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  42. <item rdf:about="https://webofdata.wordpress.com/2013/03/24/cloud-encryption-support/">
  43.  <dc:creator>Michael Hausenblas</dc:creator>
  44.  <dc:source>Web of Data by Michael Hausenblas</dc:source>
  45.  <dc:relation>http://webofdata.wordpress.com/</dc:relation>
  46.  <planet:content xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" rdf:parseType="Literal">
  47. <div>
  48. <p><em>… or, the lack of it.</em></p>
  49. <p>A recent discussion at a customer made me having a closer look
  50. around support for encryption in the context of XaaS cloud service
  51. offerings as well as concerning Hadoop. In general, this can be
  52. broken down into over-the-wire (cf. SSL/<a href=
  53. "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transport_Layer_Security">TLS</a>)
  54. and back-end encryption. While the former is widely used, the
  55. latter is rather seldom to find.</p>
  56. <p>Different reasons might exits why one wants to encrypt her data,
  57. ranging from preserving a competitive advantage to end-user privacy
  58. issues. No matter why someone wants to encrypt the data, the
  59. question is do systems support this (transparently) or are
  60. developers forced to code this in the application logic.</p>
  61. <p><strong>IaaS-level</strong>. Especially in this category, file
  62. storage for app development, one would expect wide support for
  63. built-in encryption.</p>
  64. <ul>
  65. <li>Amazon’s S3 indeed provides <a href=
  66. "http://aws.amazon.com/about-aws/whats-new/2011/10/04/amazon-s3-announces-server-side-encryption-support/">
  67. server-side support for encryption</a></li>
  68. <li>Google Storage <a href=
  69. "https://developers.google.com/storage/docs/developer-guide">does
  70. not encrypt files</a></li>
  71. <li>Same for Rackspace’s Cloud Files – <a href=
  72. "http://www.rackspace.com/knowledge_center/product-faq/cloud-files">
  73. no encryption</a>, ATM</li>
  74. <li>As well as for Microsoft’s Azure storage – <a href=
  75. "http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/windowsazuresecurity/thread/d8b461bd-87c4-4552-99ed-aab9faa16457">
  76. not encrypting files</a></li>
  77. <li>And last but not least, HP Cloud’s Object Storage is in good
  78. company by <a href=
  79. "https://docs.hpcloud.com/api/object-storage">not supporting
  80. encryption</a></li>
  81. </ul>
  82. <p>On the <strong>PaaS level</strong> things look pretty much the
  83. same: for example, <a href=
  84. "http://aws.amazon.com/elasticbeanstalk/">AWS Elastic Beanstalk</a>
  85. provides no support for encryption of the data (unless you consider
  86. S3) and concerning Google’s App Engine, <a href=
  87. "http://stackoverflow.com/questions/6040673/encrypting-user-data-on-app-engine">
  88. good practices for data encryption</a> only seem to emerge.</p>
  89. <p>Offerings on the <strong>SaaS level</strong> provide an equally
  90. poor picture:</p>
  91. <ul>
  92. <li>Dropbox offers encryption <a href=
  93. "https://www.dropbox.com/help/27/en">via S3</a>.</li>
  94. <li>Google Drive and Microsoft Skydrive seem to not offer any
  95. encryption options for storage.</li>
  96. <li>Apple’s iCloud is a notable exception: not only does it provide
  97. support but also <a href=
  98. "http://support.apple.com/kb/ht4865">nicely explains it</a>.</li>
  99. <li>For many if not most of the above SaaS-level offerings there
  100. are plug-ins that enable encryption, such as provided by <a href=
  101. "http://www.syncdocs.com/how-to-set-up-google-drive-encryption/">Syncdocs</a>
  102. or <a href="http://www.cloudfogger.com/en/">CloudFlogger</a></li>
  103. </ul>
  104. <p>In <strong>Hadoop-land</strong> things also look rather <a href=
  105. "http://stackoverflow.com/questions/7649936/using-encryption-with-hadoop">
  106. sobering</a>; there are few activities around making HDFS or the
  107. likes do encryption such as <a href=
  108. "https://launchpad.net/ecryptfs">ecryptfs</a> or <a href=
  109. "http://www.gazzang.com/encrypt-hadoop">Gazzang’s</a> offering.
  110. Last but not least: for Hadoop in the cloud, encryption is
  111. available via AWS’s EMR by using S3.</p>
  112. <div id="atatags-26942-5e82271e45067"></div>
  113. <!-- script tags removed by chumpologica --></div>
  114. </planet:content>
  115.  <dc:date rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#dateTime">2020-03-30T17:06:38.000000Z</dc:date>
  116.  <title>Cloud Cipher Capabilities</title>
  117.  <link>https://webofdata.wordpress.com/2013/03/24/cloud-encryption-support/</link>
  118.  <content:encoded rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#XMLLiteral"><![CDATA[
  119. <div xmlns='http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml'>
  120. <div>
  121. <p><em>… or, the lack of it.</em></p>
  122. <p>A recent discussion at a customer made me having a closer look
  123. around support for encryption in the context of XaaS cloud service
  124. offerings as well as concerning Hadoop. In general, this can be
  125. broken down into over-the-wire (cf. SSL/<a href=
  126. "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transport_Layer_Security">TLS</a>)
  127. and back-end encryption. While the former is widely used, the
  128. latter is rather seldom to find.</p>
  129. <p>Different reasons might exits why one wants to encrypt her data,
  130. ranging from preserving a competitive advantage to end-user privacy
  131. issues. No matter why someone wants to encrypt the data, the
  132. question is do systems support this (transparently) or are
  133. developers forced to code this in the application logic.</p>
  134. <p><strong>IaaS-level</strong>. Especially in this category, file
  135. storage for app development, one would expect wide support for
  136. built-in encryption.</p>
  137. <ul>
  138. <li>Amazon’s S3 indeed provides <a href=
  139. "http://aws.amazon.com/about-aws/whats-new/2011/10/04/amazon-s3-announces-server-side-encryption-support/">
  140. server-side support for encryption</a></li>
  141. <li>Google Storage <a href=
  142. "https://developers.google.com/storage/docs/developer-guide">does
  143. not encrypt files</a></li>
  144. <li>Same for Rackspace’s Cloud Files – <a href=
  145. "http://www.rackspace.com/knowledge_center/product-faq/cloud-files">
  146. no encryption</a>, ATM</li>
  147. <li>As well as for Microsoft’s Azure storage – <a href=
  148. "http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/windowsazuresecurity/thread/d8b461bd-87c4-4552-99ed-aab9faa16457">
  149. not encrypting files</a></li>
  150. <li>And last but not least, HP Cloud’s Object Storage is in good
  151. company by <a href=
  152. "https://docs.hpcloud.com/api/object-storage">not supporting
  153. encryption</a></li>
  154. </ul>
  155. <p>On the <strong>PaaS level</strong> things look pretty much the
  156. same: for example, <a href=
  157. "http://aws.amazon.com/elasticbeanstalk/">AWS Elastic Beanstalk</a>
  158. provides no support for encryption of the data (unless you consider
  159. S3) and concerning Google’s App Engine, <a href=
  160. "http://stackoverflow.com/questions/6040673/encrypting-user-data-on-app-engine">
  161. good practices for data encryption</a> only seem to emerge.</p>
  162. <p>Offerings on the <strong>SaaS level</strong> provide an equally
  163. poor picture:</p>
  164. <ul>
  165. <li>Dropbox offers encryption <a href=
  166. "https://www.dropbox.com/help/27/en">via S3</a>.</li>
  167. <li>Google Drive and Microsoft Skydrive seem to not offer any
  168. encryption options for storage.</li>
  169. <li>Apple’s iCloud is a notable exception: not only does it provide
  170. support but also <a href=
  171. "http://support.apple.com/kb/ht4865">nicely explains it</a>.</li>
  172. <li>For many if not most of the above SaaS-level offerings there
  173. are plug-ins that enable encryption, such as provided by <a href=
  174. "http://www.syncdocs.com/how-to-set-up-google-drive-encryption/">Syncdocs</a>
  175. or <a href="http://www.cloudfogger.com/en/">CloudFlogger</a></li>
  176. </ul>
  177. <p>In <strong>Hadoop-land</strong> things also look rather <a href=
  178. "http://stackoverflow.com/questions/7649936/using-encryption-with-hadoop">
  179. sobering</a>; there are few activities around making HDFS or the
  180. likes do encryption such as <a href=
  181. "https://launchpad.net/ecryptfs">ecryptfs</a> or <a href=
  182. "http://www.gazzang.com/encrypt-hadoop">Gazzang’s</a> offering.
  183. Last but not least: for Hadoop in the cloud, encryption is
  184. available via AWS’s EMR by using S3.</p>
  185. <div id="atatags-26942-5e82271e45067"></div>
  186. <!-- script tags removed by chumpologica --></div>
  187. </div>]]></content:encoded>
  188.  <description>… or, the lack of it. A recent discussion at a customer made me having a closer look around support for encryption in the context of XaaS cloud service offerings as well as concerning Hadoop. In general, this can be broken down into over-the-wire (cf. SSL/ TLS ) and back-end encryption. While the former is widely used, the latter is rather seldom to find. Different reasons might exits why one wants to encrypt her data, ranging from preserving a competitive advantage to end-user privacy issues. No matter why someone wants to encrypt the data, the question is do systems support ...</description>
  189. </item>
  190. <item rdf:about="http://blog.schema.org/2020/03/schema-for-coronavirus-special.html">
  191.  <dc:creator>schema.org</dc:creator>
  192.  <dc:source>schema.org</dc:source>
  193.  <dc:relation>http://blog.schema.org/</dc:relation>
  194.  <planet:content xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" rdf:parseType="Literal">
  195. <div>
  196. <div dir="ltr" style=
  197. "line-height: 1.38; margin-bottom: 0pt; margin-top: 0pt;"><span>The
  198. COVID-19 pandemic is causing a large number of “Special
  199. Announcements” pertaining to changes in schedules and other aspects
  200. of everyday life. This includes not just closure of facilities and
  201. rescheduling of events but also new availability of medical
  202. facilities such as testing centers.</span><br />
  203. <span><br /></span><span>We have today published <a href=
  204. "http://schema.org/docs/releases.html#v7.0">Schema.org 7.0</a>,
  205. which includes fast-tracked new vocabulary to assist the global
  206. response to the Coronavirus outbreak.</span><br />
  207. <span><br /></span><span>It includes a "</span><a href=
  208. "https://schema.org/SpecialAnnouncement" style=
  209. "font-family: arial; font-size: 11pt; white-space: pre;">SpecialAnnouncement</a><span>"
  210. type that provides for simple date-stamped textual updates, as well
  211. as markup to associate the announcement with a situation (such as
  212. the Coronavirus pandemic), and to indicate URLs for various kinds
  213. of update such a school closures, public transport closures,
  214. quarantine guidelines, travel bans, and information about getting
  215. tested.&#160;&#160;</span><br />
  216. <span><br /></span><span>Many new testing facilities are being
  217. rapidly established worldwide, to test for COVID-19. Schema.org now
  218. has a</span> <a href="https://schema.org/CovidTestingFacility"
  219. style=
  220. "font-family: arial; font-size: 11pt; white-space: pre;">CovidTestingFacility</a>
  221. <span>type to represent these, regardless of whether they are part
  222. of long-established medical facilities or temporary adaptations to
  223. the emergency.</span><br />
  224. <span><br /></span><span>We are also making improvements to other
  225. areas of Schema.org to help with the worldwide migration to working
  226. online and working from home, for example by helping event
  227. organizers indicate when an event has</span> <a href=
  228. "http://schema.org/EventMovedOnline" style=
  229. "font-family: arial; font-size: 11pt; white-space: pre;">moved</a>
  230. <span>from having a physical location to being conducted online,
  231. and</span></div>
  232. <div dir="ltr" style=
  233. "line-height: 1.38; margin-bottom: 0pt; margin-top: 0pt;">
  234. <span style=
  235. "background-color: transparent; color: black; font-family: &quot;arial&quot;; font-size: 11pt; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: 400; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre;">
  236. whether the event's "<a href=
  237. "https://schema.org/eventAttendanceMode">eventAttendanceMode</a>"
  238. is online, offlline or mixed.&#160;</span><br />
  239. <span><br /></span><span>We will continue to improve this
  240. vocabulary in the light of feedback (</span><a href=
  241. "https://github.com/schemaorg/schemaorg/issues/2490" style=
  242. "font-family: arial; font-size: 11pt; white-space: pre;">github</a><span>;</span>
  243. <a href=
  244. "https://docs.google.com/document/d/1fpdFFxk8s87CWwACs53SGkYv3aafSxz_DTtOQxMrBJQ/edit#"
  245. style=
  246. "font-family: arial; font-size: 11pt; white-space: pre;">doc</a><span>),
  247. and welcome suggestions for improvements and additions particularly
  248. from organizations who are publishing such
  249. updates.&#160;</span><br />
  250. <br />
  251. <a href="mailto:[email protected]" style=
  252. "font-family: arial; font-size: 11pt; white-space: pre;">Dan
  253. Brickley</a><span>, R.V.Guha, Google.</span><br />
  254. <span>Tom Marsh, Microsoft.</span></div>
  255. </div>
  256. </planet:content>
  257.  <dc:date rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#dateTime">2020-03-17T03:16:00.000000Z</dc:date>
  258.  <title>Schema for Coronavirus special announcements, Covid-19
  259. Testing Facilities and more</title>
  260.  <link>http://blog.schema.org/2020/03/schema-for-coronavirus-special.html</link>
  261.  <content:encoded rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#XMLLiteral"><![CDATA[
  262. <div xmlns='http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml'>
  263. <div>
  264. <div dir="ltr" style=
  265. "line-height: 1.38; margin-bottom: 0pt; margin-top: 0pt;"><span>The
  266. COVID-19 pandemic is causing a large number of “Special
  267. Announcements” pertaining to changes in schedules and other aspects
  268. of everyday life. This includes not just closure of facilities and
  269. rescheduling of events but also new availability of medical
  270. facilities such as testing centers.</span><br />
  271. <span><br /></span><span>We have today published <a href=
  272. "http://schema.org/docs/releases.html#v7.0">Schema.org 7.0</a>,
  273. which includes fast-tracked new vocabulary to assist the global
  274. response to the Coronavirus outbreak.</span><br />
  275. <span><br /></span><span>It includes a "</span><a href=
  276. "https://schema.org/SpecialAnnouncement" style=
  277. "font-family: arial; font-size: 11pt; white-space: pre;">SpecialAnnouncement</a><span>"
  278. type that provides for simple date-stamped textual updates, as well
  279. as markup to associate the announcement with a situation (such as
  280. the Coronavirus pandemic), and to indicate URLs for various kinds
  281. of update such a school closures, public transport closures,
  282. quarantine guidelines, travel bans, and information about getting
  283. tested.&#160;&#160;</span><br />
  284. <span><br /></span><span>Many new testing facilities are being
  285. rapidly established worldwide, to test for COVID-19. Schema.org now
  286. has a</span> <a href="https://schema.org/CovidTestingFacility"
  287. style=
  288. "font-family: arial; font-size: 11pt; white-space: pre;">CovidTestingFacility</a>
  289. <span>type to represent these, regardless of whether they are part
  290. of long-established medical facilities or temporary adaptations to
  291. the emergency.</span><br />
  292. <span><br /></span><span>We are also making improvements to other
  293. areas of Schema.org to help with the worldwide migration to working
  294. online and working from home, for example by helping event
  295. organizers indicate when an event has</span> <a href=
  296. "http://schema.org/EventMovedOnline" style=
  297. "font-family: arial; font-size: 11pt; white-space: pre;">moved</a>
  298. <span>from having a physical location to being conducted online,
  299. and</span></div>
  300. <div dir="ltr" style=
  301. "line-height: 1.38; margin-bottom: 0pt; margin-top: 0pt;">
  302. <span style=
  303. "background-color: transparent; color: black; font-family: &quot;arial&quot;; font-size: 11pt; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: 400; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre;">
  304. whether the event's "<a href=
  305. "https://schema.org/eventAttendanceMode">eventAttendanceMode</a>"
  306. is online, offlline or mixed.&#160;</span><br />
  307. <span><br /></span><span>We will continue to improve this
  308. vocabulary in the light of feedback (</span><a href=
  309. "https://github.com/schemaorg/schemaorg/issues/2490" style=
  310. "font-family: arial; font-size: 11pt; white-space: pre;">github</a><span>;</span>
  311. <a href=
  312. "https://docs.google.com/document/d/1fpdFFxk8s87CWwACs53SGkYv3aafSxz_DTtOQxMrBJQ/edit#"
  313. style=
  314. "font-family: arial; font-size: 11pt; white-space: pre;">doc</a><span>),
  315. and welcome suggestions for improvements and additions particularly
  316. from organizations who are publishing such
  317. updates.&#160;</span><br />
  318. <br />
  319. <a href="mailto:[email protected]" style=
  320. "font-family: arial; font-size: 11pt; white-space: pre;">Dan
  321. Brickley</a><span>, R.V.Guha, Google.</span><br />
  322. <span>Tom Marsh, Microsoft.</span></div>
  323. </div>
  324. </div>]]></content:encoded>
  325.  <description>The COVID-19 pandemic is causing a large number of “Special Announcements” pertaining to changes in schedules and other aspects of everyday life. This includes not just closure of facilities and rescheduling of events but also new availability of medical facilities such as testing centers. We have today published Schema.org 7.0 , which includes fast-tracked new vocabulary to assist the global response to the Coronavirus outbreak. It includes a " SpecialAnnouncement " type that provides for simple date-stamped textual updates, as well as markup to associate the announcement with a situation (such as the Coronavirus pandemic), and to indicate URLs for ...</description>
  326. </item>
  327. <item rdf:about="https://blog.ldodds.com/2020/03/15/quick-tips-for-chairing-remote-meetings/">
  328.  <dc:creator>Leigh Dodds</dc:creator>
  329.  <dc:source>Lost Boy by Leigh Dodds</dc:source>
  330.  <dc:relation>http://ldodds.com/blog/</dc:relation>
  331.  <planet:content xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" rdf:parseType="Literal">
  332. <div>
  333. <p>There’s a growing set of useful resources and guidance to help
  334. people run better remote meetings. I’ve been <a href=
  335. "https://docs.google.com/document/d/10TkXOjKVHFwuApo4v2eEbgVVE1l0mf5gOKG8F6T7TO0/edit">
  336. compiling a list to a few</a>. At the risk of repeating other,
  337. better advice, I’m going to write down some brief tips for running
  338. remote meetings.</p>
  339. <p>For a year or so I was chairing <a href=
  340. "https://w3c.openactive.io/">fortnightly meetings of the OpenActive
  341. standards group</a>. Those meetings were an opportunity to share
  342. updates with a community of collaborators, get feedback on working
  343. documents and have debates and discussion around a range of topics.
  344. So I had to get better at doing it. Not sure whether I did, but
  345. here’s a few things I learned.</p>
  346. <p>I’ll skip over general good meeting etiquette (e.g. around
  347. circulating an agenda and working documents in advance), to focus
  348. on the remote bits.</p>
  349. <ol>
  350. <li><strong>Give people time to arrive</strong>. Just because
  351. everyone is attending remotely doesn’t mean that everyone will be
  352. able to arrive promptly. They may be working through technical
  353. difficulties, for example. Build in a bit of deliberate slack time
  354. at the start of the meeting. I usually gave it around 5-10 minutes.
  355. As people arrive, greet them and let them know this is happening.
  356. You can then either chat as a group or people can switch to emails,
  357. etc while waiting for things to start.</li>
  358. <li><strong>Call the meeting to order</strong>. Make it clear when
  359. the meeting is formally starting and you’ve switched from general
  360. chat and waiting for late arrivals. This will help ensure you have
  361. people’s attention.</li>
  362. <li><strong>Use the tools you have as a chair</strong>. Monitor
  363. side chat. Monitor the video feeds to check to see if people look
  364. like they have something to say. And, most importantly, mute people
  365. that aren’t speaking but are typing or have lots of background
  366. noise. You can usually avoid the polite dance around asking people
  367. to do that, or suffering in silence, by using option to mute
  368. people. Just tell them you’ve done that. I usually had Zoom
  369. meetings set up so that people were muted on entry.</li>
  370. <li><strong>Do a roll call</strong>. Ask everyone to introduce
  371. themselves at the start. Don’t just ask everyone to do that, as
  372. they’ll talk over each other. Go through people individually as ask
  373. them to say hello or do an introduction. This helps with putting
  374. voices to names (if not everyone is on video), ensures that
  375. everyone knows how to mute/unmute and puts some structure to the
  376. meeting.</li>
  377. <li><strong>Be aware of when people are connecting in different
  378. ways</strong>. Some software, like Zoom, allow people to join in
  379. several ways. Be aware of when you have people on phone and video,
  380. especially if you’re presenting material. Try to circulate links
  381. either before or during meeting so they can see them</li>
  382. <li><strong>Use slides to help structure the meeting.</strong> I
  383. found that doing a screenshare of a set of slides for the agenda
  384. and key talking points helps to give people a sense of where you’re
  385. at in the meeting. So, for example if you have four items on your
  386. agenda, have a slide for each topic item. With key questions or
  387. decision points. It can help to focus discussion, keeps people’s
  388. attention on the meeting (rather than a separate doc) and gives
  389. people a sense of where you are. The latter is especially helpful
  390. if people are joining late.</li>
  391. <li><strong>Don’t be afraid of a quick recap</strong>. If people
  392. join a few minutes late in the meeting, give them a quick recap of
  393. where you’re at, ask them to introduce themselves. I often did this
  394. if people joined a few minutes late, but not if they dropped in 30
  395. minutes into a 1 hour meeting.</li>
  396. <li><strong>Don’t be afraid of silence or directly asking people
  397. questions</strong>. Chairing remote meetings can be stressful and
  398. awkward for everyone. It can be particularly awkward to ask
  399. questions and then sit in silence. Often this is because people are
  400. worried about talking over each other. Or they just need time to
  401. think. Don’t be afraid of a bit of silence. Doing a roll call to
  402. ask everyone individually for feedback can be helpful if you want
  403. to make decisions. Check in on people who have not said anything
  404. for a while. It’s slow, but provides some order for everyone</li>
  405. <li><strong>Keep to time</strong>. I tried very hard not to let
  406. meetings over-run even if we didn’t cover everything. People have
  407. other events in their calendars. Video and phone calls can be
  408. tiring. It’s better to wrap up at a suitable point and follow up on
  409. things you didn’t get to cover than to have half the meeting drop
  410. out at the end.</li>
  411. <li><strong>Follow-up afterwards</strong>. Make sure to follow up
  412. afterwards. Especially if not everyone was able to attend. For
  413. OpenActive we video the calls and share those as well as a summary
  414. of discussion points.</li>
  415. </ol>
  416. <p>Those are all the things I tried to consciously get better at
  417. and I think helped things go more smoothly.</p>
  418. </div>
  419. </planet:content>
  420.  <dc:date rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#dateTime">2020-03-15T15:05:49.000000Z</dc:date>
  421.  <title>Quick tips for chairing remote meetings</title>
  422.  <link>https://blog.ldodds.com/2020/03/15/quick-tips-for-chairing-remote-meetings/</link>
  423.  <content:encoded rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#XMLLiteral"><![CDATA[
  424. <div xmlns='http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml'>
  425. <div>
  426. <p>There’s a growing set of useful resources and guidance to help
  427. people run better remote meetings. I’ve been <a href=
  428. "https://docs.google.com/document/d/10TkXOjKVHFwuApo4v2eEbgVVE1l0mf5gOKG8F6T7TO0/edit">
  429. compiling a list to a few</a>. At the risk of repeating other,
  430. better advice, I’m going to write down some brief tips for running
  431. remote meetings.</p>
  432. <p>For a year or so I was chairing <a href=
  433. "https://w3c.openactive.io/">fortnightly meetings of the OpenActive
  434. standards group</a>. Those meetings were an opportunity to share
  435. updates with a community of collaborators, get feedback on working
  436. documents and have debates and discussion around a range of topics.
  437. So I had to get better at doing it. Not sure whether I did, but
  438. here’s a few things I learned.</p>
  439. <p>I’ll skip over general good meeting etiquette (e.g. around
  440. circulating an agenda and working documents in advance), to focus
  441. on the remote bits.</p>
  442. <ol>
  443. <li><strong>Give people time to arrive</strong>. Just because
  444. everyone is attending remotely doesn’t mean that everyone will be
  445. able to arrive promptly. They may be working through technical
  446. difficulties, for example. Build in a bit of deliberate slack time
  447. at the start of the meeting. I usually gave it around 5-10 minutes.
  448. As people arrive, greet them and let them know this is happening.
  449. You can then either chat as a group or people can switch to emails,
  450. etc while waiting for things to start.</li>
  451. <li><strong>Call the meeting to order</strong>. Make it clear when
  452. the meeting is formally starting and you’ve switched from general
  453. chat and waiting for late arrivals. This will help ensure you have
  454. people’s attention.</li>
  455. <li><strong>Use the tools you have as a chair</strong>. Monitor
  456. side chat. Monitor the video feeds to check to see if people look
  457. like they have something to say. And, most importantly, mute people
  458. that aren’t speaking but are typing or have lots of background
  459. noise. You can usually avoid the polite dance around asking people
  460. to do that, or suffering in silence, by using option to mute
  461. people. Just tell them you’ve done that. I usually had Zoom
  462. meetings set up so that people were muted on entry.</li>
  463. <li><strong>Do a roll call</strong>. Ask everyone to introduce
  464. themselves at the start. Don’t just ask everyone to do that, as
  465. they’ll talk over each other. Go through people individually as ask
  466. them to say hello or do an introduction. This helps with putting
  467. voices to names (if not everyone is on video), ensures that
  468. everyone knows how to mute/unmute and puts some structure to the
  469. meeting.</li>
  470. <li><strong>Be aware of when people are connecting in different
  471. ways</strong>. Some software, like Zoom, allow people to join in
  472. several ways. Be aware of when you have people on phone and video,
  473. especially if you’re presenting material. Try to circulate links
  474. either before or during meeting so they can see them</li>
  475. <li><strong>Use slides to help structure the meeting.</strong> I
  476. found that doing a screenshare of a set of slides for the agenda
  477. and key talking points helps to give people a sense of where you’re
  478. at in the meeting. So, for example if you have four items on your
  479. agenda, have a slide for each topic item. With key questions or
  480. decision points. It can help to focus discussion, keeps people’s
  481. attention on the meeting (rather than a separate doc) and gives
  482. people a sense of where you are. The latter is especially helpful
  483. if people are joining late.</li>
  484. <li><strong>Don’t be afraid of a quick recap</strong>. If people
  485. join a few minutes late in the meeting, give them a quick recap of
  486. where you’re at, ask them to introduce themselves. I often did this
  487. if people joined a few minutes late, but not if they dropped in 30
  488. minutes into a 1 hour meeting.</li>
  489. <li><strong>Don’t be afraid of silence or directly asking people
  490. questions</strong>. Chairing remote meetings can be stressful and
  491. awkward for everyone. It can be particularly awkward to ask
  492. questions and then sit in silence. Often this is because people are
  493. worried about talking over each other. Or they just need time to
  494. think. Don’t be afraid of a bit of silence. Doing a roll call to
  495. ask everyone individually for feedback can be helpful if you want
  496. to make decisions. Check in on people who have not said anything
  497. for a while. It’s slow, but provides some order for everyone</li>
  498. <li><strong>Keep to time</strong>. I tried very hard not to let
  499. meetings over-run even if we didn’t cover everything. People have
  500. other events in their calendars. Video and phone calls can be
  501. tiring. It’s better to wrap up at a suitable point and follow up on
  502. things you didn’t get to cover than to have half the meeting drop
  503. out at the end.</li>
  504. <li><strong>Follow-up afterwards</strong>. Make sure to follow up
  505. afterwards. Especially if not everyone was able to attend. For
  506. OpenActive we video the calls and share those as well as a summary
  507. of discussion points.</li>
  508. </ol>
  509. <p>Those are all the things I tried to consciously get better at
  510. and I think helped things go more smoothly.</p>
  511. </div>
  512. </div>]]></content:encoded>
  513.  <description>There’s a growing set of useful resources and guidance to help people run better remote meetings. I’ve been compiling a list to a few . At the risk of repeating other, better advice, I’m going to write down some brief tips for running remote meetings. For a year or so I was chairing fortnightly meetings of the OpenActive standards group . Those meetings were an opportunity to share updates with a community of collaborators, get feedback on working documents and have debates and discussion around a range of topics. So I had to get better at doing it. Not sure ...</description>
  514. </item>
  515. <item rdf:about="https://blog.ldodds.com/2020/03/15/what-is-collaborative-maintenance-of-data-a-short-talk-at-the-royal-society/">
  516.  <dc:creator>Leigh Dodds</dc:creator>
  517.  <dc:source>Lost Boy by Leigh Dodds</dc:source>
  518.  <dc:relation>http://ldodds.com/blog/</dc:relation>
  519.  <planet:content xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" rdf:parseType="Literal">
  520. <div>
  521. <p><em>Following the publication of their report on <a href=
  522. "https://royalsociety.org/topics-policy/projects/data-governance/">data
  523. governance in the 21st century</a>, the Royal Society are running a
  524. number of workshops to explore data governance in different
  525. sectors. In October 2019 year they ran one exploring <a href=
  526. "https://blogs.royalsociety.org/in-verba/2019/10/28/moving-from-data-governance-principles-to-practice-auto-insurance/">
  527. data governance in the auto insurance sector</a>.</em></p>
  528. <p><em>Last week they held a workshop looking at data governance in
  529. the civil society sector. The ODI were invited to help out, and I
  530. chaired a session looking at collaborative maintenance of data. I
  531. believe the Royal Society will be publishing a longer write-up of
  532. the workshop over the coming weeks.</em></p>
  533. <p><em>This blog post is a written version of a short ten minute
  534. talk I gave during the workshop. The <a href=
  535. "https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1_hm-uAeTyd4lmqE_4vAKGu4NjXRuL5XIBnkvOZWZhHo/edit?usp=sharing">
  536. slides are public</a>.</em></p>
  537. <p>Let’s start with a definition. <a href=
  538. "https://collaborative-data.theodi.org/what-is-collaborative-maintenance/">
  539. What is collaborative maintenance</a>?</p>
  540. <p>You might already be familiar with terms like “crowd-sourcing”
  541. or “citizen science”. Both of those are examples of collaborative
  542. maintenance. But it can take other forms too. At the ODI we use
  543. collaborative maintenance of data to refer to any scenario where
  544. organisations and communities are sharing the work of collecting
  545. and maintaining data.</p>
  546. <p>It might be helpful to position collaborative maintenance
  547. alongside other approaches that are part of “open culture”. These
  548. include open standards, open source, and open data. Let’s look at
  549. each of them in turn.</p>
  550. <p><a href=
  551. "https://standards.theodi.org/introduction/what-are-open-standards-for-data/">
  552. Open standards for data</a> are reusable, shared agreements that
  553. shape how we collect, share, govern and use data. There are
  554. different <a href=
  555. "https://standards.theodi.org/introduction/types-of-open-standards-for-data/">
  556. types of open standards</a>. Some are technical, and describe file
  557. formats and methods of exchanging data. Others are higher-level and
  558. capture codes of practices and protocols for collecting data. Open
  559. standards are <a href=
  560. "https://standards.theodi.org/introduction/how-open-standards-are-developed/">
  561. best developed collaboratively</a>, so that everyone impacted by or
  562. benefiting from the standard can help shape it.</p>
  563. <p>Open source involves collaborating to create reusable, openly
  564. licensed code and applications. Some open source projects are run
  565. by individuals or small communities. Others are backed by larger
  566. commercial organisations. This collaborative work is different to
  567. that of open standards. For example, it involves identifying and
  568. agreeing features, writing and testing code and producing
  569. documentation to allow others to use it.</p>
  570. <p>Open data is about publishing data under an open licence, so it
  571. can be <a href=
  572. "https://theodi.org/article/what-is-open-data-and-why-should-we-care/">
  573. accessed, used and shared by anyone for any purpose</a>. Different
  574. communities engage in publication of open data for different
  575. purposes.</p>
  576. <p>For example, the open government movement originally focused on
  577. open data as a means to increase transparency of governments. More
  578. recently there is a shift towards using open data to help address a
  579. variety of social, economic and environmental challenges. In
  580. contrast, as part of the open science movement, there is a
  581. different role for open data. Recent attention has been on the use
  582. of open data to address the reproducibility crisis around research.
  583. Or to help respond to emerging health issues, like Coronavirus.</p>
  584. <p>With a few exceptions, the main approach to open data has been a
  585. single organisation (or researcher) publishing data that they have
  586. already collected. There may be some collaboration around
  587. <em>use</em> of that data, but not in its collection or
  588. maintenance.</p>
  589. <p>This makes open data quite <a href=
  590. "https://blog.ldodds.com/2016/03/24/a-key-difference-between-open-data-and-open-source/">
  591. distinct from open source</a> or open sources.</p>
  592. <p>We can think of collaborative maintenance as about taking the
  593. approach used in open source and applying it to data. Collaborative
  594. maintenance involves collaboration across the full lifecycle of a
  595. dataset.</p>
  596. <p>Some examples might be helpful.</p>
  597. <p>OpenStreetMap is a collaboratively produced spatial database of
  598. the entire world. While it was originally produced by individuals
  599. and communities, it is now <a href=
  600. "https://theodi.org/article/how-are-facebook-apple-and-microsoft-contributing-to-openstreetmap/">
  601. contributed to by large organisations like Facebook, Microsoft and
  602. Apple</a>. The <a href="https://www.hotosm.org/">Humanitarian
  603. OpenStreetMap</a> community focuses on the collection and use of
  604. data to support humanitarian activities. The community are involved
  605. in deciding what data to collect, prioritising maintenance of data
  606. following disasters, and mapping activities either on the ground or
  607. remotely. The community works across the lifecycle and is
  608. self-directing.</p>
  609. <p><a href="https://voice.mozilla.org/en">Common Voice</a> is a
  610. Mozilla project. It aims to build an open dataset to support voice
  611. recognition applications. By asking others to contribute to the
  612. dataset, they hope to make it more comprehensive and inclusive.
