Covid-19 at Rural Hospitals Is Nothing Like the Movie Version</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://dailyyonder.com">Daily Yonder</a>.</p>
  892. ]]></content:encoded>
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  894. <slash:comments>0</slash:comments>
  895. </item>
  896. <item>
  897. <title>Rural Buzz: Tulsa Rally Ramps up Political Commentary in Social Media</title>
  898. <link>https://dailyyonder.com/rural-buzz-tulsa-rally-ramps-up-political-commentary-in-social-media/2020/06/29/</link>
  899. <comments>https://dailyyonder.com/rural-buzz-tulsa-rally-ramps-up-political-commentary-in-social-media/2020/06/29/#respond</comments>
  900. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Tim Marema]]></dc:creator>
  901. <pubDate>Mon, 29 Jun 2020 18:31:45 +0000</pubDate>
  902. <category><![CDATA[Coronavirus]]></category>
  903. <category><![CDATA[Swing State Social Media]]></category>
  904. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://dailyyonder.com/?p=60951</guid>
  905.  
  906. <description><![CDATA[<figure><img width="760" height="429" src="https://i2.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/one-country-political-discus-e1593448835223.jpg?fit=760%2C429&amp;ssl=1" class="attachment-medium size-medium wp-post-image" alt="" srcset="https://i2.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/one-country-political-discus-e1593448835223.jpg?w=1916&amp;ssl=1 1916w, https://i2.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/one-country-political-discus-e1593448835223.jpg?resize=760%2C429&amp;ssl=1 760w, https://i2.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/one-country-political-discus-e1593448835223.jpg?resize=1296%2C732&amp;ssl=1 1296w, https://i2.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/one-country-political-discus-e1593448835223.jpg?resize=768%2C434&amp;ssl=1 768w, https://i2.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/one-country-political-discus-e1593448835223.jpg?resize=1536%2C867&amp;ssl=1 1536w, https://i2.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/one-country-political-discus-e1593448835223.jpg?resize=1200%2C678&amp;ssl=1 1200w, https://i2.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/one-country-political-discus-e1593448835223.jpg?resize=1568%2C885&amp;ssl=1 1568w, https://i2.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/one-country-political-discus-e1593448835223.jpg?resize=706%2C399&amp;ssl=1 706w" sizes="(max-width: 34.9rem) calc(100vw - 2rem), (max-width: 53rem) calc(8 * (100vw / 12)), (min-width: 53rem) calc(6 * (100vw / 12)), 100vw" /></figure>
  907. <p>The proportion of rural, social-media posts focused on the politics of the pandemic increased sharply in the most recent study period, which included President Donald Trump’s rally in Tulsa, Oklahoma. From June 14-21, nearly half of all personal, public social-media posts about the pandemic originating in rural parts of six swing states dealt with politics. [&#8230;]</p>
  908. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://dailyyonder.com/rural-buzz-tulsa-rally-ramps-up-political-commentary-in-social-media/2020/06/29/">Rural Buzz: Tulsa Rally Ramps up Political Commentary in Social Media</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://dailyyonder.com">Daily Yonder</a>.</p>
  909. ]]></description>
  910. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<figure><img width="760" height="429" src="https://i2.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/one-country-political-discus-e1593448835223.jpg?fit=760%2C429&amp;ssl=1" class="attachment-medium size-medium wp-post-image" alt="" srcset="https://i2.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/one-country-political-discus-e1593448835223.jpg?w=1916&amp;ssl=1 1916w, https://i2.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/one-country-political-discus-e1593448835223.jpg?resize=760%2C429&amp;ssl=1 760w, https://i2.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/one-country-political-discus-e1593448835223.jpg?resize=1296%2C732&amp;ssl=1 1296w, https://i2.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/one-country-political-discus-e1593448835223.jpg?resize=768%2C434&amp;ssl=1 768w, https://i2.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/one-country-political-discus-e1593448835223.jpg?resize=1536%2C867&amp;ssl=1 1536w, https://i2.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/one-country-political-discus-e1593448835223.jpg?resize=1200%2C678&amp;ssl=1 1200w, https://i2.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/one-country-political-discus-e1593448835223.jpg?resize=1568%2C885&amp;ssl=1 1568w, https://i2.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/one-country-political-discus-e1593448835223.jpg?resize=706%2C399&amp;ssl=1 706w" sizes="(max-width: 34.9rem) calc(100vw - 2rem), (max-width: 53rem) calc(8 * (100vw / 12)), (min-width: 53rem) calc(6 * (100vw / 12)), 100vw" /></figure>
  911. <p>The proportion of rural, social-media posts focused on the politics of the pandemic increased sharply in the most recent study period, which included President Donald Trump’s rally in Tulsa, Oklahoma.</p>
  912.  
  913.  
  914.  
  915. <p>From June 14-21, nearly half of all personal, public social-media posts about the pandemic originating in rural parts of six swing states dealt with politics. In the previous week, political commentary constituted about one-quarter of all social media in the study. Political comments have averaged about 30% of all comments on each week in the study, which began the week of March 21. </p>
  916.  
  917.  
  918.  
  919. <p>The Tulsa rally occurred June 20, so this week’s report includes discussion on whether holding the rally was prudent, the president’s comments at the rally itself, and the followup to the event.</p>
  920.  
  921.  
  922.  
  923. <p>Also during that time period, Black Lives Matter demonstrations continued to dominate the news.</p>
  924.  
  925.  
  926.  
  927. <p><a href="https://dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/200625-June-14-21-COVID-19-Tracker.pdf" target="_blank" aria-label="undefined (opens in a new tab)" rel="noreferrer noopener">The study examines public social media </a>posted by individuals in rural parts of Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, New Hampshire, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin on platforms such as Facebook and Twitter. The study is commissioned by One Country, a Democrat-led 501(c)4 organization that is encouraging Democrats to do more to engage rural voters. Social Impact conducts the research for One Country.</p>
  928.  
  929.  
  930. <div
  931. class="wp-block-newspack-blocks-homepage-articles is-style-default wpnbha ts-4 is-style-default"
  932. style=""
  933. >
  934. <div data-posts data-current-post-id="60951">
  935. <h2 class="article-section-title">
  936. <span>related stories</span>
  937. </h2>
  938. <article data-post-id="60790"
  939. class="tag-onecountrysocialmedia category-coronavirus category-growth_and_development post-has-image"
  940. >
  941. <div class="entry-wrapper">
  942. <h3 class="entry-title"><a href="https://dailyyonder.com/rural-buzz-as-pandemic-becomes-business-as-usual-the-political-discussion-declines/2020/06/24/" rel="bookmark">Rural Buzz: As Pandemic Becomes Business as Usual, the Political Discussion Declines</a></h3> <p>President Trump was lambasted for his handling of the pandemic and Black Lives Matter protests. But the number of political social-media posts is falling. </p>
  943. <div class="entry-meta">
  944. <a href="https://dailyyonder.com/author/tim_marema/"></a> <span class="byline">
  945. by <span class="author vcard"><a class="url fn n" href="https://dailyyonder.com/author/tim_marema/">Tim Marema</a></span> </span><!-- .author-name -->
  946. <time class="entry-date published" datetime="2020-06-24T10:03:30-04:00">June 24, 2020</time><time class="updated" datetime="2020-06-24T10:07:14-04:00">June 24, 2020</time> </div><!-- .entry-meta -->
  947. </div><!-- .entry-wrapper -->
  948. </article>
  949.  
  950. <article data-post-id="60395"
  951. class="tag-onecountrysocialmedia category-coronavirus category-growth_and_development post-has-image"
  952. >
  953. <div class="entry-wrapper">
  954. <h3 class="entry-title"><a href="https://dailyyonder.com/rural-buzz-social-media-users-may-support-protest-but-worry-about-covid-19-resurgence/2020/06/15/" rel="bookmark">Rural Buzz: Social-Media Users May Support Protest but Worry about Covid-19 Resurgence</a></h3> <p>Social-media criticism of President Trump remains stable at about 50% for the fifth week in a row.</p>
  955. <div class="entry-meta">
  956. <a href="https://dailyyonder.com/author/tim_marema/"></a> <span class="byline">
  957. by <span class="author vcard"><a class="url fn n" href="https://dailyyonder.com/author/tim_marema/">Tim Marema</a></span> </span><!-- .author-name -->
  958. <time class="entry-date published" datetime="2020-06-15T18:00:16-04:00">June 15, 2020</time><time class="updated" datetime="2020-06-15T20:40:50-04:00">June 15, 2020</time> </div><!-- .entry-meta -->
  959. </div><!-- .entry-wrapper -->
  960. </article>
  961.  
  962. </div>
  963. </div>
  964.  
  965.  
  966. <hr class="wp-block-separator"/>
  967.  
  968.  
  969.  
  970. <p>Fifty-eight percent of the political social-media comments criticized the president for some aspect of how he is handling the Covid-19 crisis. Nearly half of those negative comments were about the Tulsa rally.</p>
  971.  
  972.  
  973.  
  974. <p>Rural social-media flashed on comments Trump made at the rally. “[The response to the rally] was made even worse by Trump’s suggestion during the rally that he asked his staff to slow down Covid-19 testing to prevent an increase in the infection rate figures,” the report says.</p>
  975.  
  976.  
  977.  
  978. <p>Another 9 percent of political posts were anti-Republican. Added to the anti-Trump comments, that means two-thirds of political commentary delivered through rural, swing-state social media criticized the current administration and its party.</p>
  979.  
  980.  
  981.  
  982. <p>Criticism of the president appeared to be cooling off before the Tulsa rally. “Trump’s Tulsa rally and speech content has brought his handling of the coronavirus back into full focus,” the report says.</p>
  983.  
  984.  
  985.  
  986. <figure class="wp-block-image size-large"><img src="https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/one-country-trump-net.jpg?fit=960%2C621&amp;ssl=1" alt="&quot;Trump Net Sentiment&quot; is a summation of pro and negative comments about the president. This week, 58 percent of political comments were anti-Trump. Five percent were positive, making the net minus 53." class="wp-image-60953" srcset="https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/one-country-trump-net.jpg?w=2302&amp;ssl=1 2302w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/one-country-trump-net.jpg?resize=760%2C492&amp;ssl=1 760w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/one-country-trump-net.jpg?resize=1296%2C839&amp;ssl=1 1296w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/one-country-trump-net.jpg?resize=768%2C497&amp;ssl=1 768w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/one-country-trump-net.jpg?resize=1536%2C994&amp;ssl=1 1536w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/one-country-trump-net.jpg?resize=2048%2C1326&amp;ssl=1 2048w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/one-country-trump-net.jpg?resize=1200%2C777&amp;ssl=1 1200w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/one-country-trump-net.jpg?resize=1568%2C1015&amp;ssl=1 1568w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/one-country-trump-net.jpg?resize=706%2C457&amp;ssl=1 706w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/one-country-trump-net.jpg?w=1920&amp;ssl=1 1920w" sizes="(max-width: 960px) 100vw, 960px" /></figure>
  987.  