  613. Mozilla have defined what data will be collected and the tasks to
  614. be carried out, but anyone can contribute to the dataset by adding
  615. their voice or transcribing a recording. It’s this open
  616. participation that could help ensure that the dataset represents a
  617. more diverse set of people.</p>
  618. <p><a href=
  619. "https://get-information-schools.service.gov.uk/">Edubase</a> is
  620. maintained by the Department for Education (DfE). It’s our national
  621. database of schools. It’s used in a variety of different
  622. applications. Like Mozilla, DfE are acting as the steward of the
  623. data and have defined what information should be collected. But the
  624. work of populating and maintaining the shared directory is carried
  625. out by people in the individual schools. This is the best way to
  626. keep that data up to date. Those who are know when the data has
  627. changed have the ability to update it. The contributors all benefit
  628. from shared resource.</p>
  629. <p>Build a shared directory is a common use for collaborative
  630. maintenance. But <a href=
  631. "https://collaborative-data.theodi.org/patterns/project-types">there
  632. are others</a>.</p>
  633. <p>Looking across these projects and <a href=
  634. "https://collaborative-data.theodi.org/when-to-use/">other
  635. examples</a> that we’ve studied in our <a href=
  636. "https://theodi.org/article/collaborative-data-maintenance-how-can-we-enable-shared-curation-of-high-quality-data/">
  637. desk</a> and <a href=
  638. "https://theodi.org/article/insights-from-successful-collaborative-maintenance-projects/">
  639. user research</a>, we can see that there are <a href=
  640. "https://collaborative-data.theodi.org/what-is-collaborative-maintenance/">
  641. different ways we can collaborate around data</a>.</p>
  642. <p>For example, we can work together to decide what data to
  643. collect. We can share the work of collecting and maintaining data,
  644. ensuring its quality and governing access to it. We can use open
  645. source to help to build the tools to support those communities.</p>
  646. <p>We’ve developed the <a href=
  647. "https://collaborative-data.theodi.org/">collaborative maintenance
  648. guidebook</a> to help support the design of new services and
  649. platforms. It includes some background and a worked example. The
  650. bulk of the guidebook is a <a href=
  651. "https://collaborative-data.theodi.org/patterns/">set</a> of
  652. “<a href=
  653. "https://collaborative-data.theodi.org/about-patterns/">design
  654. patterns</a>” that describe solutions to common problems. For
  655. example how to manage quality when many different people are
  656. contributing to the same dataset.</p>
  657. <p>We think collaborative maintenance can be useful in more
  658. projects. For civil society organisations collaborative maintenance
  659. might help you engage with communities that you’re supporting to
  660. collect and maintain useful data. It might also be a tool to
  661. support collaboration across the sector as a means of building
  662. common resources.</p>
  663. <p>The guidebook is at an early stage and we’d love to get feedback
  664. on it contents. Or help you apply it to a real-world project. Let
  665. us know what you think!</p>
  666. <p>&#160;</p>
  667. </div>
  668. </planet:content>
  669.  <dc:date rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#dateTime">2020-03-15T14:05:44.000000Z</dc:date>
  670.  <title>What is collaborative maintenance of data? A short talk at
  671. the Royal Society</title>
  672.  <link>https://blog.ldodds.com/2020/03/15/what-is-collaborative-maintenance-of-data-a-short-talk-at-the-royal-society/</link>
  673.  <content:encoded rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#XMLLiteral"><![CDATA[
  674. <div xmlns='http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml'>
  675. <div>
  676. <p><em>Following the publication of their report on <a href=
  677. "https://royalsociety.org/topics-policy/projects/data-governance/">data
  678. governance in the 21st century</a>, the Royal Society are running a
  679. number of workshops to explore data governance in different
  680. sectors. In October 2019 year they ran one exploring <a href=
  681. "https://blogs.royalsociety.org/in-verba/2019/10/28/moving-from-data-governance-principles-to-practice-auto-insurance/">
  682. data governance in the auto insurance sector</a>.</em></p>
  683. <p><em>Last week they held a workshop looking at data governance in
  684. the civil society sector. The ODI were invited to help out, and I
  685. chaired a session looking at collaborative maintenance of data. I
  686. believe the Royal Society will be publishing a longer write-up of
  687. the workshop over the coming weeks.</em></p>
  688. <p><em>This blog post is a written version of a short ten minute
  689. talk I gave during the workshop. The <a href=
  690. "https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1_hm-uAeTyd4lmqE_4vAKGu4NjXRuL5XIBnkvOZWZhHo/edit?usp=sharing">
  691. slides are public</a>.</em></p>
  692. <p>Let’s start with a definition. <a href=
  693. "https://collaborative-data.theodi.org/what-is-collaborative-maintenance/">
  694. What is collaborative maintenance</a>?</p>
  695. <p>You might already be familiar with terms like “crowd-sourcing”
  696. or “citizen science”. Both of those are examples of collaborative
  697. maintenance. But it can take other forms too. At the ODI we use
  698. collaborative maintenance of data to refer to any scenario where
  699. organisations and communities are sharing the work of collecting
  700. and maintaining data.</p>
  701. <p>It might be helpful to position collaborative maintenance
  702. alongside other approaches that are part of “open culture”. These
  703. include open standards, open source, and open data. Let’s look at
  704. each of them in turn.</p>
  705. <p><a href=
  706. "https://standards.theodi.org/introduction/what-are-open-standards-for-data/">
  707. Open standards for data</a> are reusable, shared agreements that
  708. shape how we collect, share, govern and use data. There are
  709. different <a href=
  710. "https://standards.theodi.org/introduction/types-of-open-standards-for-data/">
  711. types of open standards</a>. Some are technical, and describe file
  712. formats and methods of exchanging data. Others are higher-level and
  713. capture codes of practices and protocols for collecting data. Open
  714. standards are <a href=
  715. "https://standards.theodi.org/introduction/how-open-standards-are-developed/">
  716. best developed collaboratively</a>, so that everyone impacted by or
  717. benefiting from the standard can help shape it.</p>
  718. <p>Open source involves collaborating to create reusable, openly
  719. licensed code and applications. Some open source projects are run
  720. by individuals or small communities. Others are backed by larger
  721. commercial organisations. This collaborative work is different to
  722. that of open standards. For example, it involves identifying and
  723. agreeing features, writing and testing code and producing
  724. documentation to allow others to use it.</p>
  725. <p>Open data is about publishing data under an open licence, so it
  726. can be <a href=
  727. "https://theodi.org/article/what-is-open-data-and-why-should-we-care/">
  728. accessed, used and shared by anyone for any purpose</a>. Different
  729. communities engage in publication of open data for different
  730. purposes.</p>
  731. <p>For example, the open government movement originally focused on
  732. open data as a means to increase transparency of governments. More
  733. recently there is a shift towards using open data to help address a
  734. variety of social, economic and environmental challenges. In
  735. contrast, as part of the open science movement, there is a
  736. different role for open data. Recent attention has been on the use
  737. of open data to address the reproducibility crisis around research.
  738. Or to help respond to emerging health issues, like Coronavirus.</p>
  739. <p>With a few exceptions, the main approach to open data has been a
  740. single organisation (or researcher) publishing data that they have
  741. already collected. There may be some collaboration around
  742. <em>use</em> of that data, but not in its collection or
  743. maintenance.</p>
  744. <p>This makes open data quite <a href=
  745. "https://blog.ldodds.com/2016/03/24/a-key-difference-between-open-data-and-open-source/">
  746. distinct from open source</a> or open sources.</p>
  747. <p>We can think of collaborative maintenance as about taking the
  748. approach used in open source and applying it to data. Collaborative
  749. maintenance involves collaboration across the full lifecycle of a
  750. dataset.</p>
  751. <p>Some examples might be helpful.</p>
  752. <p>OpenStreetMap is a collaboratively produced spatial database of
  753. the entire world. While it was originally produced by individuals
  754. and communities, it is now <a href=
  755. "https://theodi.org/article/how-are-facebook-apple-and-microsoft-contributing-to-openstreetmap/">
  756. contributed to by large organisations like Facebook, Microsoft and
  757. Apple</a>. The <a href="https://www.hotosm.org/">Humanitarian
  758. OpenStreetMap</a> community focuses on the collection and use of
  759. data to support humanitarian activities. The community are involved
  760. in deciding what data to collect, prioritising maintenance of data
  761. following disasters, and mapping activities either on the ground or
  762. remotely. The community works across the lifecycle and is
  763. self-directing.</p>
  764. <p><a href="https://voice.mozilla.org/en">Common Voice</a> is a
  765. Mozilla project. It aims to build an open dataset to support voice
  766. recognition applications. By asking others to contribute to the
  767. dataset, they hope to make it more comprehensive and inclusive.
  768. Mozilla have defined what data will be collected and the tasks to
  769. be carried out, but anyone can contribute to the dataset by adding
  770. their voice or transcribing a recording. It’s this open
  771. participation that could help ensure that the dataset represents a
  772. more diverse set of people.</p>
  773. <p><a href=
  774. "https://get-information-schools.service.gov.uk/">Edubase</a> is
  775. maintained by the Department for Education (DfE). It’s our national
  776. database of schools. It’s used in a variety of different
  777. applications. Like Mozilla, DfE are acting as the steward of the
  778. data and have defined what information should be collected. But the
  779. work of populating and maintaining the shared directory is carried
  780. out by people in the individual schools. This is the best way to
  781. keep that data up to date. Those who are know when the data has
  782. changed have the ability to update it. The contributors all benefit
  783. from shared resource.</p>
  784. <p>Build a shared directory is a common use for collaborative
  785. maintenance. But <a href=
  786. "https://collaborative-data.theodi.org/patterns/project-types">there
  787. are others</a>.</p>
  788. <p>Looking across these projects and <a href=
  789. "https://collaborative-data.theodi.org/when-to-use/">other
  790. examples</a> that we’ve studied in our <a href=
  791. "https://theodi.org/article/collaborative-data-maintenance-how-can-we-enable-shared-curation-of-high-quality-data/">
  792. desk</a> and <a href=
  793. "https://theodi.org/article/insights-from-successful-collaborative-maintenance-projects/">
  794. user research</a>, we can see that there are <a href=
  795. "https://collaborative-data.theodi.org/what-is-collaborative-maintenance/">
  796. different ways we can collaborate around data</a>.</p>
  797. <p>For example, we can work together to decide what data to
  798. collect. We can share the work of collecting and maintaining data,
  799. ensuring its quality and governing access to it. We can use open
  800. source to help to build the tools to support those communities.</p>
  801. <p>We’ve developed the <a href=
  802. "https://collaborative-data.theodi.org/">collaborative maintenance
  803. guidebook</a> to help support the design of new services and
  804. platforms. It includes some background and a worked example. The
  805. bulk of the guidebook is a <a href=
  806. "https://collaborative-data.theodi.org/patterns/">set</a> of
  807. “<a href=
  808. "https://collaborative-data.theodi.org/about-patterns/">design
  809. patterns</a>” that describe solutions to common problems. For
  810. example how to manage quality when many different people are
  811. contributing to the same dataset.</p>
  812. <p>We think collaborative maintenance can be useful in more
  813. projects. For civil society organisations collaborative maintenance
  814. might help you engage with communities that you’re supporting to
  815. collect and maintain useful data. It might also be a tool to
  816. support collaboration across the sector as a means of building
  817. common resources.</p>
  818. <p>The guidebook is at an early stage and we’d love to get feedback
  819. on it contents. Or help you apply it to a real-world project. Let
  820. us know what you think!</p>
  821. <p>&#160;</p>
  822. </div>
  823. </div>]]></content:encoded>
  824.  <description>Following the publication of their report on data governance in the 21st century , the Royal Society are running a number of workshops to explore data governance in different sectors. In October 2019 year they ran one exploring data governance in the auto insurance sector . Last week they held a workshop looking at data governance in the civil society sector. The ODI were invited to help out, and I chaired a session looking at collaborative maintenance of data. I believe the Royal Society will be publishing a longer write-up of the workshop over the coming weeks. This blog post ...</description>
  825. </item>
  826. <item rdf:about="https://blog.ldodds.com/2020/03/02/how-can-publishing-more-data-increase-the-value-of-existing-data/">
  827.  <dc:creator>Leigh Dodds</dc:creator>
  828.  <dc:source>Lost Boy by Leigh Dodds</dc:source>
  829.  <dc:relation>http://ldodds.com/blog/</dc:relation>
  830.  <planet:content xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" rdf:parseType="Literal">
  831. <div>
  832. <p>There’s lots to love about the “<a href=
  833. "https://www.bennettinstitute.cam.ac.uk/research/research-projects/valuing-data/">Value
  834. of Data</a>” report. Like the fantastic infographic on page 9. I’ll
  835. wait while you go and check it out.</p>
  836. <p>Great, isn’t it?</p>
  837. <p>My favourite part about the paper is that it’s taught me a few
  838. terms that economists use, but which I hadn’t heard before. Like
  839. “<em>Incomplete contracts</em>” which is the uncertainty about how
  840. people will behave because of ambiguity in norms, regulations,
  841. licensing or other rules. Finally, a name to put to my repeated
  842. gripes about licensing!</p>
  843. <p>But it’s the term “<a href=
  844. "https://conceptually.org/option-value">option value</a>” that I’ve
  845. been mulling over for the last few days. Option value is a measure
  846. of our willingness to pay for something even though we’re not
  847. currently using it. Data has a large option value, because its hard
  848. to predict how its value might change in future.</p>
  849. <p>Organisations continue to keep data because of its potential
  850. future uses. I’ve written before about <a href=
  851. "https://blog.ldodds.com/2012/07/20/data-is-potential/">data as
  852. stored potential</a>.</p>
  853. <p>The report notes that the value of a dataset can change because
  854. we might be able to apply new technologies to it. Or think of new
  855. questions to ask of it. Or, and this is the interesting part,
  856. because we acquire new data that might impact its value.</p>
  857. <p>So, how does increasing access to one dataset affect the value
  858. of other datasets?</p>
  859. <p>Moving data along the data spectrum means that increasingly more
  860. people will have access to it. That means it can be used by more
  861. people, potentially in very different ways than you might expect.
  862. Applying <a href=
  863. "https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joy%27s_law_(management)">Joy’s
  864. Law</a> then we might expect some interesting, innovative or just
  865. unanticipated uses. (See also: <a href=
  866. "https://blog.ldodds.com/2016/02/21/everyone-loves-a-laser/">everyone
  867. loves a laser.)</a></p>
  868. <p><img class="aligncenter" src=
  869. "https://theodi.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/Screen-Shot-2018-02-27-at-12.42.42.png" /></p>
  870. <p>But more people using the same data is just extracting
  871. additional value from that single dataset. It’s not directly
  872. impacting the value of other dataset.</p>
  873. <p>To do that we need to use that in some specific ways. So far
  874. I’ve come up with seven ways that new data can change the value of
  875. existing data.</p>
  876. <ol>
  877. <li><strong>Comparison</strong>. If we have two or more datasets
  878. then we can compare them. That will allow us to identify
  879. differences, look for similarities, or find correlations. New data
  880. can help us discover insights that aren’t otherwise apparent.</li>
  881. <li><strong>Enrichment</strong>. New data can enrich an existing
  882. data by adding new information. It gives us context that we didn’t
  883. have access to before, unlocking further uses</li>
  884. <li><strong>Validation</strong>. New data can help us identify and
  885. correct errors in existing data.</li>
  886. <li><strong>Linking</strong>. A new dataset might help us to merge
  887. some existing dataset, allowing us to analyse them in new ways. The
  888. new dataset acts like a missing piece in a jigsaw puzzle.</li>
  889. <li><strong>Scaffolding</strong>. A new dataset can help us to
  890. organise other data. It might also help us collect new data.</li>
  891. <li><strong>Improve Coverage</strong>. Adding more data, of the
  892. same type, into an existing pool can help us create a larger,
  893. aggregated dataset. We end up with a more complete dataset, which
  894. opens up more uses. The combined dataset might have a a better
  895. spatial or temporal coverage, be less biased or capture more of the
  896. world we want to analyse</li>
  897. <li><strong>Increase Confidence</strong>. If the new data measures
  898. something we’ve already recorded, then the repeated measurements
  899. can help us to be more confident about the quality of our existing
  900. data and analyses. For example, we might pool sensor readings about
  901. the weather from multiple weather stations in the same area. Or
  902. perform a meta-analysis of a scientific study.</li>
  903. </ol>
  904. <p>I don’t think this is exhaustive, but it was a useful thought
  905. experiment.</p>
  906. <p>A while ago, I outlined <a href=
  907. "https://blog.ldodds.com/2019/05/30/how-can-we-describe-different-types-of-dataset-ten-dataset-archetypes/">
  908. ten dataset archetypes</a>. It’s interesting to see how these align
  909. with the above uses:</p>
  910. <ul>
  911. <li>A meta-analysis to <em>increase confidence</em> will draw on
  912. multiple <strong>studies</strong></li>
  913. <li>Combining <strong>sensor feeds</strong> can also help us
  914. <em>increase confidence</em> in our observations of the world</li>
  915. <li>A <strong>register</strong> can help us with <em>linking</em>
  916. or <em>scaffolding</em> datasets. They can also be used to
  917. support&#160;<em>validation.</em></li>
  918. <li>Pooling together multiple <strong>descriptions</strong> or
  919. <strong>personal records</strong> can help us create a
  920. <strong>database</strong> that has <em>improved coverage</em> for a
  921. specific application</li>
  922. <li>A <strong>social graph</strong> is often used as
  923. <em>scaffolding</em>&#160;for other datasets</li>
  924. </ul>
  925. <p>What would you add to my list of ways in which new data improves
  926. the value of existing data? What did I miss?</p>
  927. </div>
  928. </planet:content>
  929.  <dc:date rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#dateTime">2020-03-02T21:05:59.000000Z</dc:date>
  930.  <title>How can publishing more data increase the value of existing
  931. data?</title>
  932.  <link>https://blog.ldodds.com/2020/03/02/how-can-publishing-more-data-increase-the-value-of-existing-data/</link>
  933.  <content:encoded rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#XMLLiteral"><![CDATA[
  934. <div xmlns='http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml'>
  935. <div>
  936. <p>There’s lots to love about the “<a href=
  937. "https://www.bennettinstitute.cam.ac.uk/research/research-projects/valuing-data/">Value
  938. of Data</a>” report. Like the fantastic infographic on page 9. I’ll
  939. wait while you go and check it out.</p>
  940. <p>Great, isn’t it?</p>
  941. <p>My favourite part about the paper is that it’s taught me a few
  942. terms that economists use, but which I hadn’t heard before. Like
  943. “<em>Incomplete contracts</em>” which is the uncertainty about how
  944. people will behave because of ambiguity in norms, regulations,
  945. licensing or other rules. Finally, a name to put to my repeated
  946. gripes about licensing!</p>
  947. <p>But it’s the term “<a href=
  948. "https://conceptually.org/option-value">option value</a>” that I’ve
  949. been mulling over for the last few days. Option value is a measure
  950. of our willingness to pay for something even though we’re not
  951. currently using it. Data has a large option value, because its hard
  952. to predict how its value might change in future.</p>
  953. <p>Organisations continue to keep data because of its potential
  954. future uses. I’ve written before about <a href=
  955. "https://blog.ldodds.com/2012/07/20/data-is-potential/">data as
  956. stored potential</a>.</p>
  957. <p>The report notes that the value of a dataset can change because
  958. we might be able to apply new technologies to it. Or think of new
  959. questions to ask of it. Or, and this is the interesting part,
  960. because we acquire new data that might impact its value.</p>
  961. <p>So, how does increasing access to one dataset affect the value
  962. of other datasets?</p>
  963. <p>Moving data along the data spectrum means that increasingly more
  964. people will have access to it. That means it can be used by more
  965. people, potentially in very different ways than you might expect.
  966. Applying <a href=
  967. "https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joy%27s_law_(management)">Joy’s
  968. Law</a> then we might expect some interesting, innovative or just
  969. unanticipated uses. (See also: <a href=
  970. "https://blog.ldodds.com/2016/02/21/everyone-loves-a-laser/">everyone
  971. loves a laser.)</a></p>
  972. <p><img class="aligncenter" src=
  973. "https://theodi.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/Screen-Shot-2018-02-27-at-12.42.42.png" /></p>
  974. <p>But more people using the same data is just extracting
  975. additional value from that single dataset. It’s not directly
  976. impacting the value of other dataset.</p>
  977. <p>To do that we need to use that in some specific ways. So far
  978. I’ve come up with seven ways that new data can change the value of
  979. existing data.</p>
  980. <ol>
  981. <li><strong>Comparison</strong>. If we have two or more datasets
  982. then we can compare them. That will allow us to identify
  983. differences, look for similarities, or find correlations. New data
  984. can help us discover insights that aren’t otherwise apparent.</li>
  985. <li><strong>Enrichment</strong>. New data can enrich an existing
  986. data by adding new information. It gives us context that we didn’t
  987. have access to before, unlocking further uses</li>
  988. <li><strong>Validation</strong>. New data can help us identify and
  989. correct errors in existing data.</li>
  990. <li><strong>Linking</strong>. A new dataset might help us to merge
  991. some existing dataset, allowing us to analyse them in new ways. The
  992. new dataset acts like a missing piece in a jigsaw puzzle.</li>
  993. <li><strong>Scaffolding</strong>. A new dataset can help us to
  994. organise other data. It might also help us collect new data.</li>
  995. <li><strong>Improve Coverage</strong>. Adding more data, of the
  996. same type, into an existing pool can help us create a larger,
  997. aggregated dataset. We end up with a more complete dataset, which
  998. opens up more uses. The combined dataset might have a a better
  999. spatial or temporal coverage, be less biased or capture more of the
  1000. world we want to analyse</li>
  1001. <li><strong>Increase Confidence</strong>. If the new data measures
  1002. something we’ve already recorded, then the repeated measurements
  1003. can help us to be more confident about the quality of our existing
  1004. data and analyses. For example, we might pool sensor readings about
  1005. the weather from multiple weather stations in the same area. Or
  1006. perform a meta-analysis of a scientific study.</li>
  1007. </ol>
  1008. <p>I don’t think this is exhaustive, but it was a useful thought
  1009. experiment.</p>
  1010. <p>A while ago, I outlined <a href=
  1011. "https://blog.ldodds.com/2019/05/30/how-can-we-describe-different-types-of-dataset-ten-dataset-archetypes/">
  1012. ten dataset archetypes</a>. It’s interesting to see how these align
  1013. with the above uses:</p>
  1014. <ul>
  1015. <li>A meta-analysis to <em>increase confidence</em> will draw on
  1016. multiple <strong>studies</strong></li>
  1017. <li>Combining <strong>sensor feeds</strong> can also help us
  1018. <em>increase confidence</em> in our observations of the world</li>
  1019. <li>A <strong>register</strong> can help us with <em>linking</em>
  1020. or <em>scaffolding</em> datasets. They can also be used to
  1021. support&#160;<em>validation.</em></li>
  1022. <li>Pooling together multiple <strong>descriptions</strong> or
  1023. <strong>personal records</strong> can help us create a
  1024. <strong>database</strong> that has <em>improved coverage</em> for a
  1025. specific application</li>
  1026. <li>A <strong>social graph</strong> is often used as
  1027. <em>scaffolding</em>&#160;for other datasets</li>
  1028. </ul>
  1029. <p>What would you add to my list of ways in which new data improves
  1030. the value of existing data? What did I miss?</p>
  1031. </div>
  1032. </div>]]></content:encoded>
  1033.  <description>There’s lots to love about the “ Value of Data ” report. Like the fantastic infographic on page 9. I’ll wait while you go and check it out. Great, isn’t it? My favourite part about the paper is that it’s taught me a few terms that economists use, but which I hadn’t heard before. Like “ Incomplete contracts ” which is the uncertainty about how people will behave because of ambiguity in norms, regulations, licensing or other rules. Finally, a name to put to my repeated gripes about licensing! But it’s the term “ option value ” that I’ve been ...</description>
  1034. </item>
  1035. <item rdf:about="https://blog.ldodds.com/2020/02/21/three-types-of-agreement-that-shape-your-use-of-data/">
  1036.  <dc:creator>Leigh Dodds</dc:creator>
  1037.  <dc:source>Lost Boy by Leigh Dodds</dc:source>
  1038.  <dc:relation>http://ldodds.com/blog/</dc:relation>
  1039.  <planet:content xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" rdf:parseType="Literal">
  1040. <div>
  1041. <p>Whenever you’re accessing, using or sharing data you will be
  1042. bound by a variety of laws and agreements. I’ve written previously
  1043. about how <a href=
  1044. "https://blog.ldodds.com/2019/03/16/thinking-about-the-governance-of-data/">
  1045. data governance is a nested set of rules, processes, legislation
  1046. and norms.</a></p>
  1047. <p>In this post I wanted to clarify the differences between three
  1048. types of agreements that will govern your use of data. There are
  1049. others. But from a data consumer point of view these are most
  1050. common.</p>
  1051. <p>If you’re involved in <em>any</em> kind of data project, then
  1052. you should have read <em>all</em> of relevant agreements that
  1053. relate to data you’re planning to use. So you should know what to
  1054. look for.</p>
  1055. <h3>Data Sharing Agreements</h3>
  1056. <p>Data sharing agreements are usually contracts that will have
  1057. been signed between the organisations sharing data. They describe
  1058. how, when, where and for how long data will be shared.</p>
  1059. <p>They will include things like the purpose and legal basis for
  1060. sharing data. They will describe the important security, privacy
  1061. and other considerations that govern how data will be shared,
  1062. managed and used. Data sharing agreements might be time-limited. Or
  1063. they might describe an ongoing arrangement.</p>
  1064. <p>When the public and private sector are sharing data, then
  1065. publishing a register of agreements is one way to increase
  1066. transparency around how data is being shared.</p>
  1067. <p>The ICO <a href=
  1068. "https://ico.org.uk/media/2615361/data-sharing-code-for-public-consultation.pdf">
  1069. Data Sharing Code of Practice</a> has more detail on the kinds of
  1070. information a data sharing agreement should contain. As does
  1071. <a href=
  1072. "https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/digital-economy-act-2017-part-5-codes-of-practice/data-sharing-code-of-practice-code-of-practice-for-civil-registration-officials-disclosing-information-under-section-19aa-of-the-registration-service#part-4-data-sharing-and-the-law">
  1073. the UK’s Digital Economy Act 2017 code of practice for data
  1074. sharing</a>. In a recent project the ODI and CABI created <a href=
  1075. "https://gatesopenresearch.org/documents/2-44">a checklist for data
  1076. sharing agreements</a>.</p>
  1077. <p>Data sharing agreements are most useful when organisations, of
  1078. any kind, are sharing sensitive data. A contract with detailed,
  1079. binding rules helps everyone be clear on their obligations.</p>
  1080. <h3>Licences</h3>
  1081. <p>Licences are a different approach to defining the rules that
  1082. apply to use of data. A licence describes the ways that data can be
  1083. used without any of the organisations involved having to enter into
  1084. a formal agreement.</p>
  1085. <p>A licence will describe how you can use some data. It may also
  1086. place some restrictions on your use (e.g. “non-commercial”) and may
  1087. spell out some obligations (“please say where you got the data”).
  1088. So long as you use the data in the described ways, then you don’t
  1089. need any kind of explicit permission from the publisher. You don’t
  1090. even have to tell them you’re using it. Although <a href=
  1091. "https://blog.ldodds.com/2015/03/03/5-ways-to-be-a-better-open-data-reuser/">
  1092. it’s usually a good idea to do that</a>.</p>
  1093. <p>Licences remove the need to negotiate and sign agreements.
  1094. Permission is granted in advance, with a few caveats.</p>
  1095. <p>Standard licences make it easier to use data from multiple
  1096. sources, because everyone is expecting you to follow the same
  1097. rules. But only if the licences are widely adopted. <a href=
  1098. "https://blog.ldodds.com/2020/01/24/licence-friction-a-tale-of-two-datasets/">
  1099. Where licences don’t align, we end up with unnecessary
  1100. friction</a>.</p>
  1101. <p>Licences aren’t time-limited. They’re perpetual. At least as
  1102. long as you follow your obligations.</p>
  1103. <p>Licences are best used for <a href=
  1104. "https://theodi.org/about-the-odi/the-data-spectrum/">open and
  1105. public data</a>. Sometimes people use data sharing agreements when
  1106. a licence might be a better option. That’s often because
  1107. organisations know how to do contracts, but are less confident in
  1108. giving permissions. Especially if they’re <a href=
  1109. "https://blog.ldodds.com/2015/11/15/managing-risks-when-publishing-open-data/">
  1110. concerned about risks</a>.</p>
  1111. <p>Sometimes, even if there’s an open licence to use data, a
  1112. business would still prefer to have an agreement in place. That’s
  1113. might be because the licence doesn’t give them the freedoms they
  1114. want, or they’d like some additional assurances in place around
  1115. their use of data.</p>
  1116. <h3>Terms and Conditions</h3>
  1117. <p>Terms and conditions, or “terms of use” are a set of rules that
  1118. describe how you can use a service. Terms and conditions are the
  1119. things we all ignore when signing up to website. But if you’re
  1120. using a data portal, platform or API then you need to have
  1121. definitely checked the small print. (<a href=
  1122. "https://blog.ldodds.com/2017/05/19/can-you-publish-tweets-as-open-data/">You
  1123. have, haven’t you?</a>)</p>
  1124. <p>Like a Data Sharing Agreement, a set of terms and conditions is
  1125. something that you formally agree to. It might be by checking a box
  1126. rather than signing a document, but its still an agreement.</p>
  1127. <p>Terms of use will describe the service being offered and the
  1128. ways in which you can use it. Like licences and data sharing
  1129. agreements, they will also include some restrictions. For example
  1130. whether you can build a commercial service with it. Or what you can
  1131. do with the results.</p>
  1132. <p>A good set of terms and conditions will clearly and separately
  1133. identify those rules that relate to your use of the service (e.g.
  1134. how often you can use it) from those rules that relate to the data
  1135. provided to you. Ideally the terms would just refer to a separate
  1136. licence. <a href=
  1137. "https://www.metoffice.gov.uk/services/data/datapoint/terms-and-conditions---datapoint">
  1138. The Met Office Data Point terms do this</a>.</p>
  1139. <p>A poorly defined set of terms will focus on the service parts
  1140. but not include enough detail about your rights to use and reuse
  1141. data. That can happen if the emphasis has been on the terms of use
  1142. of the service as a product, rather than around the sharing of
  1143. data.</p>
  1144. <p>The terms and conditions for a data service and the rules that
  1145. relate to the data are two of <a href=
  1146. "https://blog.ldodds.com/2019/07/24/how-do-data-publishing-choices-shape-data-ecosystems/">
  1147. the important decisions that shape the data ecosystem</a> that
  1148. service will enable. It’s important to get them right.</p>
  1149. <p>Hopefully that’s a helpful primer. Remember, if you’re in any
  1150. kind of role using data then you need to read the small print. If
  1151. not, then you’re potentially exposing yourself and others to
  1152. risks.</p>
  1153. </div>
  1154. </planet:content>
  1155.  <dc:date rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#dateTime">2020-02-21T20:05:51.000000Z</dc:date>
  1156.  <title>Three types of agreement that shape your use of data</title>
  1157.  <link>https://blog.ldodds.com/2020/02/21/three-types-of-agreement-that-shape-your-use-of-data/</link>
  1158.  <content:encoded rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#XMLLiteral"><![CDATA[
  1159. <div xmlns='http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml'>
  1160. <div>
  1161. <p>Whenever you’re accessing, using or sharing data you will be
  1162. bound by a variety of laws and agreements. I’ve written previously
  1163. about how <a href=
  1164. "https://blog.ldodds.com/2019/03/16/thinking-about-the-governance-of-data/">
  1165. data governance is a nested set of rules, processes, legislation
  1166. and norms.</a></p>
  1167. <p>In this post I wanted to clarify the differences between three
  1168. types of agreements that will govern your use of data. There are
  1169. others. But from a data consumer point of view these are most
  1170. common.</p>
  1171. <p>If you’re involved in <em>any</em> kind of data project, then
  1172. you should have read <em>all</em> of relevant agreements that
  1173. relate to data you’re planning to use. So you should know what to
  1174. look for.</p>
  1175. <h3>Data Sharing Agreements</h3>
  1176. <p>Data sharing agreements are usually contracts that will have
  1177. been signed between the organisations sharing data. They describe
  1178. how, when, where and for how long data will be shared.</p>
  1179. <p>They will include things like the purpose and legal basis for
  1180. sharing data. They will describe the important security, privacy
  1181. and other considerations that govern how data will be shared,
  1182. managed and used. Data sharing agreements might be time-limited. Or
  1183. they might describe an ongoing arrangement.</p>
  1184. <p>When the public and private sector are sharing data, then
  1185. publishing a register of agreements is one way to increase
  1186. transparency around how data is being shared.</p>
  1187. <p>The ICO <a href=
  1188. "https://ico.org.uk/media/2615361/data-sharing-code-for-public-consultation.pdf">
  1189. Data Sharing Code of Practice</a> has more detail on the kinds of
  1190. information a data sharing agreement should contain. As does
  1191. <a href=
  1192. "https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/digital-economy-act-2017-part-5-codes-of-practice/data-sharing-code-of-practice-code-of-practice-for-civil-registration-officials-disclosing-information-under-section-19aa-of-the-registration-service#part-4-data-sharing-and-the-law">
  1193. the UK’s Digital Economy Act 2017 code of practice for data
  1194. sharing</a>. In a recent project the ODI and CABI created <a href=
  1195. "https://gatesopenresearch.org/documents/2-44">a checklist for data
  1196. sharing agreements</a>.</p>
  1197. <p>Data sharing agreements are most useful when organisations, of
  1198. any kind, are sharing sensitive data. A contract with detailed,
  1199. binding rules helps everyone be clear on their obligations.</p>
  1200. <h3>Licences</h3>
  1201. <p>Licences are a different approach to defining the rules that
  1202. apply to use of data. A licence describes the ways that data can be
  1203. used without any of the organisations involved having to enter into
  1204. a formal agreement.</p>
  1205. <p>A licence will describe how you can use some data. It may also
  1206. place some restrictions on your use (e.g. “non-commercial”) and may
  1207. spell out some obligations (“please say where you got the data”).
  1208. So long as you use the data in the described ways, then you don’t
  1209. need any kind of explicit permission from the publisher. You don’t
  1210. even have to tell them you’re using it. Although <a href=
  1211. "https://blog.ldodds.com/2015/03/03/5-ways-to-be-a-better-open-data-reuser/">
  1212. it’s usually a good idea to do that</a>.</p>
  1213. <p>Licences remove the need to negotiate and sign agreements.
  1214. Permission is granted in advance, with a few caveats.</p>
  1215. <p>Standard licences make it easier to use data from multiple
  1216. sources, because everyone is expecting you to follow the same
  1217. rules. But only if the licences are widely adopted. <a href=
  1218. "https://blog.ldodds.com/2020/01/24/licence-friction-a-tale-of-two-datasets/">
  1219. Where licences don’t align, we end up with unnecessary
  1220. friction</a>.</p>
  1221. <p>Licences aren’t time-limited. They’re perpetual. At least as
  1222. long as you follow your obligations.</p>
  1223. <p>Licences are best used for <a href=
  1224. "https://theodi.org/about-the-odi/the-data-spectrum/">open and
  1225. public data</a>. Sometimes people use data sharing agreements when
  1226. a licence might be a better option. That’s often because
  1227. organisations know how to do contracts, but are less confident in
  1228. giving permissions. Especially if they’re <a href=
  1229. "https://blog.ldodds.com/2015/11/15/managing-risks-when-publishing-open-data/">
  1230. concerned about risks</a>.</p>
  1231. <p>Sometimes, even if there’s an open licence to use data, a
  1232. business would still prefer to have an agreement in place. That’s
  1233. might be because the licence doesn’t give them the freedoms they
  1234. want, or they’d like some additional assurances in place around
  1235. their use of data.</p>
  1236. <h3>Terms and Conditions</h3>
  1237. <p>Terms and conditions, or “terms of use” are a set of rules that
  1238. describe how you can use a service. Terms and conditions are the
  1239. things we all ignore when signing up to website. But if you’re
  1240. using a data portal, platform or API then you need to have
  1241. definitely checked the small print. (<a href=
  1242. "https://blog.ldodds.com/2017/05/19/can-you-publish-tweets-as-open-data/">You
  1243. have, haven’t you?</a>)</p>
  1244. <p>Like a Data Sharing Agreement, a set of terms and conditions is
  1245. something that you formally agree to. It might be by checking a box
  1246. rather than signing a document, but its still an agreement.</p>
  1247. <p>Terms of use will describe the service being offered and the
  1248. ways in which you can use it. Like licences and data sharing
  1249. agreements, they will also include some restrictions. For example
  1250. whether you can build a commercial service with it. Or what you can
  1251. do with the results.</p>
  1252. <p>A good set of terms and conditions will clearly and separately
  1253. identify those rules that relate to your use of the service (e.g.
  1254. how often you can use it) from those rules that relate to the data
  1255. provided to you. Ideally the terms would just refer to a separate
  1256. licence. <a href=
  1257. "https://www.metoffice.gov.uk/services/data/datapoint/terms-and-conditions---datapoint">
  1258. The Met Office Data Point terms do this</a>.</p>
  1259. <p>A poorly defined set of terms will focus on the service parts
  1260. but not include enough detail about your rights to use and reuse
  1261. data. That can happen if the emphasis has been on the terms of use
  1262. of the service as a product, rather than around the sharing of
  1263. data.</p>
  1264. <p>The terms and conditions for a data service and the rules that
  1265. relate to the data are two of <a href=
  1266. "https://blog.ldodds.com/2019/07/24/how-do-data-publishing-choices-shape-data-ecosystems/">
  1267. the important decisions that shape the data ecosystem</a> that
  1268. service will enable. It’s important to get them right.</p>
  1269. <p>Hopefully that’s a helpful primer. Remember, if you’re in any
  1270. kind of role using data then you need to read the small print. If
  1271. not, then you’re potentially exposing yourself and others to
  1272. risks.</p>
  1273. </div>
  1274. </div>]]></content:encoded>
  1275.  <description>Whenever you’re accessing, using or sharing data you will be bound by a variety of laws and agreements. I’ve written previously about how data governance is a nested set of rules, processes, legislation and norms. In this post I wanted to clarify the differences between three types of agreements that will govern your use of data. There are others. But from a data consumer point of view these are most common. If you’re involved in any kind of data project, then you should have read all of relevant agreements that relate to data you’re planning to use. So you should ...</description>
  1276. </item>
  1277. <item rdf:about="https://planb.nicecupoftea.org/2020/02/14/links-for-my-pervasive-media-studio-talk-on-low-resolution-people/">
  1278.  <dc:creator>Libby Miller</dc:creator>
  1279.  <dc:source>Plan B by Libby Miller</dc:source>
  1280.  <dc:relation>http://planb.nicecupoftea.org/</dc:relation>
  1281.  <planet:content xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" rdf:parseType="Literal">
  1282. <div>
  1283. <p>I’m <a href=
  1284. "https://www.watershed.co.uk/studio/events/2020/02/14/low-resolution-versions-people-using-machine-learning-and-other-technologies">
  1285. giving a talk this afternoon</a> at the Pervasive Media Studio in
  1286. Bristol about some low-resolution people experiments I’ve been
  1287. making. Here are some related links:</p>
  1288. <p><a href=
  1289. "http://utouch.cpsc.ucalgary.ca/docs/AbstractMotionInHRI-RoMan11-JH.pdf">
  1290. Exploring the Affect of Abstract Motion in Social Human-Robot
  1291. Interaction</a>,&#160;John Harris and Ehud Sharlin</p>
  1292. <p><a href=
  1293. "https://github.com/libbymiller/libbybot_eleven/">Libbybot
  1294. 11&#160;</a>code and instructions</p>
  1295. <p><a href="https://goofy.zamia.org/asr/">Zamia</a>&#160;and
  1296. <a href="https://github.com/libbymiller/zamia_listening_pi">scripts
  1297. for running it on the Raspberry Pi 3</a></p>
  1298. <p><a href=
  1299. "https://github.com/libbymiller/real_libby">Real_libby</a>&#160;code</p>
  1300. <p><a href=
  1301. "https://openai.com/blog/better-language-models/">GPT-2</a></p>
  1302. <p><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gMPbEvtRaEw">Matt Jones
  1303. – Butlers or Centaurs</a></p>
  1304. <p><a href="https://twitter.com/mistertim">Tim Cowlishaw</a>‘s
  1305. <a href=
  1306. "https://colab.research.google.com/drive/1xxv2n7phjugTQn7Ar2QpCcWrKteKgsvh#scrollTo=DOf17nNvM2Ge">
  1307. colab notebook for GPT-2 retraining</a></p>
  1308. <p><a href="https://aiweirdness.com">Janelle Shane</a>‘s site and
  1309. <a href=
  1310. "https://www.waterstones.com/book/you-look-like-a-thing-and-i-love-you/janelle-shane/9781472268990">
  1311. book</a></p>
  1312. <p>This is the <a href="https://github.com/Kyubyong/dc_tts/">voice
  1313. synthesis code</a> that my colleagues used. They are hoping to open
  1314. up their version of it soon.</p>
  1315. <p>There’s a&#160;<a href="https://voicestudy.api.bbc.co.uk">voice
  1316. assistant survey</a> that uses the synthesised voices and there’s a
  1317. <a href=
  1318. "https://www.bbc.co.uk/rd/blog/2020-02-synthetic-voices-accent-artificial-interactive">
  1319. blog post</a> about that.</p>
  1320. <p>Pimoroni sell&#160;<a href=
  1321. "https://shop.pimoroni.com/products/respeaker-4-mic-array-for-raspberry-pi?variant=49984944138&amp;currency=GBP&amp;utm_source=google&amp;utm_medium=cpc&amp;utm_campaign=google+shopping&amp;gclid=CjwKCAiAp5nyBRABEiwApTwjXrTQmEdZ99aRxwmhp2jn1sVU7VQZ7au5Lf3qUDu-uuFeiDRLMKZxwBoCFooQAvD_BwE">Respeaker
  1322. 4-mics</a>.</p>
  1323. <p>I’m <a href="https://twitter.com/libbymiller">libbymiller on
  1324. twitter</a>.</p>
  1325. <p>&#160;</p>
  1326. </div>
  1327. </planet:content>
  1328.  <dc:date rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#dateTime">2020-02-14T16:06:15.000000Z</dc:date>
  1329.  <title>Links for my Pervasive Media Studio talk</title>
  1330.  <link>https://planb.nicecupoftea.org/2020/02/14/links-for-my-pervasive-media-studio-talk-on-low-resolution-people/</link>
  1331.  <content:encoded rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#XMLLiteral"><![CDATA[
  1332. <div xmlns='http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml'>
  1333. <div>
  1334. <p>I’m <a href=
  1335. "https://www.watershed.co.uk/studio/events/2020/02/14/low-resolution-versions-people-using-machine-learning-and-other-technologies">
  1336. giving a talk this afternoon</a> at the Pervasive Media Studio in
  1337. Bristol about some low-resolution people experiments I’ve been
  1338. making. Here are some related links:</p>
  1339. <p><a href=
  1340. "http://utouch.cpsc.ucalgary.ca/docs/AbstractMotionInHRI-RoMan11-JH.pdf">
  1341. Exploring the Affect of Abstract Motion in Social Human-Robot
  1342. Interaction</a>,&#160;John Harris and Ehud Sharlin</p>
  1343. <p><a href=
  1344. "https://github.com/libbymiller/libbybot_eleven/">Libbybot
  1345. 11&#160;</a>code and instructions</p>
  1346. <p><a href="https://goofy.zamia.org/asr/">Zamia</a>&#160;and
  1347. <a href="https://github.com/libbymiller/zamia_listening_pi">scripts
  1348. for running it on the Raspberry Pi 3</a></p>
  1349. <p><a href=
  1350. "https://github.com/libbymiller/real_libby">Real_libby</a>&#160;code</p>
  1351. <p><a href=
  1352. "https://openai.com/blog/better-language-models/">GPT-2</a></p>
  1353. <p><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gMPbEvtRaEw">Matt Jones
  1354. – Butlers or Centaurs</a></p>
  1355. <p><a href="https://twitter.com/mistertim">Tim Cowlishaw</a>‘s
  1356. <a href=
  1357. "https://colab.research.google.com/drive/1xxv2n7phjugTQn7Ar2QpCcWrKteKgsvh#scrollTo=DOf17nNvM2Ge">
  1358. colab notebook for GPT-2 retraining</a></p>
  1359. <p><a href="https://aiweirdness.com">Janelle Shane</a>‘s site and
  1360. <a href=
  1361. "https://www.waterstones.com/book/you-look-like-a-thing-and-i-love-you/janelle-shane/9781472268990">
  1362. book</a></p>
  1363. <p>This is the <a href="https://github.com/Kyubyong/dc_tts/">voice
  1364. synthesis code</a> that my colleagues used. They are hoping to open
  1365. up their version of it soon.</p>
  1366. <p>There’s a&#160;<a href="https://voicestudy.api.bbc.co.uk">voice
  1367. assistant survey</a> that uses the synthesised voices and there’s a
  1368. <a href=
  1369. "https://www.bbc.co.uk/rd/blog/2020-02-synthetic-voices-accent-artificial-interactive">
  1370. blog post</a> about that.</p>
  1371. <p>Pimoroni sell&#160;<a href=
  1372. "https://shop.pimoroni.com/products/respeaker-4-mic-array-for-raspberry-pi?variant=49984944138&amp;currency=GBP&amp;utm_source=google&amp;utm_medium=cpc&amp;utm_campaign=google+shopping&amp;gclid=CjwKCAiAp5nyBRABEiwApTwjXrTQmEdZ99aRxwmhp2jn1sVU7VQZ7au5Lf3qUDu-uuFeiDRLMKZxwBoCFooQAvD_BwE">Respeaker
  1373. 4-mics</a>.</p>
  1374. <p>I’m <a href="https://twitter.com/libbymiller">libbymiller on
  1375. twitter</a>.</p>
  1376. <p>&#160;</p>
  1377. </div>
  1378. </div>]]></content:encoded>
  1379.  <description>I’m giving a talk this afternoon at the Pervasive Media Studio in Bristol about some low-resolution people experiments I’ve been making. Here are some related links: Exploring the Affect of Abstract Motion in Social Human-Robot Interaction ,&amp;#160;John Harris and Ehud Sharlin Libbybot 11&amp;#160; code and instructions Zamia &amp;#160;and scripts for running it on the Raspberry Pi 3 Real_libby &amp;#160;code GPT-2 Matt Jones – Butlers or Centaurs Tim Cowlishaw ‘s colab notebook for GPT-2 retraining Janelle Shane ‘s site and book This is the voice synthesis code that my colleagues used. They are hoping to open up their version of it ...</description>
  1380. </item>
  1381. <item rdf:about="https://blog.ldodds.com/2020/02/09/guide-a-retrospective/">
  1382.  <dc:creator>Leigh Dodds</dc:creator>
  1383.  <dc:source>Lost Boy by Leigh Dodds</dc:source>
  1384.  <dc:relation>http://ldodds.com/blog/</dc:relation>
  1385.  <planet:content xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" rdf:parseType="Literal">
  1386. <div>
  1387. <figure data-shortcode="caption" id="attachment_1634"
  1388. aria-describedby="caption-attachment-1634" style="width: 800px"
  1389. class="wp-caption aligncenter"><a href=
  1390. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/4608720906_182b7fe9cb_c.jpg">
  1391. <img data-attachment-id="1634" data-permalink=
  1392. "https://blog.ldodds.com/2020/02/09/guide-a-retrospective/sony-dsc/"
  1393. data-orig-file=
  1394. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/4608720906_182b7fe9cb_c.jpg"
  1395. data-orig-size="800,466" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta=
  1396. "{&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;DSLR-A700&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;SONY DSC&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;1272724471&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;50&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;400&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0.076923076923077&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;SONY DSC&quot;,&quot;orientation&quot;:&quot;0&quot;}"
  1397. data-image-title="" data-image-description=
  1398. "&lt;p&gt;Photo licence CC-BY-NC-ND 2.0, by Caroline. https://www.flickr.com/photos/carolineld/4608720906/&lt;/p&gt;"
  1399. data-medium-file=
  1400. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/4608720906_182b7fe9cb_c.jpg?w=300"
  1401. data-large-file=
  1402. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/4608720906_182b7fe9cb_c.jpg?w=800"
  1403. class="wp-image-1634 size-full" src=
  1404. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/4608720906_182b7fe9cb_c.jpg?w=1100"
  1405. alt="" srcset=
  1406. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/4608720906_182b7fe9cb_c.jpg 800w, https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/4608720906_182b7fe9cb_c.jpg?w=150 150w, https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/4608720906_182b7fe9cb_c.jpg?w=300 300w, https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/4608720906_182b7fe9cb_c.jpg?w=768 768w"
  1407. sizes="(max-width: 800px) 100vw, 800px" /></a>
  1408. <figcaption id="caption-attachment-1634" class="wp-caption-text">
  1409. “Tyntesfield servants’ bells” by Caroline. CC-BY-NC-ND licence.
  1410. <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/carolineld/4608720906/" rel=
  1411. "nofollow">https://www.flickr.com/photos/carolineld/4608720906/</a></figcaption>
  1412. </figure>
  1413. <p><em>This article was first published in the February 2030
  1414. edition of Sustain magazine. Ten years since the public launch of
  1415. GUIDE we sit down with its designers to chat about its origin and
  1416. what’s made it successful.</em></p>
  1417. <p>It’s a Saturday morning and I’m sitting in the bustling cafe at
  1418. <a href=
  1419. "https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/tyntesfield">Tyntesfield</a>
  1420. house, a National Trust property south of Bristol. I’m enjoying a
  1421. large pot of tea and a slice of cake with Joe Shilling and Gordon
  1422. Leith designers of one of the world’s most popular social
  1423. applications: GUIDE. I’d expected to meet somewhere in the city,
  1424. but Shilling suggested this as a suitable venue. It turns out
  1425. Tyntesfield plays a part in the origin story of GUIDE. So its
  1426. fitting that we are here for the tenth anniversary of its public
  1427. launch.</p>
  1428. <p>SHILLING: “Originally we were just playing. Exploring the design
  1429. parameters of social applications.”</p>
  1430. <p>He stirs the pot of tea while Leith begins sectioning the sponge
  1431. cake they’ve ordered.</p>
  1432. <p>SHILLING: “People did that more in the early days of the web.
  1433. But Twitter, Facebook, Instagram…they just kind of sucked up all
  1434. the attention and users. It killed off all that creativity. For a
  1435. while it seemed like they just owned the space…But then TikTok
  1436. happened…”</p>
  1437. <p>He pauses while I nod to indicate I’ve heard of it.</p>
  1438. <p>SHILLING: “…and small experiments like <a href=
  1439. "https://postlight.com/trackchanges/introducing-yap-from-postlight-labs">
  1440. Yap</a>. It was a slow burn, but I think a bunch of us started to
  1441. get interested again in designing different kinds of social apps.
  1442. We were part of this indie scene building and releasing bespoke
  1443. social networks. They came and went really quickly. People just
  1444. enjoyed them whilst they were around.”</p>
  1445. <p>Leith interjects around a mouthful of cake:</p>
  1446. <p>LEITH: “Some really random stuff. Social nets with built in
  1447. profile decay so they were guaranteed to end. Made them low
  1448. commitment, disposable. Messaging services where you could only
  1449. post at really specific, sometimes random times. Networks that only
  1450. came online when its members were in precise geographic
  1451. coordinates. Spatial partitioning to force separation of networks
  1452. for home, work and play. Experimental, ritualised
  1453. interfactions.”</p>
  1454. <p>SHILLING: “The migratory networks grew out of that movement too.
  1455. They didn’t last long, but they were intense. ”</p>
  1456. <p>LEITH: “Yeah. Social networks that just kicked into life around
  1457. a critical mass of people. Like in a club. Want to stay a
  1458. member…share the memes? Then you needed to be in its radius. In the
  1459. right city, at the right time. And then keep up as the algorithm
  1460. shifted it. Social spaces herding their members.”</p>
  1461. <p>SHILLING: “They were intense and incredibly problematic. Which
  1462. is why they didn’t last long. But for a while there was a crowd
  1463. that loved them. Until the club promoters got involved and then
  1464. that commercial aspect killed it.”</p>
  1465. <h3>RENT-SEEKING</h3>
  1466. <p>GUIDE had a very different starting point. Flat sharing in
  1467. Bristol, the duo needed money. Their indie credibility was high,
  1468. but what they were looking for a more mainstream hit with some
  1469. likelihood of revenue. The break-up of Facebook and the other big
  1470. services had created an opportunity which many were hoping to
  1471. capitalise on. But investment was a problem.</p>
  1472. <p>LEITH: “We wrote a lot of grant proposals. Goal was to use the
  1473. money to build out decent code base. Pay for some servers that we
  1474. could use to launch something bigger”.</p>
  1475. <p>Shilling pours the tea, while Leith passes me a slice of
  1476. cake.</p>
  1477. <p>SHILLING: “It was a bit more principled that that. There was
  1478. plenty of money for apps to help with social isolation. We thought
  1479. maybe we could build something useful, tackle some social problems,
  1480. work with a different demographic than we had before. But, yeah, we
  1481. had our own goals too. We had to take what opportunities were out
  1482. there.”</p>
  1483. <p>LEITH: “My mum had been attending this <a href=
  1484. "https://www.gmmh.nhs.uk/memory-skills-groups/">Memory Skills
  1485. group</a>. Passing around old photos and memorabilia to get people
  1486. talking and reminiscing. We thought we could create something
  1487. digital.”</p>
  1488. <p>SHILLING: “We managed to land a grant to explore the idea. We
  1489. figured that there was a demographic that had spent time connecting
  1490. not around the high street or the local football club. But with
  1491. stuff they’d all been doing online. Streaming the same shows.
  1492. Revisiting old game worlds. We thought those could be really useful
  1493. touch points and memory triggers too. And not everyone can access
  1494. some of the other services.”</p>
  1495. <p>LEITH: “Mum could talk for hours about Skyrim and Fallout”.</p>
  1496. <p>SHILLING: “So we prototyped some social spaces based around that
  1497. kind of content. It was during the user testing that we had the
  1498. real eye-opener”.</p>
  1499. <figure data-shortcode="caption" id="attachment_1638"
  1500. aria-describedby="caption-attachment-1638" style="width: 800px"
  1501. class="wp-caption aligncenter"><a href=
  1502. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/18516079841_b7fb67b158_c.jpg">
  1503. <img data-attachment-id="1638" data-permalink=
  1504. "https://blog.ldodds.com/2020/02/09/guide-a-retrospective/18516079841_b7fb67b158_c/"
  1505. data-orig-file=
  1506. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/18516079841_b7fb67b158_c.jpg"
  1507. data-orig-size="800,605" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta=
  1508. "{&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;DSC-RX100&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;1431510329&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;12.3&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;800&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0.01&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;orientation&quot;:&quot;0&quot;}"
  1509. data-image-title="18516079841_b7fb67b158_c" data-image-description=
  1510. "" data-medium-file=
  1511. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/18516079841_b7fb67b158_c.jpg?w=300"
  1512. data-large-file=
  1513. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/18516079841_b7fb67b158_c.jpg?w=800"
  1514. class="wp-image-1638 size-full" src=
  1515. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/18516079841_b7fb67b158_c.jpg?w=1100"
  1516. alt="" srcset=
  1517. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/18516079841_b7fb67b158_c.jpg 800w, https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/18516079841_b7fb67b158_c.jpg?w=150 150w, https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/18516079841_b7fb67b158_c.jpg?w=300 300w, https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/18516079841_b7fb67b158_c.jpg?w=768 768w"
  1518. sizes="(max-width: 800px) 100vw, 800px" /></a>
  1519. <figcaption id="caption-attachment-1638" class="wp-caption-text">
  1520. “Memory Box” by judy_and_ed. CC-BY-NC. <a href=
  1521. "https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/18516079841/" rel=
  1522. "nofollow">https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/18516079841/</a></figcaption>
  1523. </figure>
  1524. <h3>ITERATIONS</h3>
  1525. <p>The first iterations of the app that ultimately became GUIDE
  1526. were pretty rough. Shilling and Leith have been pretty open about
  1527. their early failures.</p>
  1528. <p>LEITH: “The first iteration was basically a Twitch knock-off.
  1529. People could join the group remotely, chat to each other and watch
  1530. whatever the facilitator decided to stream.”</p>
  1531. <p>SHILLING: “Engagement was low. We didn’t have cash to license a
  1532. decent range of content. The facilitators needed too much training
  1533. on the streaming interface and real-time community management.”</p>
  1534. <p>LEITH: “I then tried getting a generic game engine to boot up
  1535. old game worlds, so we could run tours. But the tech was a
  1536. nightmare to get working. Basically needed different engines for
  1537. different games”</p>
  1538. <p>SHILLING: “Some of the users loved it, mainly those that had the
  1539. right hardware and were already into gaming. But it didn’t work for
  1540. most people. And again…I…we were worried about licensing
  1541. issues”</p>
  1542. <p>LEITH: “So we started testing a customised, open source version
  1543. of <a href="https://yap.chat/">Yap</a>. Hosted chat rooms,
  1544. time-limited rooms and content embedding…that ticked a lot of
  1545. boxes. I built a custom index over the Internet Archive, so we
  1546. could use their content as embeds”.</p>
  1547. <p>SHILLING: “There’s so much great stuff that people love in the
  1548. Internet Archive. At the time, not many services were using it.
  1549. <a href="https://twitter.com/yorecomputer">Just a few social media
  1550. accounts</a>. So we made using it a core feature. It neatly avoided
  1551. the licensing issues. We let the alpha testers run with the service
  1552. for a while. We gave them and the memory service facilitators tips
  1553. on hosting their own chats. And basically left them to it for a few
  1554. weeks. It was during the later user testing that we discovered they
  1555. were using it in different ways that we’d expected.”</p>
  1556. <p>Instead of having conversations with their peer groups, the most
  1557. engaged users were using it to chat with their families.
  1558. Grandparents showing their grandchildren stuff they’d watched,
  1559. listened to, or read when they were younger.</p>
  1560. <p>SHILLING: “They were using it to tell stories”</p>
  1561. <p>Surrounded by the bustle in the cafe, we pause to enjoy the tea
  1562. and cake. Then Shilling gestures around the room.</p>
  1563. <p>SHILLING: “We came here one weekend. To get out of the city.
  1564. Take some time to think. They have these volunteers here. One in
  1565. every room of the house. People just giving up their free time to
  1566. answer any questions you might have as you wander around. Maybe,
  1567. point out interesting things you might not have noticed? Or, if
  1568. you’re interested, <a href=
  1569. "https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/blogs/curators-blog/an-object-i-love-at-castle-ward-mary-wards-microscope">
  1570. tell you about some of things they love about the place</a>. It was
  1571. fascinating. I realised that’s how our alpha testers were using the
  1572. prototype…just sharing their passions with their family.”</p>
  1573. <p>LEITH: “So this is where GUIDE was born. We hashed out the core
  1574. features for the next iteration in a walk through the grounds.
  1575. Fantastic cake, too.”</p>
  1576. <figure data-shortcode="caption" id="attachment_1643"
  1577. aria-describedby="caption-attachment-1643" style="width: 799px"
  1578. class="wp-caption aligncenter"><a href=
  1579. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/5136897807_fe728d807e_c.jpg">
  1580. <img data-attachment-id="1643" data-permalink=
  1581. "https://blog.ldodds.com/2020/02/09/guide-a-retrospective/5136897807_fe728d807e_c/"
  1582. data-orig-file=
  1583. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/5136897807_fe728d807e_c.jpg"
  1584. data-orig-size="799,533" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta=
  1585. "{&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;NIKON D70&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;1288644684&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;50&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;200&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0.016666666666667&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;orientation&quot;:&quot;0&quot;}"
  1586. data-image-title="5136897807_fe728d807e_c" data-image-description=
  1587. "" data-medium-file=
  1588. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/5136897807_fe728d807e_c.jpg?w=300"
  1589. data-large-file=
  1590. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/5136897807_fe728d807e_c.jpg?w=799"
  1591. class="wp-image-1643 size-full" src=
  1592. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/5136897807_fe728d807e_c.jpg?w=1100"
  1593. alt="" srcset=
  1594. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/5136897807_fe728d807e_c.jpg 799w, https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/5136897807_fe728d807e_c.jpg?w=150 150w, https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/5136897807_fe728d807e_c.jpg?w=300 300w, https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/5136897807_fe728d807e_c.jpg?w=768 768w"
  1595. sizes="(max-width: 799px) 100vw, 799px" /></a>
  1596. <figcaption id="caption-attachment-1643" class="wp-caption-text">
  1597. “Walkman and mix tapes” by henry… CC-BY-NC-ND. <a href=
  1598. "https://www.flickr.com/photos/henrybloomfield/5136897807/" rel=
  1599. "nofollow">https://www.flickr.com/photos/henrybloomfield/5136897807/</a></figcaption>
  1600. </figure>
  1601. <h3>MEMORY PALACE</h3>
  1602. <p>The familiar, core features of GUIDE have stayed roughly the
  1603. same since that day.</p>
  1604. <p>Anyone can become a Guide and create a Room which they can use
  1605. to curate and showcase small collections of public domain or openly
  1606. licensed content. But no more than seven videos, photos, games or
  1607. whatever else you can embed from the Internet Archive. Room
  1608. contents can be refreshed once a week.</p>
  1609. <p>Visitors are limited to a maximum of five people. Everyone else
  1610. gets to wait in a lobby, with new visitors being admitted every
  1611. twenty minutes. Audio feeds only from the Guides, allowing them to
  1612. chat to Visitors. But Visitors can only interact with Guides via a
  1613. chat interface that requires building up messages — mostly
  1614. questions — from a restricted set of words and phrases that can be
  1615. tweaked by Guides for their specific Room. Each visitor limited to
  1616. one question every five minutes.</p>
  1617. <p>LEITH: “The asymmetric interface, lobby system and cool-down
  1618. timers were lifted straight from games. I looked up the average
  1619. number of grandchildren people had. Turns out its about fives, so
  1620. we used that to size Rooms. The seven item limit was because I
  1621. thought it was a lucky number. We leaned heavily on the Internet
  1622. Archive’s bandwidth early on for the embeds, but we now mirror a
  1623. lot of stuff. And donate, obviously.”</p>
  1624. <p>SHILLING: “The restricted chat interface has helped limit
  1625. spamming and moderation. No video feeds from Guides means that the
  1626. focus stays on the contents of the Room, not the host. Twitch had
  1627. some problematic stuff which we wanted to avoid. I think its more
  1628. inclusive.”</p>
  1629. <p>LEITH: “Audio only meant the <a href=
  1630. "https://peerj.com/articles/851/">ASMR</a> crowd were still happy
  1631. though”.</p>
  1632. <p>Today there are tens of thousands of Rooms. Shilling shows me a
  1633. Room where the Guide gives tours of historical maps of Bath,
  1634. <a href=
  1635. "https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums/72157648680290940">
  1636. mixing in old photos for context</a>. Another, “Eleanor’s Knitting
  1637. Room” curates <a href=
  1638. "https://archive.org/details/knittingpatterns">knitting
  1639. patterns</a>. The Guide alternating between knitting tips and
  1640. cultural critiques.</p>
  1641. <p>Leith has a bookmarked collection of retro-gaming Rooms.
  1642. <a href="https://www.doomworld.com/25years/the-roots-of-doom-mapping/">
  1643. Doom WAD teardowns</a> and classic speed-runs analysis for the most
  1644. part.</p>
  1645. <p>In my own collection, my favourite is a Room showing a rota of
  1646. <a href="https://natsukashii.art/manhoru/">Japanese manhole cover
  1647. designs</a>, the Guide an expert on Japanese art and
  1648. infrastructure. I often have this one a second screen whilst
  1649. writing. The lobby wait time is regularly over an hour. Shilling
  1650. asks me to share that one with him.</p>
  1651. <p>LEITH: “There are no discovery tools in Guide. That was
  1652. deliberate from the start. Strictly no search engine. Want to find
  1653. a Room? You’ll need to be invited by a Guide or grab a link from a
  1654. friend”.</p>
  1655. <p>SHILLING: “Our approach has been to allow the service to grow
  1656. within the bounds of existing communities. We originally marketed
  1657. the site to family groups, and an older demographic. The UK and US
  1658. were late adopters, the service was much more popular elsewhere for
  1659. a long time. Things really took off when <a href=
  1660. "https://www.sachajudd.com/superfan">the fandoms grabbed hold of
  1661. it</a>.”</p>
  1662. <p>An ecosystem of recommendation systems, reviews and community
  1663. Room databases has grown up around the service. I asked whether
  1664. that defeated the purpose of not building those into the core
  1665. app?</p>
  1666. <p>LEITH: “It’s about power. If we ran those features then it would
  1667. be our algorithms. Our choice. We didn’t want that.”</p>
  1668. <p>SHILLING: “We wanted the community to decide how to best use
  1669. GUIDE as social glue. There’s so many more creative ways in which
  1670. people interact with and use the platform now”.</p>
  1671. <p>The two decline to get into discussion of the commercial success
  1672. of GUIDE. It’s well-documented that the two have become moderately
  1673. wealthy from the service. More than enough to cover that rent in
  1674. the city centre. Shilling only touches on it briefly:</p>
  1675. <p>SHILLING: “No ads and a subscription-based service has kept us
  1676. honest. The goal was to pay the bills while running a service we
  1677. love. We’ve shared a lot of that revenue back with the community in
  1678. various ways”.</p>
  1679. <figure data-shortcode="caption" id="attachment_1640"
  1680. aria-describedby="caption-attachment-1640" style="width: 1034px"
  1681. class="wp-caption aligncenter"><a href=
  1682. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/jacques-bopp-pvta7r3jbtc-unsplash.jpg">
  1683. <img data-attachment-id="1640" data-permalink=
  1684. "https://blog.ldodds.com/2020/02/09/guide-a-retrospective/jacques-bopp-pvta7r3jbtc-unsplash/"
  1685. data-orig-file=
  1686. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/jacques-bopp-pvta7r3jbtc-unsplash.jpg"
  1687. data-orig-size="3500,2303" data-comments-opened="1"
  1688. data-image-meta="{&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;orientation&quot;:&quot;0&quot;}"
  1689. data-image-title="jacques-bopp-pvtA7r3jBTc-unsplash"
  1690. data-image-description="" data-medium-file=
  1691. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/jacques-bopp-pvta7r3jbtc-unsplash.jpg?w=300"
  1692. data-large-file=
  1693. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/jacques-bopp-pvta7r3jbtc-unsplash.jpg?w=1024"
  1694. class="wp-image-1640 size-large" src=
  1695. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/jacques-bopp-pvta7r3jbtc-unsplash.jpg?w=1024&amp;h=674"
  1696. alt="" width="1024" height="674" srcset=
  1697. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/jacques-bopp-pvta7r3jbtc-unsplash.jpg?w=1024&amp;h=674 1024w, https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/jacques-bopp-pvta7r3jbtc-unsplash.jpg?w=2048&amp;h=1348 2048w, https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/jacques-bopp-pvta7r3jbtc-unsplash.jpg?w=150&amp;h=99 150w, https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/jacques-bopp-pvta7r3jbtc-unsplash.jpg?w=300&amp;h=197 300w, https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/jacques-bopp-pvta7r3jbtc-unsplash.jpg?w=768&amp;h=505 768w"
  1698. sizes="(max-width: 1024px) 100vw, 1024px" /></a>
  1699. <figcaption id="caption-attachment-1640" class="wp-caption-text">
  1700. Photo by Jacques Bopp on Unsplash. <a href=
  1701. "https://unsplash.com/photos/pvtA7r3jBTc" rel=
  1702. "nofollow">https://unsplash.com/photos/pvtA7r3jBTc</a></figcaption>
  1703. </figure>
  1704. <h3>SLOW WEB</h3>
  1705. <p>GUIDE can be situated within the <a href=
  1706. "https://jackcheng.com/the-slow-web/">Slow Web</a> movement. There
  1707. are a host of services offering quieter online experiences. Videos
  1708. of <a href=
  1709. "https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCAcsAE1tpLuP3y7UhxUoWpQ">walks
  1710. through foreign cities</a>. Live <a href=
  1711. "https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EEIk7gwjgIM">feeds from orbiting
  1712. satellites</a> and VR outposts mounted on <a href=
  1713. "https://twitter.com/subtitle_buoy">marine buoys</a> and in
  1714. <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2BDnAMR3GLg">wild
  1715. locations</a> around the world. Social features as bolt-on
  1716. features. But GUIDE’s focus on the curation of small spaces, story
  1717. telling and shared discovery sets it apart.</p>
  1718. <p>Of course, all of this was possible before. YouTube and Twitch
  1719. supported broadcasts and streaming for years, and many people used
  1720. them in similar ways. But the purposeful design of a more dedicated
  1721. interface highlights how constraints can shape a community and
  1722. spark creativity. Removal of many of the asymmetries inherent in
  1723. the design of those older platforms has undoubtedly helped.</p>
  1724. <p>While we finished the last of the tea, I asked them what they
  1725. thought made the service successful.</p>
  1726. <p>SHILLING: “You can find, watch and listen to any of the material
  1727. that people are sharing in GUIDE on the open web. Just Google it.
  1728. But I don’t think people just want more content. They want context.
  1729. And its people that bring that context to life. You can find Rooms
  1730. now where there’s a relay of Guides running 24×7. Each Guide
  1731. highlighting different aspects of the exact same collection.
  1732. Costume design, narrative arcs and character bios. Historical and
  1733. cultural significance. Personal stories. There’s endless context to
  1734. discover around the same content. That’s what fandoms have
  1735. understood for years.”</p>
  1736. <p>LEITH: “People just like stories. We gave them a place to tell
  1737. them. And an opportunity to listen.”</p>
  1738. </div>
  1739. </planet:content>
  1740.  <dc:date rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#dateTime">2020-02-09T16:05:50.000000Z</dc:date>
  1741.  <title>GUIDE, a retrospective</title>
  1742.  <link>https://blog.ldodds.com/2020/02/09/guide-a-retrospective/</link>
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  1758. data-medium-file=
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  1760. data-large-file=
  1761. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/4608720906_182b7fe9cb_c.jpg?w=800"
  1762. class="wp-image-1634 size-full" src=
  1763. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/4608720906_182b7fe9cb_c.jpg?w=1100"
  1764. alt="" srcset=
  1765. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/4608720906_182b7fe9cb_c.jpg 800w, https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/4608720906_182b7fe9cb_c.jpg?w=150 150w, https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/4608720906_182b7fe9cb_c.jpg?w=300 300w, https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/4608720906_182b7fe9cb_c.jpg?w=768 768w"
  1766. sizes="(max-width: 800px) 100vw, 800px" /></a>
  1767. <figcaption id="caption-attachment-1634" class="wp-caption-text">
  1768. “Tyntesfield servants’ bells” by Caroline. CC-BY-NC-ND licence.
  1769. <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/carolineld/4608720906/" rel=
  1770. "nofollow">https://www.flickr.com/photos/carolineld/4608720906/</a></figcaption>
  1771. </figure>
  1772. <p><em>This article was first published in the February 2030
  1773. edition of Sustain magazine. Ten years since the public launch of
  1774. GUIDE we sit down with its designers to chat about its origin and
  1775. what’s made it successful.</em></p>
  1776. <p>It’s a Saturday morning and I’m sitting in the bustling cafe at
  1777. <a href=
  1778. "https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/tyntesfield">Tyntesfield</a>
  1779. house, a National Trust property south of Bristol. I’m enjoying a
  1780. large pot of tea and a slice of cake with Joe Shilling and Gordon
  1781. Leith designers of one of the world’s most popular social
  1782. applications: GUIDE. I’d expected to meet somewhere in the city,
  1783. but Shilling suggested this as a suitable venue. It turns out
  1784. Tyntesfield plays a part in the origin story of GUIDE. So its
  1785. fitting that we are here for the tenth anniversary of its public
  1786. launch.</p>
  1787. <p>SHILLING: “Originally we were just playing. Exploring the design
  1788. parameters of social applications.”</p>
  1789. <p>He stirs the pot of tea while Leith begins sectioning the sponge
  1790. cake they’ve ordered.</p>
  1791. <p>SHILLING: “People did that more in the early days of the web.
  1792. But Twitter, Facebook, Instagram…they just kind of sucked up all
  1793. the attention and users. It killed off all that creativity. For a
  1794. while it seemed like they just owned the space…But then TikTok
  1795. happened…”</p>
  1796. <p>He pauses while I nod to indicate I’ve heard of it.</p>
  1797. <p>SHILLING: “…and small experiments like <a href=
  1798. "https://postlight.com/trackchanges/introducing-yap-from-postlight-labs">
  1799. Yap</a>. It was a slow burn, but I think a bunch of us started to
  1800. get interested again in designing different kinds of social apps.
  1801. We were part of this indie scene building and releasing bespoke
  1802. social networks. They came and went really quickly. People just
  1803. enjoyed them whilst they were around.”</p>
  1804. <p>Leith interjects around a mouthful of cake:</p>
  1805. <p>LEITH: “Some really random stuff. Social nets with built in
  1806. profile decay so they were guaranteed to end. Made them low
  1807. commitment, disposable. Messaging services where you could only
  1808. post at really specific, sometimes random times. Networks that only
  1809. came online when its members were in precise geographic
  1810. coordinates. Spatial partitioning to force separation of networks
  1811. for home, work and play. Experimental, ritualised
  1812. interfactions.”</p>
  1813. <p>SHILLING: “The migratory networks grew out of that movement too.
  1814. They didn’t last long, but they were intense. ”</p>
  1815. <p>LEITH: “Yeah. Social networks that just kicked into life around
  1816. a critical mass of people. Like in a club. Want to stay a
  1817. member…share the memes? Then you needed to be in its radius. In the
  1818. right city, at the right time. And then keep up as the algorithm
  1819. shifted it. Social spaces herding their members.”</p>
  1820. <p>SHILLING: “They were intense and incredibly problematic. Which
  1821. is why they didn’t last long. But for a while there was a crowd
  1822. that loved them. Until the club promoters got involved and then
  1823. that commercial aspect killed it.”</p>
  1824. <h3>RENT-SEEKING</h3>
  1825. <p>GUIDE had a very different starting point. Flat sharing in
  1826. Bristol, the duo needed money. Their indie credibility was high,
  1827. but what they were looking for a more mainstream hit with some
  1828. likelihood of revenue. The break-up of Facebook and the other big
  1829. services had created an opportunity which many were hoping to
  1830. capitalise on. But investment was a problem.</p>
  1831. <p>LEITH: “We wrote a lot of grant proposals. Goal was to use the
  1832. money to build out decent code base. Pay for some servers that we
  1833. could use to launch something bigger”.</p>
  1834. <p>Shilling pours the tea, while Leith passes me a slice of
  1835. cake.</p>
  1836. <p>SHILLING: “It was a bit more principled that that. There was
  1837. plenty of money for apps to help with social isolation. We thought
  1838. maybe we could build something useful, tackle some social problems,
  1839. work with a different demographic than we had before. But, yeah, we
  1840. had our own goals too. We had to take what opportunities were out
  1841. there.”</p>
  1842. <p>LEITH: “My mum had been attending this <a href=
  1843. "https://www.gmmh.nhs.uk/memory-skills-groups/">Memory Skills
  1844. group</a>. Passing around old photos and memorabilia to get people
  1845. talking and reminiscing. We thought we could create something
  1846. digital.”</p>
  1847. <p>SHILLING: “We managed to land a grant to explore the idea. We
  1848. figured that there was a demographic that had spent time connecting
  1849. not around the high street or the local football club. But with
  1850. stuff they’d all been doing online. Streaming the same shows.