  988.  
  989.  
  990. <p><strong>The Economy</strong></p>
  991.  
  992.  
  993.  
  994. <p>In the non-political social-media posts, rural residents expressed concern about their jobs and the economy. “Optimism on the economy is in short supply,” the report said.</p>
  995.  
  996.  
  997.  
  998. <p>“Insecurity is impacting the minds of employees, employers, and the unemployed alike. Changes in lifestyles are also having an impact on relationships and even personalities, with some feeling they have become more introverted.”</p>
  999.  
  1000.  
  1001.  
  1002. <p>While some social-media users are in despair, others are more optimistic. “ Overall, there is a sense of insecurity as to what the future holds.”</p>
  1003.  
  1004.  
  1005.  
  1006. <p><strong>Less Focus on the Numbers</strong></p>
  1007.  
  1008.  
  1009.  
  1010. <p>Rural residents in Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, New Hampshire, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin were focusing less on their own Covid-19 numbers and more on what’s happening in other states. During the June 14-21 study period, states like Florida, Texas, and Mississippi were in the news for new outbreaks, while many of the six swing states were seeing declines or stabilization in new-infection numbers. This has changed since the study period. Currently, Iowa, Michigan, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin are seeing an increase in cases, <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/us/coronavirus-us-cases.html">according to the New York Times. </a>New cases in Minnesota are holding steady, while they are dropping in New Hampshire.</p>
  1011.  
  1012.  
  1013.  
  1014. <p><strong>Mask ‘Etiquette’&nbsp;</strong></p>
  1015.  
  1016.  
  1017.  
  1018. <p>Masks are generating their own social-media hotspot, with those who are pro- and anti-mask lining up to debate.</p>
  1019.  
  1020.  
  1021.  
  1022. <p>“There is clearly a dividing line between those who feel a mask is a necessity in disease prevention and those who don’t, which is causing friction within communities.”</p>
  1023.  
  1024.  
  1025.  
  1026. <p>Some see masks as an infringement on liberty, while others see them as an essential part of preventing the spread of the pandemic. “Their effectiveness, infringement on liberty, and even mask etiquette is all being discussed throughout the pandemic.”</p>
  1027.  
  1028.  
  1029.  
  1030. <p><strong>Conspiracy Theories and More</strong></p>
  1031.  
  1032.  
  1033.  
  1034. <p>Other trends in in the report are the following:</p>
  1035.  
  1036.  
  1037.  
  1038. <ul><li>“While COVID-related conspiracy theories continue to flourish, they are joined by dangerous rumors regarding the demise of Covid-19. This is partly due to a failure of local and federal officials to send out clear and consistent messaging, which has allowed confusion and misinformation to thrive among the populous.”</li><li>Discussion about infection rates and deaths declined.&nbsp;</li><li>The discussion is getting more intense. “Tension seems to be rising between groups who have opposing views about the seriousness of Covid-19. Those who are scared berate those who deny its existence or do little to prevent its spread.”</li><li>“Confusion is still dominating the conversation on Covid-19. Treatments, testing and social distancing are all being spoke of.”</li><li>“Mental illness continues to be a persistent topic of conversation during the pandemic with many rural people clearly in need of help.”</li></ul>
  1039.  
  1040.  
  1041.  
  1042. <p><strong>More People Posting</strong></p>
  1043.  
  1044.  
  1045.  
  1046. <p>For the first time, the number of authors posting social media in rural parts of swing states increased from the previous week, rising from 18,000 to 20,000. Previously, the number of authors dropped every week since the study started the week of March 21.</p>
  1047.  
  1048.  
  1049.  
  1050. <p>Also for the first time, the number of posts on the pandemic remained steady, at 47,000. Previously, there have been fewer posts on the pandemic each week of the study.</p>
  1051.  
  1052.  
  1053.  
  1054. <p><strong>How the Study Was Conducted</strong></p>
  1055.  
  1056.  
  1057.  
  1058. <p>The study was conducted for One Country by Impact Social. The firm’s methodology combines big data and algorithms with randomized sampling and human analysis.</p>
  1059.  
  1060.  
  1061.  
  1062. <p>The study uses publicly available social-media posts from blogs and big platforms like Facebook and Twitter that are geocoded to the rural counties in Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, New Hampshire, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin.&nbsp;</p>
  1063.  
  1064.  
  1065.  
  1066. <p>The researchers filter the posts to “focus solely on the views of local citizens,” according to the researchers.</p>
  1067.  
  1068.  
  1069.  
  1070. <p>From this universe of posts, the researchers pull a randomized sample. In the final stage, humans read the sample of social-media posts and categorize them based on their content.</p>
  1071.  
  1072.  
  1073.  
  1074. <p>The study is not to be confused with a randomized public-opinion poll. Those polls attempt to estimate overall political and social opinions by polling a small and random sample of the larger population. Heidi Heitkamp, the former Democratic senator from North Dakota who is a co-founder of One Country, said the social-media study can help measure broad political trends and the range of opinion being expressed on a particular topics.  </p>
  1075. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://dailyyonder.com/rural-buzz-tulsa-rally-ramps-up-political-commentary-in-social-media/2020/06/29/">Rural Buzz: Tulsa Rally Ramps up Political Commentary in Social Media</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://dailyyonder.com">Daily Yonder</a>.</p>
  1076. ]]></content:encoded>
  1077. <wfw:commentRss>https://dailyyonder.com/rural-buzz-tulsa-rally-ramps-up-political-commentary-in-social-media/2020/06/29/feed/</wfw:commentRss>
  1078. <slash:comments>0</slash:comments>
  1079. </item>
  1080. <item>
  1081. <title>Youth Are Flipping an Abandoned North Carolina Prison into a Sustainable Farm</title>
  1082. <link>https://dailyyonder.com/youth-are-flipping-an-abandoned-north-carolina-prison-into-a-sustainable-farm/2020/06/29/</link>
  1083. <comments>https://dailyyonder.com/youth-are-flipping-an-abandoned-north-carolina-prison-into-a-sustainable-farm/2020/06/29/#respond</comments>
  1084. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Christina Cooke]]></dc:creator>
  1085. <pubDate>Mon, 29 Jun 2020 17:00:00 +0000</pubDate>
  1086. <category><![CDATA[Agriculture]]></category>
  1087. <category><![CDATA[Youth]]></category>
  1088. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://dailyyonder.com/?p=60923</guid>
  1089.  
  1090. <description><![CDATA[<figure><img width="760" height="503" src="https://i2.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/g1J3zwXg.jpeg?fit=760%2C503&amp;ssl=1" class="attachment-medium size-medium wp-post-image" alt="" srcset="https://i2.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/g1J3zwXg.jpeg?w=2048&amp;ssl=1 2048w, https://i2.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/g1J3zwXg.jpeg?resize=760%2C503&amp;ssl=1 760w, https://i2.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/g1J3zwXg.jpeg?resize=1296%2C858&amp;ssl=1 1296w, https://i2.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/g1J3zwXg.jpeg?resize=768%2C509&amp;ssl=1 768w, https://i2.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/g1J3zwXg.jpeg?resize=1536%2C1017&amp;ssl=1 1536w, https://i2.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/g1J3zwXg.jpeg?resize=1200%2C795&amp;ssl=1 1200w, https://i2.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/g1J3zwXg.jpeg?resize=1568%2C1038&amp;ssl=1 1568w, https://i2.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/g1J3zwXg.jpeg?resize=706%2C467&amp;ssl=1 706w, https://i2.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/g1J3zwXg.jpeg?w=1920&amp;ssl=1 1920w" sizes="(max-width: 34.9rem) calc(100vw - 2rem), (max-width: 53rem) calc(8 * (100vw / 12)), (min-width: 53rem) calc(6 * (100vw / 12)), 100vw" /></figure>
  1091. <p>By transforming a decaying prison into a flourishing farm, these young men are avoiding the criminal justice system—and creating a model to share.</p>
  1092. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://dailyyonder.com/youth-are-flipping-an-abandoned-north-carolina-prison-into-a-sustainable-farm/2020/06/29/">Youth Are Flipping an Abandoned North Carolina Prison into a Sustainable Farm</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://dailyyonder.com">Daily Yonder</a>.</p>
  1093. ]]></description>
  1094. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<figure><img width="760" height="503" src="https://i2.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/g1J3zwXg.jpeg?fit=760%2C503&amp;ssl=1" class="attachment-medium size-medium wp-post-image" alt="" srcset="https://i2.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/g1J3zwXg.jpeg?w=2048&amp;ssl=1 2048w, https://i2.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/g1J3zwXg.jpeg?resize=760%2C503&amp;ssl=1 760w, https://i2.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/g1J3zwXg.jpeg?resize=1296%2C858&amp;ssl=1 1296w, https://i2.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/g1J3zwXg.jpeg?resize=768%2C509&amp;ssl=1 768w, https://i2.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/g1J3zwXg.jpeg?resize=1536%2C1017&amp;ssl=1 1536w, https://i2.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/g1J3zwXg.jpeg?resize=1200%2C795&amp;ssl=1 1200w, https://i2.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/g1J3zwXg.jpeg?resize=1568%2C1038&amp;ssl=1 1568w, https://i2.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/g1J3zwXg.jpeg?resize=706%2C467&amp;ssl=1 706w, https://i2.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/g1J3zwXg.jpeg?w=1920&amp;ssl=1 1920w" sizes="(max-width: 34.9rem) calc(100vw - 2rem), (max-width: 53rem) calc(8 * (100vw / 12)), (min-width: 53rem) calc(6 * (100vw / 12)), 100vw" /></figure>
  1095. <p class="has-text-align-center"><strong><em>This story was originally published by <a href="https://civileats.com/2020/06/15/youth-are-flipping-an-abandoned-north-carolina-prison-into-a-sustainable-farm/">Civil Eats</a> and republished here via </em></strong><a href="https://sojoexchange.squarespace.com/"><strong><em>Solutions Journalism Network</em></strong> <strong><em>Story Exchange</em></strong></a></p>
  1096.  
  1097.  
  1098.  
  1099. <p>On a crisp, windy day in March, 17-year-old Norman Garcia-Lopez tries to coax a donkey and a herd of 14 sheep from a fenced yard out to open pasture. “Come on, Miss Easter,” he says, holding a shallow bowl of food under the donkey’s nose. She steps through the door in the chain-link fence, and her fleecy charges follow soon after, bleating.</p>
  1100.  
  1101.  
  1102.  
  1103. <p>Garcia-Lopez isn’t on a typical farm. Surrounded by tall fences and razor wire, he and the group of high-school-aged young men affiliated with the nonprofit&nbsp;<a href="http://www.growingchange.org/">Growing Change</a>&nbsp;are farming in an abandoned prison in rural Wagram, North Carolina. Since 2011, this group has been working to flip the Scotland Correctional Center—a facility decommissioned in 2001 and subsequently left to decay—into a sustainable farm and education center. They’re leasing the property at no cost from the state’s Department of Public Safety.</p>
  1104.  
  1105.  
  1106.  