  1851. Revisiting old game worlds. We thought those could be really useful
  1852. touch points and memory triggers too. And not everyone can access
  1853. some of the other services.”</p>
  1854. <p>LEITH: “Mum could talk for hours about Skyrim and Fallout”.</p>
  1855. <p>SHILLING: “So we prototyped some social spaces based around that
  1856. kind of content. It was during the user testing that we had the
  1857. real eye-opener”.</p>
  1858. <figure data-shortcode="caption" id="attachment_1638"
  1859. aria-describedby="caption-attachment-1638" style="width: 800px"
  1860. class="wp-caption aligncenter"><a href=
  1861. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/18516079841_b7fb67b158_c.jpg">
  1862. <img data-attachment-id="1638" data-permalink=
  1863. "https://blog.ldodds.com/2020/02/09/guide-a-retrospective/18516079841_b7fb67b158_c/"
  1864. data-orig-file=
  1865. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/18516079841_b7fb67b158_c.jpg"
  1866. data-orig-size="800,605" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta=
  1867. "{&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;DSC-RX100&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;1431510329&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;12.3&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;800&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0.01&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;orientation&quot;:&quot;0&quot;}"
  1868. data-image-title="18516079841_b7fb67b158_c" data-image-description=
  1869. "" data-medium-file=
  1870. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/18516079841_b7fb67b158_c.jpg?w=300"
  1871. data-large-file=
  1872. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/18516079841_b7fb67b158_c.jpg?w=800"
  1873. class="wp-image-1638 size-full" src=
  1874. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/18516079841_b7fb67b158_c.jpg?w=1100"
  1875. alt="" srcset=
  1876. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/18516079841_b7fb67b158_c.jpg 800w, https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/18516079841_b7fb67b158_c.jpg?w=150 150w, https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/18516079841_b7fb67b158_c.jpg?w=300 300w, https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/18516079841_b7fb67b158_c.jpg?w=768 768w"
  1877. sizes="(max-width: 800px) 100vw, 800px" /></a>
  1878. <figcaption id="caption-attachment-1638" class="wp-caption-text">
  1879. “Memory Box” by judy_and_ed. CC-BY-NC. <a href=
  1880. "https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/18516079841/" rel=
  1881. "nofollow">https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/18516079841/</a></figcaption>
  1882. </figure>
  1883. <h3>ITERATIONS</h3>
  1884. <p>The first iterations of the app that ultimately became GUIDE
  1885. were pretty rough. Shilling and Leith have been pretty open about
  1886. their early failures.</p>
  1887. <p>LEITH: “The first iteration was basically a Twitch knock-off.
  1888. People could join the group remotely, chat to each other and watch
  1889. whatever the facilitator decided to stream.”</p>
  1890. <p>SHILLING: “Engagement was low. We didn’t have cash to license a
  1891. decent range of content. The facilitators needed too much training
  1892. on the streaming interface and real-time community management.”</p>
  1893. <p>LEITH: “I then tried getting a generic game engine to boot up
  1894. old game worlds, so we could run tours. But the tech was a
  1895. nightmare to get working. Basically needed different engines for
  1896. different games”</p>
  1897. <p>SHILLING: “Some of the users loved it, mainly those that had the
  1898. right hardware and were already into gaming. But it didn’t work for
  1899. most people. And again…I…we were worried about licensing
  1900. issues”</p>
  1901. <p>LEITH: “So we started testing a customised, open source version
  1902. of <a href="https://yap.chat/">Yap</a>. Hosted chat rooms,
  1903. time-limited rooms and content embedding…that ticked a lot of
  1904. boxes. I built a custom index over the Internet Archive, so we
  1905. could use their content as embeds”.</p>
  1906. <p>SHILLING: “There’s so much great stuff that people love in the
  1907. Internet Archive. At the time, not many services were using it.
  1908. <a href="https://twitter.com/yorecomputer">Just a few social media
  1909. accounts</a>. So we made using it a core feature. It neatly avoided
  1910. the licensing issues. We let the alpha testers run with the service
  1911. for a while. We gave them and the memory service facilitators tips
  1912. on hosting their own chats. And basically left them to it for a few
  1913. weeks. It was during the later user testing that we discovered they
  1914. were using it in different ways that we’d expected.”</p>
  1915. <p>Instead of having conversations with their peer groups, the most
  1916. engaged users were using it to chat with their families.
  1917. Grandparents showing their grandchildren stuff they’d watched,
  1918. listened to, or read when they were younger.</p>
  1919. <p>SHILLING: “They were using it to tell stories”</p>
  1920. <p>Surrounded by the bustle in the cafe, we pause to enjoy the tea
  1921. and cake. Then Shilling gestures around the room.</p>
  1922. <p>SHILLING: “We came here one weekend. To get out of the city.
  1923. Take some time to think. They have these volunteers here. One in
  1924. every room of the house. People just giving up their free time to
  1925. answer any questions you might have as you wander around. Maybe,
  1926. point out interesting things you might not have noticed? Or, if
  1927. you’re interested, <a href=
  1928. "https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/blogs/curators-blog/an-object-i-love-at-castle-ward-mary-wards-microscope">
  1929. tell you about some of things they love about the place</a>. It was
  1930. fascinating. I realised that’s how our alpha testers were using the
  1931. prototype…just sharing their passions with their family.”</p>
  1932. <p>LEITH: “So this is where GUIDE was born. We hashed out the core
  1933. features for the next iteration in a walk through the grounds.
  1934. Fantastic cake, too.”</p>
  1935. <figure data-shortcode="caption" id="attachment_1643"
  1936. aria-describedby="caption-attachment-1643" style="width: 799px"
  1937. class="wp-caption aligncenter"><a href=
  1938. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/5136897807_fe728d807e_c.jpg">
  1939. <img data-attachment-id="1643" data-permalink=
  1940. "https://blog.ldodds.com/2020/02/09/guide-a-retrospective/5136897807_fe728d807e_c/"
  1941. data-orig-file=
  1942. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/5136897807_fe728d807e_c.jpg"
  1943. data-orig-size="799,533" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta=
  1944. "{&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;NIKON D70&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;1288644684&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;50&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;200&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0.016666666666667&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;orientation&quot;:&quot;0&quot;}"
  1945. data-image-title="5136897807_fe728d807e_c" data-image-description=
  1946. "" data-medium-file=
  1947. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/5136897807_fe728d807e_c.jpg?w=300"
  1948. data-large-file=
  1949. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/5136897807_fe728d807e_c.jpg?w=799"
  1950. class="wp-image-1643 size-full" src=
  1951. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/5136897807_fe728d807e_c.jpg?w=1100"
  1952. alt="" srcset=
  1953. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/5136897807_fe728d807e_c.jpg 799w, https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/5136897807_fe728d807e_c.jpg?w=150 150w, https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/5136897807_fe728d807e_c.jpg?w=300 300w, https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/5136897807_fe728d807e_c.jpg?w=768 768w"
  1954. sizes="(max-width: 799px) 100vw, 799px" /></a>
  1955. <figcaption id="caption-attachment-1643" class="wp-caption-text">
  1956. “Walkman and mix tapes” by henry… CC-BY-NC-ND. <a href=
  1957. "https://www.flickr.com/photos/henrybloomfield/5136897807/" rel=
  1958. "nofollow">https://www.flickr.com/photos/henrybloomfield/5136897807/</a></figcaption>
  1959. </figure>
  1960. <h3>MEMORY PALACE</h3>
  1961. <p>The familiar, core features of GUIDE have stayed roughly the
  1962. same since that day.</p>
  1963. <p>Anyone can become a Guide and create a Room which they can use
  1964. to curate and showcase small collections of public domain or openly
  1965. licensed content. But no more than seven videos, photos, games or
  1966. whatever else you can embed from the Internet Archive. Room
  1967. contents can be refreshed once a week.</p>
  1968. <p>Visitors are limited to a maximum of five people. Everyone else
  1969. gets to wait in a lobby, with new visitors being admitted every
  1970. twenty minutes. Audio feeds only from the Guides, allowing them to
  1971. chat to Visitors. But Visitors can only interact with Guides via a
  1972. chat interface that requires building up messages — mostly
  1973. questions — from a restricted set of words and phrases that can be
  1974. tweaked by Guides for their specific Room. Each visitor limited to
  1975. one question every five minutes.</p>
  1976. <p>LEITH: “The asymmetric interface, lobby system and cool-down
  1977. timers were lifted straight from games. I looked up the average
  1978. number of grandchildren people had. Turns out its about fives, so
  1979. we used that to size Rooms. The seven item limit was because I
  1980. thought it was a lucky number. We leaned heavily on the Internet
  1981. Archive’s bandwidth early on for the embeds, but we now mirror a
  1982. lot of stuff. And donate, obviously.”</p>
  1983. <p>SHILLING: “The restricted chat interface has helped limit
  1984. spamming and moderation. No video feeds from Guides means that the
  1985. focus stays on the contents of the Room, not the host. Twitch had
  1986. some problematic stuff which we wanted to avoid. I think its more
  1987. inclusive.”</p>
  1988. <p>LEITH: “Audio only meant the <a href=
  1989. "https://peerj.com/articles/851/">ASMR</a> crowd were still happy
  1990. though”.</p>
  1991. <p>Today there are tens of thousands of Rooms. Shilling shows me a
  1992. Room where the Guide gives tours of historical maps of Bath,
  1993. <a href=
  1994. "https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums/72157648680290940">
  1995. mixing in old photos for context</a>. Another, “Eleanor’s Knitting
  1996. Room” curates <a href=
  1997. "https://archive.org/details/knittingpatterns">knitting
  1998. patterns</a>. The Guide alternating between knitting tips and
  1999. cultural critiques.</p>
  2000. <p>Leith has a bookmarked collection of retro-gaming Rooms.
  2001. <a href="https://www.doomworld.com/25years/the-roots-of-doom-mapping/">
  2002. Doom WAD teardowns</a> and classic speed-runs analysis for the most
  2003. part.</p>
  2004. <p>In my own collection, my favourite is a Room showing a rota of
  2005. <a href="https://natsukashii.art/manhoru/">Japanese manhole cover
  2006. designs</a>, the Guide an expert on Japanese art and
  2007. infrastructure. I often have this one a second screen whilst
  2008. writing. The lobby wait time is regularly over an hour. Shilling
  2009. asks me to share that one with him.</p>
  2010. <p>LEITH: “There are no discovery tools in Guide. That was
  2011. deliberate from the start. Strictly no search engine. Want to find
  2012. a Room? You’ll need to be invited by a Guide or grab a link from a
  2013. friend”.</p>
  2014. <p>SHILLING: “Our approach has been to allow the service to grow
  2015. within the bounds of existing communities. We originally marketed
  2016. the site to family groups, and an older demographic. The UK and US
  2017. were late adopters, the service was much more popular elsewhere for
  2018. a long time. Things really took off when <a href=
  2019. "https://www.sachajudd.com/superfan">the fandoms grabbed hold of
  2020. it</a>.”</p>
  2021. <p>An ecosystem of recommendation systems, reviews and community
  2022. Room databases has grown up around the service. I asked whether
  2023. that defeated the purpose of not building those into the core
  2024. app?</p>
  2025. <p>LEITH: “It’s about power. If we ran those features then it would
  2026. be our algorithms. Our choice. We didn’t want that.”</p>
  2027. <p>SHILLING: “We wanted the community to decide how to best use
  2028. GUIDE as social glue. There’s so many more creative ways in which
  2029. people interact with and use the platform now”.</p>
  2030. <p>The two decline to get into discussion of the commercial success
  2031. of GUIDE. It’s well-documented that the two have become moderately
  2032. wealthy from the service. More than enough to cover that rent in
  2033. the city centre. Shilling only touches on it briefly:</p>
  2034. <p>SHILLING: “No ads and a subscription-based service has kept us
  2035. honest. The goal was to pay the bills while running a service we
  2036. love. We’ve shared a lot of that revenue back with the community in
  2037. various ways”.</p>
  2038. <figure data-shortcode="caption" id="attachment_1640"
  2039. aria-describedby="caption-attachment-1640" style="width: 1034px"
  2040. class="wp-caption aligncenter"><a href=
  2041. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/jacques-bopp-pvta7r3jbtc-unsplash.jpg">
  2042. <img data-attachment-id="1640" data-permalink=
  2043. "https://blog.ldodds.com/2020/02/09/guide-a-retrospective/jacques-bopp-pvta7r3jbtc-unsplash/"
  2044. data-orig-file=
  2045. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/jacques-bopp-pvta7r3jbtc-unsplash.jpg"
  2046. data-orig-size="3500,2303" data-comments-opened="1"
  2047. data-image-meta="{&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;orientation&quot;:&quot;0&quot;}"
  2048. data-image-title="jacques-bopp-pvtA7r3jBTc-unsplash"
  2049. data-image-description="" data-medium-file=
  2050. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/jacques-bopp-pvta7r3jbtc-unsplash.jpg?w=300"
  2051. data-large-file=
  2052. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/jacques-bopp-pvta7r3jbtc-unsplash.jpg?w=1024"
  2053. class="wp-image-1640 size-large" src=
  2054. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/jacques-bopp-pvta7r3jbtc-unsplash.jpg?w=1024&amp;h=674"
  2055. alt="" width="1024" height="674" srcset=
  2056. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/jacques-bopp-pvta7r3jbtc-unsplash.jpg?w=1024&amp;h=674 1024w, https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/jacques-bopp-pvta7r3jbtc-unsplash.jpg?w=2048&amp;h=1348 2048w, https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/jacques-bopp-pvta7r3jbtc-unsplash.jpg?w=150&amp;h=99 150w, https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/jacques-bopp-pvta7r3jbtc-unsplash.jpg?w=300&amp;h=197 300w, https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/jacques-bopp-pvta7r3jbtc-unsplash.jpg?w=768&amp;h=505 768w"
  2057. sizes="(max-width: 1024px) 100vw, 1024px" /></a>
  2058. <figcaption id="caption-attachment-1640" class="wp-caption-text">
  2059. Photo by Jacques Bopp on Unsplash. <a href=
  2060. "https://unsplash.com/photos/pvtA7r3jBTc" rel=
  2061. "nofollow">https://unsplash.com/photos/pvtA7r3jBTc</a></figcaption>
  2062. </figure>
  2063. <h3>SLOW WEB</h3>
  2064. <p>GUIDE can be situated within the <a href=
  2065. "https://jackcheng.com/the-slow-web/">Slow Web</a> movement. There
  2066. are a host of services offering quieter online experiences. Videos
  2067. of <a href=
  2068. "https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCAcsAE1tpLuP3y7UhxUoWpQ">walks
  2069. through foreign cities</a>. Live <a href=
  2070. "https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EEIk7gwjgIM">feeds from orbiting
  2071. satellites</a> and VR outposts mounted on <a href=
  2072. "https://twitter.com/subtitle_buoy">marine buoys</a> and in
  2073. <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2BDnAMR3GLg">wild
  2074. locations</a> around the world. Social features as bolt-on
  2075. features. But GUIDE’s focus on the curation of small spaces, story
  2076. telling and shared discovery sets it apart.</p>
  2077. <p>Of course, all of this was possible before. YouTube and Twitch
  2078. supported broadcasts and streaming for years, and many people used
  2079. them in similar ways. But the purposeful design of a more dedicated
  2080. interface highlights how constraints can shape a community and
  2081. spark creativity. Removal of many of the asymmetries inherent in
  2082. the design of those older platforms has undoubtedly helped.</p>
  2083. <p>While we finished the last of the tea, I asked them what they
  2084. thought made the service successful.</p>
  2085. <p>SHILLING: “You can find, watch and listen to any of the material
  2086. that people are sharing in GUIDE on the open web. Just Google it.
  2087. But I don’t think people just want more content. They want context.
  2088. And its people that bring that context to life. You can find Rooms
  2089. now where there’s a relay of Guides running 24×7. Each Guide
  2090. highlighting different aspects of the exact same collection.
  2091. Costume design, narrative arcs and character bios. Historical and
  2092. cultural significance. Personal stories. There’s endless context to
  2093. discover around the same content. That’s what fandoms have
  2094. understood for years.”</p>
  2095. <p>LEITH: “People just like stories. We gave them a place to tell
  2096. them. And an opportunity to listen.”</p>
  2097. </div>
  2098. </div>]]></content:encoded>
  2099.  <description>“Tyntesfield servants’ bells” by Caroline. CC-BY-NC-ND licence. https://www.flickr.com/photos/carolineld/4608720906/ This article was first published in the February 2030 edition of Sustain magazine. Ten years since the public launch of GUIDE we sit down with its designers to chat about its origin and what’s made it successful. It’s a Saturday morning and I’m sitting in the bustling cafe at Tyntesfield house, a National Trust property south of Bristol. I’m enjoying a large pot of tea and a slice of cake with Joe Shilling and Gordon Leith designers of one of the world’s most popular social applications: GUIDE. I’d expected to meet somewhere ...</description>
  2100. </item>
  2101. <item rdf:about="https://blog.ldodds.com/2020/02/04/can-the-regulation-of-hazardous-substances-help-us-think-about-regulation-of-ai/">
  2102.  <dc:creator>Leigh Dodds</dc:creator>
  2103.  <dc:source>Lost Boy by Leigh Dodds</dc:source>
  2104.  <dc:relation>http://ldodds.com/blog/</dc:relation>
  2105.  <planet:content xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" rdf:parseType="Literal">
  2106. <div>
  2107. <p>This post is a thought experiment. It considers how existing
  2108. laws that cover the registration and testing of hazardous
  2109. substances like pesticides might be used as an analogy for thinking
  2110. through approaches to regulation of AI/ML.</p>
  2111. <p>As a thought experiment its not a detailed or well-research
  2112. proposal, but there are elements which I think are interesting. I’m
  2113. interested in feedback and also pointers to more detailed
  2114. explorations of similar ideas.</p>
  2115. <h2>A cursory look of substance registration legislation in the EU
  2116. and US</h2>
  2117. <p>Under EU <a href=
  2118. "https://echa.europa.eu/regulations/reach/understanding-reach">REACH</a>
  2119. legislation, if you want to manufacture or import large amount of
  2120. potentially hazardous chemical substances then you need to register
  2121. with the ECHA. The <a href=
  2122. "https://echa.europa.eu/regulations/reach/registration">registration
  2123. process</a> involves providing information about the substance and
  2124. its potential risks.</p>
  2125. <p>“No data no market” is a key principle of the legislation. The
  2126. private sector carries the burden of collecting data and
  2127. demonstrating safety of substances. There is a <a href=
  2128. "https://echa.europa.eu/regulations/reach/registration/information-requirements">
  2129. standard set of information</a> that must be provided.</p>
  2130. <p>In order to demonstrate the safety, companies may need to carry
  2131. out animal testing. The legislation has been designed to minimise
  2132. unnecessary animal&#160; testing. While there is an argument that
  2133. all testing is unnecessary, current practices requires testing in
  2134. some circumstances. Where testing is not required, then other data
  2135. sources can be used. But controlled animal tests are the proof of
  2136. last resort if no other data is available.</p>
  2137. <p>To further minimise the need to carry out tests on animals, the
  2138. legislation is designed to encourage companies registering the same
  2139. (or similar) substances to <a href=
  2140. "https://echa.europa.eu/regulations/reach/registration/data-sharing">
  2141. share data with one another</a> in a “fair, transparent and
  2142. non-discriminatory way”. Companies There is <a href=
  2143. "https://echa.europa.eu/documents/10162/23036412/guidance_on_data_sharing_en.pdf/545e4463-9e67-43f0-852f-35e70a8ead60">
  2144. detailed guidance around data sharing</a>, including a legal
  2145. framework and guidance on cost sharing.</p>
  2146. <p>The coordination around sharing data and costs is achieved via a
  2147. <a href=
  2148. "https://www.hse.gov.uk/reach/resources/17sief.pdf">SIEF</a> (PDF),
  2149. a loose consortia of businesses looking to register the same
  2150. substance. There is guidance to help facilitate creation of these
  2151. sharing forums.</p>
  2152. <p>The US has a similar set of laws which also aim to <a href=
  2153. "https://enviro.blr.com/environmental-news/hazmat-and-chemicals/pesticide-manufacture-and-application/Compensation-for-pesticide-data">
  2154. encourage sharing of data across companies</a> to minimise animal
  2155. testing and other regulatory burdens. The practice of “<a href=
  2156. "https://www.epa.gov/pesticide-registration/pesticide-registration-manual-chapter-10-data-compensation-requirements">data
  2157. compensation</a>” provides businesses with a <a href=
  2158. "https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=vx5pciq8Ru4C&amp;pg=PA23#v=onepage&amp;q&amp;f=false">
  2159. right to charge fees for use of data</a>. The legislation doesn’t
  2160. define acceptable fees, but does specify an arbitration
  2161. procedure.</p>
  2162. <p>The compensation, along with some exclusive use arrangements,
  2163. are intended to avoid discouraging original research, testing and
  2164. registration of new substances. Companies that bear the costs of
  2165. developing new substances can have exclusive use for a period and
  2166. expect some compensation for research costs to bring to market.
  2167. Later manufacturers can benefit from the safety testing results,
  2168. but have to pay for the privilege of access.</p>
  2169. <h2>Summarising some design principles</h2>
  2170. <p>Based on my reading, I think both sets of legislation are
  2171. ultimately designed to:</p>
  2172. <ul>
  2173. <li>increase safety of the general public, by ensuring that
  2174. substances are properly tested and documented</li>
  2175. <li>require companies to assess the risks of substances</li>
  2176. <li>take an ethical stance on reducing unnecessary animal testing
  2177. and other data collection by facilitating<br />
  2178. data collection</li>
  2179. <li>require companies to register their intention to manufacture or
  2180. import substances</li>
  2181. <li>enable companies to coordinate in order to share costs and
  2182. other burdens of registration</li>
  2183. <li>provide an arbitration route if data is not being shared</li>
  2184. <li>avoid discouraging new research and development by providing a
  2185. cost sharing model to offset regulatory requirements</li>
  2186. </ul>
  2187. <h2>Parallels to AI regulation</h2>
  2188. <p>What if we adopted a similar approach towards the regulation of
  2189. AI/ML?</p>
  2190. <p>When we think about some of the issues with large scale, public
  2191. deployment of AI/ML, I think the debate often highlights a variety
  2192. of needs, including:</p>
  2193. <ul>
  2194. <li>greater oversight about how systems are being designed and
  2195. tested, to help understand risks and design problems</li>
  2196. <li>understanding how and where systems are being deployed, to help
  2197. assess impacts</li>
  2198. <li>minimising harms to either the general public, or specific
  2199. communities</li>
  2200. <li>thorough testing of new approaches to assess immediate and
  2201. potential long-term impacts</li>
  2202. <li>reducing unnecessary data collection that is otherwise required
  2203. to train and test models</li>
  2204. <li>exploration of potential impacts of new technologies to address
  2205. social, economic and environmental problems</li>
  2206. <li>to continue to encourage primary research and innovation</li>
  2207. </ul>
  2208. <p>That list is not exhaustive. I suspect not everyone will
  2209. necessarily agree on the importance of all elements.</p>
  2210. <p>However, if we look at these concerns and the principles that
  2211. underpin the legislation of hazardous substances, I think there are
  2212. a lot of parallels.</p>
  2213. <h2>Applying the approach to AI</h2>
  2214. <p>What if, for certain well-defined applications of AI/ML such as
  2215. facial recognition, autonomous vehicles, etc, we required companies
  2216. to:</p>
  2217. <ul>
  2218. <li>register their systems, accompanies by a standard set of
  2219. technical, testing and other documentation</li>
  2220. <li>carry out tests of their system using agreed protocols, to
  2221. encourage consistency in comparison across testing</li>
  2222. <li>share data, e.g via a data trust or similar model, in order to
  2223. minimise the unnecessary collection of data and to facilitate some
  2224. assessment of bias in training data</li>
  2225. <li>demonstrate and document the safety of their systems to agreed
  2226. standards, allowing public and private sector users of systems and
  2227. models to make informed decisions about risks, or to support
  2228. enforcement of legal standards</li>
  2229. <li>coordinate to share costs of collecting and maintaining data,
  2230. conducting tests of standard models, etc</li>
  2231. <li>and, perhaps, after a period, accept that trained models would
  2232. become available for others to reuse, similarly to how medicines or
  2233. other substances may ultimately be manufactured by other
  2234. companies</li>
  2235. </ul>
  2236. <p>In addition to providing more controls and assurance around how
  2237. AI/ML is being deployed, an approach based on facilitating
  2238. collaboration around collection of data might help nudge new and
  2239. emerging sectors into a more open direction, right from the
  2240. start.</p>
  2241. <p>There are a number of potential risks and issues which I will
  2242. acknowledge up front:</p>
  2243. <ul>
  2244. <li>sharing of data about hazardous substance testing doesn’t have
  2245. to address data protection. But this could be factored in to the
  2246. design, and some uses of AI/ML draw on non-personal data</li>
  2247. <li>we may want to simply ban, or discourage use of some
  2248. applications of AI/ML, rather than enable it. But at the moment
  2249. there are few, if any controls</li>
  2250. <li>the approach might encourage collection and sharing of data
  2251. which we might otherwise want to restrict. But strong governance
  2252. and access controls, via a data trust or other institution might
  2253. actually raise the bar around governance and security, beyond that
  2254. which individual businesses can, or are willing to achieve.
  2255. Coordination with a regulator might also help decide on how much is
  2256. “enough” data</li>
  2257. <li>the utility of data and openly available models might degrade
  2258. over time, requiring ongoing investment</li>
  2259. <li>the approach seems most applicable to uses of AI/ML with
  2260. similar data requirements, In practice there may be only a small
  2261. number of these, or data requirements may vary enough to limit
  2262. benefits of data sharing</li>
  2263. </ul>
  2264. <p>Again, not an exhaustive list. But as I’ve noted, I think there
  2265. are ways to mitigate some of these risks.</p>
  2266. <p>Let me know what you think, what I’ve missed, or what I should
  2267. be reading. I’m not in a position to move this forward, but welcome
  2268. a discussion. Leave your thoughts in the comments below, or
  2269. <a href="https://twitter.com/ldodds">ping me on twitter</a>.</p>
  2270. </div>
  2271. </planet:content>
  2272.  <dc:date rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#dateTime">2020-02-04T21:05:48.000000Z</dc:date>
  2273.  <title>Can the regulation of hazardous substances help us think
  2274. about regulation of AI?</title>
  2275.  <link>https://blog.ldodds.com/2020/02/04/can-the-regulation-of-hazardous-substances-help-us-think-about-regulation-of-ai/</link>
  2276.  <content:encoded rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#XMLLiteral"><![CDATA[
  2277. <div xmlns='http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml'>
  2278. <div>
  2279. <p>This post is a thought experiment. It considers how existing
  2280. laws that cover the registration and testing of hazardous
  2281. substances like pesticides might be used as an analogy for thinking
  2282. through approaches to regulation of AI/ML.</p>
  2283. <p>As a thought experiment its not a detailed or well-research
  2284. proposal, but there are elements which I think are interesting. I’m
  2285. interested in feedback and also pointers to more detailed
  2286. explorations of similar ideas.</p>
  2287. <h2>A cursory look of substance registration legislation in the EU
  2288. and US</h2>
  2289. <p>Under EU <a href=
  2290. "https://echa.europa.eu/regulations/reach/understanding-reach">REACH</a>
  2291. legislation, if you want to manufacture or import large amount of
  2292. potentially hazardous chemical substances then you need to register
  2293. with the ECHA. The <a href=
  2294. "https://echa.europa.eu/regulations/reach/registration">registration
  2295. process</a> involves providing information about the substance and
  2296. its potential risks.</p>
  2297. <p>“No data no market” is a key principle of the legislation. The
  2298. private sector carries the burden of collecting data and
  2299. demonstrating safety of substances. There is a <a href=
  2300. "https://echa.europa.eu/regulations/reach/registration/information-requirements">
  2301. standard set of information</a> that must be provided.</p>
  2302. <p>In order to demonstrate the safety, companies may need to carry
  2303. out animal testing. The legislation has been designed to minimise
  2304. unnecessary animal&#160; testing. While there is an argument that
  2305. all testing is unnecessary, current practices requires testing in
  2306. some circumstances. Where testing is not required, then other data
  2307. sources can be used. But controlled animal tests are the proof of
  2308. last resort if no other data is available.</p>
  2309. <p>To further minimise the need to carry out tests on animals, the
  2310. legislation is designed to encourage companies registering the same
  2311. (or similar) substances to <a href=
  2312. "https://echa.europa.eu/regulations/reach/registration/data-sharing">
  2313. share data with one another</a> in a “fair, transparent and
  2314. non-discriminatory way”. Companies There is <a href=
  2315. "https://echa.europa.eu/documents/10162/23036412/guidance_on_data_sharing_en.pdf/545e4463-9e67-43f0-852f-35e70a8ead60">
  2316. detailed guidance around data sharing</a>, including a legal
  2317. framework and guidance on cost sharing.</p>
  2318. <p>The coordination around sharing data and costs is achieved via a
  2319. <a href=
  2320. "https://www.hse.gov.uk/reach/resources/17sief.pdf">SIEF</a> (PDF),
  2321. a loose consortia of businesses looking to register the same
  2322. substance. There is guidance to help facilitate creation of these
  2323. sharing forums.</p>
  2324. <p>The US has a similar set of laws which also aim to <a href=
  2325. "https://enviro.blr.com/environmental-news/hazmat-and-chemicals/pesticide-manufacture-and-application/Compensation-for-pesticide-data">
  2326. encourage sharing of data across companies</a> to minimise animal
  2327. testing and other regulatory burdens. The practice of “<a href=
  2328. "https://www.epa.gov/pesticide-registration/pesticide-registration-manual-chapter-10-data-compensation-requirements">data
  2329. compensation</a>” provides businesses with a <a href=
  2330. "https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=vx5pciq8Ru4C&amp;pg=PA23#v=onepage&amp;q&amp;f=false">
  2331. right to charge fees for use of data</a>. The legislation doesn’t
  2332. define acceptable fees, but does specify an arbitration
  2333. procedure.</p>
  2334. <p>The compensation, along with some exclusive use arrangements,
  2335. are intended to avoid discouraging original research, testing and
  2336. registration of new substances. Companies that bear the costs of
  2337. developing new substances can have exclusive use for a period and
  2338. expect some compensation for research costs to bring to market.
  2339. Later manufacturers can benefit from the safety testing results,
  2340. but have to pay for the privilege of access.</p>
  2341. <h2>Summarising some design principles</h2>
  2342. <p>Based on my reading, I think both sets of legislation are
  2343. ultimately designed to:</p>
  2344. <ul>
  2345. <li>increase safety of the general public, by ensuring that
  2346. substances are properly tested and documented</li>
  2347. <li>require companies to assess the risks of substances</li>
  2348. <li>take an ethical stance on reducing unnecessary animal testing
  2349. and other data collection by facilitating<br />
  2350. data collection</li>
  2351. <li>require companies to register their intention to manufacture or
  2352. import substances</li>
  2353. <li>enable companies to coordinate in order to share costs and
  2354. other burdens of registration</li>
  2355. <li>provide an arbitration route if data is not being shared</li>
  2356. <li>avoid discouraging new research and development by providing a
  2357. cost sharing model to offset regulatory requirements</li>
  2358. </ul>
  2359. <h2>Parallels to AI regulation</h2>
  2360. <p>What if we adopted a similar approach towards the regulation of
  2361. AI/ML?</p>
  2362. <p>When we think about some of the issues with large scale, public
  2363. deployment of AI/ML, I think the debate often highlights a variety
  2364. of needs, including:</p>
  2365. <ul>
  2366. <li>greater oversight about how systems are being designed and
  2367. tested, to help understand risks and design problems</li>
  2368. <li>understanding how and where systems are being deployed, to help
  2369. assess impacts</li>
  2370. <li>minimising harms to either the general public, or specific
  2371. communities</li>
  2372. <li>thorough testing of new approaches to assess immediate and
  2373. potential long-term impacts</li>
  2374. <li>reducing unnecessary data collection that is otherwise required
  2375. to train and test models</li>
  2376. <li>exploration of potential impacts of new technologies to address
  2377. social, economic and environmental problems</li>
  2378. <li>to continue to encourage primary research and innovation</li>
  2379. </ul>
  2380. <p>That list is not exhaustive. I suspect not everyone will
  2381. necessarily agree on the importance of all elements.</p>
  2382. <p>However, if we look at these concerns and the principles that
  2383. underpin the legislation of hazardous substances, I think there are
  2384. a lot of parallels.</p>
  2385. <h2>Applying the approach to AI</h2>
  2386. <p>What if, for certain well-defined applications of AI/ML such as
  2387. facial recognition, autonomous vehicles, etc, we required companies
  2388. to:</p>
  2389. <ul>
  2390. <li>register their systems, accompanies by a standard set of
  2391. technical, testing and other documentation</li>
  2392. <li>carry out tests of their system using agreed protocols, to
  2393. encourage consistency in comparison across testing</li>
  2394. <li>share data, e.g via a data trust or similar model, in order to
  2395. minimise the unnecessary collection of data and to facilitate some
  2396. assessment of bias in training data</li>
  2397. <li>demonstrate and document the safety of their systems to agreed
  2398. standards, allowing public and private sector users of systems and
  2399. models to make informed decisions about risks, or to support
  2400. enforcement of legal standards</li>
  2401. <li>coordinate to share costs of collecting and maintaining data,
  2402. conducting tests of standard models, etc</li>
  2403. <li>and, perhaps, after a period, accept that trained models would
  2404. become available for others to reuse, similarly to how medicines or
  2405. other substances may ultimately be manufactured by other
  2406. companies</li>
  2407. </ul>
  2408. <p>In addition to providing more controls and assurance around how
  2409. AI/ML is being deployed, an approach based on facilitating
  2410. collaboration around collection of data might help nudge new and
  2411. emerging sectors into a more open direction, right from the
  2412. start.</p>
  2413. <p>There are a number of potential risks and issues which I will
  2414. acknowledge up front:</p>
  2415. <ul>
  2416. <li>sharing of data about hazardous substance testing doesn’t have
  2417. to address data protection. But this could be factored in to the
  2418. design, and some uses of AI/ML draw on non-personal data</li>
  2419. <li>we may want to simply ban, or discourage use of some
  2420. applications of AI/ML, rather than enable it. But at the moment
  2421. there are few, if any controls</li>
  2422. <li>the approach might encourage collection and sharing of data
  2423. which we might otherwise want to restrict. But strong governance
  2424. and access controls, via a data trust or other institution might
  2425. actually raise the bar around governance and security, beyond that
  2426. which individual businesses can, or are willing to achieve.
  2427. Coordination with a regulator might also help decide on how much is
  2428. “enough” data</li>
  2429. <li>the utility of data and openly available models might degrade
  2430. over time, requiring ongoing investment</li>
  2431. <li>the approach seems most applicable to uses of AI/ML with
  2432. similar data requirements, In practice there may be only a small
  2433. number of these, or data requirements may vary enough to limit
  2434. benefits of data sharing</li>
  2435. </ul>
  2436. <p>Again, not an exhaustive list. But as I’ve noted, I think there
  2437. are ways to mitigate some of these risks.</p>
  2438. <p>Let me know what you think, what I’ve missed, or what I should
  2439. be reading. I’m not in a position to move this forward, but welcome
  2440. a discussion. Leave your thoughts in the comments below, or
  2441. <a href="https://twitter.com/ldodds">ping me on twitter</a>.</p>
  2442. </div>
  2443. </div>]]></content:encoded>
  2444.  <description>This post is a thought experiment. It considers how existing laws that cover the registration and testing of hazardous substances like pesticides might be used as an analogy for thinking through approaches to regulation of AI/ML. As a thought experiment its not a detailed or well-research proposal, but there are elements which I think are interesting. I’m interested in feedback and also pointers to more detailed explorations of similar ideas. A cursory look of substance registration legislation in the EU and US Under EU REACH legislation, if you want to manufacture or import large amount of potentially hazardous chemical substances ...</description>
  2445. </item>
  2446. <item rdf:about="https://blog.ldodds.com/2020/02/02/when-can-expect-more-from-data-portability/">
  2447.  <dc:creator>Leigh Dodds</dc:creator>
  2448.  <dc:source>Lost Boy by Leigh Dodds</dc:source>
  2449.  <dc:relation>http://ldodds.com/blog/</dc:relation>
  2450.  <planet:content xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" rdf:parseType="Literal">
  2451. <div>
  2452. <p>We’re at the end of week 5 of 2020, of the new decade and I’m on
  2453. a diet.</p>
  2454. <p>I’m back to using <a href=
  2455. "https://www.myfitnesspal.com/">MyFitnessPal</a> again. I’ve used
  2456. it on and off for the last 10 years whenever I’ve decided that
  2457. <em>now</em> is the time to be more healthy. The sporadic, but
  2458. detailed history of data collection around my weight and eating
  2459. habits mark out each of the times when <em>this time</em> was going
  2460. to be the time when I really made a change.</p>
  2461. <p>My success has been mixed. But the latest diet is going pretty
  2462. well, thanks for asking.</p>
  2463. <p>This morning the app chose the following feature to highlight as
  2464. part of its irregular nudges for me to upgrade to premium.</p>
  2465. <p><a href=
  2466. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/screenshot_20200202-085746.png">
  2467. <img data-attachment-id="1610" data-permalink=
  2468. "https://blog.ldodds.com/2020/02/02/when-can-expect-more-from-data-portability/screenshot_20200202-085746/"
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  2474. data-image-description="" data-medium-file=
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  2476. data-large-file=
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  2479. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/screenshot_20200202-085746.png?w=169&amp;h=300"
  2480. alt="" width="169" height="300" srcset=
  2481. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/screenshot_20200202-085746.png?w=169&amp;h=300 169w, https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/screenshot_20200202-085746.png?w=338&amp;h=600 338w, https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/screenshot_20200202-085746.png?w=84&amp;h=150 84w"
  2482. sizes="(max-width: 169px) 100vw, 169px" /></a></p>
  2483. <p>Downloading data about your weight, nutrition and exercise
  2484. history are a premium feature of the service. This gave me pause
  2485. for thought for several reasons.</p>
  2486. <p>Under UK legislation, and for as long as we maintain <a href=
  2487. "https://www.instituteforgovernment.org.uk/explainers/data-adequacy">
  2488. data adequacy</a> with the EU, I have a right to data portability.
  2489. I can request access to any data about me, in a machine-readable
  2490. format, from any service I happen to be using.</p>
  2491. <p>The company that produce MyFitnessPal, <a href=
  2492. "https://www.underarmour.co.uk/en-gb/">Under Armour,</a> do offer
  2493. me a way to exercise this right. It’s described in their privacy
  2494. policy, as shown in the following images.</p>
  2495. <p><a href=
  2496. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/screenshot_20200202-085633.png">
  2497. <img data-attachment-id="1608" data-permalink=
  2498. "https://blog.ldodds.com/2020/02/02/when-can-expect-more-from-data-portability/screenshot_20200202-085633/"
  2499. data-orig-file=
  2500. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/screenshot_20200202-085633.png"
  2501. data-orig-size="1080,911" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta=
  2502. "{&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;orientation&quot;:&quot;0&quot;}"
  2503. data-image-title="Screenshot_20200202-085633"
  2504. data-image-description="" data-medium-file=
  2505. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/screenshot_20200202-085633.png?w=300"
  2506. data-large-file=
  2507. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/screenshot_20200202-085633.png?w=1024"
  2508. class="alignnone wp-image-1608 size-medium" src=
  2509. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/screenshot_20200202-085633.png?w=300&amp;h=253"
  2510. alt="Note about how to exercise your GDPR rights in MyFitnessPal"
  2511. width="300" height="253" srcset=
  2512. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/screenshot_20200202-085633.png?w=300&amp;h=253 300w, https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/screenshot_20200202-085633.png?w=600&amp;h=506 600w, https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/screenshot_20200202-085633.png?w=150&amp;h=127 150w"
  2513. sizes=
  2514. "(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px" /></a><img data-attachment-id=
  2515. "1609" data-permalink=
  2516. "https://blog.ldodds.com/2020/02/02/when-can-expect-more-from-data-portability/screenshot_20200202-085646/"
  2517. data-orig-file=
  2518. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/screenshot_20200202-085646.png"
  2519. data-orig-size="1078,1207" data-comments-opened="1"
  2520. data-image-meta="{&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;orientation&quot;:&quot;0&quot;}"
  2521. data-image-title="Screenshot_20200202-085646"
  2522. data-image-description="" data-medium-file=
  2523. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/screenshot_20200202-085646.png?w=268"
  2524. data-large-file=
  2525. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/screenshot_20200202-085646.png?w=915"
  2526. class="alignnone wp-image-1609 size-medium" src=
  2527. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/screenshot_20200202-085646.png?w=268&amp;h=300"
  2528. alt="Data portability in MyFitnessPal" width="268" height="300"
  2529. srcset=
  2530. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/screenshot_20200202-085646.png?w=268&amp;h=300 268w, https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/screenshot_20200202-085646.png?w=536&amp;h=600 536w, https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/screenshot_20200202-085646.png?w=134&amp;h=150 134w"
  2531. sizes="(max-width: 268px) 100vw, 268px" /></p>
  2532. <p>Rather than enabling this access via an existing product
  2533. feature, they’ve decide to make me and everyone else request the
  2534. data directly. Every time I want to use it.</p>
  2535. <p>This might be a deliberate decision. They’re following the
  2536. legislation to the letter. Perhaps its a conscious decision to push
  2537. people towards a premium service, rather than make it easy by
  2538. default. Their user base is international, so they don’t have to
  2539. offer this feature to everyone.</p>
  2540. <p>Or maybe its the legal and product teams not looking at data
  2541. portability as an opportunity. That’s something that <a href=
  2542. "https://theodi.org/article/the-eu-general-data-protection-regulation-opportunities-for-grocery-retail/">
  2543. the ODI has previously explored</a>.</p>
  2544. <p>I’m hoping to see more exploration of the potential benefits and
  2545. uses of data portability in 2020.</p>
  2546. <p>I think we need to re-frame the discussion away from compliance
  2547. and on to commercial and consumer benefits. For example, by
  2548. highlighting how access to data contributes to building ecosystems
  2549. around services, to help retain and grow a customer base. That is
  2550. more likely to get traction than a continued focus on compliance
  2551. and product switching.</p>
  2552. <p>MyFitnessPal already connects into an ecosystem of other
  2553. services. A stronger message around portability might help grow
  2554. that further.&#160; After all, there are <a href=
  2555. "https://blog.ldodds.com/2015/04/14/open-data-and-diabetes/">more
  2556. reasons to monitor what you eat</a> than just weight loss.</p>
  2557. <p>Clearer legislation and stronger guidance from organisations
  2558. like ICO and industry regulators describing how data portability
  2559. should be implemented would also help. Wider international adoption
  2560. of data portability rights wouldn’t hurt either.</p>
  2561. <p>There’s also a role for community driven projects to build
  2562. stronger norms and expectations around data portability. Projects
  2563. like <a href=
  2564. "https://blog.okfn.org/2018/02/22/we-crack-the-schufa-the-german-credit-scoring/">
  2565. OpenSchufa</a> demonstrate the positive benefits of coordinated
  2566. action to build up an aggregated view of donated, personal
  2567. data.</p>
  2568. <p>But I’d also settle with a return to <a href=
  2569. "https://blog.ldodds.com/2005/05/25/connecting-social-content-services-using-foaf-rdf-and-rest/">
  2570. the ethos of the early 2010s</a>, when making data flow between
  2571. services was the default. Small pieces, loosely joined.</p>
  2572. <p>If we want the big platforms to go on a diet, then they’re going
  2573. to need to give up some of those bytes.</p>
  2574. </div>
  2575. </planet:content>
  2576.  <dc:date rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#dateTime">2020-02-02T15:05:48.000000Z</dc:date>
  2577.  <title>When can expect more from data portability?</title>
  2578.  <link>https://blog.ldodds.com/2020/02/02/when-can-expect-more-from-data-portability/</link>
  2579.  <content:encoded rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#XMLLiteral"><![CDATA[
  2580. <div xmlns='http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml'>
  2581. <div>
  2582. <p>We’re at the end of week 5 of 2020, of the new decade and I’m on
  2583. a diet.</p>
  2584. <p>I’m back to using <a href=
  2585. "https://www.myfitnesspal.com/">MyFitnessPal</a> again. I’ve used
  2586. it on and off for the last 10 years whenever I’ve decided that
  2587. <em>now</em> is the time to be more healthy. The sporadic, but
  2588. detailed history of data collection around my weight and eating
  2589. habits mark out each of the times when <em>this time</em> was going
  2590. to be the time when I really made a change.</p>
  2591. <p>My success has been mixed. But the latest diet is going pretty
  2592. well, thanks for asking.</p>
  2593. <p>This morning the app chose the following feature to highlight as
  2594. part of its irregular nudges for me to upgrade to premium.</p>
  2595. <p><a href=
  2596. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/screenshot_20200202-085746.png">
  2597. <img data-attachment-id="1610" data-permalink=
  2598. "https://blog.ldodds.com/2020/02/02/when-can-expect-more-from-data-portability/screenshot_20200202-085746/"
  2599. data-orig-file=
  2600. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/screenshot_20200202-085746.png"
  2601. data-orig-size="1080,1920" data-comments-opened="1"
  2602. data-image-meta="{&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;orientation&quot;:&quot;0&quot;}"
  2603. data-image-title="Screenshot_20200202-085746"
  2604. data-image-description="" data-medium-file=
  2605. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/screenshot_20200202-085746.png?w=169"
  2606. data-large-file=
  2607. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/screenshot_20200202-085746.png?w=576"
  2608. class="aligncenter size-medium wp-image-1610" src=
  2609. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/screenshot_20200202-085746.png?w=169&amp;h=300"
  2610. alt="" width="169" height="300" srcset=
  2611. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/screenshot_20200202-085746.png?w=169&amp;h=300 169w, https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/screenshot_20200202-085746.png?w=338&amp;h=600 338w, https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/screenshot_20200202-085746.png?w=84&amp;h=150 84w"
  2612. sizes="(max-width: 169px) 100vw, 169px" /></a></p>
  2613. <p>Downloading data about your weight, nutrition and exercise
  2614. history are a premium feature of the service. This gave me pause
  2615. for thought for several reasons.</p>
  2616. <p>Under UK legislation, and for as long as we maintain <a href=
  2617. "https://www.instituteforgovernment.org.uk/explainers/data-adequacy">
  2618. data adequacy</a> with the EU, I have a right to data portability.
  2619. I can request access to any data about me, in a machine-readable
  2620. format, from any service I happen to be using.</p>
  2621. <p>The company that produce MyFitnessPal, <a href=
  2622. "https://www.underarmour.co.uk/en-gb/">Under Armour,</a> do offer
  2623. me a way to exercise this right. It’s described in their privacy
  2624. policy, as shown in the following images.</p>
  2625. <p><a href=
  2626. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/screenshot_20200202-085633.png">
  2627. <img data-attachment-id="1608" data-permalink=
  2628. "https://blog.ldodds.com/2020/02/02/when-can-expect-more-from-data-portability/screenshot_20200202-085633/"
  2629. data-orig-file=
  2630. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/screenshot_20200202-085633.png"
  2631. data-orig-size="1080,911" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta=
  2632. "{&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;orientation&quot;:&quot;0&quot;}"
  2633. data-image-title="Screenshot_20200202-085633"
  2634. data-image-description="" data-medium-file=
  2635. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/screenshot_20200202-085633.png?w=300"
  2636. data-large-file=
  2637. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/screenshot_20200202-085633.png?w=1024"
  2638. class="alignnone wp-image-1608 size-medium" src=
  2639. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/screenshot_20200202-085633.png?w=300&amp;h=253"
  2640. alt="Note about how to exercise your GDPR rights in MyFitnessPal"
  2641. width="300" height="253" srcset=
  2642. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/screenshot_20200202-085633.png?w=300&amp;h=253 300w, https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/screenshot_20200202-085633.png?w=600&amp;h=506 600w, https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/screenshot_20200202-085633.png?w=150&amp;h=127 150w"
  2643. sizes=
  2644. "(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px" /></a><img data-attachment-id=
  2645. "1609" data-permalink=
  2646. "https://blog.ldodds.com/2020/02/02/when-can-expect-more-from-data-portability/screenshot_20200202-085646/"
  2647. data-orig-file=
  2648. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/screenshot_20200202-085646.png"
  2649. data-orig-size="1078,1207" data-comments-opened="1"
  2650. data-image-meta="{&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;orientation&quot;:&quot;0&quot;}"
  2651. data-image-title="Screenshot_20200202-085646"
  2652. data-image-description="" data-medium-file=
  2653. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/screenshot_20200202-085646.png?w=268"
  2654. data-large-file=
  2655. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/screenshot_20200202-085646.png?w=915"
  2656. class="alignnone wp-image-1609 size-medium" src=
  2657. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/screenshot_20200202-085646.png?w=268&amp;h=300"
  2658. alt="Data portability in MyFitnessPal" width="268" height="300"
  2659. srcset=
  2660. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/screenshot_20200202-085646.png?w=268&amp;h=300 268w, https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/screenshot_20200202-085646.png?w=536&amp;h=600 536w, https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/screenshot_20200202-085646.png?w=134&amp;h=150 134w"
  2661. sizes="(max-width: 268px) 100vw, 268px" /></p>
  2662. <p>Rather than enabling this access via an existing product
  2663. feature, they’ve decide to make me and everyone else request the
  2664. data directly. Every time I want to use it.</p>
  2665. <p>This might be a deliberate decision. They’re following the
  2666. legislation to the letter. Perhaps its a conscious decision to push
  2667. people towards a premium service, rather than make it easy by
  2668. default. Their user base is international, so they don’t have to
  2669. offer this feature to everyone.</p>
  2670. <p>Or maybe its the legal and product teams not looking at data
  2671. portability as an opportunity. That’s something that <a href=
  2672. "https://theodi.org/article/the-eu-general-data-protection-regulation-opportunities-for-grocery-retail/">
  2673. the ODI has previously explored</a>.</p>
  2674. <p>I’m hoping to see more exploration of the potential benefits and
  2675. uses of data portability in 2020.</p>
  2676. <p>I think we need to re-frame the discussion away from compliance
  2677. and on to commercial and consumer benefits. For example, by
  2678. highlighting how access to data contributes to building ecosystems
  2679. around services, to help retain and grow a customer base. That is
  2680. more likely to get traction than a continued focus on compliance
  2681. and product switching.</p>
  2682. <p>MyFitnessPal already connects into an ecosystem of other
  2683. services. A stronger message around portability might help grow
  2684. that further.&#160; After all, there are <a href=
  2685. "https://blog.ldodds.com/2015/04/14/open-data-and-diabetes/">more
  2686. reasons to monitor what you eat</a> than just weight loss.</p>
  2687. <p>Clearer legislation and stronger guidance from organisations
  2688. like ICO and industry regulators describing how data portability
  2689. should be implemented would also help. Wider international adoption
  2690. of data portability rights wouldn’t hurt either.</p>
  2691. <p>There’s also a role for community driven projects to build
  2692. stronger norms and expectations around data portability. Projects
  2693. like <a href=
  2694. "https://blog.okfn.org/2018/02/22/we-crack-the-schufa-the-german-credit-scoring/">
  2695. OpenSchufa</a> demonstrate the positive benefits of coordinated
  2696. action to build up an aggregated view of donated, personal
  2697. data.</p>
  2698. <p>But I’d also settle with a return to <a href=
  2699. "https://blog.ldodds.com/2005/05/25/connecting-social-content-services-using-foaf-rdf-and-rest/">
  2700. the ethos of the early 2010s</a>, when making data flow between
  2701. services was the default. Small pieces, loosely joined.</p>
  2702. <p>If we want the big platforms to go on a diet, then they’re going
  2703. to need to give up some of those bytes.</p>
  2704. </div>
  2705. </div>]]></content:encoded>
  2706.  <description>We’re at the end of week 5 of 2020, of the new decade and I’m on a diet. I’m back to using MyFitnessPal again. I’ve used it on and off for the last 10 years whenever I’ve decided that now is the time to be more healthy. The sporadic, but detailed history of data collection around my weight and eating habits mark out each of the times when this time was going to be the time when I really made a change. My success has been mixed. But the latest diet is going pretty well, thanks for asking. This morning ...</description>
  2707. </item>
  2708. <item rdf:about="https://blog.ldodds.com/2020/01/31/do-data-scientists-spend-80-of-their-time-cleaning-data-turns-out-no/">
  2709.  <dc:creator>Leigh Dodds</dc:creator>
  2710.  <dc:source>Lost Boy by Leigh Dodds</dc:source>
  2711.  <dc:relation>http://ldodds.com/blog/</dc:relation>
  2712.  <planet:content xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" rdf:parseType="Literal">
  2713. <div>
  2714. <p>It’s hard to read an article about data science or really
  2715. anything that involves creating something useful from data these
  2716. days without tripping over this factoid, or some variant of it:</p>
  2717. <p><em>Data scientists spend 80% of their time cleaning data rather
  2718. than creating insights.</em></p>
  2719. <p>Or</p>
  2720. <p><em>Data scientists only spend 20% of their time creating
  2721. insights, the rest wrangling data.</em></p>
  2722. <p>It’s frequently used to highlight the need to address a number
  2723. of issues around data quality, standards, access. Or as a way to
  2724. sell portals, dashboards and other analytic tools.</p>
  2725. <p>The thing is, I think it’s a bullshit statistic.</p>
  2726. <p>Not because I don’t think there aren’t improvements to be made
  2727. about how we access and share data. Far from it. My issue is more
  2728. about how that statistic is framed and because its just endlessly
  2729. parroted without any real insight.</p>
  2730. <h2>What did the surveys say?</h2>
  2731. <p>I’ve tried to dig out the underlying survey or source of that
  2732. factoid, to see if there’s more context. While the figure is widely
  2733. referenced its rarely accompanied by a link to a survey or
  2734. results.</p>
  2735. <p>Amusingly <a href=
  2736. "https://www.ibm.com/analytics/data-science">this IBM data science
  2737. product marketing page</a> cites <a href=
  2738. "https://hbr.org/2018/08/what-data-scientists-really-do-according-to-35-data-scientists">
  2739. this 2018 HBR blog post</a> which cites <a href=
  2740. "https://www.ibm.com/cloud/blog/ibm-data-catalog-data-scientists-productivity">
  2741. this 2017 IBM blog</a> which cites <a href=
  2742. "https://visit.figure-eight.com/rs/416-ZBE-142/images/CrowdFlower_DataScienceReport_2016.pdf">
  2743. this 2016 Crowdflower survey</a>. Why don’t people link to original
  2744. sources?</p>
  2745. <p>In terms of sources of data on how data scientists actually
  2746. spend their time, I’ve found two ongoing surveys.</p>
  2747. <ul>
  2748. <li>The Crowdflower (now <a href=
  2749. "https://www.figure-eight.com/">Figure Eight</a>) data science
  2750. survey. This has run annually since 2015. The <a href=
  2751. "https://visit.figure-eight.com/rs/416-ZBE-142/images/Data-Scientist-Report.pdf">
  2752. 2018 is here</a>, but you’ll need to <a href=
  2753. "https://visit.figure-eight.com/WC-2019-StateofAIReport_RegLP2018GTM.html?source=Web&amp;medium=FEResourceCenter">
  2754. fill in a form to see the 2019 version in your inbox.</a></li>
  2755. <li>The <a href=
  2756. "https://www.kaggle.com/c/kaggle-survey-2019">Kaggle Data Science
  2757. Survey</a>, which has run since 2017. You can see some <a href=
  2758. "https://www.kaggle.com/paultimothymooney/2018-kaggle-machine-learning-data-science-survey">
  2759. charts for the 2018 survey in this notebook</a></li>
  2760. </ul>
  2761. <p>So what do these surveys actually say?</p>
  2762. <ul>
  2763. <li>Crowdflower, <a href=
  2764. "https://visit.figure-eight.com/rs/416-ZBE-142/images/Crowdflower_Data_Scientist_Survey2015.pdf">
  2765. 2015</a>: “<em>66.7% said cleaning and organizing data is one of
  2766. their most time-consuming tasks</em>“.
  2767. <ul>
  2768. <li>They didn’t report estimates of time spent</li>
  2769. </ul>
  2770. </li>
  2771. <li>Crowdflower, <a href=
  2772. "https://visit.figure-eight.com/rs/416-ZBE-142/images/CrowdFlower_DataScienceReport_2016.pdf">
  2773. 2016</a>: “<em>What data scientists spend the most time doing?
  2774. Cleaning and organizing data: 60%, Collecting data sets; 19%
  2775. …</em>“.
  2776. <ul>
  2777. <li>Only 80% of time spent if you also lump in collecting data as
  2778. well</li>
  2779. </ul>
  2780. </li>
  2781. <li>Crowdflower, <a href=
  2782. "https://visit.figure-eight.com/rs/416-ZBE-142/images/CrowdFlower_DataScienceReport.pdf">
  2783. 2017</a>: “<em>What activity takes up most of your time? 51%
  2784. Collecting, labeling, cleaning and organizing data</em>”
  2785. <ul>
  2786. <li>Less than 80% and also now includes tasks like labelling of
  2787. data</li>
  2788. </ul>
  2789. </li>
  2790. <li>Figure Eight, <a href=
  2791. "https://visit.figure-eight.com/rs/416-ZBE-142/images/Data-Scientist-Report.pdf">
  2792. 2018</a>: Doesn’t cover this question.</li>
  2793. <li>Figure Eight, 2019: “<em>Nearly three quarters of technical
  2794. respondents 73.5% spend 25% or more of their time managing,
  2795. cleaning, and/or labeling data</em>”
  2796. <ul>
  2797. <li>That’s pretty far from 80%!</li>
  2798. </ul>
  2799. </li>
  2800. <li>Kaggle, <a href="https://www.kaggle.com/surveys/2017">2017</a>:
  2801. Doesn’t cover this question</li>
  2802. <li>Kaggle, <a href=
  2803. "https://www.kaggle.com/paultimothymooney/2018-kaggle-machine-learning-data-science-survey">
  2804. 2018</a>: “<em>During a typical data science project, what percent
  2805. of your time is spent engaged in the following tasks? ~11%
  2806. Gathering data, 15% Cleaning data…</em>”
  2807. <ul>
  2808. <li>Again, much less than 80%</li>
  2809. </ul>
  2810. </li>
  2811. </ul>
  2812. <p>Only the Crowdflower survey reports anything close to 80%, but
  2813. you need to lump in actually collecting data as well.</p>
  2814. <p>Are there other sources? I’ve not spent too much time on it. But
  2815. this <a href=
  2816. "http://www.bizreport.com/2015/07/report-data-scientists-spend-bulk-of-time-cleaning-up.html">
  2817. 2015 bizreport article</a> mentions another survey which suggests
  2818. “<em>between 50% and 90% of business intelligence (BI) workers’
  2819. time is spend prepping data to be analyzed</em>“.</p>
  2820. <p>And an <a href=
  2821. "https://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/18/technology/for-big-data-scientists-hurdle-to-insights-is-janitor-work.html">
  2822. August 2014 New York Times article</a> states that: “<em>Data
  2823. scientists, according to interviews and expert estimates, spend
  2824. from 50 percent to 80 percent of their time mired in this more
  2825. mundane labor of collecting and preparing unruly digital
  2826. data</em>“. But doesn’t link to the surveys, because newspapers
  2827. hate links.</p>
  2828. <p>It’s worth noting that <a href=
  2829. "https://flowingdata.com/2009/06/04/rise-of-the-data-scientist/">“Data
  2830. Scientist” as a job started to really become a thing around
  2831. 2009</a>. Although <a href=
  2832. "https://www.forbes.com/sites/gilpress/2013/05/28/a-very-short-history-of-data-science/">
  2833. the concept of data science is older</a>. So there may not be much
  2834. more to dig up. If you’ve seen some earlier surveys, then let me
  2835. know.</p>
  2836. <h2>Is it a useful statistic?</h2>
  2837. <p>So looking at the figures, it looks to me that this is a
  2838. bullshit statistic. Data scientists do a whole range of different
  2839. types of task. If you arbitrary label some of these as analysis and
  2840. others not, then you can make them add up to 80%.</p>
  2841. <p>But that’s not the only reason why I think its a bullshit
  2842. statistic.</p>
  2843. <p>Firstly there’s the implication that cleaning and working with
  2844. data is somehow not worth the time of a data scientist. It’s
  2845. “<a href=
  2846. "https://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/18/technology/for-big-data-scientists-hurdle-to-insights-is-janitor-work.html">data
  2847. janitor work</a>” work. And “<a href=
  2848. "http://don%E2%80%99t%20particularly%20love%20munging%20and%20cleaning%20data%20either.%20It%E2%80%99s%20a%20waste%20of%20their%20skills%20to%20be%20polishing%20the%20materials%20they%20rely%20on.">It’s
  2849. a waste of their skills to be polishing the materials they rely
  2850. on</a>“. Ugh.</p>
  2851. <p>Who, might I ask, is supposed to do this janitorial work?</p>
  2852. <p>I would argue that spending time working with data. To
  2853. transform, explore and understand it better is absolutely what data
  2854. scientists should be doing. This is the medium they are working
  2855. in.</p>
  2856. <p>Understand the material better and you’ll get better
  2857. insights.</p>
  2858. <p>Secondly, I think data science use cases and workflows are a
  2859. poor measure for how well data is published. Data science is
  2860. frequently about doing bespoke analysis which means creating and
  2861. labelling unique datasets. No matter how cleanly formatted or
  2862. standardised a dataset its likely to need some work.</p>
  2863. <p>A sculptor has different needs than a bricklayer. They both use
  2864. similar materials. And they both create things of lasting value and
  2865. worth.</p>
  2866. <p>We could measure utility better using other assessments than
  2867. time spent on bespoke work.</p>
  2868. <p>Thirdly, it’s measuring the wrong thing. Actually, maybe some
  2869. friction around the use of data is a good thing. Especially if it
  2870. encourages you to spend more time understanding a dataset. Even
  2871. more so if it in any way puts a break on dumb uses of
  2872. machine-learning.</p>
  2873. <p>If we want the process of accessing, using and sharing data to
  2874. be as frictionless as possible in a technical sense, then let’s
  2875. make sure that is offset by adding friction elsewhere. E.g. to add
  2876. checkpoints for reviews of ethical impacts. No matter how highly
  2877. paid a data scientist is, the impacts of poor use of data and AI
  2878. can be much, much larger.</p>
  2879. <p>Don’t tell me that data scientists are spending time too much
  2880. time working with data and not enough time getting insights into
  2881. production. Tell me that data scientists are increasingly spending
  2882. 50% of their time considering the ethical and social impacts of
  2883. their work.</p>
  2884. <p>Let’s measure <em>that</em>.</p>
  2885. </div>
  2886. </planet:content>
  2887.  <dc:date rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#dateTime">2020-01-31T21:05:49.000000Z</dc:date>
  2888.  <title>Do data scientists spend 80% of their time cleaning data?
  2889. Turns out, no?</title>
  2890.  <link>https://blog.ldodds.com/2020/01/31/do-data-scientists-spend-80-of-their-time-cleaning-data-turns-out-no/</link>
  2891.  <content:encoded rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#XMLLiteral"><![CDATA[
  2892. <div xmlns='http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml'>
  2893. <div>
  2894. <p>It’s hard to read an article about data science or really
  2895. anything that involves creating something useful from data these
  2896. days without tripping over this factoid, or some variant of it:</p>
  2897. <p><em>Data scientists spend 80% of their time cleaning data rather
  2898. than creating insights.</em></p>
  2899. <p>Or</p>
  2900. <p><em>Data scientists only spend 20% of their time creating
  2901. insights, the rest wrangling data.</em></p>
  2902. <p>It’s frequently used to highlight the need to address a number
  2903. of issues around data quality, standards, access. Or as a way to
  2904. sell portals, dashboards and other analytic tools.</p>
  2905. <p>The thing is, I think it’s a bullshit statistic.</p>
  2906. <p>Not because I don’t think there aren’t improvements to be made
  2907. about how we access and share data. Far from it. My issue is more
  2908. about how that statistic is framed and because its just endlessly
  2909. parroted without any real insight.</p>
  2910. <h2>What did the surveys say?</h2>
  2911. <p>I’ve tried to dig out the underlying survey or source of that
  2912. factoid, to see if there’s more context. While the figure is widely
  2913. referenced its rarely accompanied by a link to a survey or
  2914. results.</p>
  2915. <p>Amusingly <a href=
  2916. "https://www.ibm.com/analytics/data-science">this IBM data science
  2917. product marketing page</a> cites <a href=
  2918. "https://hbr.org/2018/08/what-data-scientists-really-do-according-to-35-data-scientists">
  2919. this 2018 HBR blog post</a> which cites <a href=
  2920. "https://www.ibm.com/cloud/blog/ibm-data-catalog-data-scientists-productivity">
  2921. this 2017 IBM blog</a> which cites <a href=
  2922. "https://visit.figure-eight.com/rs/416-ZBE-142/images/CrowdFlower_DataScienceReport_2016.pdf">
  2923. this 2016 Crowdflower survey</a>. Why don’t people link to original
  2924. sources?</p>
  2925. <p>In terms of sources of data on how data scientists actually
  2926. spend their time, I’ve found two ongoing surveys.</p>
  2927. <ul>
  2928. <li>The Crowdflower (now <a href=
  2929. "https://www.figure-eight.com/">Figure Eight</a>) data science
  2930. survey. This has run annually since 2015. The <a href=
  2931. "https://visit.figure-eight.com/rs/416-ZBE-142/images/Data-Scientist-Report.pdf">
  2932. 2018 is here</a>, but you’ll need to <a href=
  2933. "https://visit.figure-eight.com/WC-2019-StateofAIReport_RegLP2018GTM.html?source=Web&amp;medium=FEResourceCenter">
  2934. fill in a form to see the 2019 version in your inbox.</a></li>
  2935. <li>The <a href=
  2936. "https://www.kaggle.com/c/kaggle-survey-2019">Kaggle Data Science
  2937. Survey</a>, which has run since 2017. You can see some <a href=
  2938. "https://www.kaggle.com/paultimothymooney/2018-kaggle-machine-learning-data-science-survey">
  2939. charts for the 2018 survey in this notebook</a></li>
  2940. </ul>
  2941. <p>So what do these surveys actually say?</p>
  2942. <ul>
  2943. <li>Crowdflower, <a href=
  2944. "https://visit.figure-eight.com/rs/416-ZBE-142/images/Crowdflower_Data_Scientist_Survey2015.pdf">
  2945. 2015</a>: “<em>66.7% said cleaning and organizing data is one of
  2946. their most time-consuming tasks</em>“.
  2947. <ul>
  2948. <li>They didn’t report estimates of time spent</li>
  2949. </ul>
  2950. </li>
  2951. <li>Crowdflower, <a href=
  2952. "https://visit.figure-eight.com/rs/416-ZBE-142/images/CrowdFlower_DataScienceReport_2016.pdf">
  2953. 2016</a>: “<em>What data scientists spend the most time doing?
  2954. Cleaning and organizing data: 60%, Collecting data sets; 19%
  2955. …</em>“.
  2956. <ul>
  2957. <li>Only 80% of time spent if you also lump in collecting data as
  2958. well</li>
  2959. </ul>
  2960. </li>
  2961. <li>Crowdflower, <a href=
  2962. "https://visit.figure-eight.com/rs/416-ZBE-142/images/CrowdFlower_DataScienceReport.pdf">
  2963. 2017</a>: “<em>What activity takes up most of your time? 51%
  2964. Collecting, labeling, cleaning and organizing data</em>”
  2965. <ul>
  2966. <li>Less than 80% and also now includes tasks like labelling of
  2967. data</li>
  2968. </ul>
  2969. </li>
  2970. <li>Figure Eight, <a href=
  2971. "https://visit.figure-eight.com/rs/416-ZBE-142/images/Data-Scientist-Report.pdf">
  2972. 2018</a>: Doesn’t cover this question.</li>
  2973. <li>Figure Eight, 2019: “<em>Nearly three quarters of technical
  2974. respondents 73.5% spend 25% or more of their time managing,
  2975. cleaning, and/or labeling data</em>”
  2976. <ul>
  2977. <li>That’s pretty far from 80%!</li>
  2978. </ul>
  2979. </li>
  2980. <li>Kaggle, <a href="https://www.kaggle.com/surveys/2017">2017</a>:
  2981. Doesn’t cover this question</li>
  2982. <li>Kaggle, <a href=
  2983. "https://www.kaggle.com/paultimothymooney/2018-kaggle-machine-learning-data-science-survey">
  2984. 2018</a>: “<em>During a typical data science project, what percent
  2985. of your time is spent engaged in the following tasks? ~11%
  2986. Gathering data, 15% Cleaning data…</em>”
  2987. <ul>
  2988. <li>Again, much less than 80%</li>
  2989. </ul>
  2990. </li>
  2991. </ul>
  2992. <p>Only the Crowdflower survey reports anything close to 80%, but
  2993. you need to lump in actually collecting data as well.</p>
  2994. <p>Are there other sources? I’ve not spent too much time on it. But
  2995. this <a href=
  2996. "http://www.bizreport.com/2015/07/report-data-scientists-spend-bulk-of-time-cleaning-up.html">
  2997. 2015 bizreport article</a> mentions another survey which suggests
  2998. “<em>between 50% and 90% of business intelligence (BI) workers’
  2999. time is spend prepping data to be analyzed</em>“.</p>
  3000. <p>And an <a href=
  3001. "https://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/18/technology/for-big-data-scientists-hurdle-to-insights-is-janitor-work.html">
  3002. August 2014 New York Times article</a> states that: “<em>Data
  3003. scientists, according to interviews and expert estimates, spend
  3004. from 50 percent to 80 percent of their time mired in this more
  3005. mundane labor of collecting and preparing unruly digital
  3006. data</em>“. But doesn’t link to the surveys, because newspapers
  3007. hate links.</p>
  3008. <p>It’s worth noting that <a href=
  3009. "https://flowingdata.com/2009/06/04/rise-of-the-data-scientist/">“Data
  3010. Scientist” as a job started to really become a thing around
  3011. 2009</a>. Although <a href=
  3012. "https://www.forbes.com/sites/gilpress/2013/05/28/a-very-short-history-of-data-science/">
  3013. the concept of data science is older</a>. So there may not be much
  3014. more to dig up. If you’ve seen some earlier surveys, then let me
  3015. know.</p>
  3016. <h2>Is it a useful statistic?</h2>
  3017. <p>So looking at the figures, it looks to me that this is a
  3018. bullshit statistic. Data scientists do a whole range of different
  3019. types of task. If you arbitrary label some of these as analysis and
  3020. others not, then you can make them add up to 80%.</p>
  3021. <p>But that’s not the only reason why I think its a bullshit
  3022. statistic.</p>
  3023. <p>Firstly there’s the implication that cleaning and working with
  3024. data is somehow not worth the time of a data scientist. It’s
  3025. “<a href=
  3026. "https://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/18/technology/for-big-data-scientists-hurdle-to-insights-is-janitor-work.html">data
  3027. janitor work</a>” work. And “<a href=
  3028. "http://don%E2%80%99t%20particularly%20love%20munging%20and%20cleaning%20data%20either.%20It%E2%80%99s%20a%20waste%20of%20their%20skills%20to%20be%20polishing%20the%20materials%20they%20rely%20on.">It’s
  3029. a waste of their skills to be polishing the materials they rely
  3030. on</a>“. Ugh.</p>
  3031. <p>Who, might I ask, is supposed to do this janitorial work?</p>
  3032. <p>I would argue that spending time working with data. To
  3033. transform, explore and understand it better is absolutely what data
  3034. scientists should be doing. This is the medium they are working
  3035. in.</p>
  3036. <p>Understand the material better and you’ll get better
  3037. insights.</p>
  3038. <p>Secondly, I think data science use cases and workflows are a
  3039. poor measure for how well data is published. Data science is
  3040. frequently about doing bespoke analysis which means creating and
  3041. labelling unique datasets. No matter how cleanly formatted or
  3042. standardised a dataset its likely to need some work.</p>
  3043. <p>A sculptor has different needs than a bricklayer. They both use
  3044. similar materials. And they both create things of lasting value and
  3045. worth.</p>
  3046. <p>We could measure utility better using other assessments than
  3047. time spent on bespoke work.</p>
  3048. <p>Thirdly, it’s measuring the wrong thing. Actually, maybe some
  3049. friction around the use of data is a good thing. Especially if it
  3050. encourages you to spend more time understanding a dataset. Even
  3051. more so if it in any way puts a break on dumb uses of
  3052. machine-learning.</p>
  3053. <p>If we want the process of accessing, using and sharing data to
  3054. be as frictionless as possible in a technical sense, then let’s
  3055. make sure that is offset by adding friction elsewhere. E.g. to add
  3056. checkpoints for reviews of ethical impacts. No matter how highly
  3057. paid a data scientist is, the impacts of poor use of data and AI
  3058. can be much, much larger.</p>
  3059. <p>Don’t tell me that data scientists are spending time too much
  3060. time working with data and not enough time getting insights into
  3061. production. Tell me that data scientists are increasingly spending
  3062. 50% of their time considering the ethical and social impacts of
  3063. their work.</p>
  3064. <p>Let’s measure <em>that</em>.</p>
  3065. </div>
  3066. </div>]]></content:encoded>
  3067.  <description>It’s hard to read an article about data science or really anything that involves creating something useful from data these days without tripping over this factoid, or some variant of it: Data scientists spend 80% of their time cleaning data rather than creating insights. Or Data scientists only spend 20% of their time creating insights, the rest wrangling data. It’s frequently used to highlight the need to address a number of issues around data quality, standards, access. Or as a way to sell portals, dashboards and other analytic tools. The thing is, I think it’s a bullshit statistic. Not because ...</description>
  3068. </item>
  3069. <item rdf:about="https://blog.ldodds.com/2020/01/29/long-live-rss-how-i-manage-my-reading/">
  3070.  <dc:creator>Leigh Dodds</dc:creator>
  3071.  <dc:source>Lost Boy by Leigh Dodds</dc:source>
  3072.  <dc:relation>http://ldodds.com/blog/</dc:relation>
  3073.  <planet:content xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" rdf:parseType="Literal">
  3074. <div>
  3075. <p>“LONG LIVE RSS!”</p>
  3076. <p>I shout these words from my bedroom window every morning.