  1107. <p>During its first several years in existence, Growing Change engaged young men who were on intensive juvenile probation and had been kicked out of their schools and homes. But after 2016, the young people involved decided to change the eligibility requirements for future participants. Now, they welcome their peers facing chaos at home, failure at school, trouble with mental health or substance abuse, and involvement with the criminal justice system. Many are also minorities or possess multiple ethnic identities in a country where racism and xenophobia are rampant.</p>
  1108.  
  1109.  
  1110.  
  1111. <p>Designed to help teens avoid the criminal justice system, which&nbsp;<a href="https://www.sentencingproject.org/publications/un-report-on-racial-disparities/">disproportionately imprisons people of color</a>, the program provides the young men with mental health treatment and the chance to develop workplace skills and a sense of self-efficacy, or the idea they can get from one point to another if they have a plan.</p>
  1112.  
  1113.  
  1114.  
  1115. <p>“These are the young men on which we build our adult prisons,” says Growing Change Founder and Executive Director Noran Sanford. Being locked up as a kid is one of the most damaging, opportunity-stripping experiences a person can have, he says. “As a clinician, as a social worker, as a mental health therapist, [I can tell you] it is one of the greatest risk factors in nearly every problem we’re dealing with today in our adult population.”</p>
  1116.  
  1117.  
  1118.  
  1119. <p>In his prison-flip work, Sanford has his sights set on a number of problems at once: the high number of young people entering the criminal justice system; the absence of job opportunities for veterans; the decline in small, independent farmers in the area; residents’ lack of access to local, sustainable food; and the health disparities between urban and rural areas.</p>
  1120.  
  1121.  
  1122.  
  1123. <p>Scotland County Commissioner Carol McCall, a Growing Change board member and retired social worker, appreciates the intersectionality of the project. “The vision to take something discarded, unsightly, and unproductive and turn it into a working organization that serves a variety of purposes is unprecedented,” she says. “I’m really proud it’s happening right here in my own county.”</p>
  1124.  
  1125.  
  1126.  
  1127. <h3>A Wakeup Call at a Funeral</h3>
  1128.  
  1129.  
  1130.  
  1131. <p>Growing Change serves three counties near the southern border of North Carolina in the eastern part of the state. The area is extremely diverse, home to equal parts Native American (primarily members of the Lumbee Tribe), Black, and white residents.</p>
  1132.  
  1133.  
  1134.  
  1135. <p>It is also extremely poor: More than a third of the people in the city of Lumberton, located in Robeson County, live below the poverty line; the county’s median household income is&nbsp;<a href="https://www.countyhealthrankings.org/app/north-carolina/2019/rankings/robeson/county/outcomes/overall/snapshot">$33,700</a>; and approximately&nbsp;<a href="https://www.ncmedicaljournal.com/content/ncm/78/1/58.full.pdf">36 percent</a>&nbsp;of the population is on Medicaid, compared with&nbsp;<a href="https://www.statista.com/topics/1091/medicaid/">18 percent</a>&nbsp;nationally. Additionally,&nbsp;<a href="https://www.countyhealthrankings.org/app/north-carolina/2019/rankings/robeson/county/outcomes/overall/snapshot">21 percent</a>&nbsp;of the people in Robeson County and&nbsp;<a href="https://www.countyhealthrankings.org/app/north-carolina/2019/rankings/scotland/county/outcomes/overall/snapshot">25 percent</a>&nbsp;of the people in Scotland County experience food insecurity.</p>
  1136.  
  1137.  
  1138.  
  1139. <p>Compounding matters, these two counties had the&nbsp;<a href="https://www.countyhealthrankings.org/app/north-carolina/2020/rankings/robeson/county/outcomes/overall/snapshot">worst health rankings</a>&nbsp;in the state in 2019, making residents&nbsp;<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/us/north-carolina-coronavirus-cases.html#county">especially vulnerable to COVID-19</a>. While Scotland County has not been too heavily hit by the virus yet, as of press time Robeson ranks&nbsp;<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/us/north-carolina-coronavirus-cases.html">among the top 10 counties in the state</a>&nbsp;for infections, with case numbers on the rise. Because several of the Growing Change youth have underlying respiratory conditions, the group is careful to observe safety protocols—like working in small groups and pausing operations if someone close to them is tested for the virus (which has happened four times so far).</p>
  1140.  
  1141.  
  1142.  
  1143. <p>A tall, thin white man in his early 50s with a long, graying ponytail, Sanford grew up in the area and was working as a social worker and mental health therapist for youth and families in the juvenile justice system when he received an unexpected wakeup call in 2009. A middle-schooler he’d been working with—who was smart, good with people, and one of the best running backs Sanford had ever seen—was killed in a gang-related incident.</p>
  1144.  
  1145.  
  1146.  
  1147. <p>“I had to be honest with myself that the system had not done everything it could do, that I had not done everything I could do,” says Sanford. As a person of faith, he began to pray and spend structured time thinking about what he and the system could do differently.</p>
  1148.  
  1149.  
  1150.  
  1151. <p>At the same time, the old Scotland Correctional Center in Wagram, which he’d driven by dozens of times without considering, began to rise in his awareness. He learned that, up until the 1970s, North Carolina had made heavy use of inmates sentenced to&nbsp;<a href="https://www.ncpedia.org/chain-gang">chain gangs</a>, including those housed at the Wagram prison, to build the state’s highways. Most of these prisoners were Black, and many had only been convicted of minor crimes. In 1979, North Carolina had more prisons and the highest incarceration rate of any state in the country.</p>
  1152.  
  1153.  
  1154.  
  1155. <p>When Sanford presented his idea of reclaiming the abandoned property, many of the young people he worked with thought he was “kind of kooky,” remembers Terrence Smith, who was part of the first cohort of 12 and is now the other salaried employee of Growing Change.</p>
  1156.  
  1157.  
  1158.  
  1159. <p>But once Sanford walked the young men through the property, handed them the keys, and asked them, “What do we do with this?” they grew excited about the possibilities, Smith says.</p>
  1160.  
  1161.  
  1162.  
  1163. <h3>Instilling Hope in People and Place</h3>
  1164.  
  1165.  
  1166.  
  1167. <p>In addition to providing off-site therapy, Growing Change puts youth in charge of creating and carrying out a collective vision for the former prison, situated on a 67-acre parcel a couple miles outside Wagram’s tiny downtown.</p>
  1168.  
  1169.  
  1170.  
  1171. <p>Although the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.growingchange.org/gc-master-plan/">master plan</a>&nbsp;will take years to achieve, a number of elements are already in place: The current nine participants are keeping bees, rotationally grazing a herd of sheep they will use for wool and meat, caring for a flock of laying hens, composting food waste, tending a garden with organic methods, and managing vermiculture and&nbsp;<a href="https://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston/beneficials/beneficial-51_black_soldier_fly.htm">soldier fly</a>&nbsp;operations.</p>
  1172.  
  1173.  
  1174.  
  1175. <p>Down the road, they hope to create aquaponic tanks and cultivate mushrooms (in former prison cells) and introduce a certified community kitchen (in the galley), a prison history museum (in the barracks), a climbing wall (up a guard tower), a recording studio (in the freestanding&nbsp;<a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Box_(torture)">hot box</a>&nbsp;building), and staff quarters and office space.</p>
  1176.  
  1177.  
  1178.  
  1179. <p>A central focus of their efforts is giving back to their community. During the first few years, participants tended a garden and distributed free boxes of produce and flowers to their food-insecure neighbors. And when the pandemic hit in March, the youth partnered with various agencies including Carolina Farm Stewardship to distribute boxes of food to people in need, including restaurant workers and&nbsp;<a href="https://www.npr.org/2020/05/08/852435761/as-hospitals-lose-revenue-thousands-of-health-care-workers-face-furloughs-layoff">furloughed hospital staff</a>. They also planted a new garden on the former prison softball field that they will harvest in late summer and donate.</p>
  1180.  
  1181.  
  1182.  
  1183. <p>This direct service allows outsiders to begin seeing the young men differently, Sanford explains. He also arranges opportunities for them to present the prison-flip model they’re developing to university and government leaders across North Carolina, as well as at places like the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.</p>
  1184.  
  1185.  
  1186.  
  1187. <p>“What traditional therapy often doesn’t touch is … the community,” Sanford says. “There has to be some kind of social efficacy developed, that [community members] can have confidence that these young people&nbsp;<em>can</em>&nbsp;change. They have to make a place for them at the table.”</p>
  1188.  
  1189.  
  1190.  
  1191. <p>Admittedly, Growing Change is ambitious. But it all fits in to how Sanford—who has won multiple awards and fellowships over the years, including the&nbsp;<a href="https://www.opensocietyfoundations.org/grants/soros-justice-fellowships?fellow=noran-sanford">Soros Justice Fellowship</a>&nbsp;in 2015 and the&nbsp;<a href="https://www.ashoka.org/en-us/fellow/noran-sanford">Ashoka Fellowship</a>&nbsp;in 2016—sets out to solve problems. “This is a systems approach,” he says. “I’m a systems practitioner, really.”</p>
  1192.  
  1193.  
  1194.  
  1195. <p>Davon Goodwin, an Army-veteran-turned-farmer who became involved with Growing Change after getting injured in Afghanistan in 2010, sees agriculture as a perfect fit for the youth, many of whom suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) like he does. Farming can provide a refuge and sense of purpose for people who are struggling with trauma, he says.</p>
  1196.  
  1197.  
  1198.  
  1199. <p>“I don’t know what it is about soil, but it changes you—it humbles you, and it brings a sense of calm that the youth need,” says Goodwin, who sits on the Growing Change board, runs the&nbsp;<a href="https://sandhillsag.com/">Sandhills AGInnovation Center</a>, and credits farming for setting him on a good path during a dark time. “When you’re growing food, there’s fellowship that happens that doesn’t happen anywhere else.”</p>
  1200.  
  1201.  
  1202.  
  1203. <p>In addition to rehabilitating the youth and transforming the dark, oppressive space in Scotland County into something beneficial, Sanford hopes to provide a model for other places looking to do the same. Across the U.S., more than 300 prisons have been decommissioned, including&nbsp;<a href="https://www.ncdps.gov/adult-corrections/prisons/closed-prisons">62 in North Carolina alone</a>. Most are in poor, rural areas and have closed because of the&nbsp;<a href="https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2018/05/02/americas-incarceration-rate-is-at-a-two-decade-low/">declining number of inmates in the U.S.</a>, the consolidation of many smaller prisons into fewer larger ones, and, at least in North Carolina, Sanford says, a number of reforms affecting when people are sent to prison.</p>
  1204.  
  1205.  
  1206.  
  1207. <p>“At the core level, we are instilling hope,” Sanford continues. “When hope is gone, it creates a pretty vicious void that a lot of other grimmer things can get pulled into. And as low-wealth rural America is left further behind, then that vacuum is stronger. We’re breaking that stream.”</p>
  1208.  
  1209.  
  1210.  
  1211. <h3>At Work on the Farm</h3>
  1212.  