  3077. Reaffirming my love for this century’s most criminally neglected
  3078. data standard.</p>
  3079. <p>If you’ve either forgotten, or never enjoyed, the ease of
  3080. managing your information consumption via the magic of RSS and a
  3081. feed reader, then you’re missing out mate.</p>
  3082. <p>Struggling with the noise, gloom and general bombast of social
  3083. media? Get yourself a feed reader and fill it full of interesting
  3084. subscriptions for a most measured and sedate way to consume
  3085. words.</p>
  3086. <p>Once upon a time everyone(*) used them. We engaged in educated
  3087. discourse, shared blog rolls, sent trackbacks and wrote comments on
  3088. each others websites. <a href=
  3089. "https://twobithistory.org/2018/12/18/rss.html">Elegant weapons for
  3090. a more civilized age</a> (**).</p>
  3091. <p>I like to read things when I have time to reduce distractions
  3092. and give me change to absorb several viewpoints rather than simply
  3093. the latest, hottest takes.</p>
  3094. <p>I’ve fine-tuned my approach to managing my reading and research.
  3095. A few of the tools and services have changed, but the essentials
  3096. stay the same.&#160;If you’re interested, here’s how I’ve made
  3097. things work for me:</p>
  3098. <ul>
  3099. <li><a href="https://feedbin.com/">Feedbin</a>
  3100. <ul>
  3101. <li>Manages all my subscriptions for blogs, newsletters and more
  3102. into one easily accessible location</li>
  3103. <li>Lots of sites still support RSS its not dead, merely
  3104. resting</li>
  3105. <li>Feedbin is great at discovering feeds if you just paste in a
  3106. site URL. One of the magic parts of RSS</li>
  3107. <li>You can also subscribe to newsletters with a special Feedbin
  3108. email address and they’ll get delivered to your reader. Brilliant.
  3109. You’re not making me go back into my inbox, its scary in
  3110. there.</li>
  3111. </ul>
  3112. </li>
  3113. <li><a href=
  3114. "https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.seazon.feedme&amp;hl=en_GB">
  3115. Feedme</a>. Feedbin allows me to read posts anywhere, but I use
  3116. this Android app (<a href="https://feedbin.com/apps">there are
  3117. others</a>) as a client instead
  3118. <ul>
  3119. <li>Regularly syncs with Feedbin, so I can have all the latest
  3120. unread posts on my phone for the commute or an idle few
  3121. minutes</li>
  3122. <li>It provides a really quick interface to skim through posts and
  3123. either immediately read the or add them to my “to read” list, in
  3124. Pocket…</li>
  3125. </ul>
  3126. </li>
  3127. <li><a href="https://getpocket.com/">Pocket</a>. Mobile and web app
  3128. that I basically use as a way to manage a backlog of things “to
  3129. read”.
  3130. <ul>
  3131. <li>Gives me a clutter free (no ads!) way to read content either in
  3132. the browser (which I rarely do) or on my phone</li>
  3133. <li>It has its issues with some content, but you can easily switch
  3134. to a full web view</li>
  3135. <li>Not everything I want to read comes in via my feed reader so I
  3136. take links from Slack, Twitter or elsewhere and use the Pocket
  3137. browser extension or its share button integration to stash things
  3138. away for later reading. Basically if its not a 1-2 minute read it
  3139. goes into Pocket until I’m ready for it. Keeps the number of
  3140. browser tabs under control too.</li>
  3141. <li>The offline content syncing makes it great for using on my
  3142. commute, especially on the tube</li>
  3143. </ul>
  3144. </li>
  3145. <li><a href="https://ifttt.com/">IFTTT</a>. I use this service to
  3146. do two things:
  3147. <ul>
  3148. <li>Once I archive something in Pocket then it automatically adds
  3149. them to Pinboard for me, using the right tags.</li>
  3150. <li>If I favourite something it tweets out the link without me
  3151. having to go and actually look at twitter</li>
  3152. </ul>
  3153. </li>
  3154. <li><a href="http://pinboard.in/">Pinboard</a>. Basically a
  3155. complete <a href="http://pinboard.in/u:ldodds/">archive of articles
  3156. I’ve read</a>.
  3157. <ul>
  3158. <li>Gives me a backup separate to Pocket and public links to share
  3159. tagged collections of articles with others. E.g. <a href=
  3160. "http://pinboard.in/u:ldodds/">stuff I’ve cooked or am planning on
  3161. cooking</a>.</li>
  3162. </ul>
  3163. </li>
  3164. </ul>
  3165. <p>The end result is a fully self-curated feed of interesting
  3166. stuff. I’m no longer fighting someone else’s algorithm, so I can
  3167. easily find things again.</p>
  3168. <p>I can minimise number of organisations I’m following on twitter,
  3169. and just subscribe to their blogs. Also helps to buck the trend
  3170. towards more email newsletters which are just blogs but you’re all
  3171. in denial.</p>
  3172. <p>Also helps to reduce the number of distractions, and fight the
  3173. pressure to keep checking on twitter in case I’ve missed something
  3174. interesting. It’ll be in the feed reader when I’m ready.</p>
  3175. <p>Long live RSS!</p>
  3176. <p>It’s about time we stopped rebooting social networks and
  3177. rediscovered more flexible ways to create, share and read content
  3178. online. Go read</p>
  3179. <p>Say it with me. Go on.</p>
  3180. <p>LONG LIVE RSS!</p>
  3181. <p>(*) not actually everyone, but all the cool kids anyway.
  3182. Alright, just us nerds, but we loved it.</p>
  3183. <p>(**) not actually more civilised, but it was more
  3184. decentralised</p>
  3185. <p>&#160;</p>
  3186. </div>
  3187. </planet:content>
  3188.  <dc:date rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#dateTime">2020-01-29T19:05:50.000000Z</dc:date>
  3189.  <title>Long live RSS! How I manage my reading</title>
  3190.  <link>https://blog.ldodds.com/2020/01/29/long-live-rss-how-i-manage-my-reading/</link>
  3191.  <content:encoded rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#XMLLiteral"><![CDATA[
  3192. <div xmlns='http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml'>
  3193. <div>
  3194. <p>“LONG LIVE RSS!”</p>
  3195. <p>I shout these words from my bedroom window every morning.
  3196. Reaffirming my love for this century’s most criminally neglected
  3197. data standard.</p>
  3198. <p>If you’ve either forgotten, or never enjoyed, the ease of
  3199. managing your information consumption via the magic of RSS and a
  3200. feed reader, then you’re missing out mate.</p>
  3201. <p>Struggling with the noise, gloom and general bombast of social
  3202. media? Get yourself a feed reader and fill it full of interesting
  3203. subscriptions for a most measured and sedate way to consume
  3204. words.</p>
  3205. <p>Once upon a time everyone(*) used them. We engaged in educated
  3206. discourse, shared blog rolls, sent trackbacks and wrote comments on
  3207. each others websites. <a href=
  3208. "https://twobithistory.org/2018/12/18/rss.html">Elegant weapons for
  3209. a more civilized age</a> (**).</p>
  3210. <p>I like to read things when I have time to reduce distractions
  3211. and give me change to absorb several viewpoints rather than simply
  3212. the latest, hottest takes.</p>
  3213. <p>I’ve fine-tuned my approach to managing my reading and research.
  3214. A few of the tools and services have changed, but the essentials
  3215. stay the same.&#160;If you’re interested, here’s how I’ve made
  3216. things work for me:</p>
  3217. <ul>
  3218. <li><a href="https://feedbin.com/">Feedbin</a>
  3219. <ul>
  3220. <li>Manages all my subscriptions for blogs, newsletters and more
  3221. into one easily accessible location</li>
  3222. <li>Lots of sites still support RSS its not dead, merely
  3223. resting</li>
  3224. <li>Feedbin is great at discovering feeds if you just paste in a
  3225. site URL. One of the magic parts of RSS</li>
  3226. <li>You can also subscribe to newsletters with a special Feedbin
  3227. email address and they’ll get delivered to your reader. Brilliant.
  3228. You’re not making me go back into my inbox, its scary in
  3229. there.</li>
  3230. </ul>
  3231. </li>
  3232. <li><a href=
  3233. "https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.seazon.feedme&amp;hl=en_GB">
  3234. Feedme</a>. Feedbin allows me to read posts anywhere, but I use
  3235. this Android app (<a href="https://feedbin.com/apps">there are
  3236. others</a>) as a client instead
  3237. <ul>
  3238. <li>Regularly syncs with Feedbin, so I can have all the latest
  3239. unread posts on my phone for the commute or an idle few
  3240. minutes</li>
  3241. <li>It provides a really quick interface to skim through posts and
  3242. either immediately read the or add them to my “to read” list, in
  3243. Pocket…</li>
  3244. </ul>
  3245. </li>
  3246. <li><a href="https://getpocket.com/">Pocket</a>. Mobile and web app
  3247. that I basically use as a way to manage a backlog of things “to
  3248. read”.
  3249. <ul>
  3250. <li>Gives me a clutter free (no ads!) way to read content either in
  3251. the browser (which I rarely do) or on my phone</li>
  3252. <li>It has its issues with some content, but you can easily switch
  3253. to a full web view</li>
  3254. <li>Not everything I want to read comes in via my feed reader so I
  3255. take links from Slack, Twitter or elsewhere and use the Pocket
  3256. browser extension or its share button integration to stash things
  3257. away for later reading. Basically if its not a 1-2 minute read it
  3258. goes into Pocket until I’m ready for it. Keeps the number of
  3259. browser tabs under control too.</li>
  3260. <li>The offline content syncing makes it great for using on my
  3261. commute, especially on the tube</li>
  3262. </ul>
  3263. </li>
  3264. <li><a href="https://ifttt.com/">IFTTT</a>. I use this service to
  3265. do two things:
  3266. <ul>
  3267. <li>Once I archive something in Pocket then it automatically adds
  3268. them to Pinboard for me, using the right tags.</li>
  3269. <li>If I favourite something it tweets out the link without me
  3270. having to go and actually look at twitter</li>
  3271. </ul>
  3272. </li>
  3273. <li><a href="http://pinboard.in/">Pinboard</a>. Basically a
  3274. complete <a href="http://pinboard.in/u:ldodds/">archive of articles
  3275. I’ve read</a>.
  3276. <ul>
  3277. <li>Gives me a backup separate to Pocket and public links to share
  3278. tagged collections of articles with others. E.g. <a href=
  3279. "http://pinboard.in/u:ldodds/">stuff I’ve cooked or am planning on
  3280. cooking</a>.</li>
  3281. </ul>
  3282. </li>
  3283. </ul>
  3284. <p>The end result is a fully self-curated feed of interesting
  3285. stuff. I’m no longer fighting someone else’s algorithm, so I can
  3286. easily find things again.</p>
  3287. <p>I can minimise number of organisations I’m following on twitter,
  3288. and just subscribe to their blogs. Also helps to buck the trend
  3289. towards more email newsletters which are just blogs but you’re all
  3290. in denial.</p>
  3291. <p>Also helps to reduce the number of distractions, and fight the
  3292. pressure to keep checking on twitter in case I’ve missed something
  3293. interesting. It’ll be in the feed reader when I’m ready.</p>
  3294. <p>Long live RSS!</p>
  3295. <p>It’s about time we stopped rebooting social networks and
  3296. rediscovered more flexible ways to create, share and read content
  3297. online. Go read</p>
  3298. <p>Say it with me. Go on.</p>
  3299. <p>LONG LIVE RSS!</p>
  3300. <p>(*) not actually everyone, but all the cool kids anyway.
  3301. Alright, just us nerds, but we loved it.</p>
  3302. <p>(**) not actually more civilised, but it was more
  3303. decentralised</p>
  3304. <p>&#160;</p>
  3305. </div>
  3306. </div>]]></content:encoded>
  3307.  <description>“LONG LIVE RSS!” I shout these words from my bedroom window every morning. Reaffirming my love for this century’s most criminally neglected data standard. If you’ve either forgotten, or never enjoyed, the ease of managing your information consumption via the magic of RSS and a feed reader, then you’re missing out mate. Struggling with the noise, gloom and general bombast of social media? Get yourself a feed reader and fill it full of interesting subscriptions for a most measured and sedate way to consume words. Once upon a time everyone(*) used them. We engaged in educated discourse, shared blog rolls, ...</description>
  3308. </item>
  3309. <item rdf:about="http://chem-bla-ics.blogspot.com/2020/01/metaboeu2020-in-toulouse-and-elixir.html">
  3310.  <dc:creator>Egon Willighagen</dc:creator>
  3311.  <dc:source>chem-bla-ics by Egon Willighagen</dc:source>
  3312.  <dc:relation>http://chem-bla-ics.blogspot.com/</dc:relation>
  3313.  <planet:content xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" rdf:parseType="Literal">
  3314. <div>This week I attended the <a href=
  3315. "https://rfmf-mpf-2020.sciencesconf.org/">European RFMF
  3316. Metabomeeting 2020</a>, aka #<a href=
  3317. "https://twitter.com/hashtag/MetaboEU2020">MetaboEU2020</a>, held
  3318. in Toulouse. Originally, I had hoped to do this by train, but that
  3319. turned out unfeasible. Co-located with this meeting where <a href=
  3320. "https://elixir-europe.org/">ELIXIR</a> <a href=
  3321. "https://elixir-europe.org/communities/metabolomics">Metabolomics
  3322. Community</a> meetings. We're involved in two implementation
  3323. studies for together less than a month of work. But both this
  3324. community and the conference are great places to talk about
  3325. <a href="https://www.wikipathways.org/index.php/WikiPathways">WikiPathways</a>,
  3326. BridgeDb (our website is still disconnected from the internet), and
  3327. cheminformatics.<br />
  3328. <br />
  3329. Toulouse was generally great. It comes with its big city issues,
  3330. like fairly expensive hotels, and a very frequent public transport
  3331. system. It also had a great food market where we had our "gala
  3332. dinner". Toulouse is also home to Airbus, so it was hard to miss
  3333. the Beluga:<br />
  3334. <br />
  3335. <div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;">
  3336. <a href=
  3337. "https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-8v87njPqIkk/XiwOnSasGfI/AAAAAAAAJi0/QxPnJZqUL-wfFh-F4ySoC9RcvbFy6axjQCLcBGAsYHQ/s1600/signal-attachment-2020-01-25-104549.jpeg"
  3338. style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0"
  3339. data-original-height="1200" data-original-width="1600" height="240"
  3340. src=
  3341. "https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-8v87njPqIkk/XiwOnSasGfI/AAAAAAAAJi0/QxPnJZqUL-wfFh-F4ySoC9RcvbFy6axjQCLcBGAsYHQ/s320/signal-attachment-2020-01-25-104549.jpeg"
  3342. width="320" /></a></div>
  3343. <br />
  3344. The&#160;MetaboEU2020 conference itself had some 400 participants,
  3345. of course, with a lot of wet lab metabolomics. As a chemist, with a
  3346. good pile of training in analytical chemistry, it's great to see
  3347. the progress. From a data analysis perspective, the community has a
  3348. long way to come. We're still talking about known known, unknown
  3349. knowns, and unknown unknowns. The posters were often cryptic, e.g.
  3350. stating they found 35 interesting metabolites, without actually
  3351. listing them. The talks were also really interesting.<br />
  3352. <br />
  3353. Now, if you read this, there is a good chance you were not at the
  3354. meeting. You can check the above linked hashtag for coverage on
  3355. Twitter, but we can do better. <a href=
  3356. "https://chem-bla-ics.blogspot.com/search?q=lanyrd">I loved
  3357. Lanyrd</a>, but their business model was not scalable and the
  3358. service no longer exists. But <a href=
  3359. "https://tools.wmflabs.org/scholia/topic/Q45340488">Scholia</a>
  3360. (see doi:<a href=
  3361. "https://doi.org/10.3897/rio.5.e35820">10.3897/rio.5.e35820</a>)
  3362. could fill the gap (it uses the Wikidata RDF and SPARQL queries). I
  3363. followed <a href="https://github.com/fnielsen">Finn</a>'s steps and
  3364. created <a href=
  3365. "https://tools.wmflabs.org/scholia/event/Q82457634">a page for the
  3366. meeting</a>&#160;and started associated speakers (I've done this in
  3367. the past for other meetings too):<br />
  3368. <br />
  3369. <div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;">
  3370. <a href=
  3371. "https://tools.wmflabs.org/scholia/event/Q82457634"><img border="0"
  3372. data-original-height="463" data-original-width="1135" height="260"
  3373. src=
  3374. "https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-9YKxPNNGnho/XiwQYEbMl0I/AAAAAAAAJjA/L8Mi9CJrTocVW7ETTWMbZjsplPAgOlSaQCLcBGAsYHQ/s640/Screenshot_20200125_105413.png"
  3375. width="640" /></a></div>
  3376. <div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;">
  3377. <br /></div>
  3378. <div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;">Finn
  3379. also created proceedings pages in the past, which I also followed.
  3380. So, I asked people on Twitter to post their slidedeck and posters
  3381. on <a href="https://figshare.com/">Figshare</a> or <a href=
  3382. "https://zenodo.org/">Zenodo</a>, and so far we ended up with
  3383. <a href="https://tools.wmflabs.org/scholia/venue/Q82739111">10
  3384. "proceedings"</a> (thanks to everyone who did!!!):</div>
  3385. <div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;">
  3386. <br /></div>
  3387. <div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;">
  3388. <a href=
  3389. "https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-RAnHZbODX0c/XiwRKKntCxI/AAAAAAAAJjI/gQRwuByEhlYC376VxfgkE6sL9Ys09205ACLcBGAsYHQ/s1600/Screenshot_20200125_105704.png"
  3390. style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0"
  3391. data-original-height="525" data-original-width="1135" height="296"
  3392. src=
  3393. "https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-RAnHZbODX0c/XiwRKKntCxI/AAAAAAAAJjI/gQRwuByEhlYC376VxfgkE6sL9Ys09205ACLcBGAsYHQ/s640/Screenshot_20200125_105704.png"
  3394. width="640" /></a></div>
  3395. <div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;">
  3396. <br /></div>
  3397. <div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;">
  3398. <br /></div>
  3399. <div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;">As
  3400. you can see, there is <a href=
  3401. "https://tools.wmflabs.org/scholia/venue/Q82739111/latest-works/rss">
  3402. an RSS feed</a> which you can follow (e.g. with <a href=
  3403. "https://feedly.com/">Feedly</a>) to get updates if more materials
  3404. appears online! I wish all conferences did this!</div>
  3405. <div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;">
  3406. <br /></div>
  3407. <div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;">Oh,
  3408. one of the posters is the semantic web <a href=
  3409. "https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.11685684.v1">work by Denise on
  3410. integrating content of WikiPathways with enzyme kinetics data</a>.
  3411. Work in progress, but <a href=
  3412. "https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Release_early,_release_often">release
  3413. soon, release often</a>.</div>
  3414. </div>
  3415. </planet:content>
  3416.  <dc:date rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#dateTime">2020-01-25T10:05:00.000000Z</dc:date>
  3417.  <title>MetaboEU2020 in Toulouse and the ELIXIR Metabolomics
  3418. Community assemblies</title>
  3419.  <link>http://chem-bla-ics.blogspot.com/2020/01/metaboeu2020-in-toulouse-and-elixir.html</link>
  3420.  <content:encoded rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#XMLLiteral"><![CDATA[
  3421. <div xmlns='http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml'>
  3422. <div>This week I attended the <a href=
  3423. "https://rfmf-mpf-2020.sciencesconf.org/">European RFMF
  3424. Metabomeeting 2020</a>, aka #<a href=
  3425. "https://twitter.com/hashtag/MetaboEU2020">MetaboEU2020</a>, held
  3426. in Toulouse. Originally, I had hoped to do this by train, but that
  3427. turned out unfeasible. Co-located with this meeting where <a href=
  3428. "https://elixir-europe.org/">ELIXIR</a> <a href=
  3429. "https://elixir-europe.org/communities/metabolomics">Metabolomics
  3430. Community</a> meetings. We're involved in two implementation
  3431. studies for together less than a month of work. But both this
  3432. community and the conference are great places to talk about
  3433. <a href="https://www.wikipathways.org/index.php/WikiPathways">WikiPathways</a>,
  3434. BridgeDb (our website is still disconnected from the internet), and
  3435. cheminformatics.<br />
  3436. <br />
  3437. Toulouse was generally great. It comes with its big city issues,
  3438. like fairly expensive hotels, and a very frequent public transport
  3439. system. It also had a great food market where we had our "gala
  3440. dinner". Toulouse is also home to Airbus, so it was hard to miss
  3441. the Beluga:<br />
  3442. <br />
  3443. <div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;">
  3444. <a href=
  3445. "https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-8v87njPqIkk/XiwOnSasGfI/AAAAAAAAJi0/QxPnJZqUL-wfFh-F4ySoC9RcvbFy6axjQCLcBGAsYHQ/s1600/signal-attachment-2020-01-25-104549.jpeg"
  3446. style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0"
  3447. data-original-height="1200" data-original-width="1600" height="240"
  3448. src=
  3449. "https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-8v87njPqIkk/XiwOnSasGfI/AAAAAAAAJi0/QxPnJZqUL-wfFh-F4ySoC9RcvbFy6axjQCLcBGAsYHQ/s320/signal-attachment-2020-01-25-104549.jpeg"
  3450. width="320" /></a></div>
  3451. <br />
  3452. The&#160;MetaboEU2020 conference itself had some 400 participants,
  3453. of course, with a lot of wet lab metabolomics. As a chemist, with a
  3454. good pile of training in analytical chemistry, it's great to see
  3455. the progress. From a data analysis perspective, the community has a
  3456. long way to come. We're still talking about known known, unknown
  3457. knowns, and unknown unknowns. The posters were often cryptic, e.g.
  3458. stating they found 35 interesting metabolites, without actually
  3459. listing them. The talks were also really interesting.<br />
  3460. <br />
  3461. Now, if you read this, there is a good chance you were not at the
  3462. meeting. You can check the above linked hashtag for coverage on
  3463. Twitter, but we can do better. <a href=
  3464. "https://chem-bla-ics.blogspot.com/search?q=lanyrd">I loved
  3465. Lanyrd</a>, but their business model was not scalable and the
  3466. service no longer exists. But <a href=
  3467. "https://tools.wmflabs.org/scholia/topic/Q45340488">Scholia</a>
  3468. (see doi:<a href=
  3469. "https://doi.org/10.3897/rio.5.e35820">10.3897/rio.5.e35820</a>)
  3470. could fill the gap (it uses the Wikidata RDF and SPARQL queries). I
  3471. followed <a href="https://github.com/fnielsen">Finn</a>'s steps and
  3472. created <a href=
  3473. "https://tools.wmflabs.org/scholia/event/Q82457634">a page for the
  3474. meeting</a>&#160;and started associated speakers (I've done this in
  3475. the past for other meetings too):<br />
  3476. <br />
  3477. <div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;">
  3478. <a href=
  3479. "https://tools.wmflabs.org/scholia/event/Q82457634"><img border="0"
  3480. data-original-height="463" data-original-width="1135" height="260"
  3481. src=
  3482. "https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-9YKxPNNGnho/XiwQYEbMl0I/AAAAAAAAJjA/L8Mi9CJrTocVW7ETTWMbZjsplPAgOlSaQCLcBGAsYHQ/s640/Screenshot_20200125_105413.png"
  3483. width="640" /></a></div>
  3484. <div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;">
  3485. <br /></div>
  3486. <div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;">Finn
  3487. also created proceedings pages in the past, which I also followed.
  3488. So, I asked people on Twitter to post their slidedeck and posters
  3489. on <a href="https://figshare.com/">Figshare</a> or <a href=
  3490. "https://zenodo.org/">Zenodo</a>, and so far we ended up with
  3491. <a href="https://tools.wmflabs.org/scholia/venue/Q82739111">10
  3492. "proceedings"</a> (thanks to everyone who did!!!):</div>
  3493. <div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;">
  3494. <br /></div>
  3495. <div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;">
  3496. <a href=
  3497. "https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-RAnHZbODX0c/XiwRKKntCxI/AAAAAAAAJjI/gQRwuByEhlYC376VxfgkE6sL9Ys09205ACLcBGAsYHQ/s1600/Screenshot_20200125_105704.png"
  3498. style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0"
  3499. data-original-height="525" data-original-width="1135" height="296"
  3500. src=
  3501. "https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-RAnHZbODX0c/XiwRKKntCxI/AAAAAAAAJjI/gQRwuByEhlYC376VxfgkE6sL9Ys09205ACLcBGAsYHQ/s640/Screenshot_20200125_105704.png"
  3502. width="640" /></a></div>
  3503. <div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;">
  3504. <br /></div>
  3505. <div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;">
  3506. <br /></div>
  3507. <div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;">As
  3508. you can see, there is <a href=
  3509. "https://tools.wmflabs.org/scholia/venue/Q82739111/latest-works/rss">
  3510. an RSS feed</a> which you can follow (e.g. with <a href=
  3511. "https://feedly.com/">Feedly</a>) to get updates if more materials
  3512. appears online! I wish all conferences did this!</div>
  3513. <div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;">
  3514. <br /></div>
  3515. <div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;">Oh,
  3516. one of the posters is the semantic web <a href=
  3517. "https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.11685684.v1">work by Denise on
  3518. integrating content of WikiPathways with enzyme kinetics data</a>.
  3519. Work in progress, but <a href=
  3520. "https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Release_early,_release_often">release
  3521. soon, release often</a>.</div>
  3522. </div>
  3523. </div>]]></content:encoded>
  3524.  <description>This week I attended the European RFMF Metabomeeting 2020 , aka # MetaboEU2020 , held in Toulouse. Originally, I had hoped to do this by train, but that turned out unfeasible. Co-located with this meeting where ELIXIR Metabolomics Community meetings. We're involved in two implementation studies for together less than a month of work. But both this community and the conference are great places to talk about WikiPathways , BridgeDb (our website is still disconnected from the internet), and cheminformatics. Toulouse was generally great. It comes with its big city issues, like fairly expensive hotels, and a very frequent public ...</description>
  3525. </item>
  3526. <item rdf:about="https://blog.ldodds.com/2020/01/24/licence-friction-a-tale-of-two-datasets/">
  3527.  <dc:creator>Leigh Dodds</dc:creator>
  3528.  <dc:source>Lost Boy by Leigh Dodds</dc:source>
  3529.  <dc:relation>http://ldodds.com/blog/</dc:relation>
  3530.  <planet:content xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" rdf:parseType="Literal">
  3531. <div>
  3532. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">For years now at the Open Data
  3533. Institute we’ve been working to increase access to data, to create
  3534. a range of social and economic benefits across a range of sectors.
  3535. While the details change across projects one of the more consistent
  3536. aspects of our work and guidance has been to support data stewards
  3537. in making data as open as possible, whilst ensuring that is clearly
  3538. licensed.</span></p>
  3539. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">Reference data, like addresses
  3540. and other geospatial data, that underpins our national and global
  3541. data infrastructure needs to be available under an open licence. If
  3542. it’s not, which is the ongoing situation in the UK, then other data
  3543. cannot be made as open as possible.&#160;</span></p>
  3544. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">Other considerations aside, data
  3545. can only be as open as the reference data it relies upon. Ideally,
  3546. reference data would be in the public domain, e.g. using <a href=
  3547. "https://creativecommons.org/share-your-work/public-domain/cc0/">a
  3548. CC0 waiver</a>. Attribution</span> <a href=
  3549. "https://blog.ldodds.com/2015/03/03/5-ways-to-be-a-better-open-data-reuser/">
  3550. <span style="font-weight:400;">should be a consistent norm
  3551. regardless of what licence is used</span></a><span style=
  3552. "font-weight:400;">.&#160;</span></p>
  3553. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">Data becomes more useful when it
  3554. is linked with other data. When it comes to data, adding context
  3555. adds value. It can also add risks, but more value can be created
  3556. from linking data.&#160;</span></p>
  3557. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">When data is published using
  3558. bespoke or restrictive licences then it is harder to combine
  3559. different datasets together, because there are often limitations in
  3560. the licensing terms that restrict how data can be used and
  3561. redistributed.</span></p>
  3562. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">This means data needs to be
  3563. licensed using common, consistent licences. Licences that work with
  3564. a range of different types of data, collected and used by different
  3565. communities across jurisdictions.&#160;</span></p>
  3566. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">Incompatible licences create
  3567. friction that can make it impossible to create useful products and
  3568. services.&#160;</span></p>
  3569. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">It’s well-reported that data
  3570. scientists and other users spend huge amounts of time cleaning and
  3571. tidying data because it’s messy and non-standardised. It’s probably
  3572. less well-reported how many great ideas are simply shelved because
  3573. of lack of access to data. Or are impossible because of issues with
  3574. restrictive or incompatible data licences. Or are cancelled or
  3575. simply needlessly expensive due to the need for legal consultations
  3576. and drafting of data sharing agreements.</span></p>
  3577. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">These are the hurdles you often
  3578. need to overcome before you even get started with that messy
  3579. data.</span></p>
  3580. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">Here’s a real-world example of
  3581. where the lack of open geospatial data in the UK, and ongoing
  3582. incompatibilities between data licensing is getting in the way of
  3583. useful work.&#160;</span></p>
  3584. <h2><b>Introducing Active Places</b></h2>
  3585. <p><span style="font-weight:400;"><a href=
  3586. "https://www.activeplacespower.com/opendata">Active Places</a> is a
  3587. dataset stewarded by <a href="https://www.sportengland.org/">Sport
  3588. England</a>. It provides a curated database of sporting facilities
  3589. across England. It includes facilities provided by a range of
  3590. organisations across the public, private and third-sectors. It’s
  3591. designed to help support decision making about the provision of
  3592. tens of thousands of sporting sites and facilities around the UK to
  3593. drive investment and policy making.&#160;</span></p>
  3594. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">The dataset is rich and includes
  3595. a wide range of information from disabled access through to the
  3596. length of ski slopes or the number of turns on a cycling
  3597. track.</span></p>
  3598. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">While Sport England are the data
  3599. steward, the curation of the dataset is partly subcontracted to a
  3600. data management firm and partly carried out collaboratively with
  3601. the owners of those sites and facilities.</span></p>
  3602. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">The dataset is published under a
  3603. standard open licence, the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0
  3604. licence. So anyone can access, use and share the data so long as
  3605. they acknowledge its source. Contributors to the dataset agree to
  3606. this licence as part of registering to contribute to the
  3607. site.</span></p>
  3608. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">The dataset includes geospatial
  3609. data, including the addresses and locations of individual sites.
  3610. This data includes IP from Ordnance Survey and Royal Mail, which
  3611. means they have a say over what happens to it. In order to release
  3612. the data under an open licence, Sport England had to request an
  3613. exemption from the Ordnance Survey to their default position, which
  3614. is that data containing OS IP cannot be sublicensed. When granted
  3615. an exemption, an organisation may publish their data under an open
  3616. licence. In short, OS waive their rights over the geographic
  3617. locations in the data.&#160;</span></p>
  3618. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">The OS can’t, however waive any
  3619. rights that Royal Mail has over the address data. In order to grant
  3620. Sport England an exemption, the OS also had to seek permission from
  3621. Royal Mail.&#160; The Sport England team were able to confirm this
  3622. for me.&#160;</span></p>
  3623. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">Unfortunately it’s not clear,
  3624. without having checked, that this is actually the case. It’s not
  3625. evident in the documentation of either Active Places or the OS
  3626. exemption process. Is it clarifying all third-party rights a
  3627. routine part of the exemption process or not?</span></p>
  3628. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">It would be helpful to
  3629. know.</span> <span style="font-weight:400;">As the ODI has
  3630. highlighted,</span> <a href=
  3631. "https://theodi.org/project/creating-the-uks-first-free-and-open-address-list/">
  3632. <span style="font-weight:400;">lack of transparency around
  3633. third-party rights in open data is a problem</span></a><span style=
  3634. "font-weight:400;">. For many datasets the situation remains
  3635. unclear. And Unclear positions are fantastic generators of legal
  3636. and insurance fees.</span></p>
  3637. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">So, to recap: Sport England has
  3638. invested time in convincing Ordnance Survey to allow it to openly
  3639. publish a rich dataset for the public good. A dataset in which
  3640. geospatial data is clearly important, but is not the main feature
  3641. of the dataset. The reference data is dictating how open the
  3642. dataset can be and, as a result how much value can be created from
  3643. it.</span></p>
  3644. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">In case you’re wondering, lots of
  3645. other organisations have had to do the same thing. The process is
  3646. standardised to try and streamline it for everyone. A 2016 FOI
  3647. request shows that</span> <a href=
  3648. "https://knowwhereconsulting.co.uk/blog/ordnance-survey-are-pretty-damn-good-at-derived-data-exemptions/">
  3649. <span style="font-weight:400;">between 2011 and 2015 the Ordnance
  3650. Survey handled more than a 1000 of these
  3651. requests</span></a><span style=
  3652. "font-weight:400;">.&#160;</span></p>
  3653. <h2><b>Enter OpenStreetMap</b></h2>
  3654. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">At the end of 2019, members of
  3655. the OpenStreetmap community contacted Sport England to request
  3656. permission to use the Active Places dataset.&#160;</span></p>
  3657. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">If you’re not familiar with
  3658. <a href="https://www.openstreetmap.org/">OpenStreetmap</a>, then
  3659. you should be. It’s an openly licensed map of the world maintained
  3660. by a huge community of volunteers, humanitarian organisations,
  3661. public and private sector businesses around the world.</span></p>
  3662. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">The <a href=
  3663. "https://wiki.osmfoundation.org/wiki/Main_Page">OpenStreetmap
  3664. Foundation</a> is the official steward of the dataset with the day
  3665. to data curation and operations happening through its volunteer
  3666. network. As a small not-for-profit, it has to be very cautious
  3667. about legal issues relating to the data. It can’t afford to be
  3668. sued. The community is careful to ensure that data that is imported
  3669. or added into the database comes from openly licensed
  3670. sources.</span></p>
  3671. <p><a href=
  3672. "https://blog.openstreetmap.org/2017/03/17/use-of-cc-by-data/"><span style="font-weight:400;">
  3673. In March 2017</span></a><span style="font-weight:400;">, after a
  3674. consultation with the Creative Commons, the <a href=
  3675. "https://wiki.osmfoundation.org/wiki/Licensing_Working_Group">OpenStreetmap
  3676. Licence/Legal Working Group</a> concluded that data published under
  3677. the Creative Commons Attribution licence is not compatible with the
  3678. licence used by OpenStreetmap which is called the <a href=
  3679. "https://opendatacommons.org/licenses/odbl/index.html">Open
  3680. Database Licence</a>. They felt that some specific terms in the
  3681. licence (and particularly in <a href=
  3682. "https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/">its 4.0 version</a>)
  3683. meant that they needed additional permission in order to include
  3684. that data in OpenStreetmap.</span></p>
  3685. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">Since then the OpenStreetmap
  3686. community, has been contacting data stewards to <a href=
  3687. "https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B3PN5zfbzThqeTdWR1l3SzJVcTg/view?usp=sharing">
  3688. ask them to sign an additional waiver</a> that grants the OSM
  3689. community explicit permission to use the data. This is exactly what
  3690. open licensing of data is intended to avoid.</span></p>
  3691. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">CC-BY is one of the most
  3692. frequently used open data licences, so this isn’t a rare
  3693. occurrence.&#160;</span></p>
  3694. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">As an indicator of the extra
  3695. effort required, in <a href=
  3696. "https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7FhpkSsP9IQ">a 2018 talk from the
  3697. Bing Maps team</a> in which they discuss how they have been
  3698. supporting the OpenStreetmap community in Australia, they called
  3699. out their legal team as one of the most important assets they had
  3700. to provide to the local mapping community,</span> <a href=
  3701. "https://youtu.be/7FhpkSsP9IQ?t=1137"><span style=
  3702. "font-weight:400;">helping them to get waivers
  3703. signed</span></a><span style="font-weight:400;">. At the time of
  3704. writing <a href=
  3705. "https://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/Australian_data_catalogue">nearly
  3706. 90 waivers have been circulated in Australia alone</a>, not all of
  3707. which have been signed.</span></p>
  3708. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">So, to recap, due to a perceived
  3709. incompatibility between two of the most frequently used open data
  3710. licences, the OpenStreetmap community and its supporters are
  3711. spending time negotiating access to data that is already published
  3712. under an open licence.</span></p>
  3713. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">I am not a lawyer. So these are
  3714. <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pWdd6_ZxX8c">like, just my
  3715. opinions</a>. But while I understand why the OSM Licence Working
  3716. Group needs to be cautious, it feels like they are being overly
  3717. cautious. Then again, I’m not the one responsible for stewarding an
  3718. increasingly important part of a global data
  3719. infrastructure.&#160;</span></p>
  3720. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">Another opinion is that perhaps
  3721. the Microsoft legal team might be better deployed to solve the
  3722. licence incompatibility issues. Instead they are now drafting their
  3723. own new open data licences, which are compatible with
  3724. CC-BY.</span></p>
  3725. <h2><b>Active Places and OpenStreetmap</b></h2>
  3726. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">Still with me?</span></p>
  3727. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">At the end of last year, members
  3728. of the OpenStreetMap community contacted Sport England to ask them
  3729. to sign a waiver so that they could use the Active Places data.
  3730. Presumably to incorporate some of the data into the OSM
  3731. database.</span></p>
  3732. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">The Sport England data and legal
  3733. teams then had to understand what they were being asked to do and
  3734. why. And they asked for some independent advice, which is where I
  3735. provided some support through our work with Sport England on the
  3736. OpenActive programme.&#160;</span></p>
  3737. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">The discussion
  3738. included:</span></p>
  3739. <ul>
  3740. <li style="font-weight:400;"><span style=
  3741. "font-weight:400;">questions about why an additional waiver was
  3742. actually necessary</span></li>
  3743. <li style="font-weight:400;"><span style="font-weight:400;">the
  3744. differences in how CC-BY and ODbL are designed to require data to
  3745. remain open and accessible – CC-BY includes limitation on use of
  3746. technical restrictions, which is allowed by the</span> <a href=
  3747. "https://opendefinition.org/od/2.1/en/"><span style=
  3748. "font-weight:400;">open definition</span></a><span style=
  3749. "font-weight:400;">, whilst ODbL adopts a principle of encouraging
  3750. “parallel distribution”.&#160;</span></li>
  3751. <li style="font-weight:400;"><span style=
  3752. "font-weight:400;">acceptable forms and methods of
  3753. attribution</span></li>
  3754. <li style="font-weight:400;"><span style="font-weight:400;">who,
  3755. within an organisation like Sport England, might have
  3756. responsibility to decide what acceptable attribution looked
  3757. like</span></li>
  3758. <li style="font-weight:400;"><span style="font-weight:400;">why the
  3759. OSM community had come to its decisions</span></li>
  3760. <li style="font-weight:400;"><span style="font-weight:400;">who
  3761. actually had authority to sign-off on the proposed
  3762. waiver</span></li>
  3763. <li style="font-weight:400;"><span style="font-weight:400;">whether
  3764. signing a waiver and granting a specific permission undermined
  3765. Sport England’s goal to adopt standard open data practices and
  3766. licences, and a consistent approach for every user</span></li>
  3767. <li style="font-weight:400;"><span style="font-weight:400;">whether
  3768. the OS exemption, which granted permission to SE to publish the
  3769. dataset under an open licence, impacted any of the
  3770. above</span></li>
  3771. </ul>
  3772. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">All reasonable questions from a
  3773. team being asked to do something new.&#160;</span></p>
  3774. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">Like a number of organisations
  3775. asked to sign waiver in Australia, SE have not yet signed a waiver
  3776. and may choose not to do so. Like all public sector organisations,
  3777. SE are being cautious about taking risks.&#160;</span></p>
  3778. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">The discussion has</span>
  3779. <a href="https://twitter.com/sp8962/status/1206371109517565952"><span style="font-weight:400;">
  3780. spilled out onto twitter</span></a><span style="font-weight:400;">.
  3781. I’m writing this to provide some context and background to the
  3782. discussion in that thread. I’m not criticising anyone as I think
  3783. everyone is trying to come to a reasonable
  3784. outcome.&#160;</span></p>
  3785. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">As the twitter thread highlights,
  3786. the OSM community are not just concerned about the CC-BY licence
  3787. but also about the potential that additional third-party rights are
  3788. lurking in the data. Clarifying that may require SE to share more
  3789. details about how the address and location data in the dataset is
  3790. collected, validated and normalised for the OSM community to be
  3791. happy. But, as noted earlier in the blog, I’ve at least been able
  3792. to determine the status of any third-party rights in the data. So
  3793. perhaps this will help to move things further.</span></p>
  3794. <h2>The End</h2>
  3795. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">So, as a final recap, we have two
  3796. organisations both aiming to publish and use data for the public
  3797. good. But, because of complexities around derived data and licence
  3798. compatibilities, data that might otherwise be used in new,
  3799. innovative ways is instead going unused.</span></p>
  3800. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">This is a situation that needs
  3801. solving. It needs the UK government and <a href=
  3802. "https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/geospatial-commission">
  3803. Geospatial Commission</a> to open up more geospatial
  3804. data.</span></p>
  3805. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">I</span><span style=
  3806. "font-weight:400;">t needs the open data community to invest in
  3807. resolving licence incompatibilities (and less in creating new
  3808. licences) so that everyone benefits.&#160;</span></p>
  3809. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">We also need to understand when
  3810. licences are the appropriate means of governing how data is used
  3811. and when norms, e.g. around attribution, can usefully shape how
  3812. data is accessed, used and shared.</span></p>
  3813. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">Until then these issues are going
  3814. to continue to undermine the creation of value from open
  3815. (geospatial) data.</span></p>
  3816. </div>
  3817. </planet:content>
  3818.  <dc:date rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#dateTime">2020-01-24T20:05:47.000000Z</dc:date>
  3819.  <title>Licence Friction: A Tale of Two Datasets</title>
  3820.  <link>https://blog.ldodds.com/2020/01/24/licence-friction-a-tale-of-two-datasets/</link>
  3821.  <content:encoded rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#XMLLiteral"><![CDATA[
  3822. <div xmlns='http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml'>
  3823. <div>
  3824. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">For years now at the Open Data
  3825. Institute we’ve been working to increase access to data, to create
  3826. a range of social and economic benefits across a range of sectors.
  3827. While the details change across projects one of the more consistent
  3828. aspects of our work and guidance has been to support data stewards
  3829. in making data as open as possible, whilst ensuring that is clearly
  3830. licensed.</span></p>
  3831. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">Reference data, like addresses
  3832. and other geospatial data, that underpins our national and global
  3833. data infrastructure needs to be available under an open licence. If
  3834. it’s not, which is the ongoing situation in the UK, then other data
  3835. cannot be made as open as possible.&#160;</span></p>
  3836. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">Other considerations aside, data
  3837. can only be as open as the reference data it relies upon. Ideally,
  3838. reference data would be in the public domain, e.g. using <a href=
  3839. "https://creativecommons.org/share-your-work/public-domain/cc0/">a
  3840. CC0 waiver</a>. Attribution</span> <a href=
  3841. "https://blog.ldodds.com/2015/03/03/5-ways-to-be-a-better-open-data-reuser/">
  3842. <span style="font-weight:400;">should be a consistent norm
  3843. regardless of what licence is used</span></a><span style=
  3844. "font-weight:400;">.&#160;</span></p>
  3845. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">Data becomes more useful when it
  3846. is linked with other data. When it comes to data, adding context
  3847. adds value. It can also add risks, but more value can be created
  3848. from linking data.&#160;</span></p>
  3849. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">When data is published using
  3850. bespoke or restrictive licences then it is harder to combine
  3851. different datasets together, because there are often limitations in
  3852. the licensing terms that restrict how data can be used and
  3853. redistributed.</span></p>
  3854. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">This means data needs to be
  3855. licensed using common, consistent licences. Licences that work with
  3856. a range of different types of data, collected and used by different
  3857. communities across jurisdictions.&#160;</span></p>
  3858. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">Incompatible licences create
  3859. friction that can make it impossible to create useful products and
  3860. services.&#160;</span></p>
  3861. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">It’s well-reported that data
  3862. scientists and other users spend huge amounts of time cleaning and
  3863. tidying data because it’s messy and non-standardised. It’s probably
  3864. less well-reported how many great ideas are simply shelved because
  3865. of lack of access to data. Or are impossible because of issues with
  3866. restrictive or incompatible data licences. Or are cancelled or
  3867. simply needlessly expensive due to the need for legal consultations
  3868. and drafting of data sharing agreements.</span></p>
  3869. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">These are the hurdles you often
  3870. need to overcome before you even get started with that messy
  3871. data.</span></p>
  3872. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">Here’s a real-world example of
  3873. where the lack of open geospatial data in the UK, and ongoing
  3874. incompatibilities between data licensing is getting in the way of
  3875. useful work.&#160;</span></p>
  3876. <h2><b>Introducing Active Places</b></h2>
  3877. <p><span style="font-weight:400;"><a href=
  3878. "https://www.activeplacespower.com/opendata">Active Places</a> is a
  3879. dataset stewarded by <a href="https://www.sportengland.org/">Sport
  3880. England</a>. It provides a curated database of sporting facilities
  3881. across England. It includes facilities provided by a range of
  3882. organisations across the public, private and third-sectors. It’s
  3883. designed to help support decision making about the provision of
  3884. tens of thousands of sporting sites and facilities around the UK to
  3885. drive investment and policy making.&#160;</span></p>
  3886. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">The dataset is rich and includes
  3887. a wide range of information from disabled access through to the
  3888. length of ski slopes or the number of turns on a cycling
  3889. track.</span></p>
  3890. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">While Sport England are the data
  3891. steward, the curation of the dataset is partly subcontracted to a
  3892. data management firm and partly carried out collaboratively with
  3893. the owners of those sites and facilities.</span></p>
  3894. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">The dataset is published under a
  3895. standard open licence, the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0
  3896. licence. So anyone can access, use and share the data so long as
  3897. they acknowledge its source. Contributors to the dataset agree to
  3898. this licence as part of registering to contribute to the
  3899. site.</span></p>
  3900. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">The dataset includes geospatial
  3901. data, including the addresses and locations of individual sites.
  3902. This data includes IP from Ordnance Survey and Royal Mail, which
  3903. means they have a say over what happens to it. In order to release
  3904. the data under an open licence, Sport England had to request an
  3905. exemption from the Ordnance Survey to their default position, which
  3906. is that data containing OS IP cannot be sublicensed. When granted
  3907. an exemption, an organisation may publish their data under an open
  3908. licence. In short, OS waive their rights over the geographic
  3909. locations in the data.&#160;</span></p>
  3910. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">The OS can’t, however waive any
  3911. rights that Royal Mail has over the address data. In order to grant
  3912. Sport England an exemption, the OS also had to seek permission from
  3913. Royal Mail.&#160; The Sport England team were able to confirm this
  3914. for me.&#160;</span></p>
  3915. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">Unfortunately it’s not clear,
  3916. without having checked, that this is actually the case. It’s not
  3917. evident in the documentation of either Active Places or the OS
  3918. exemption process. Is it clarifying all third-party rights a
  3919. routine part of the exemption process or not?</span></p>
  3920. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">It would be helpful to
  3921. know.</span> <span style="font-weight:400;">As the ODI has
  3922. highlighted,</span> <a href=
  3923. "https://theodi.org/project/creating-the-uks-first-free-and-open-address-list/">
  3924. <span style="font-weight:400;">lack of transparency around
  3925. third-party rights in open data is a problem</span></a><span style=
  3926. "font-weight:400;">. For many datasets the situation remains
  3927. unclear. And Unclear positions are fantastic generators of legal
  3928. and insurance fees.</span></p>
  3929. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">So, to recap: Sport England has
  3930. invested time in convincing Ordnance Survey to allow it to openly
  3931. publish a rich dataset for the public good. A dataset in which
  3932. geospatial data is clearly important, but is not the main feature
  3933. of the dataset. The reference data is dictating how open the
  3934. dataset can be and, as a result how much value can be created from
  3935. it.</span></p>
  3936. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">In case you’re wondering, lots of
  3937. other organisations have had to do the same thing. The process is
  3938. standardised to try and streamline it for everyone. A 2016 FOI
  3939. request shows that</span> <a href=
  3940. "https://knowwhereconsulting.co.uk/blog/ordnance-survey-are-pretty-damn-good-at-derived-data-exemptions/">
  3941. <span style="font-weight:400;">between 2011 and 2015 the Ordnance
  3942. Survey handled more than a 1000 of these
  3943. requests</span></a><span style=
  3944. "font-weight:400;">.&#160;</span></p>
  3945. <h2><b>Enter OpenStreetMap</b></h2>
  3946. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">At the end of 2019, members of
  3947. the OpenStreetmap community contacted Sport England to request
  3948. permission to use the Active Places dataset.&#160;</span></p>
  3949. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">If you’re not familiar with
  3950. <a href="https://www.openstreetmap.org/">OpenStreetmap</a>, then
  3951. you should be. It’s an openly licensed map of the world maintained
  3952. by a huge community of volunteers, humanitarian organisations,
  3953. public and private sector businesses around the world.</span></p>
  3954. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">The <a href=
  3955. "https://wiki.osmfoundation.org/wiki/Main_Page">OpenStreetmap
  3956. Foundation</a> is the official steward of the dataset with the day
  3957. to data curation and operations happening through its volunteer
  3958. network. As a small not-for-profit, it has to be very cautious
  3959. about legal issues relating to the data. It can’t afford to be
  3960. sued. The community is careful to ensure that data that is imported
  3961. or added into the database comes from openly licensed
  3962. sources.</span></p>
  3963. <p><a href=
  3964. "https://blog.openstreetmap.org/2017/03/17/use-of-cc-by-data/"><span style="font-weight:400;">
  3965. In March 2017</span></a><span style="font-weight:400;">, after a
  3966. consultation with the Creative Commons, the <a href=
  3967. "https://wiki.osmfoundation.org/wiki/Licensing_Working_Group">OpenStreetmap
  3968. Licence/Legal Working Group</a> concluded that data published under
  3969. the Creative Commons Attribution licence is not compatible with the
  3970. licence used by OpenStreetmap which is called the <a href=
  3971. "https://opendatacommons.org/licenses/odbl/index.html">Open
  3972. Database Licence</a>. They felt that some specific terms in the
  3973. licence (and particularly in <a href=
  3974. "https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/">its 4.0 version</a>)
  3975. meant that they needed additional permission in order to include
  3976. that data in OpenStreetmap.</span></p>
  3977. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">Since then the OpenStreetmap
  3978. community, has been contacting data stewards to <a href=
  3979. "https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B3PN5zfbzThqeTdWR1l3SzJVcTg/view?usp=sharing">
  3980. ask them to sign an additional waiver</a> that grants the OSM
  3981. community explicit permission to use the data. This is exactly what
  3982. open licensing of data is intended to avoid.</span></p>
  3983. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">CC-BY is one of the most
  3984. frequently used open data licences, so this isn’t a rare
  3985. occurrence.&#160;</span></p>
  3986. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">As an indicator of the extra
  3987. effort required, in <a href=
  3988. "https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7FhpkSsP9IQ">a 2018 talk from the
  3989. Bing Maps team</a> in which they discuss how they have been
  3990. supporting the OpenStreetmap community in Australia, they called
  3991. out their legal team as one of the most important assets they had
  3992. to provide to the local mapping community,</span> <a href=
  3993. "https://youtu.be/7FhpkSsP9IQ?t=1137"><span style=
  3994. "font-weight:400;">helping them to get waivers
  3995. signed</span></a><span style="font-weight:400;">. At the time of
  3996. writing <a href=
  3997. "https://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/Australian_data_catalogue">nearly
  3998. 90 waivers have been circulated in Australia alone</a>, not all of
  3999. which have been signed.</span></p>
  4000. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">So, to recap, due to a perceived
  4001. incompatibility between two of the most frequently used open data
  4002. licences, the OpenStreetmap community and its supporters are
  4003. spending time negotiating access to data that is already published
  4004. under an open licence.</span></p>
  4005. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">I am not a lawyer. So these are
  4006. <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pWdd6_ZxX8c">like, just my
  4007. opinions</a>. But while I understand why the OSM Licence Working
  4008. Group needs to be cautious, it feels like they are being overly
  4009. cautious. Then again, I’m not the one responsible for stewarding an
  4010. increasingly important part of a global data
  4011. infrastructure.&#160;</span></p>
  4012. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">Another opinion is that perhaps
  4013. the Microsoft legal team might be better deployed to solve the
  4014. licence incompatibility issues. Instead they are now drafting their
  4015. own new open data licences, which are compatible with
  4016. CC-BY.</span></p>
  4017. <h2><b>Active Places and OpenStreetmap</b></h2>
  4018. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">Still with me?</span></p>
  4019. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">At the end of last year, members
  4020. of the OpenStreetMap community contacted Sport England to ask them
  4021. to sign a waiver so that they could use the Active Places data.
  4022. Presumably to incorporate some of the data into the OSM
  4023. database.</span></p>
  4024. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">The Sport England data and legal
  4025. teams then had to understand what they were being asked to do and
  4026. why. And they asked for some independent advice, which is where I
  4027. provided some support through our work with Sport England on the
  4028. OpenActive programme.&#160;</span></p>
  4029. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">The discussion
  4030. included:</span></p>
  4031. <ul>
  4032. <li style="font-weight:400;"><span style=
  4033. "font-weight:400;">questions about why an additional waiver was
  4034. actually necessary</span></li>
  4035. <li style="font-weight:400;"><span style="font-weight:400;">the
  4036. differences in how CC-BY and ODbL are designed to require data to
  4037. remain open and accessible – CC-BY includes limitation on use of
  4038. technical restrictions, which is allowed by the</span> <a href=
  4039. "https://opendefinition.org/od/2.1/en/"><span style=
  4040. "font-weight:400;">open definition</span></a><span style=
  4041. "font-weight:400;">, whilst ODbL adopts a principle of encouraging
  4042. “parallel distribution”.&#160;</span></li>
  4043. <li style="font-weight:400;"><span style=
  4044. "font-weight:400;">acceptable forms and methods of
  4045. attribution</span></li>
  4046. <li style="font-weight:400;"><span style="font-weight:400;">who,
  4047. within an organisation like Sport England, might have
  4048. responsibility to decide what acceptable attribution looked
  4049. like</span></li>
  4050. <li style="font-weight:400;"><span style="font-weight:400;">why the
  4051. OSM community had come to its decisions</span></li>
  4052. <li style="font-weight:400;"><span style="font-weight:400;">who
  4053. actually had authority to sign-off on the proposed
  4054. waiver</span></li>
  4055. <li style="font-weight:400;"><span style="font-weight:400;">whether
  4056. signing a waiver and granting a specific permission undermined
  4057. Sport England’s goal to adopt standard open data practices and
  4058. licences, and a consistent approach for every user</span></li>
  4059. <li style="font-weight:400;"><span style="font-weight:400;">whether
  4060. the OS exemption, which granted permission to SE to publish the
  4061. dataset under an open licence, impacted any of the
  4062. above</span></li>
  4063. </ul>
  4064. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">All reasonable questions from a
  4065. team being asked to do something new.&#160;</span></p>
  4066. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">Like a number of organisations
  4067. asked to sign waiver in Australia, SE have not yet signed a waiver
  4068. and may choose not to do so. Like all public sector organisations,
  4069. SE are being cautious about taking risks.&#160;</span></p>
  4070. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">The discussion has</span>
  4071. <a href="https://twitter.com/sp8962/status/1206371109517565952"><span style="font-weight:400;">
  4072. spilled out onto twitter</span></a><span style="font-weight:400;">.
  4073. I’m writing this to provide some context and background to the
  4074. discussion in that thread. I’m not criticising anyone as I think
  4075. everyone is trying to come to a reasonable
  4076. outcome.&#160;</span></p>
  4077. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">As the twitter thread highlights,
  4078. the OSM community are not just concerned about the CC-BY licence
  4079. but also about the potential that additional third-party rights are
  4080. lurking in the data. Clarifying that may require SE to share more
  4081. details about how the address and location data in the dataset is
  4082. collected, validated and normalised for the OSM community to be
  4083. happy. But, as noted earlier in the blog, I’ve at least been able
  4084. to determine the status of any third-party rights in the data. So
  4085. perhaps this will help to move things further.</span></p>
  4086. <h2>The End</h2>
  4087. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">So, as a final recap, we have two
  4088. organisations both aiming to publish and use data for the public
  4089. good. But, because of complexities around derived data and licence
  4090. compatibilities, data that might otherwise be used in new,
  4091. innovative ways is instead going unused.</span></p>
  4092. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">This is a situation that needs
  4093. solving. It needs the UK government and <a href=
  4094. "https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/geospatial-commission">
  4095. Geospatial Commission</a> to open up more geospatial
  4096. data.</span></p>
  4097. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">I</span><span style=
  4098. "font-weight:400;">t needs the open data community to invest in
  4099. resolving licence incompatibilities (and less in creating new
  4100. licences) so that everyone benefits.&#160;</span></p>
  4101. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">We also need to understand when
  4102. licences are the appropriate means of governing how data is used
  4103. and when norms, e.g. around attribution, can usefully shape how
  4104. data is accessed, used and shared.</span></p>
  4105. <p><span style="font-weight:400;">Until then these issues are going
  4106. to continue to undermine the creation of value from open
  4107. (geospatial) data.</span></p>
  4108. </div>
  4109. </div>]]></content:encoded>
  4110.  <description>For years now at the Open Data Institute we’ve been working to increase access to data, to create a range of social and economic benefits across a range of sectors. While the details change across projects one of the more consistent aspects of our work and guidance has been to support data stewards in making data as open as possible, whilst ensuring that is clearly licensed. Reference data, like addresses and other geospatial data, that underpins our national and global data infrastructure needs to be available under an open licence. If it’s not, which is the ongoing situation in the ...</description>
  4111. </item>
  4112. <item rdf:about="http://blog.schema.org/2020/01/schemaorg-60.html">
  4113.  <dc:creator>schema.org</dc:creator>
  4114.  <dc:source>schema.org</dc:source>
  4115.  <dc:relation>http://blog.schema.org/</dc:relation>
  4116.  <planet:content xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" rdf:parseType="Literal">
  4117. <div>
  4118. <div dir="ltr" style="text-align: left;"><a href=
  4119. "https://schema.org/">Schema.org</a> version 6.0 has been released.
  4120. See the <a href=
  4121. "https://schema.org/docs/releases.html#v6.0">release notes</a> for
  4122. full details. &#160;As always, the release notes have full details
  4123. and links (including previous releases e.g.&#160;<a href=
  4124. "https://schema.org/docs/releases.html#v5.0">5.0</a>&#160;and&#160;<a href="https://schema.org/docs/releases.html#v4.0">4.0</a>).<br />
  4125.  
  4126. <br />
  4127. We are now aiming to release updated schemas on an approximately
  4128. monthly basis (with longer gaps around vacation periods).
  4129. Typically, new terms are first added to our "Pending" area to give
  4130. time for the definitions to benefit from implementation experience
  4131. before they are added to the "core" of Schema.org. As always, many
  4132. thanks to everyone who has contributed to this release of
  4133. Schema.org.<br />
  4134. <br />
  4135. --<br />
  4136. Dan Brickley, for Schema.org.<br />
  4137. <br /></div>
  4138. </div>
  4139. </planet:content>
  4140.  <dc:date rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#dateTime">2020-01-22T16:13:00.000000Z</dc:date>
  4141.  <title>Schema.org 6.0</title>
  4142.  <link>http://blog.schema.org/2020/01/schemaorg-60.html</link>
  4143.  <content:encoded rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#XMLLiteral"><![CDATA[
  4144. <div xmlns='http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml'>
  4145. <div>
  4146. <div dir="ltr" style="text-align: left;"><a href=
  4147. "https://schema.org/">Schema.org</a> version 6.0 has been released.
  4148. See the <a href=
  4149. "https://schema.org/docs/releases.html#v6.0">release notes</a> for
  4150. full details. &#160;As always, the release notes have full details
  4151. and links (including previous releases e.g.&#160;<a href=
  4152. "https://schema.org/docs/releases.html#v5.0">5.0</a>&#160;and&#160;<a href="https://schema.org/docs/releases.html#v4.0">4.0</a>).<br />
  4153.  
  4154. <br />
  4155. We are now aiming to release updated schemas on an approximately
  4156. monthly basis (with longer gaps around vacation periods).
  4157. Typically, new terms are first added to our "Pending" area to give
  4158. time for the definitions to benefit from implementation experience
  4159. before they are added to the "core" of Schema.org. As always, many
  4160. thanks to everyone who has contributed to this release of
  4161. Schema.org.<br />
  4162. <br />
  4163. --<br />
  4164. Dan Brickley, for Schema.org.<br />
  4165. <br /></div>
  4166. </div>
  4167. </div>]]></content:encoded>
  4168.  <description>
  4169.  Schema.org  version 6.0 has been released.
  4170. See the  release notes  for
  4171. full details. &amp;#160;As always, the release notes have full details
  4172. and links (including previous releases e.g.&amp;#160; 5.0 &amp;#160;and&amp;#160; 4.0 ).
  4173.  
  4174. We are now aiming to release updated schemas on an approximately
  4175. monthly basis (with longer gaps around vacation periods).
  4176. Typically, new terms are first added to our "Pending" area to give
  4177. time for the definitions to benefit from implementation experience
  4178. before they are added to the "core" of Schema.org. As always, many
  4179. thanks to everyone who has contributed to this release of
  4180. Schema.org.
  4181. --
  4182. Dan Brickley, for Schema.org.
  4183.  
  4184. </description>
  4185. </item>
  4186. <item rdf:about="https://blog.ldodds.com/2020/01/18/paper-review-the-coerciveness-of-the-primary-key-infrastructure-problems-in-human-services-work/">
  4187.  <dc:creator>Leigh Dodds</dc:creator>
  4188.  <dc:source>Lost Boy by Leigh Dodds</dc:source>
  4189.  <dc:relation>http://ldodds.com/blog/</dc:relation>
  4190.  <planet:content xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" rdf:parseType="Literal">
  4191. <div>
  4192. <p>This blog post is a quick review and notes relating to a
  4193. research paper called: <a href=
  4194. "https://doi.org/10.1145/3359153">The Coerciveness of the Primary
  4195. Key: Infrastructure Problems in Human Services Work</a> (<a href=
  4196. "https://amy.voida.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/primaryKey-cscw2019.pdf">PDF
  4197. available here</a>)</p>
  4198. <p>It’s part of my new <a href=
  4199. "https://blog.ldodds.com/category/research-notebook/">research
  4200. notebook</a> to help me collect and share notes on research papers
  4201. and reports.</p>
  4202. <h2>Brief summary</h2>
  4203. <p>This paper explores the impact of data infrastructure, and in
  4204. particular the use of identifiers and the design of databases, on
  4205. the delivery of human (public) services. By reviewing the use of
  4206. identifiers and data in service delivery to support homelessness
  4207. and those affected by AIDS, the authors highlight a number of
  4208. tensions between how the design of data infrastructure and the need
  4209. to share data with funders and other agencies has an inevitable
  4210. impact on frontline services.</p>
  4211. <p>For example, the need to evidence impact to funders requires the
  4212. collection of additional personal, legal identifiers. Even when
  4213. that information is not critical to the delivery of support.</p>
  4214. <p>The paper also explores the interplay between the well defined,
  4215. unforgiving world of database design, and the messy nature of
  4216. delivering services to individuals. Along the way the authors touch
  4217. on aspects of identity, identification, and explore different types
  4218. of identifiers and data collection practices.</p>
  4219. <p>The authors draw out a number of infrastructure problems and
  4220. provide some design provocations for alternate approaches. The
  4221. three main problems are the immutability of identifiers in database
  4222. schema, the “hegemony of NOT NULL” (or the need for
  4223. identification), and the demand for uniqueness across contexts.</p>
  4224. <h2>Three reasons to read</h2>
  4225. <p>Here’s three reasons why you might want to read this paper:</p>
  4226. <ol>
  4227. <li>If, like me, you’re often advocating for use of consistent,
  4228. open identifiers, then this paper provides a useful perspective of
  4229. how this approach might create issues or unwanted side effects
  4230. outside of the simpler world of reference data</li>
  4231. <li>If you’re designing digital public services then the design
  4232. provocations around identifiers and approaches to identification
  4233. are definitely worth reading. I think there’s some useful
  4234. reflections about how we capture and manage personal
  4235. information</li>
  4236. <li>If you’re a public policy person and advocating for consistent
  4237. use of identifiers across agencies, then there’s some important
  4238. considerations around the the policy, privacy and personal impacts
  4239. of data collection in this paper</li>
  4240. </ol>
  4241. <h2>Three things I learned</h2>
  4242. <p>Here’s three things that I learned from reading the paper.</p>
  4243. <ol>
  4244. <li>In a section on “<em>The Data Work of Human Services
  4245. Provision</em>“, the authors highlighted three aspects of frontline
  4246. data collection which I found it useful to think about:
  4247. <ul>
  4248. <li><em>data compliance work</em> – collecting data purely to
  4249. support the needs of funders, which might be at odds with the needs
  4250. of both the people being supported and the service delivery
  4251. staff</li>
  4252. <li><em>data coordination work</em> – which stems from the need to
  4253. link and aggregate data across agencies and funders to provide
  4254. coordinated support</li>
  4255. <li><em>data confidence work</em> – the need to build a trusted
  4256. relationship with people, at the front-line, in order to capture
  4257. valid, useful data</li>
  4258. </ul>
  4259. </li>
  4260. <li>Similarly, the authors tease out four reasons for capturing
  4261. identifiers, each of which have different motivations, outcomes and
  4262. approaches to identification:
  4263. <ul>
  4264. <li><em>counting clients</em> – a basic need to monitor and
  4265. evaluate service provision, identification here is only necessary
  4266. to avoid duplicates when counting</li>
  4267. <li><em>developing longitudinal histories</em> – e.g. identifying
  4268. and tracking support given to a person over time can help service
  4269. workers to develop understanding and improve support for
  4270. individuals</li>
  4271. <li><em>as a means of accessing services</em> – e.g. helping to
  4272. identify eligibility for support</li>
  4273. <li><em>to coordinate service provision</em> – e.g. sharing
  4274. information about individuals with other agencies and services,
  4275. which may also have different approaches to identification and use
  4276. of identifiers</li>
  4277. </ul>
  4278. </li>
  4279. <li>The design provocations around database design were helpful to
  4280. highlight some alternate approaches to capturing personal
  4281. information and the needs of the service vs that of the
  4282. individual</li>
  4283. </ol>
  4284. <h2>Thoughts and impressions</h2>
  4285. <p>As someone who has not been directly involved in the design of
  4286. digital systems to support human services, I found the perspectives
  4287. and insight shared in this paper really useful. If you’ve been
  4288. working in this space for some time, then it may be less
  4289. insightful.</p>
  4290. <p>However I haven’t seen much discussion about good ways to design
  4291. more humane digital services and, in particular, the databases
  4292. behind them, so I suspect the paper could do with a wider airing.
  4293. Its useful reading alongside things like <a href=
  4294. "https://www.kalzumeus.com/2010/06/17/falsehoods-programmers-believe-about-names/">
  4295. Falsehoods Programmers Believe About Names</a> and <a href=
  4296. "https://medium.com/gender-2-0/falsehoods-programmers-believe-about-gender-f9a3512b4c9c">
  4297. Falsehoods Programmers Believe About Gender</a>.</p>
  4298. <p>Why don’t we have a better approach to managing personal
  4299. information in databases? Are there solutions our there
  4300. already?</p>
  4301. <p>Finally, the paper makes some pointed comments about the role of
  4302. funders in data ecosystems. Funders are routinely collecting and
  4303. aggregating data as part of evaluation studies, but this data might
  4304. also help support service delivery if it were more accessible. It’s
  4305. interesting to consider the balance between minimising unnecessary
  4306. collection of data simply to support evaluation versus the
  4307. potential role of funders as intermediaries that can provide
  4308. additional support to charities, agencies or other service delivery
  4309. organisations that may lack the time, funding and capability to do
  4310. more with that data.</p>
  4311. <p>&#160;</p>
  4312. <p>&#160;</p>
  4313. </div>
  4314. </planet:content>
  4315.  <dc:date rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#dateTime">2020-01-18T13:05:50.000000Z</dc:date>
  4316.  <title>[Paper Review] The Coerciveness of the Primary Key:
  4317. Infrastructure Problems in Human Services Work</title>
  4318.  <link>https://blog.ldodds.com/2020/01/18/paper-review-the-coerciveness-of-the-primary-key-infrastructure-problems-in-human-services-work/</link>
  4319.  <content:encoded rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#XMLLiteral"><![CDATA[
  4320. <div xmlns='http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml'>
  4321. <div>
  4322. <p>This blog post is a quick review and notes relating to a
  4323. research paper called: <a href=
  4324. "https://doi.org/10.1145/3359153">The Coerciveness of the Primary
  4325. Key: Infrastructure Problems in Human Services Work</a> (<a href=
  4326. "https://amy.voida.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/primaryKey-cscw2019.pdf">PDF
  4327. available here</a>)</p>
  4328. <p>It’s part of my new <a href=
  4329. "https://blog.ldodds.com/category/research-notebook/">research
  4330. notebook</a> to help me collect and share notes on research papers
  4331. and reports.</p>
  4332. <h2>Brief summary</h2>
  4333. <p>This paper explores the impact of data infrastructure, and in
  4334. particular the use of identifiers and the design of databases, on
  4335. the delivery of human (public) services. By reviewing the use of
  4336. identifiers and data in service delivery to support homelessness
  4337. and those affected by AIDS, the authors highlight a number of
  4338. tensions between how the design of data infrastructure and the need
  4339. to share data with funders and other agencies has an inevitable
  4340. impact on frontline services.</p>
  4341. <p>For example, the need to evidence impact to funders requires the
  4342. collection of additional personal, legal identifiers. Even when
  4343. that information is not critical to the delivery of support.</p>
  4344. <p>The paper also explores the interplay between the well defined,
  4345. unforgiving world of database design, and the messy nature of
  4346. delivering services to individuals. Along the way the authors touch
  4347. on aspects of identity, identification, and explore different types
  4348. of identifiers and data collection practices.</p>
  4349. <p>The authors draw out a number of infrastructure problems and
  4350. provide some design provocations for alternate approaches. The
  4351. three main problems are the immutability of identifiers in database
  4352. schema, the “hegemony of NOT NULL” (or the need for
  4353. identification), and the demand for uniqueness across contexts.</p>
  4354. <h2>Three reasons to read</h2>
  4355. <p>Here’s three reasons why you might want to read this paper:</p>
  4356. <ol>
  4357. <li>If, like me, you’re often advocating for use of consistent,
  4358. open identifiers, then this paper provides a useful perspective of
  4359. how this approach might create issues or unwanted side effects
  4360. outside of the simpler world of reference data</li>
  4361. <li>If you’re designing digital public services then the design
  4362. provocations around identifiers and approaches to identification
  4363. are definitely worth reading. I think there’s some useful
  4364. reflections about how we capture and manage personal
  4365. information</li>
  4366. <li>If you’re a public policy person and advocating for consistent
  4367. use of identifiers across agencies, then there’s some important
  4368. considerations around the the policy, privacy and personal impacts
  4369. of data collection in this paper</li>
  4370. </ol>
  4371. <h2>Three things I learned</h2>
  4372. <p>Here’s three things that I learned from reading the paper.</p>
  4373. <ol>
  4374. <li>In a section on “<em>The Data Work of Human Services
  4375. Provision</em>“, the authors highlighted three aspects of frontline
  4376. data collection which I found it useful to think about:
  4377. <ul>
  4378. <li><em>data compliance work</em> – collecting data purely to
  4379. support the needs of funders, which might be at odds with the needs
  4380. of both the people being supported and the service delivery
  4381. staff</li>
  4382. <li><em>data coordination work</em> – which stems from the need to
  4383. link and aggregate data across agencies and funders to provide
  4384. coordinated support</li>
  4385. <li><em>data confidence work</em> – the need to build a trusted
  4386. relationship with people, at the front-line, in order to capture
  4387. valid, useful data</li>
  4388. </ul>
  4389. </li>
  4390. <li>Similarly, the authors tease out four reasons for capturing
  4391. identifiers, each of which have different motivations, outcomes and
  4392. approaches to identification:
  4393. <ul>
  4394. <li><em>counting clients</em> – a basic need to monitor and
  4395. evaluate service provision, identification here is only necessary
  4396. to avoid duplicates when counting</li>
  4397. <li><em>developing longitudinal histories</em> – e.g. identifying
  4398. and tracking support given to a person over time can help service
  4399. workers to develop understanding and improve support for
  4400. individuals</li>
  4401. <li><em>as a means of accessing services</em> – e.g. helping to
  4402. identify eligibility for support</li>
  4403. <li><em>to coordinate service provision</em> – e.g. sharing
  4404. information about individuals with other agencies and services,
  4405. which may also have different approaches to identification and use
  4406. of identifiers</li>
  4407. </ul>
  4408. </li>
  4409. <li>The design provocations around database design were helpful to
  4410. highlight some alternate approaches to capturing personal
  4411. information and the needs of the service vs that of the
  4412. individual</li>
  4413. </ol>
  4414. <h2>Thoughts and impressions</h2>
  4415. <p>As someone who has not been directly involved in the design of
  4416. digital systems to support human services, I found the perspectives
  4417. and insight shared in this paper really useful. If you’ve been
  4418. working in this space for some time, then it may be less
  4419. insightful.</p>
  4420. <p>However I haven’t seen much discussion about good ways to design
  4421. more humane digital services and, in particular, the databases
  4422. behind them, so I suspect the paper could do with a wider airing.