  1213.  
  1214.  
  1215. <p>After the released sheep settle into grazing, Garcia-Lopez heads back into the prison yard to start on another project, tying the chain-link gate shut behind him with a thick rope. A rooster crows.</p>
  1216.  
  1217.  
  1218.  
  1219. <p>“I’ve been here almost a year, and I’ve seen so much progress,” says the 17-year-old, wearing a black fleece jacket and blue jeans. “It’s neat seeing stuff coming together, even the small things.”</p>
  1220.  
  1221.  
  1222.  
  1223. <p>The teens, who are paid hourly, spend one dedicated day a week, plus additional work periods, on the farm. On this Saturday morning, multiple projects unfold across the flat yard and inside the brick barracks building full of steel-barred cells.</p>
  1224.  
  1225.  
  1226.  
  1227. <p>Over the past few weeks, the youth have built a minivan-sized chicken tractor out of wire and PVC pipe they salvaged from the prison drain field. Today, a few of them are reinforcing the joints with metal brackets so they can contain the chickens as they start grazing them behind the sheep. In a different corner of the yard, another group patches gaps in the chain-link fence so the roosters, who’ve been antagonizing the hens, can be put in their own “bachelor pad.” And inside the barracks, a third group modifies the aeration system they’ve built for the compost pile housed in a cell formerly used for solitary confinement.</p>
  1228.  
  1229.  
  1230.  
  1231. <p>The local cooperative extension and experts at the state’s two land-grant universities, N.C. State University (NCSU) and North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, have provided guidance and support through the entire project. Students at the NCSU School of Design helped craft the property’s master plan, and experts in topics like rotational grazing, mycology, and vermiculture also guide the youth.</p>
  1232.  
  1233.  
  1234.  
  1235. <p>Inside the barracks, Terrence Smith leans over the deep freezer that has been repurposed as a worm bin for a vermicomposting project. Smith uses a hand rake to stir the dark soil, exposing a number of wriggling worms. “I put five pounds of bananas in here a few days ago, and they’ve eaten the crap out of them—there’s only the skins left!” he says, impressed.</p>
  1236.  
  1237.  
  1238.  
  1239. <p>As the youth put the various elements of the massive project in place, Growing Change engages in a constant give-and-take with those around them. They receive around 600 pounds of discarded produce from the University of North Carolina at Pembroke (UNCP) each week; they redistribute the edible portions of that food to food banks, feed other scraps to the chickens, and give the spoiled pieces to either the compost pile or the soldier flies, whose larvae they’re raising to help feed the animals.</p>
  1240.  
  1241.  
  1242.  
  1243. <p>In all they do, Sanford looks for ways to create revenue streams to help compensate the youth and pay for the program. The farm sells eggs and salad greens to a nearby university, and it plans to sell meat and wool from the sheep as well. Though the garden they’re tending this spring will supply free food to the community, they eventually plan to grow the ingredients for chowchow—a recipe that honors the various backgrounds of program participants: collards for the Black youth, tomatoes for the Native Americans, cabbage for the Scotch-Irish, and jalape<em>ñ</em>os for the Latinxs—and offer the product for sale.</p>
  1244.  
  1245.  
  1246.  
  1247. <p>“Our county has many challenges,” Dr. Debby Hanmer, Growing Change board chair and founder of the sustainable agriculture program at the nearby UNCP. “I want us to be an example of what sustainable can look like, not just in agriculture, but in all things.”</p>
  1248.  
  1249.  
  1250.  
  1251. <h3>‘They Bring Out A Better Side of Me’</h3>
  1252.  
  1253.  
  1254.  
  1255. <p>While large commodity farms dominate much of the landscape in this part of North Carolina, Garcia-Lopez, like most of the other teens involved, didn’t know much about farming when he became involved a year ago. “My first day, they were like, ‘What do you know about bees?’ and I was like, ‘Absolutely nothing!’” he says. He now helps oversee the beekeeping operation.</p>
  1256.  
  1257.  
  1258.  
  1259. <p>Michael “Fluffy” Adyson Strickland became involved two years ago and has also learned many new skills, but&nbsp;<em>his&nbsp;</em>primary charge is to tame the guard donkey, Miss Easter, who was unhandled and extremely skittish when she arrived in 2018.</p>
  1260.  
  1261.  
  1262.  
  1263. <p>“I saw her, and I clicked with her—I was one of the only people who could touch her at one point in time,” says the 16-year-old, who wears a hoody and rubber boots and has his thick hair tied up in a knot. “Once I started rubbing her back, Noran was like, ‘Do you want to start taming her?’” Eventually, the program hopes to be able to allow children in the community to pet the donkey.</p>
  1264.  
  1265.  
  1266.  
  1267. <p>“When I got here, it opened my eyes,” says Strickland. He might like to pursue environmental science, with the aim of being able to help other people care for the environment, he says.</p>
  1268.  
  1269.  
  1270.  
  1271. <p>The most powerful aspect of the program for Ryan Morin, a 15-year-old with side-swept hair and a tie-dye T-shirt, has been the relationships he’s developed with the other participants. “We were all in a compromised position [when we arrived], which left us vulnerable,” he says. “The first people we encountered, we found a special bond with them. They bring out a better side of me; they have shown me who I really am and what I can become.”</p>
  1272.  
  1273.  
  1274.  
  1275. <p>So far, the program has proven effective at its central goal of keeping young men out of prison—for the 24 youth involved over the five-year period from 2011 to 2016, an internal study found it was 92 percent effective at preventing recidivism and adult incarceration.</p>
  1276.  
  1277.  
  1278.  
  1279. <p>Some say that the ultimate impact can’t be determined until years from now, once the “troubled” youth have grown up more and charted their own paths. But Sanford says he has seen noteworthy changes. “You see youth who are learning how to work successfully; they are being able to get control of substance abuse patterns; they are working through and stabilizing some of their interpersonal relationships … And you see some healing within some family systems.” Additionally, Sanford says, participants have gone on to attend college, join the military, and secure steady employment.</p>
  1280.  
  1281.  
  1282.  
  1283. <p>A decade after getting involved at the age of 14, Smith is a shining example. He grew up in an abusive household and, after being put on probation in seventh grade, was ordered to work with a Sanford as a therapist.</p>
  1284.  
  1285.  
  1286.  
  1287. <p>The program “helped me stay grounded enough to complete high school—and look forward to something afterward,” Smith says. It also taught him to carry himself in a way that people respect and respond to.</p>
  1288.  
  1289.  
  1290.  
  1291. <h3>Creating a Model to Share</h3>
  1292.  
  1293.  
  1294.  
  1295. <p>In hopes of helping others replicate the model, Sanford is in the process of creating an open-source prison-flipping model with step-by-step instructions and online resources. He is planning to distribute it to each of the 300 communities with a closed prison later this year via the national cooperative extension system.</p>
  1296.  
  1297.  
  1298.  
  1299. <p>Sanford hopes to help others in rural America convert spaces meant to confine and punish into spaces that nourish and rehabilitate. “If you look at a lot of these issues, especially around incarceration, it’s [been] a 90 percent urban conversation,” says Sanford. He wants to see that change.</p>
  1300.  
  1301.  
  1302.  
  1303. <p>At end of the day, the young people wrap up their projects and gather in the area being secured for the roosters. Strickland and two other young men retrieve the orange birds from their pens and set them down; two immediately begin to fight, fluffing their feathers and jumping toward each other. The young men hover, tempted to intervene. “Let ’em go,” Sanford says. “They’ve got to work this out.”</p>
  1304. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://dailyyonder.com/youth-are-flipping-an-abandoned-north-carolina-prison-into-a-sustainable-farm/2020/06/29/">Youth Are Flipping an Abandoned North Carolina Prison into a Sustainable Farm</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://dailyyonder.com">Daily Yonder</a>.</p>
  1305. ]]></content:encoded>
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  1307. <slash:comments>0</slash:comments>
  1308. </item>
  1309. <item>
  1310. <title>How to Garage Sale During a Pandemic</title>
  1311. <link>https://dailyyonder.com/how-to-garage-sale-during-a-pandemic/2020/06/29/</link>
  1312. <comments>https://dailyyonder.com/how-to-garage-sale-during-a-pandemic/2020/06/29/#respond</comments>
  1313. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Donna Kallner]]></dc:creator>
  1314. <pubDate>Mon, 29 Jun 2020 10:00:00 +0000</pubDate>
  1315. <category><![CDATA[Coronavirus]]></category>
  1316. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://dailyyonder.com/?p=59301</guid>
  1317.  
  1318. <description><![CDATA[<figure><img width="760" height="474" src="https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/IMG_20200522_121416-scaled-e1590507953848.jpg?fit=760%2C474&amp;ssl=1" class="attachment-medium size-medium wp-post-image" alt="" srcset="https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/IMG_20200522_121416-scaled-e1590507953848.jpg?w=2022&amp;ssl=1 2022w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/IMG_20200522_121416-scaled-e1590507953848.jpg?resize=760%2C474&amp;ssl=1 760w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/IMG_20200522_121416-scaled-e1590507953848.jpg?resize=1296%2C808&amp;ssl=1 1296w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/IMG_20200522_121416-scaled-e1590507953848.jpg?resize=768%2C479&amp;ssl=1 768w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/IMG_20200522_121416-scaled-e1590507953848.jpg?resize=1536%2C958&amp;ssl=1 1536w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/IMG_20200522_121416-scaled-e1590507953848.jpg?resize=750%2C468&amp;ssl=1 750w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/IMG_20200522_121416-scaled-e1590507953848.jpg?resize=250%2C156&amp;ssl=1 250w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/IMG_20200522_121416-scaled-e1590507953848.jpg?w=1920&amp;ssl=1 1920w" sizes="(max-width: 34.9rem) calc(100vw - 2rem), (max-width: 53rem) calc(8 * (100vw / 12)), (min-width: 53rem) calc(6 * (100vw / 12)), 100vw" /></figure>
  1319. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://dailyyonder.com/how-to-garage-sale-during-a-pandemic/2020/06/29/">How to Garage Sale During a Pandemic</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://dailyyonder.com">Daily Yonder</a>.</p>
  1320. ]]></description>
  1321. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<figure><img width="760" height="474" src="https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/IMG_20200522_121416-scaled-e1590507953848.jpg?fit=760%2C474&amp;ssl=1" class="attachment-medium size-medium wp-post-image" alt="" srcset="https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/IMG_20200522_121416-scaled-e1590507953848.jpg?w=2022&amp;ssl=1 2022w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/IMG_20200522_121416-scaled-e1590507953848.jpg?resize=760%2C474&amp;ssl=1 760w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/IMG_20200522_121416-scaled-e1590507953848.jpg?resize=1296%2C808&amp;ssl=1 1296w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/IMG_20200522_121416-scaled-e1590507953848.jpg?resize=768%2C479&amp;ssl=1 768w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/IMG_20200522_121416-scaled-e1590507953848.jpg?resize=1536%2C958&amp;ssl=1 1536w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/IMG_20200522_121416-scaled-e1590507953848.jpg?resize=750%2C468&amp;ssl=1 750w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/IMG_20200522_121416-scaled-e1590507953848.jpg?resize=250%2C156&amp;ssl=1 250w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/IMG_20200522_121416-scaled-e1590507953848.jpg?w=1920&amp;ssl=1 1920w" sizes="(max-width: 34.9rem) calc(100vw - 2rem), (max-width: 53rem) calc(8 * (100vw / 12)), (min-width: 53rem) calc(6 * (100vw / 12)), 100vw" /></figure>
  1322. <div class="wp-block-group"><div class="wp-block-group__inner-container">
  1323. <p>After a couple months of stay-at-home orders, many rural families are faced with a new crisis: The kids didn&#8217;t stop growing. I&#8217;m not talking about the &#8220;<a href="https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=COVID-15">Covid-15</a>&#8221; weight gain that many adults experienced in isolation. I mean arms and legs that are too long for the shirts and pants they wore two months ago. And the shorts and tees they wore last summer? Yikes!</p>
  1324.  
  1325.  
  1326.  
  1327. <p>Unless they get some new clothes soon, some of our kids will look like modern-day relatives of <a href="https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Li%27l_Abner"><em>Li&#8217;l Abner</em></a>. You might not remember that old comic strip but that&#8217;s what your grandparents may be thinking of when you chop pant legs and sleeves off the clothes your kids are busting out of.&nbsp;</p>
  1328.  
  1329.  
  1330.  
  1331. <p>In normal times, many rural families head to garage sales to get summer clothes for the kids. But these aren&#8217;t normal times. Some health departments, municipalities, even states have banned – or at least strongly discouraged – garage sales.&nbsp;</p>
  1332.  
  1333.  
  1334.  
  1335. <p>And they do have some pretty good reasons. Normal garage sale behaviors could be risky during a pandemic, although those behaviors may sound far-fetched if you have never experienced a garage sale firsthand. Your neighbors are used to congregating in your driveway before a sale opens so they can rush in as a mob to be first to reach stuff you just want out of your house. And, yes, we do go from one garage sale after another to paw through other people&#8217;s junk. If you look at it from a health department standpoint, it&#8217;s the perfect recipe for community spread of a virus.</p>
  1336.  
  1337.  
  1338.  
  1339. <p>The adrenaline rush that comes with spotting a rack of garments &#8220;<em>the right sizes!!!&#8221;</em>&nbsp;doesn&#8217;t have to make you forget your pandemic manners, though. So if your area allows garage sales, here are ways both shoppers and sellers can protect themselves and their communities.</p>
  1340.  
  1341.  
  1342.  
  1343. <p><strong>Pandemic Manners For Garage Sale Buyers</strong></p>
  1344.  
  1345.  
  1346.  
  1347. <ul><li><strong>Leave the kids at home.</strong> You&#8217;re desperate for a little alone time anyway, and this is the perfect excuse. <em>It&#8217;s not safe to risk them touching stuff, </em>you say. <em>Some people aren&#8217;t even allowing kids into their sales now. </em>Take a tape measure and a list of their current measurements instead. You&#8217;re welcome.&nbsp;</li></ul>
  1348.  
  1349.  
  1350.  
  1351. <ul><li><strong>Be prepared. </strong>At minimum you will want to have hand sanitizer, a mask, that tape measure and list of current measurements, your own bags for containing purchases before they go into your car, and cash in different denominations (more on that below). Put that cash in an envelope: Nobody wants bills that have been tucked in your bra. Go to the bathroom before leaving home. Clear a space in the car for your purchases.</li></ul>
  1352.  
  1353.  
  1354.  
  1355. <ul><li><strong>Keep a record. </strong>If you visit multiple sales to stretch out that alone time, snap a picture at each place. Geotagged photos will help you remember exactly where you were and at what time in case your health department calls you while contact tracing an outbreak. Having a clear record may help you avoid 14 days of unnecessary quarantine – or help you know to begin it sooner rather than later.</li></ul>
  1356.  
  1357.  
  1358.  
  1359. <ul><li><strong>Look for signs.</strong> Many sellers will be posting signs that explain their expectations of buyers and the precautions they have taken for your safety. Find them, read them, follow them. If you can&#8217;t, politely excuse yourself and leave. This is not the time to haggle over pricing or politics. </li></ul>
  1360.  
  1361.  
  1362.  
  1363. <ul><li><strong>Keep your hands in your pockets. </strong>Yeah – don&#8217;t be touching stuff unless you&#8217;re seriously considering a purchase. Do others the courtesy of sanitizing right before you shop, and do it again before you open your car. Don&#8217;t touch your face.</li></ul>
  1364.  
  1365.  
  1366.  
  1367. <ul><li><strong>Keep your distance. </strong>Using hand sanitizer and not touching your face help prevent the transfer of the virus from surfaces. But you are still vulnerable to airborne droplets from other people coughing, sneezing, laughing, and possibly even talking loud enough for a geezer like me to hear the question. A mask helps disrupt the trajectory of those droplets, which is why you want to see sellers and other shoppers wearing masks, too. But you still want to maintain that recommended 6-foot social distance, especially when the sale is inside a garage instead of in the yard. Rather than break that boundary, yield. A seasoned garage sale shopper knows some people have no concept of personal space. They <em>should </em>know better by now, but don&#8217;t bet on it. Likewise, if the seller has not limited the number of shoppers or isn&#8217;t enforcing the limits, you might as well leave. Your kids need you healthy more than they need new-to-them clothes.</li></ul>
  1368.  
  1369.  
  1370.  
  1371. <ul><li><strong>Don&#8217;t linger. </strong>Viral transmission increases with time. Make it your goal to be in and out in 10 minutes. Be a Hunter, not a Gatherer: Scan, sight the target, acquire, retreat. It&#8217;s a different kind of satisfaction than you get from turning over each item to see what might be hidden beneath. But we both know that any item you miss this time will probably show up at another garage sale in a year or two. You&#8217;ll get another chance.</li></ul>
  1372.  
  1373.  
  1374.  
  1375. <ul><li><strong>Don&#8217;t go if you or someone in your home is or has been unwell or had close contact with someone who might have been infectious.</strong> The responsible thing then is to stay home. Maybe instead you can text your list of current measurements and a link to this article to a friend who can shop for you. Imagine how much fun it will be telling your kids, &#8220;But Auntie picked this out just for you!&#8221; When every other article of their clothing is too tight, they might learn to broaden their taste in attire. <em>Nobody gave me a choice and I survived</em> is another option. Yes, we do turn into our mothers. </li></ul>
  1376.  
  1377.  
  1378.  
  1379. <ul><li><strong>Clean your purchases. </strong>Bag your purchases before putting them in your car. Launder or sanitize everything when you get home.</li></ul>
  1380.  
  1381.  
  1382.  
  1383. <p><strong>Pandemic Procedures For Garage Sale Sellers</strong></p>
  1384.  
  1385.  
  1386.  
  1387. <ul><li><strong>Check the rules. </strong>If permits are required in your area, get a permit. Visit your county health department&#8217;s web site to confirm that garage sales are allowed and if so, what are the rules.</li></ul>
  1388.  
  1389.  
  1390.  
  1391. <ul><li><strong>Weigh the risks.</strong> If someone in your household or close contacts circle is immune-compromised or there are other elevated risk factors, you may want to pass up this year&#8217;s sale. </li></ul>
  1392.  
  1393.  
  1394.  
  1395. <ul><li><strong>Skip the mega-sale. </strong>Most years there&#8217;s an advantage to having multi-household sales: The more items you have to promote, the more buyers you can attract. This year it might be best to target specific buyers and keep your sale smaller. Kid clothes? Perfect. Lawn games and outdoor furniture? Awesome. Books and home decor items? Leave them in the boxes where you Marie Kondo&#8217;d them during quarantine. They&#8217;ll be ready for next year&#8217;s sale.</li></ul>
  1396.  
  1397.  
  1398.  
  1399. <ul><li><strong>Skip the ads.</strong> Maybe this year you don&#8217;t really want shoppers coming from outside your area. Attracting targeted, local shoppers to a smaller sale is doable on social media. Let people know when it is (and no early sales), what you will have (pictures help), what you will do to protect buyers, and what precautions you expect from buyers. </li></ul>
  1400.  
  1401.  
  1402.  
  1403. <ul><li><strong>Be clear about expectations.</strong> In your social media posts, let people know what you expect. At your sale, post signs with those expectations in several locations. Yours may differ but here&#8217;s a sample:</li></ul>
  1404.  
  1405.  
  1406.  
  1407. <ul><li><strong>Rules of This Sale</strong><ul><li>No early sales. </li><li>Buyers must wear face masks.</li><li>Only 4 buyers allowed in at a time.</li><li>Keep your distance.</li><li>No children.</li><li>Buyers get 10 minutes to shop if others are waiting.</li><li>Ask for help. Clothing is sorted by size.</li><li>Cash only, exact change appreciated.</li></ul></li></ul>
  1408.  
  1409.  
  1410.  
  1411. <ul><li><strong>To price or not to price? </strong>Pricing takes time, requires extra supplies and handling, and is nobody&#8217;s favorite part of garage sale preparation. Instead, you might try a &#8220;priceless&#8221; sale:</li></ul>
  1412.  
  1413.  
  1414.  
  1415. <ul><li><strong>Pay what you think is fair or what you can afford. </strong>We want to make cashing out simple and with minimal contact. Exact change is greatly appreciated. Thank you!</li></ul>
  1416.  
  1417.  
  1418.  
  1419. <p>Some shoppers are uncomfortable with this style of sale because they&#8217;re afraid they will offend you by offering too little. The only way it really works is if the seller is resolved to accept <em>whatever </em>amount a buyer tenders. If you can&#8217;t do that, better spend the time pricing and be prepared to handle more cash as you make change.</p>
  1420.  
  1421.  
  1422.  
  1423. <ul><li><strong>Cash handling. </strong>If you do a priceless sale, you can minimize handling of money by having buyers deposit directly into a piggy bank or equivalent. You can DIY a cash drop by cutting a slot into a recycled gallon ice cream tub covered to hide the contents. For security, duct tape the lid in place and zip-tie the tub to something too big to walk away. You will still want to be able to make some changes, just in case. At the end of the day you can put on disposable gloves just once to count up your earnings.</li></ul>
  1424.  
  1425.  
  1426.  
  1427. <ul><li><strong>Crowd control</strong>. If possible, set up your sale outdoors with spacing that allows a safe social distance between shoppers. If you must set up inside the garage, position racks or tables with more space for movement than you might have allowed at previous sales. You may want to display clothing (especially kid clothes) by size in separate groupings so people aren&#8217;t handling everything to get to what they need. To limit the number of shoppers at one time (and hold back the early birds), mark out a perimeter. We use flagging tape and electric fence posts. You might even consider a one-way traffic flow with separate entrance and exit.</li></ul>
  1428.  
  1429.  
  1430.  
  1431. <figure class="wp-block-image size-large"><img src="https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/IMG_20170526_142255_DRO.jpg?w=960&#038;ssl=1" alt="" class="wp-image-59304" srcset="https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/IMG_20170526_142255_DRO.jpg?w=1280&amp;ssl=1 1280w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/IMG_20170526_142255_DRO.jpg?resize=760%2C570&amp;ssl=1 760w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/IMG_20170526_142255_DRO.jpg?resize=768%2C576&amp;ssl=1 768w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/IMG_20170526_142255_DRO.jpg?resize=750%2C563&amp;ssl=1 750w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/IMG_20170526_142255_DRO.jpg?resize=250%2C188&amp;ssl=1 250w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/IMG_20170526_142255_DRO.jpg?resize=86%2C64&amp;ssl=1 86w" sizes="(max-width: 960px) 100vw, 960px" data-recalc-dims="1" /><figcaption>The author uses flagging tape and electric fence posts to set up a sale perimeter and control traffic &#8212; especially early bird shoppers. Photo by Donna Kallner</figcaption></figure>
  1432.  
  1433.  
  1434.  
  1435. <ul><li><strong>No play area.</strong> In normal times, some sellers set up a play area to keep kids occupied so their parents shop longer. Or they have a box of toys or treats and the little ones can pick out a freebie. Not this year.</li></ul>
  1436.  
  1437.  
  1438.  
  1439. <ul><li><strong>Take Covid-19 precautions seriously.</strong> Disinfect surfaces (including plastic hangers) as you set up, and throughout the sale. Wear a mask. Provide hand sanitizer (you may want to zip-tie it to something that can&#8217;t walk away). Maintain social distance. Provide a lined trash container for customers who wear disposable gloves while shopping.</li></ul>
  1440.  
  1441.  
  1442.  
  1443. <ul><li><strong>Protect your home.</strong> When you have to go into your home to use the bathroom, take the time to use hand sanitizer and let it dry before reaching for the door. Once you get inside, wash your hands thoroughly. On your way back out, disinfect faucets, doorknobs, light switches, and other surfaces you might have touched.</li></ul>
  1444.  
  1445.  
  1446.  
  1447. <ul><li><strong>Protect yourself.</strong> Keep your mask on. Don&#8217;t touch your face. When you need to eat or drink, have another member of your household cover for you at the sale and go inside. Wash your hands, remove the mask, and wash your hands and face. Feeling grubby is normal when you hold a garage sale, even without a pandemic.</li></ul>
  1448.  
  1449.  
  1450.  
  1451. <ul><li><strong>When it&#8217;s over, take down signs, shift unsold items as necessary, and close up.</strong> While you&#8217;re still grubby, count the cash and place it in a clean envelope. Sanitize surfaces you touch as you enter your home. Clothes go right into the washer, you go right into the shower. </li></ul>
  1452.  
  1453.  
  1454.  
  1455. <p>It will take a bit of planning and some simple precautions to garage sale during this pandemic. But please, take those precautions seriously. A few days after a sale you don&#8217;t want to wish you had.</p>
  1456.  
  1457.  
  1458.  
  1459. <p><em>Donna Kallner writes from rural northern Wisconsin.</em></p>
  1460. </div></div>
  1461. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://dailyyonder.com/how-to-garage-sale-during-a-pandemic/2020/06/29/">How to Garage Sale During a Pandemic</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://dailyyonder.com">Daily Yonder</a>.</p>
  1462. ]]></content:encoded>
  1463. <wfw:commentRss>https://dailyyonder.com/how-to-garage-sale-during-a-pandemic/2020/06/29/feed/</wfw:commentRss>
  1464. <slash:comments>0</slash:comments>
  1465. </item>
  1466. <item>
  1467. <title>For Four Days in a Row, Rural Counties Set Record for New Covid-19 Cases</title>
  1468. <link>https://dailyyonder.com/rural-counties-have-highest-number-of-new-infections-four-days-straight/2020/06/27/</link>
  1469. <comments>https://dailyyonder.com/rural-counties-have-highest-number-of-new-infections-four-days-straight/2020/06/27/#respond</comments>
  1470. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Tim Marema]]></dc:creator>
  1471. <pubDate>Sat, 27 Jun 2020 22:34:33 +0000</pubDate>
  1472. <category><![CDATA[Coronavirus]]></category>
  1473. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://dailyyonder.com/?p=60933</guid>
  1474.  
  1475. <description><![CDATA[<figure><img width="760" height="409" src="https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/NEWdailycassthrujune26.jpg?fit=760%2C409&amp;ssl=1" class="attachment-medium size-medium wp-post-image" alt="" srcset="https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/NEWdailycassthrujune26.jpg?w=1126&amp;ssl=1 1126w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/NEWdailycassthrujune26.jpg?resize=760%2C409&amp;ssl=1 760w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/NEWdailycassthrujune26.jpg?resize=768%2C413&amp;ssl=1 768w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/NEWdailycassthrujune26.jpg?resize=706%2C380&amp;ssl=1 706w" sizes="(max-width: 34.9rem) calc(100vw - 2rem), (max-width: 53rem) calc(8 * (100vw / 12)), (min-width: 53rem) calc(6 * (100vw / 12)), 100vw" /></figure>
  1476. <p>Rural counties have seen record-breaking numbers of new Covid-19 cases for the last four days in a row. The streak started on Tuesday, June 23, when there were 3,885 new cases of Covid-19 in nonmetropolitan, or rural, counties. The figure climbed each day, reaching 4,550 new cases on Friday, June 26. The previous record for [&#8230;]</p>
  1477. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://dailyyonder.com/rural-counties-have-highest-number-of-new-infections-four-days-straight/2020/06/27/">For Four Days in a Row, Rural Counties Set Record for New Covid-19 Cases</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://dailyyonder.com">Daily Yonder</a>.</p>
  1478. ]]></description>
  1479. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<figure><img width="760" height="409" src="https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/NEWdailycassthrujune26.jpg?fit=760%2C409&amp;ssl=1" class="attachment-medium size-medium wp-post-image" alt="" srcset="https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/NEWdailycassthrujune26.jpg?w=1126&amp;ssl=1 1126w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/NEWdailycassthrujune26.jpg?resize=760%2C409&amp;ssl=1 760w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/NEWdailycassthrujune26.jpg?resize=768%2C413&amp;ssl=1 768w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/NEWdailycassthrujune26.jpg?resize=706%2C380&amp;ssl=1 706w" sizes="(max-width: 34.9rem) calc(100vw - 2rem), (max-width: 53rem) calc(8 * (100vw / 12)), (min-width: 53rem) calc(6 * (100vw / 12)), 100vw" /></figure>
  1480. <p>Rural counties have seen record-breaking numbers of new Covid-19 cases for the last four days in a row.</p>
  1481.  
  1482.  
  1483.  
  1484. <p>The streak started on Tuesday, June 23, when there were 3,885 new cases of Covid-19 in nonmetropolitan, or rural, counties. The figure climbed each day, reaching 4,550 new cases on Friday, June 26.</p>
  1485.  
  1486.  
  1487.  
  1488. <p>The previous record for new Covid-19 cases on a single day in nonmetropolitan counties was set on June 12, when there were 3,655 new infections.</p>
  1489.  
  1490.  
  1491.  
  1492. <p>The rise in new cases of Covid-19 in rural counties is part of the national uptick in infections. Rural cases are rising at a slightly faster rate than the national average. In the last week, June 20-26, the cumulative number of rural infections climbed by 11.9%. Nationally, cases were up 9.5% for that period.&nbsp;</p>
  1493.  
  1494.  
  1495.  
  1496. <p>The rate of increase is greatest in midsized metropolitan areas (metros with populations of 500,000 to under 1 million). Those counties had an increase of 13.9% June 20-26.For our most recent county-level map of new infections,<a href="https://dailyyonder.com/rural-counties-set-record-for-new-cases-of-covid-19/2020/06/26/"> see our June 26 article</a>.</p>
  1497. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://dailyyonder.com/rural-counties-have-highest-number-of-new-infections-four-days-straight/2020/06/27/">For Four Days in a Row, Rural Counties Set Record for New Covid-19 Cases</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://dailyyonder.com">Daily Yonder</a>.</p>
  1498. ]]></content:encoded>
  1499. <wfw:commentRss>https://dailyyonder.com/rural-counties-have-highest-number-of-new-infections-four-days-straight/2020/06/27/feed/</wfw:commentRss>
  1500. <slash:comments>0</slash:comments>
  1501. </item>
  1502. <item>
  1503. <title>Down Yonder: Covid-19 Behind Bars, American Greater Good, 36 Mile-Long Lifeline, Schoolbus Drivers, No Wall on Tribal Land</title>
  1504. <link>https://dailyyonder.com/down-yonder-covid-19-behind-bars-american-greater-good-36-mile-long-lifeline-schoolbus-drivers-no-wall-on-tribal-land/2020/06/27/</link>
  1505. <comments>https://dailyyonder.com/down-yonder-covid-19-behind-bars-american-greater-good-36-mile-long-lifeline-schoolbus-drivers-no-wall-on-tribal-land/2020/06/27/#respond</comments>
  1506. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Staff]]></dc:creator>
  1507. <pubDate>Sat, 27 Jun 2020 10:00:00 +0000</pubDate>
  1508. <category><![CDATA[Media]]></category>
  1509. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://dailyyonder.com/?p=60854</guid>
  1510.  
  1511. <description><![CDATA[<figure><img width="760" height="428" src="https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/DownYonder-attached-arrow.jpg?fit=760%2C428&amp;ssl=1" class="attachment-medium size-medium wp-post-image" alt="" srcset="https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/DownYonder-attached-arrow.jpg?w=1920&amp;ssl=1 1920w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/DownYonder-attached-arrow.jpg?resize=760%2C428&amp;ssl=1 760w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/DownYonder-attached-arrow.jpg?resize=1296%2C729&amp;ssl=1 1296w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/DownYonder-attached-arrow.jpg?resize=768%2C432&amp;ssl=1 768w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/DownYonder-attached-arrow.jpg?resize=1536%2C864&amp;ssl=1 1536w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/DownYonder-attached-arrow.jpg?resize=750%2C422&amp;ssl=1 750w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/DownYonder-attached-arrow.jpg?resize=250%2C141&amp;ssl=1 250w" sizes="(max-width: 34.9rem) calc(100vw - 2rem), (max-width: 53rem) calc(8 * (100vw / 12)), (min-width: 53rem) calc(6 * (100vw / 12)), 100vw" /></figure>
  1512. <p>Welcome to Down Yonder – our weekly roundup of good reads we&#8217;ve found around the web. Our goal is to showcase more perspectives on national and global issues through a rural lens. Expect Down Yonder on Saturdays. Enjoy! ProPublica: Inside the U.S.’s Largest Maximum-Security Prison, Covid-19 Raged. Outside, Officials Called Their Fight a Success. Inmates [&#8230;]</p>
  1513. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://dailyyonder.com/down-yonder-covid-19-behind-bars-american-greater-good-36-mile-long-lifeline-schoolbus-drivers-no-wall-on-tribal-land/2020/06/27/">Down Yonder: Covid-19 Behind Bars, American Greater Good, 36 Mile-Long Lifeline, Schoolbus Drivers, No Wall on Tribal Land</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://dailyyonder.com">Daily Yonder</a>.</p>
  1514. ]]></description>
  1515. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<figure><img width="760" height="428" src="https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/DownYonder-attached-arrow.jpg?fit=760%2C428&amp;ssl=1" class="attachment-medium size-medium wp-post-image" alt="" srcset="https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/DownYonder-attached-arrow.jpg?w=1920&amp;ssl=1 1920w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/DownYonder-attached-arrow.jpg?resize=760%2C428&amp;ssl=1 760w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/DownYonder-attached-arrow.jpg?resize=1296%2C729&amp;ssl=1 1296w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/DownYonder-attached-arrow.jpg?resize=768%2C432&amp;ssl=1 768w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/DownYonder-attached-arrow.jpg?resize=1536%2C864&amp;ssl=1 1536w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/DownYonder-attached-arrow.jpg?resize=750%2C422&amp;ssl=1 750w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/DownYonder-attached-arrow.jpg?resize=250%2C141&amp;ssl=1 250w" sizes="(max-width: 34.9rem) calc(100vw - 2rem), (max-width: 53rem) calc(8 * (100vw / 12)), (min-width: 53rem) calc(6 * (100vw / 12)), 100vw" /></figure>
  1516. <hr class="wp-block-separator is-style-wide"/>
  1517.  
  1518.  
  1519.  
  1520. <div class="wp-block-media-text alignwide is-stacked-on-mobile" style="grid-template-columns:28% auto"><figure class="wp-block-media-text__media"><img src="https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/ARROW_Y.jpg?resize=960%2C540&#038;ssl=1" alt="" class="wp-image-59211" srcset="https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/ARROW_Y.jpg?resize=1296%2C729&amp;ssl=1 1296w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/ARROW_Y.jpg?resize=760%2C428&amp;ssl=1 760w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/ARROW_Y.jpg?resize=768%2C432&amp;ssl=1 768w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/ARROW_Y.jpg?resize=1536%2C864&amp;ssl=1 1536w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/ARROW_Y.jpg?resize=750%2C422&amp;ssl=1 750w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/ARROW_Y.jpg?resize=250%2C141&amp;ssl=1 250w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/ARROW_Y.jpg?w=1920&amp;ssl=1 1920w" sizes="(max-width: 960px) 100vw, 960px" data-recalc-dims="1" /></figure><div class="wp-block-media-text__content">
  1521. <p>Welcome to <strong>Down Yonder</strong> – our weekly roundup of good reads we&#8217;ve found around the web.</p>
  1522.  
  1523.  
  1524.  
  1525. <p>Our goal is to showcase more perspectives on national and global issues through a rural lens. Expect Down Yonder on Saturdays. Enjoy!</p>
  1526. </div></div>
  1527.  
  1528.  
  1529.  
  1530. <hr class="wp-block-separator is-style-wide"/>
  1531.  
  1532.  
  1533.  
  1534. <div class="wp-block-media-text alignwide is-stacked-on-mobile" style="grid-template-columns:30% auto"><figure class="wp-block-media-text__media"><img src="https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Screen-Shot-2020-06-25-at-8.24.12-AM.png?w=960&#038;ssl=1" alt="" class="wp-image-60855" srcset="https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Screen-Shot-2020-06-25-at-8.24.12-AM.png?w=826&amp;ssl=1 826w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Screen-Shot-2020-06-25-at-8.24.12-AM.png?resize=760%2C688&amp;ssl=1 760w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Screen-Shot-2020-06-25-at-8.24.12-AM.png?resize=768%2C695&amp;ssl=1 768w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Screen-Shot-2020-06-25-at-8.24.12-AM.png?resize=706%2C639&amp;ssl=1 706w" sizes="(max-width: 826px) 100vw, 826px" data-recalc-dims="1" /></figure><div class="wp-block-media-text__content">
  1535. <p style="font-size:17px"><strong>ProPublica: <a href="https://www.propublica.org/article/inside-the-uss-largest-maximum-security-prison-covid-19-raged">Inside the U.S.’s Largest Maximum-Security Prison, Covid-19 Raged. Outside, Officials Called Their Fight a Success.</a> </strong></p>
  1536.  
  1537.  
  1538.  
  1539. <p style="font-size:17px">Inmates at Angola prison in Louisiana told ProPublica of widespread illness, dysfunctional care and deadly neglect as the coronavirus outbreak hit.</p>
  1540. </div></div>
  1541.  
  1542.  
  1543.  
  1544. <hr class="wp-block-separator is-style-wide"/>
  1545.  
  1546.  
  1547.  
  1548. <div class="wp-block-media-text alignwide is-stacked-on-mobile" style="grid-template-columns:30% auto"><figure class="wp-block-media-text__media"><img src="https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Screen-Shot-2020-06-25-at-8.35.52-AM.png?w=960&#038;ssl=1" alt="" class="wp-image-60858" srcset="https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Screen-Shot-2020-06-25-at-8.35.52-AM.png?w=712&amp;ssl=1 712w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Screen-Shot-2020-06-25-at-8.35.52-AM.png?resize=706%2C656&amp;ssl=1 706w" sizes="(max-width: 712px) 100vw, 712px" data-recalc-dims="1" /></figure><div class="wp-block-media-text__content">
  1549. <p style="font-size:17px"><strong>Grist: <a href="https://grist.org/politics/covid-masks-reveal-americas-collective-action-problem/">What Greater Good? Covid Is Unmasking America’s Collective Action Problem. </a></strong></p>
  1550.  
  1551.  
  1552.  
  1553. <p style="font-size:17px">Over the pandemic-filled last four months, one thing’s become clear: Face masks can slow the spread of coronavirus and help to flatten the curve. The only issue? Mask-wearing is starting to look like a giant collective action problem — and many Americans are refusing to cooperate.</p>
  1554. </div></div>
  1555.  
  1556.  
  1557.  
  1558. <hr class="wp-block-separator is-style-wide"/>
  1559.  
  1560.  
  1561.  
  1562. <div class="wp-block-media-text alignwide is-stacked-on-mobile" style="grid-template-columns:30% auto"><figure class="wp-block-media-text__media"><img src="https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Screen-Shot-2020-06-25-at-9.39.23-AM.png?w=960&#038;ssl=1" alt="" class="wp-image-60860" srcset="https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Screen-Shot-2020-06-25-at-9.39.23-AM.png?w=1094&amp;ssl=1 1094w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Screen-Shot-2020-06-25-at-9.39.23-AM.png?resize=760%2C738&amp;ssl=1 760w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Screen-Shot-2020-06-25-at-9.39.23-AM.png?resize=768%2C746&amp;ssl=1 768w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Screen-Shot-2020-06-25-at-9.39.23-AM.png?resize=706%2C685&amp;ssl=1 706w" sizes="(max-width: 960px) 100vw, 960px" data-recalc-dims="1" /></figure><div class="wp-block-media-text__content">
  1563. <p style="font-size:17px"><strong>High Country News: <a href="https://www.hcn.org/articles/photos-transportation-cordovas-longest-road-just-36-miles-provides-a-lifeline-for-rural-alaskans">Cordova’s longest road, just 36 miles, provides a lifeline for rural Alaskans </a></strong></p>
  1564.  
  1565.  
  1566.  
  1567. <p style="font-size:17px">Photos explore life on the Copper River Highway.</p>
  1568. </div></div>
  1569.  
  1570.  
  1571.  
  1572. <hr class="wp-block-separator is-style-wide"/>
  1573.  
  1574.  
  1575.  
  1576. <div class="wp-block-media-text alignwide is-stacked-on-mobile" style="grid-template-columns:30% auto"><figure class="wp-block-media-text__media"><img src="https://i2.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Screen-Shot-2020-06-25-at-10.02.25-AM.png?w=960&#038;ssl=1" alt="" class="wp-image-60862" srcset="https://i2.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Screen-Shot-2020-06-25-at-10.02.25-AM.png?w=806&amp;ssl=1 806w, https://i2.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Screen-Shot-2020-06-25-at-10.02.25-AM.png?resize=698%2C760&amp;ssl=1 698w, https://i2.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Screen-Shot-2020-06-25-at-10.02.25-AM.png?resize=768%2C837&amp;ssl=1 768w, https://i2.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Screen-Shot-2020-06-25-at-10.02.25-AM.png?resize=706%2C769&amp;ssl=1 706w" sizes="(max-width: 806px) 100vw, 806px" data-recalc-dims="1" /></figure><div class="wp-block-media-text__content">
  1577. <p style="font-size:17px"><strong>The Hechinger Report: </strong><a href="https://hechingerreport.org/when-kids-go-back-to-school-whos-going-to-drive-the-bus/"><strong>When Kids Go Back to School, Who’s Going to Drive the Bus?</strong> </a></p>
  1578.  
  1579.  
  1580.  
  1581. <p style="font-size:17px">Bus drivers, like other school support staff, are often older and can’t do their jobs remotely. School administrators are struggling to figure out how to reopen while keeping these staff safe.</p>
  1582. </div></div>
  1583.  
  1584.  
  1585.  
  1586. <hr class="wp-block-separator is-style-wide"/>
  1587.  
  1588.  
  1589.  
  1590. <div class="wp-block-media-text alignwide is-stacked-on-mobile" style="grid-template-columns:30% auto"><figure class="wp-block-media-text__media"><img src="https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Screen-Shot-2020-06-25-at-10.44.47-AM.png?w=960&#038;ssl=1" alt="" class="wp-image-60864" srcset="https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Screen-Shot-2020-06-25-at-10.44.47-AM.png?w=882&amp;ssl=1 882w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Screen-Shot-2020-06-25-at-10.44.47-AM.png?resize=760%2C751&amp;ssl=1 760w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Screen-Shot-2020-06-25-at-10.44.47-AM.png?resize=768%2C759&amp;ssl=1 768w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Screen-Shot-2020-06-25-at-10.44.47-AM.png?resize=706%2C698&amp;ssl=1 706w, https://i1.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Screen-Shot-2020-06-25-at-10.44.47-AM.png?resize=100%2C100&amp;ssl=1 100w" sizes="(max-width: 882px) 100vw, 882px" data-recalc-dims="1" /></figure><div class="wp-block-media-text__content">
  1591. <p style="font-size:17px"><strong>Cronkite News: <a href="https://cronkitenews.azpbs.org/2020/06/24/border-wall-cocopah-reservation/">For Now, No Border Wall Will Split Cocopah Reservation Along the Colorado River</a> </strong></p>
  1592.  
  1593.  
  1594.  
  1595. <p style="font-size:17px">Border wall now stretches along just more than 200 miles of U.S.-Mexico borderland.  But there’s a tiny swath of tribal land along the lower Colorado River where that’s not the case.</p>
  1596. </div></div>
  1597.  
  1598.  
  1599.  
  1600. <hr class="wp-block-separator is-style-wide"/>
  1601. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://dailyyonder.com/down-yonder-covid-19-behind-bars-american-greater-good-36-mile-long-lifeline-schoolbus-drivers-no-wall-on-tribal-land/2020/06/27/">Down Yonder: Covid-19 Behind Bars, American Greater Good, 36 Mile-Long Lifeline, Schoolbus Drivers, No Wall on Tribal Land</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://dailyyonder.com">Daily Yonder</a>.</p>
  1602. ]]></content:encoded>
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  1604. <slash:comments>0</slash:comments>
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  1606. <item>
  1607. <title>Commentary: The Role of Human Capital in Community Development</title>
  1608. <link>https://dailyyonder.com/commentary-the-role-of-human-capital-in-community-development/2020/06/26/</link>
  1609. <comments>https://dailyyonder.com/commentary-the-role-of-human-capital-in-community-development/2020/06/26/#respond</comments>
  1610. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Scott Thompson]]></dc:creator>
  1611. <pubDate>Fri, 26 Jun 2020 17:00:00 +0000</pubDate>
  1612. <category><![CDATA[Growth and Development]]></category>
  1613. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://dailyyonder.com/?p=57091</guid>
  1614.  
  1615. <description><![CDATA[<figure><img width="760" height="507" src="https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/savings-2789112_1920.jpg?fit=760%2C507&amp;ssl=1" class="attachment-medium size-medium wp-post-image" alt="" srcset="https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/savings-2789112_1920.jpg?w=1920&amp;ssl=1 1920w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/savings-2789112_1920.jpg?resize=760%2C507&amp;ssl=1 760w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/savings-2789112_1920.jpg?resize=1296%2C864&amp;ssl=1 1296w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/savings-2789112_1920.jpg?resize=768%2C512&amp;ssl=1 768w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/savings-2789112_1920.jpg?resize=1536%2C1024&amp;ssl=1 1536w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/savings-2789112_1920.jpg?resize=750%2C500&amp;ssl=1 750w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/savings-2789112_1920.jpg?resize=250%2C167&amp;ssl=1 250w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/savings-2789112_1920.jpg?resize=450%2C300&amp;ssl=1 450w" sizes="(max-width: 34.9rem) calc(100vw - 2rem), (max-width: 53rem) calc(8 * (100vw / 12)), (min-width: 53rem) calc(6 * (100vw / 12)), 100vw" /></figure>
  1616. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://dailyyonder.com/commentary-the-role-of-human-capital-in-community-development/2020/06/26/">Commentary: The Role of Human Capital in Community Development</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://dailyyonder.com">Daily Yonder</a>.</p>
  1617. ]]></description>
  1618. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<figure><img width="760" height="507" src="https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/savings-2789112_1920.jpg?fit=760%2C507&amp;ssl=1" class="attachment-medium size-medium wp-post-image" alt="" srcset="https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/savings-2789112_1920.jpg?w=1920&amp;ssl=1 1920w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/savings-2789112_1920.jpg?resize=760%2C507&amp;ssl=1 760w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/savings-2789112_1920.jpg?resize=1296%2C864&amp;ssl=1 1296w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/savings-2789112_1920.jpg?resize=768%2C512&amp;ssl=1 768w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/savings-2789112_1920.jpg?resize=1536%2C1024&amp;ssl=1 1536w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/savings-2789112_1920.jpg?resize=750%2C500&amp;ssl=1 750w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/savings-2789112_1920.jpg?resize=250%2C167&amp;ssl=1 250w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/savings-2789112_1920.jpg?resize=450%2C300&amp;ssl=1 450w" sizes="(max-width: 34.9rem) calc(100vw - 2rem), (max-width: 53rem) calc(8 * (100vw / 12)), (min-width: 53rem) calc(6 * (100vw / 12)), 100vw" /></figure>
  1619. <div class="wp-block-group"><div class="wp-block-group__inner-container">
  1620. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Years ago, I made the mistake of conflating the concepts of “economic development” and “community development.” To most people, this might not appear to be a serious indiscretion, but the two concepts are not entirely interchangeable. </span></p>
  1621. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Not understanding the difference between the two notions can be costly in time, financial resources, and has the potential to obfuscate the real issues in a community. In small rural towns like Rushville, Illinois, those are resources that can’t afford to be squandered.</span></p>
  1622. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Unfortunately, I wasn’t alone. I had taken the same approach to community improvement programming as those who had served before me. Our lack of knowledge about community development made us ineffective leaders. </span></p>
  1623. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Essentially, we left our practitioners to aimlessly fend for themselves, with little guidance and no clear goals. We had no real way to measure if what we were doing was having a meaningful impact, either economically or socially.</span></p>
  1624. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">We produced new public works projects, but they were hardly transformative. Early in my first term as a mayor of Rushville, Illinois, I failed to create goals for community improvement.</span></p>
  1625. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">My hope was, as we made improvements to the industrial park and pursued improving our downtown, </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">entrepreneurship</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"> would increase with new and better jobs coming to the community. This period was the depth of the Great Recession and the economic development wasn’t occurring and economic growth wasn’t any better. There were no new business start-ups and new jobs weren’t coming to Rushville.</span></p>
  1626. <p><a href="https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/pasted-image-0.jpg?ssl=1"><img class=" wp-image-57092 alignleft" src="https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/pasted-image-0.jpg?resize=342%2C182&#038;ssl=1" alt="" width="342" height="182" srcset="https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/pasted-image-0.jpg?w=267&amp;ssl=1 267w, https://i0.wp.com/dailyyonder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/pasted-image-0.jpg?resize=250%2C133&amp;ssl=1 250w" sizes="(max-width: 342px) 100vw, 342px" data-recalc-dims="1" /></a></p>
  1627. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">While I was pursuing my master’s degree, I became familiar with the Community Capitals Framework (CCF). The CCF is a holistic and systematic approach to community improvement and/or development. It was the tool I needed to help me make a clear distinctions between economic development and community development. </span></p>
  1628. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Through the use of the CCF, I’m able to visualize outcomes and identify the data needed to measure progress towards achieving our goals. However, the real power of this tool is how it enables users to identify seven key capitals in a community. Human capital is one of the seven community capitals.</span></p>
  1629. <p><b>What Is Human Capital?</b></p>
  1630. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In its basic form, human capital reflects the investments individuals make in their education, training for employment, and health. As the level of human capital rises, productivity levels rise and individual earnings can increase. </span></p>
  1631. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">However, human capital isn’t limited to producing economic outcomes.This isn’t to say that human capital can’t be measured through quantitative or qualitative analysis. This capital is important to the strength and vitality of a community. </span></p>
  1632. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Communities with strong human capital have leaders who are capable of reaching across differences and focus on assets and fellow influencers. </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">The attributes of human capital include the individual qualities that help us participate in organizations and build our communities.</span></p>
  1633. <p><b>Avoiding Hegemony in Community Development</b></p>
  1634. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Avoiding the effects of hegemony in rural community development work (particularly in the Midwest) can be challenging. A lack of diversity within an organization or committee can have a limiting effect on the scope and breadth of development projects and whom the projects benefit. Frequently, this is reflected in the neighborhoods and projects we concentrate our efforts on and with whom we engage to assist us in our work. </span></p>
  1635. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In metropolitan communities, hegemony often results in the gentrification of neighborhoods</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">. However, we also see the effects of homogenous design features in rural communities. The cookie cutter approach used by some states in the creation of welcoming gateway signage into small towns gives the appearance of all small and rural towns being alike. Unfortunately, it fails to reflect the cultural uniqueness of a community.</span></p>
  1636. <p><b>The Dual Role of Human Capital in Community Development</b></p>
  1637. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Human capital plays two important roles in community development work. As an input, CD organizers rely upon the characteristics of human capital to build their teams. We weigh the needs of our organization against the assets of skills, knowledge, and capabilities of available talent to find the best fit and produce our desired outcomes.</span></p>
  1638. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">As an output of our work, we often engage in projects that are aimed to improve the quality of life in our communities. Those improvements may include improving housing stock, providing healthcare services, or rallying behind supporting local schools.</span></p>
  1639. <p><b>An Example of the Dual Role of Human Capital in Community Development</b></p>
  1640. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In Rushville, our community development work was performed under our brand </span><i><span style="font-weight: 400;">Energize Rushville</span></i><span style="font-weight: 400;">. The initial focus of our work was to address affordable housing issues. </span></p>
  1641. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Appropriately, the name of the first committee was The Rushville Housing Committee. The housing committee was comprised of eleven persons. Committee members were selected based on their skills in organizing and leadership. They were also selected for their subject matter expertise, including construction, finance, and education. </span></p>
  1642. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Elected officials were deliberately excluded from committee membership, including myself. If the committee were to work in the spirt for which it was created, it needed to operate as a citizen’s committee and not an extension of local units of government and work with a diverse group of consultants and NGOs. </span></p>
  1643. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The first work product was a publication of the results of a community housing needs assessment. Through the assessment, the committee identified deficiencies in the safety and quality of rental properties, a need for improving the stock of income-based and supportive housing options for senior citizens, and the need to improve access to local services, primarily assisting French speaking West African residents who immigrated to Rushville.</span></p>
  1644. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Many of the members were also engaged in community improvement projects with other organizations, including churches. Through their social capital ties, members were also bringing new ideas to the committee, expanding the committee’s sphere of influence. </span></p>
  1645. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Those ideas included ways to facilitate the inclusion of our new West African community members and the creation of an annual community-wide wellness program, branded as </span><i><span style="font-weight: 400;">Exercise Rushville</span></i><span style="font-weight: 400;">. This program led to the recruitment of new participants. The newcomers have organized road races for runners and formed a community cycling group.</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"> </span></p>
  1646. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In the thirteen years since its formation, the Rushville Housing Committee has transitioned into a community development team. They’ve also adopted a new name: “Grow Rushville.” </span></p>
  1647. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The committee now has its own identity and its own goals. The success of this group is nothing short of remarkable. Its members have unleashed the power of human capital, which has enabled them to reproduce the social capital necessary to build new relationships. </span></p>
  1648. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">It resulted in achieving ambitious goals and creating new community assets that can be utilized by anyone. Later this year, the community will cut the ribbon on a new $6 million fitness and community center.</span></p>
  1649. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">My next article will discuss the role of cultural capital in community development, using another example from Rushville, Illinois.</span></p>
  1650. <p><i>Scott Thompson is a labor market economist who lives in Iowa. He is the former mayor of Rushville, Illinois.</i> <a href="https://dailyyonder.com/author/scott-thompson/"><i>Read Scott’s previous Daily Yonder columns</i></a><i>. The opinions expressed in this column are his own.</i></p>
  1651. </div></div>
  1652. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://dailyyonder.com/commentary-the-role-of-human-capital-in-community-development/2020/06/26/">Commentary: The Role of Human Capital in Community Development</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://dailyyonder.com">Daily Yonder</a>.</p>
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