  4423. Its useful reading alongside things like <a href=
  4424. "https://www.kalzumeus.com/2010/06/17/falsehoods-programmers-believe-about-names/">
  4425. Falsehoods Programmers Believe About Names</a> and <a href=
  4426. "https://medium.com/gender-2-0/falsehoods-programmers-believe-about-gender-f9a3512b4c9c">
  4427. Falsehoods Programmers Believe About Gender</a>.</p>
  4428. <p>Why don’t we have a better approach to managing personal
  4429. information in databases? Are there solutions our there
  4430. already?</p>
  4431. <p>Finally, the paper makes some pointed comments about the role of
  4432. funders in data ecosystems. Funders are routinely collecting and
  4433. aggregating data as part of evaluation studies, but this data might
  4434. also help support service delivery if it were more accessible. It’s
  4435. interesting to consider the balance between minimising unnecessary
  4436. collection of data simply to support evaluation versus the
  4437. potential role of funders as intermediaries that can provide
  4438. additional support to charities, agencies or other service delivery
  4439. organisations that may lack the time, funding and capability to do
  4440. more with that data.</p>
  4441. <p>&#160;</p>
  4442. <p>&#160;</p>
  4443. </div>
  4444. </div>]]></content:encoded>
  4445.  <description>This blog post is a quick review and notes relating to a research paper called: The Coerciveness of the Primary Key: Infrastructure Problems in Human Services Work ( PDF available here ) It’s part of my new research notebook to help me collect and share notes on research papers and reports. Brief summary This paper explores the impact of data infrastructure, and in particular the use of identifiers and the design of databases, on the delivery of human (public) services. By reviewing the use of identifiers and data in service delivery to support homelessness and those affected by AIDS, the ...</description>
  4446. </item>
  4447. <item rdf:about="http://blog.aksw.org/sansa-0-7-1-semantic-analytics-stack-released/">
  4448.  <dc:creator>AKSW Group - University of Leipzig</dc:creator>
  4449.  <dc:source>AKSW Group - University of Leipzig</dc:source>
  4450.  <dc:relation>http://blog.aksw.org/</dc:relation>
  4451.  <planet:content xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" rdf:parseType="Literal">
  4452. <div>
  4453. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">We are happy to announce SANSA
  4454. 0.7.1 – the&#160;seventh release of the Scalable Semantic Analytics
  4455. Stack. SANSA employs distributed computing via Apache Spark and
  4456. Flink in order to allow <strong>scalable machine learning,
  4457. inference and querying capabilities for large knowledge
  4458. graphs</strong>.</span></p>
  4459. <ul>
  4460. <li>Website: <a href=
  4461. "http://sansa-stack.net">http://sansa-stack.net</a></li>
  4462. <li>GitHub: <a href=
  4463. "https://github.com/SANSA-Stack">https://github.com/SANSA-Stack</a></li>
  4464. <li>Download: <a href=
  4465. "http://sansa-stack.net/downloads-usage/">http://sansa-stack.net/downloads-usage/</a></li>
  4466. <li>ChangeLog: <a href=
  4467. "https://github.com/SANSA-Stack/SANSA-Stack/releases">https://github.com/SANSA-Stack/SANSA-Stack/releases</a></li>
  4468. </ul>
  4469. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">You can find usage guidelines
  4470. and examples at <a href=
  4471. "http://sansa-stack.net/user-guide">http://sansa-stack.net/user-guide</a>.</span></p>
  4472. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The following features are
  4473. currently supported by SANSA:</span></p>
  4474. <ul>
  4475. <li>Reading and writing RDF files in N-Triples, Turtle, RDF/XML,
  4476. N-Quad, TRIX format</li>
  4477. <li>Reading OWL files in various standard formats</li>
  4478. <li>Query heterogeneous sources (Data Lake) using SPARQL – CSV,
  4479. Parquet, MongoDB, Cassandra, JDBC (MySQL, SQL Server, etc.) are
  4480. supported</li>
  4481. <li>Support for multiple data partitioning techniques</li>
  4482. <li>SPARQL querying via&#160;<a href=
  4483. "https://github.com/SmartDataAnalytics/Sparqlify">Sparqlify</a>&#160;and
  4484. Ontop and Tensors</li>
  4485. <li>Graph-parallel querying of RDF using SPARQL (1.0) via GraphX
  4486. traversals (experimental)</li>
  4487. <li>RDFS, RDFS Simple and OWL-Horst forward chaining inference</li>
  4488. <li>RDF graph clustering with different algorithms</li>
  4489. <li>Terminological decision trees (experimental)</li>
  4490. <li>Knowledge graph embedding approaches:&#160;<a href=
  4491. "http://papers.nips.cc/paper/5071-translating-embeddings-for-modeling-multi-relational-data.pdf">TransE</a>&#160;(beta),&#160;<a href="https://arxiv.org/pdf/1412.6575.pdf">DistMult</a>&#160;(beta)</li>
  4492. </ul>
  4493. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Noteworthy changes or updates
  4494. since the previous release are:</span></p>
  4495. <ul>
  4496. <li>TRIX support</li>
  4497. <li>A&#160;new query engine over compressed RDF data</li>
  4498. <li>OWL/XML Support</li>
  4499. </ul>
  4500. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Deployment and getting
  4501. started:</span></p>
  4502. <ul>
  4503. <li><span style="font-weight: 400;">There are template projects for
  4504. SBT and Maven for Apache Spark as well as for Apache Flink<a href=
  4505. "http://sansa-stack.net/downloads-usage/">&#160;available</a>&#160;to
  4506. get started.</span></li>
  4507. <li><span style="font-weight: 400;">The SANSA jar files are in
  4508. Maven Central i.e. in most IDEs you can just search for “sansa” to
  4509. include the dependencies in Maven projects.</span></li>
  4510. <li><span style="font-weight: 400;"><a href=
  4511. "https://github.com/SANSA-Stack/SANSA-Examples">Example
  4512. code</a>&#160;is available for various tasks.</span></li>
  4513. <li><span style="font-weight: 400;">We provide
  4514. interactive&#160;<a href=
  4515. "https://github.com/SANSA-Stack/SANSA-Notebooks">notebooks</a>&#160;for
  4516. running and testing code via Docker.</span></li>
  4517. </ul>
  4518. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">We want to thank everyone who
  4519. helped to create this release, in particular the projects <a href=
  4520. "http://www.bigdataocean.eu">Big Data Ocean</a>, <a href=
  4521. "http://slipo.eu">SLIPO</a>, <a href=
  4522. "http://qrowd-project.eu">QROWD</a>, <a href=
  4523. "https://www.ec-better.eu">BETTER</a>, <a href=
  4524. "http://boost40.eu">BOOST</a>, MLwin, PLATOON and <a href=
  4525. "https://simple-ml.de">Simple-ML</a>.&#160;Also check out our
  4526. recent articles in which we describe how to use SANSA for <a href=
  4527. "http://jens-lehmann.org/files/2020/icsc_dise.pdf">tensor based
  4528. querying</a><span style="font-weight: 400;">, <a href=
  4529. "http://jens-lehmann.org/files/2019/iswc_sparklify.pdf">scalable
  4530. RDB2RDF query execution</a></span><span style="font-weight: 400;">,
  4531. <a href=
  4532. "http://jens-lehmann.org/files/2019/iswc_dist_quality_assessment.pdf">
  4533. quality assessment</a></span> <span style="font-weight: 400;">and
  4534. <a href=
  4535. "http://jens-lehmann.org/files/2019/semantics_dist_sparql.pdf">semantic
  4536. partitioning</a></span><span style=
  4537. "font-weight: 400;">.</span></span></p>
  4538. <p>Spread the word by retweeting our <a href=
  4539. "https://twitter.com/SANSA_Stack/status/1072897902828285953">release
  4540. announcement on Twitter</a>. For more updates, please <a href=
  4541. "https://twitter.com/SANSA_Stack">view our Twitter feed</a> and
  4542. consider following us.</p>
  4543. <p>Greetings from the&#160;<a href=
  4544. "http://sansa-stack.net/community/#Contributors">SANSA Development
  4545. Team</a></p>
  4546. <p>&#160;</p>
  4547. </div>
  4548. </planet:content>
  4549.  <dc:date rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#dateTime">2020-01-17T09:05:04.000000Z</dc:date>
  4550.  <title>SANSA 0.7.1 (Semantic Analytics Stack) Released</title>
  4551.  <link>http://blog.aksw.org/sansa-0-7-1-semantic-analytics-stack-released/</link>
  4552.  <content:encoded rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#XMLLiteral"><![CDATA[
  4553. <div xmlns='http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml'>
  4554. <div>
  4555. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">We are happy to announce SANSA
  4556. 0.7.1 – the&#160;seventh release of the Scalable Semantic Analytics
  4557. Stack. SANSA employs distributed computing via Apache Spark and
  4558. Flink in order to allow <strong>scalable machine learning,
  4559. inference and querying capabilities for large knowledge
  4560. graphs</strong>.</span></p>
  4561. <ul>
  4562. <li>Website: <a href=
  4563. "http://sansa-stack.net">http://sansa-stack.net</a></li>
  4564. <li>GitHub: <a href=
  4565. "https://github.com/SANSA-Stack">https://github.com/SANSA-Stack</a></li>
  4566. <li>Download: <a href=
  4567. "http://sansa-stack.net/downloads-usage/">http://sansa-stack.net/downloads-usage/</a></li>
  4568. <li>ChangeLog: <a href=
  4569. "https://github.com/SANSA-Stack/SANSA-Stack/releases">https://github.com/SANSA-Stack/SANSA-Stack/releases</a></li>
  4570. </ul>
  4571. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">You can find usage guidelines
  4572. and examples at <a href=
  4573. "http://sansa-stack.net/user-guide">http://sansa-stack.net/user-guide</a>.</span></p>
  4574. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The following features are
  4575. currently supported by SANSA:</span></p>
  4576. <ul>
  4577. <li>Reading and writing RDF files in N-Triples, Turtle, RDF/XML,
  4578. N-Quad, TRIX format</li>
  4579. <li>Reading OWL files in various standard formats</li>
  4580. <li>Query heterogeneous sources (Data Lake) using SPARQL – CSV,
  4581. Parquet, MongoDB, Cassandra, JDBC (MySQL, SQL Server, etc.) are
  4582. supported</li>
  4583. <li>Support for multiple data partitioning techniques</li>
  4584. <li>SPARQL querying via&#160;<a href=
  4585. "https://github.com/SmartDataAnalytics/Sparqlify">Sparqlify</a>&#160;and
  4586. Ontop and Tensors</li>
  4587. <li>Graph-parallel querying of RDF using SPARQL (1.0) via GraphX
  4588. traversals (experimental)</li>
  4589. <li>RDFS, RDFS Simple and OWL-Horst forward chaining inference</li>
  4590. <li>RDF graph clustering with different algorithms</li>
  4591. <li>Terminological decision trees (experimental)</li>
  4592. <li>Knowledge graph embedding approaches:&#160;<a href=
  4593. "http://papers.nips.cc/paper/5071-translating-embeddings-for-modeling-multi-relational-data.pdf">TransE</a>&#160;(beta),&#160;<a href="https://arxiv.org/pdf/1412.6575.pdf">DistMult</a>&#160;(beta)</li>
  4594. </ul>
  4595. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Noteworthy changes or updates
  4596. since the previous release are:</span></p>
  4597. <ul>
  4598. <li>TRIX support</li>
  4599. <li>A&#160;new query engine over compressed RDF data</li>
  4600. <li>OWL/XML Support</li>
  4601. </ul>
  4602. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Deployment and getting
  4603. started:</span></p>
  4604. <ul>
  4605. <li><span style="font-weight: 400;">There are template projects for
  4606. SBT and Maven for Apache Spark as well as for Apache Flink<a href=
  4607. "http://sansa-stack.net/downloads-usage/">&#160;available</a>&#160;to
  4608. get started.</span></li>
  4609. <li><span style="font-weight: 400;">The SANSA jar files are in
  4610. Maven Central i.e. in most IDEs you can just search for “sansa” to
  4611. include the dependencies in Maven projects.</span></li>
  4612. <li><span style="font-weight: 400;"><a href=
  4613. "https://github.com/SANSA-Stack/SANSA-Examples">Example
  4614. code</a>&#160;is available for various tasks.</span></li>
  4615. <li><span style="font-weight: 400;">We provide
  4616. interactive&#160;<a href=
  4617. "https://github.com/SANSA-Stack/SANSA-Notebooks">notebooks</a>&#160;for
  4618. running and testing code via Docker.</span></li>
  4619. </ul>
  4620. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">We want to thank everyone who
  4621. helped to create this release, in particular the projects <a href=
  4622. "http://www.bigdataocean.eu">Big Data Ocean</a>, <a href=
  4623. "http://slipo.eu">SLIPO</a>, <a href=
  4624. "http://qrowd-project.eu">QROWD</a>, <a href=
  4625. "https://www.ec-better.eu">BETTER</a>, <a href=
  4626. "http://boost40.eu">BOOST</a>, MLwin, PLATOON and <a href=
  4627. "https://simple-ml.de">Simple-ML</a>.&#160;Also check out our
  4628. recent articles in which we describe how to use SANSA for <a href=
  4629. "http://jens-lehmann.org/files/2020/icsc_dise.pdf">tensor based
  4630. querying</a><span style="font-weight: 400;">, <a href=
  4631. "http://jens-lehmann.org/files/2019/iswc_sparklify.pdf">scalable
  4632. RDB2RDF query execution</a></span><span style="font-weight: 400;">,
  4633. <a href=
  4634. "http://jens-lehmann.org/files/2019/iswc_dist_quality_assessment.pdf">
  4635. quality assessment</a></span> <span style="font-weight: 400;">and
  4636. <a href=
  4637. "http://jens-lehmann.org/files/2019/semantics_dist_sparql.pdf">semantic
  4638. partitioning</a></span><span style=
  4639. "font-weight: 400;">.</span></span></p>
  4640. <p>Spread the word by retweeting our <a href=
  4641. "https://twitter.com/SANSA_Stack/status/1072897902828285953">release
  4642. announcement on Twitter</a>. For more updates, please <a href=
  4643. "https://twitter.com/SANSA_Stack">view our Twitter feed</a> and
  4644. consider following us.</p>
  4645. <p>Greetings from the&#160;<a href=
  4646. "http://sansa-stack.net/community/#Contributors">SANSA Development
  4647. Team</a></p>
  4648. <p>&#160;</p>
  4649. </div>
  4650. </div>]]></content:encoded>
  4651.  <description>We are happy to announce SANSA 0.7.1 – the&amp;#160;seventh release of the Scalable Semantic Analytics Stack. SANSA employs distributed computing via Apache Spark and Flink in order to allow scalable machine learning, inference and querying capabilities for large knowledge graphs . Website: http://sansa-stack.net GitHub: https://github.com/SANSA-Stack Download: http://sansa-stack.net/downloads-usage/ ChangeLog: https://github.com/SANSA-Stack/SANSA-Stack/releases You can find usage guidelines and examples at http://sansa-stack.net/user-guide . The following features are currently supported by SANSA: Reading and writing RDF files in N-Triples, Turtle, RDF/XML, N-Quad, TRIX format Reading OWL files in various standard formats Query heterogeneous sources (Data Lake) using SPARQL – CSV, Parquet, MongoDB, Cassandra, JDBC (MySQL, ...</description>
  4652. </item>
  4653. <item rdf:about="http://chem-bla-ics.blogspot.com/2020/01/help-digital-object-identifiers.html">
  4654.  <dc:creator>Egon Willighagen</dc:creator>
  4655.  <dc:source>chem-bla-ics by Egon Willighagen</dc:source>
  4656.  <dc:relation>http://chem-bla-ics.blogspot.com/</dc:relation>
  4657.  <planet:content xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" rdf:parseType="Literal">
  4658. <div>The (for <a href="https://jcheminf.biomedcentral.com/">J.
  4659. Cheminform.</a>) new SpringerNature article template has the
  4660. Digital Object Identifier (DOI) at the bottom of the article page.
  4661. So, every time I want to use the DOI I have to scroll all the way
  4662. down to the page. That could be find for abstracts, but totally
  4663. unusable for Open Access articles.<br />
  4664. <br />
  4665. So, after our J. Cheminform. editors telcon this Monday, I started
  4666. a <a href=
  4667. "https://twitter.com/egonwillighagen/status/1216737073660600322">Twitter
  4668. poll</a>:<br />
  4669. <br />
  4670. <div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;">
  4671. <a href=
  4672. "https://twitter.com/egonwillighagen/status/1216737073660600322"><img border="0"
  4673. data-original-height="440" data-original-width="581" height="301"
  4674. src=
  4675. "https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-5Vj1oOX5q8o/XiAIls_AS-I/AAAAAAAAJao/XEhuetpWrTwiPrJmlLxabqEq-tAw5-EBQCLcBGAsYHQ/s400/Screenshot_20200116_074647.png"
  4676. width="400" /></a><span id="goog_1253656680"></span><a href=
  4677. "https://draft.blogger.com/"></a><span id=
  4678. "goog_1253656681"></span></div>
  4679. <br />
  4680. Where I want the DOI? At the top, with the other metadata:<br />
  4681. <table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class=
  4682. "tr-caption-container" style=
  4683. "margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;">
  4684. <tbody>
  4685. <tr>
  4686. <td style="text-align: center;"><a href=
  4687. "https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-Vfwax2uPJ_Y/XiAI4jsp7vI/AAAAAAAAJaw/i0hD0zdX2kMzgGS5uE93Bzb_i2yXg1RpACLcBGAsYHQ/s1600/Screenshot_20200116_075446.png"
  4688. style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0"
  4689. data-original-height="263" data-original-width="791" height="212"
  4690. src=
  4691. "https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-Vfwax2uPJ_Y/XiAI4jsp7vI/AAAAAAAAJaw/i0hD0zdX2kMzgGS5uE93Bzb_i2yXg1RpACLcBGAsYHQ/s640/Screenshot_20200116_075446.png"
  4692. width="640" /></a></td>
  4693. </tr>
  4694. <tr>
  4695. <td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Recent <a href=
  4696. "https://jcheminf.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13321-019-0404-1">
  4697. article</a> in the Journal of Cheminformatics.</td>
  4698. </tr>
  4699. </tbody>
  4700. </table>
  4701. If you agree, <a href=
  4702. "https://twitter.com/egonwillighagen/status/1216737073660600322">please
  4703. vote</a>. With enough votes, we can engage with upper
  4704. SpringerNature manager to have journals choose where they want the
  4705. DOI to be shown.<br />
  4706. <br />
  4707. (Of course, the DOI as semantic data in the HTML is also important,
  4708. but there is quite good annotation of that in the HTML
  4709. &lt;head&gt;. Link out to RDF about the article, is still missing,
  4710. I think.)</div>
  4711. </planet:content>
  4712.  <dc:date rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#dateTime">2020-01-16T06:59:00.000000Z</dc:date>
  4713.  <title>Help! Digital Object Identifiers: Usability reduced if given
  4714. at the bottom of the page</title>
  4715.  <link>http://chem-bla-ics.blogspot.com/2020/01/help-digital-object-identifiers.html</link>
  4716.  <content:encoded rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#XMLLiteral"><![CDATA[
  4717. <div xmlns='http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml'>
  4718. <div>The (for <a href="https://jcheminf.biomedcentral.com/">J.
  4719. Cheminform.</a>) new SpringerNature article template has the
  4720. Digital Object Identifier (DOI) at the bottom of the article page.
  4721. So, every time I want to use the DOI I have to scroll all the way
  4722. down to the page. That could be find for abstracts, but totally
  4723. unusable for Open Access articles.<br />
  4724. <br />
  4725. So, after our J. Cheminform. editors telcon this Monday, I started
  4726. a <a href=
  4727. "https://twitter.com/egonwillighagen/status/1216737073660600322">Twitter
  4728. poll</a>:<br />
  4729. <br />
  4730. <div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;">
  4731. <a href=
  4732. "https://twitter.com/egonwillighagen/status/1216737073660600322"><img border="0"
  4733. data-original-height="440" data-original-width="581" height="301"
  4734. src=
  4735. "https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-5Vj1oOX5q8o/XiAIls_AS-I/AAAAAAAAJao/XEhuetpWrTwiPrJmlLxabqEq-tAw5-EBQCLcBGAsYHQ/s400/Screenshot_20200116_074647.png"
  4736. width="400" /></a><span id="goog_1253656680"></span><a href=
  4737. "https://draft.blogger.com/"></a><span id=
  4738. "goog_1253656681"></span></div>
  4739. <br />
  4740. Where I want the DOI? At the top, with the other metadata:<br />
  4741. <table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class=
  4742. "tr-caption-container" style=
  4743. "margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;">
  4744. <tbody>
  4745. <tr>
  4746. <td style="text-align: center;"><a href=
  4747. "https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-Vfwax2uPJ_Y/XiAI4jsp7vI/AAAAAAAAJaw/i0hD0zdX2kMzgGS5uE93Bzb_i2yXg1RpACLcBGAsYHQ/s1600/Screenshot_20200116_075446.png"
  4748. style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0"
  4749. data-original-height="263" data-original-width="791" height="212"
  4750. src=
  4751. "https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-Vfwax2uPJ_Y/XiAI4jsp7vI/AAAAAAAAJaw/i0hD0zdX2kMzgGS5uE93Bzb_i2yXg1RpACLcBGAsYHQ/s640/Screenshot_20200116_075446.png"
  4752. width="640" /></a></td>
  4753. </tr>
  4754. <tr>
  4755. <td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Recent <a href=
  4756. "https://jcheminf.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13321-019-0404-1">
  4757. article</a> in the Journal of Cheminformatics.</td>
  4758. </tr>
  4759. </tbody>
  4760. </table>
  4761. If you agree, <a href=
  4762. "https://twitter.com/egonwillighagen/status/1216737073660600322">please
  4763. vote</a>. With enough votes, we can engage with upper
  4764. SpringerNature manager to have journals choose where they want the
  4765. DOI to be shown.<br />
  4766. <br />
  4767. (Of course, the DOI as semantic data in the HTML is also important,
  4768. but there is quite good annotation of that in the HTML
  4769. &lt;head&gt;. Link out to RDF about the article, is still missing,
  4770. I think.)</div>
  4771. </div>]]></content:encoded>
  4772.  <description>The (for J. Cheminform. ) new SpringerNature article template has the Digital Object Identifier (DOI) at the bottom of the article page. So, every time I want to use the DOI I have to scroll all the way down to the page. That could be find for abstracts, but totally unusable for Open Access articles. So, after our J. Cheminform. editors telcon this Monday, I started a Twitter poll : Where I want the DOI? At the top, with the other metadata: Recent article in the Journal of Cheminformatics. If you agree, please vote . With enough votes, we can ...</description>
  4773. </item>
  4774. <item rdf:about="https://blog.ldodds.com/2020/01/14/paper-review-open-data-for-electricity-modeling-legal-aspects/">
  4775.  <dc:creator>Leigh Dodds</dc:creator>
  4776.  <dc:source>Lost Boy by Leigh Dodds</dc:source>
  4777.  <dc:relation>http://ldodds.com/blog/</dc:relation>
  4778.  <planet:content xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" rdf:parseType="Literal">
  4779. <div>
  4780. <p>This blog post is a quick review and notes relating to a
  4781. research paper called: <a href=
  4782. "https://doi.org/10.1016/j.esr.2019.100433">Open data for
  4783. electronic modeling: Legal aspects</a>.</p>
  4784. <p>It’s part of my new <a href=
  4785. "https://blog.ldodds.com/category/research-notebook/">research
  4786. notebook</a> to help me collect and share notes on research papers
  4787. and reports.</p>
  4788. <h2>Brief summary</h2>
  4789. <p>The paper reviews the legal status of publicly available energy
  4790. data (and some related datasets) in Europe, with a focus on German
  4791. law. The paper is intended to help identify some of the legal
  4792. issues relevant to creation of analytical models to support use of
  4793. energy data, e.g. for capacity planning.</p>
  4794. <p>As background, the paper describes the types of data relevant to
  4795. building these types of model, the relevant aspects of database and
  4796. copyright law in the EU and the properties of open
  4797. licences.&#160;This background is used to assess some of the key
  4798. data assets published in the EU and how they are licensed (or not)
  4799. for reuse.</p>
  4800. <p>The paper concludes that the majority of uses of this data to
  4801. support energy modelling in the EU, whether for research or other
  4802. purposes, is likely to be infringing on the rights of the database
  4803. holders, meaning that users are currently carrying legal risks. The
  4804. paper notes that in many cases this is likely not the intended
  4805. outcome.</p>
  4806. <p>The paper provides a range of recommendations to address this
  4807. issue, including the adoption of open licences.</p>
  4808. <h2>Three reasons to read</h2>
  4809. <p>Here’s three reasons why you might want to read this paper</p>
  4810. <ol>
  4811. <li>It provides a helpful primer on <a href=
  4812. "https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2211467X19301269#sec3">
  4813. the range of datasets and data types</a> that are used to develop
  4814. applications in the energy sector in the EU. Useful if you want to
  4815. know more about the domain</li>
  4816. <li>The <a href=
  4817. "https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2211467X19301269#sec4">
  4818. background information on database rights and related IP law</a> is
  4819. clearly written and a good introduction to the topic</li>
  4820. <li>The paper provides a great case study of <a href=
  4821. "https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2211467X19301269#sec5">
  4822. how licensing and legal protections applies to data use</a> in a
  4823. sector. The approach taken could be reused and extended to other
  4824. areas</li>
  4825. </ol>
  4826. <h2>Three things I learned</h2>
  4827. <p>Here’s three things that I learned from reading the paper.</p>
  4828. <ol>
  4829. <li>That a database might be covered by copyright (an “original”
  4830. database) in addition to database rights. But the authors note this
  4831. doesn’t apply in the case of a typical energy dataset</li>
  4832. <li>That individual member states might have their own statutory
  4833. exemptions to the the Database Directive. E.g. in Germany it
  4834. doesn’t apply to use of data in non-commercial teaching. So there
  4835. is variation in how it applies.</li>
  4836. <li>The discussion on <a href=
  4837. "https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2211467X19301269#sec5.4">
  4838. how the Database Directive relates to statutory obligations to
  4839. publish data</a> was interesting, but highlights that the situation
  4840. is unclear.</li>
  4841. </ol>
  4842. <h2>Thoughts and impressions</h2>
  4843. <p>Great paper that clearly articulates the legal issues relating
  4844. to publication and use of data in the energy sector in the EU. It’s
  4845. easy to extrapolate from this work to other use cases in energy and
  4846. by extension to other sectors.</p>
  4847. <p>The paper concludes with a good set of recommendations: the
  4848. adoption of open licences, the need to clarify rights around data
  4849. reuse and the role of data institutions in doing that, and how
  4850. policy makers can push towards a more open ecosystem.</p>
  4851. <p>However there’s a suggestion that funders should just mandate
  4852. open licences when funding academic research. While this is the
  4853. general trend I see across research funding, in the context of this
  4854. article it lacks a bit of nuance. The paper clearly indicates that
  4855. the current status quo is that data users do not have the rights to
  4856. apply open licences to the data they are publishing and generating.
  4857. I think funders also need to engage with other policy makers to
  4858. ensure that upstream provision of data is aligned with an open
  4859. research agenda. Otherwise we risk perpetuating an unclear
  4860. landscape of rights and permissions. The authors do note the need
  4861. to address wider issues, but I think there’s a potential role of
  4862. research funders in helping to drive change.</p>
  4863. <p>Finally, in their review of open licences, the authors recommend
  4864. a move towards adoption of CC0 (public domain waivers and marks)
  4865. and CC-BY 4.0. But they don’t address the fact that upstream
  4866. licensing might limit the choice of how researchers can licence
  4867. downstream data.</p>
  4868. <p>Specifically, the authors note the use of OpenStreetmap data to
  4869. provide infrastructure data. However <a href=
  4870. "https://theodi.org/projects-services/projects/using-geospatial-data-a-guide-to-licences/">
  4871. depending on your use</a>, you may need to adopt this licence when
  4872. republishing data. This can be at odds with a mandate to use other
  4873. licences or restrictive licences used by other data stewards.</p>
  4874. <p>&#160;</p>
  4875. </div>
  4876. </planet:content>
  4877.  <dc:date rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#dateTime">2020-01-14T19:06:00.000000Z</dc:date>
  4878.  <title>[Paper review] Open data for electricity modeling: Legal
  4879. aspects</title>
  4880.  <link>https://blog.ldodds.com/2020/01/14/paper-review-open-data-for-electricity-modeling-legal-aspects/</link>
  4881.  <content:encoded rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#XMLLiteral"><![CDATA[
  4882. <div xmlns='http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml'>
  4883. <div>
  4884. <p>This blog post is a quick review and notes relating to a
  4885. research paper called: <a href=
  4886. "https://doi.org/10.1016/j.esr.2019.100433">Open data for
  4887. electronic modeling: Legal aspects</a>.</p>
  4888. <p>It’s part of my new <a href=
  4889. "https://blog.ldodds.com/category/research-notebook/">research
  4890. notebook</a> to help me collect and share notes on research papers
  4891. and reports.</p>
  4892. <h2>Brief summary</h2>
  4893. <p>The paper reviews the legal status of publicly available energy
  4894. data (and some related datasets) in Europe, with a focus on German
  4895. law. The paper is intended to help identify some of the legal
  4896. issues relevant to creation of analytical models to support use of
  4897. energy data, e.g. for capacity planning.</p>
  4898. <p>As background, the paper describes the types of data relevant to
  4899. building these types of model, the relevant aspects of database and
  4900. copyright law in the EU and the properties of open
  4901. licences.&#160;This background is used to assess some of the key
  4902. data assets published in the EU and how they are licensed (or not)
  4903. for reuse.</p>
  4904. <p>The paper concludes that the majority of uses of this data to
  4905. support energy modelling in the EU, whether for research or other
  4906. purposes, is likely to be infringing on the rights of the database
  4907. holders, meaning that users are currently carrying legal risks. The
  4908. paper notes that in many cases this is likely not the intended
  4909. outcome.</p>
  4910. <p>The paper provides a range of recommendations to address this
  4911. issue, including the adoption of open licences.</p>
  4912. <h2>Three reasons to read</h2>
  4913. <p>Here’s three reasons why you might want to read this paper</p>
  4914. <ol>
  4915. <li>It provides a helpful primer on <a href=
  4916. "https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2211467X19301269#sec3">
  4917. the range of datasets and data types</a> that are used to develop
  4918. applications in the energy sector in the EU. Useful if you want to
  4919. know more about the domain</li>
  4920. <li>The <a href=
  4921. "https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2211467X19301269#sec4">
  4922. background information on database rights and related IP law</a> is
  4923. clearly written and a good introduction to the topic</li>
  4924. <li>The paper provides a great case study of <a href=
  4925. "https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2211467X19301269#sec5">
  4926. how licensing and legal protections applies to data use</a> in a
  4927. sector. The approach taken could be reused and extended to other
  4928. areas</li>
  4929. </ol>
  4930. <h2>Three things I learned</h2>
  4931. <p>Here’s three things that I learned from reading the paper.</p>
  4932. <ol>
  4933. <li>That a database might be covered by copyright (an “original”
  4934. database) in addition to database rights. But the authors note this
  4935. doesn’t apply in the case of a typical energy dataset</li>
  4936. <li>That individual member states might have their own statutory
  4937. exemptions to the the Database Directive. E.g. in Germany it
  4938. doesn’t apply to use of data in non-commercial teaching. So there
  4939. is variation in how it applies.</li>
  4940. <li>The discussion on <a href=
  4941. "https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2211467X19301269#sec5.4">
  4942. how the Database Directive relates to statutory obligations to
  4943. publish data</a> was interesting, but highlights that the situation
  4944. is unclear.</li>
  4945. </ol>
  4946. <h2>Thoughts and impressions</h2>
  4947. <p>Great paper that clearly articulates the legal issues relating
  4948. to publication and use of data in the energy sector in the EU. It’s
  4949. easy to extrapolate from this work to other use cases in energy and
  4950. by extension to other sectors.</p>
  4951. <p>The paper concludes with a good set of recommendations: the
  4952. adoption of open licences, the need to clarify rights around data
  4953. reuse and the role of data institutions in doing that, and how
  4954. policy makers can push towards a more open ecosystem.</p>
  4955. <p>However there’s a suggestion that funders should just mandate
  4956. open licences when funding academic research. While this is the
  4957. general trend I see across research funding, in the context of this
  4958. article it lacks a bit of nuance. The paper clearly indicates that
  4959. the current status quo is that data users do not have the rights to
  4960. apply open licences to the data they are publishing and generating.
  4961. I think funders also need to engage with other policy makers to
  4962. ensure that upstream provision of data is aligned with an open
  4963. research agenda. Otherwise we risk perpetuating an unclear
  4964. landscape of rights and permissions. The authors do note the need
  4965. to address wider issues, but I think there’s a potential role of
  4966. research funders in helping to drive change.</p>
  4967. <p>Finally, in their review of open licences, the authors recommend
  4968. a move towards adoption of CC0 (public domain waivers and marks)
  4969. and CC-BY 4.0. But they don’t address the fact that upstream
  4970. licensing might limit the choice of how researchers can licence
  4971. downstream data.</p>
  4972. <p>Specifically, the authors note the use of OpenStreetmap data to
  4973. provide infrastructure data. However <a href=
  4974. "https://theodi.org/projects-services/projects/using-geospatial-data-a-guide-to-licences/">
  4975. depending on your use</a>, you may need to adopt this licence when
  4976. republishing data. This can be at odds with a mandate to use other
  4977. licences or restrictive licences used by other data stewards.</p>
  4978. <p>&#160;</p>
  4979. </div>
  4980. </div>]]></content:encoded>
  4981.  <description>This blog post is a quick review and notes relating to a research paper called: Open data for electronic modeling: Legal aspects . It’s part of my new research notebook to help me collect and share notes on research papers and reports. Brief summary The paper reviews the legal status of publicly available energy data (and some related datasets) in Europe, with a focus on German law. The paper is intended to help identify some of the legal issues relevant to creation of analytical models to support use of energy data, e.g. for capacity planning. As background, the paper describes ...</description>
  4982. </item>
  4983. <item rdf:about="https://tripletalk.wordpress.com/2009/06/11/common-tag-semantic-tagging-format-released-today/">
  4984.  <dc:creator>Peter Mika</dc:creator>
  4985.  <dc:source>Tripletalk by Peter Mika</dc:source>
  4986.  <dc:relation>http://tripletalk.wordpress.com/</dc:relation>
  4987.  <planet:content xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" rdf:parseType="Literal">
  4988. <div>
  4989. <p><a href="http://commontag.org"><img class="alignleft" title=
  4990. "Common Tag logo" src=
  4991. "https://i1.wp.com/commontag.org/w/images/logo.png" alt="" width=
  4992. "240" height="100" /></a></p>
  4993. <p>The <a href="http://www.commontag.org">Common Tag</a> format for
  4994. <a class="zem_slink" title="Semantic Web" rel="wikipedia" href=
  4995. "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Semantic_Web">semantic</a> tagging
  4996. has been finally released today after almost a year of intense work
  4997. on it by a group of Web companies active in the semantic
  4998. technologies area, among them Yahoo. It’s been great fun working on
  4999. this and I’m proud to have been involved: while there have been
  5000. vocabularies before for representing tags in RDF, this effort is
  5001. different in at least two respects.</p>
  5002. <p>First, a significant effort of time has been spent on making
  5003. sure the specification meets the needs of all partners involved.
  5004. The support of these companies for the specification will ensure
  5005. that developers in the future can rely on a single format for
  5006. annotation with semantic tags and interchanging <a class=
  5007. "zem_slink" title="Tag (metadata)" rel="wikipedia" href=
  5008. "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tag_%28metadata%29">tag</a> data. The
  5009. website already lists a number of applications but I’m pretty sure
  5010. that a common tagging format will open entirely new possibilities
  5011. in searching, navigating and aggregating web content.</p>
  5012. <p>Second, the format has been developed with publishers in mind,
  5013. in particular in making it as easy as possible to embed semantic
  5014. tags in HTML using <a class="zem_slink" title="RDFa" href=
  5015. "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml-rdfa-primer/" rel="nofollow">RDFa</a>,
  5016. a syntax universally embraced by all those involved. The choice for
  5017. RDF also means that unlike in the case of the rel-tag microformat,
  5018. Common Tags can be applied to any object, not just documents.</p>
  5019. <p>So, it’s time for a new era in tagging!</p>
  5020. <div class="zemanta-pixie" style="margin-top:10px;height:15px;">
  5021. <a class="zemanta-pixie-a" title="Reblog this post [with Zemanta]"
  5022. href=
  5023. "http://reblog.zemanta.com/zemified/3b08e0c8-6431-4426-b59b-bf3f755cdffc/"
  5024. rel="nofollow"><img class="zemanta-pixie-img" style=
  5025. "border:medium none;float:right;" src=
  5026. "https://i2.wp.com/img.zemanta.com/reblog_e.png" alt=
  5027. "Reblog this post [with Zemanta]" /></a></div>
  5028. </div>
  5029. </planet:content>
  5030.  <dc:date rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#dateTime">2019-12-10T17:10:35.000000Z</dc:date>
  5031.  <title>Common Tag semantic tagging format released today</title>
  5032.  <link>https://tripletalk.wordpress.com/2009/06/11/common-tag-semantic-tagging-format-released-today/</link>
  5033.  <content:encoded rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#XMLLiteral"><![CDATA[
  5034. <div xmlns='http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml'>
  5035. <div>
  5036. <p><a href="http://commontag.org"><img class="alignleft" title=
  5037. "Common Tag logo" src=
  5038. "https://i1.wp.com/commontag.org/w/images/logo.png" alt="" width=
  5039. "240" height="100" /></a></p>
  5040. <p>The <a href="http://www.commontag.org">Common Tag</a> format for
  5041. <a class="zem_slink" title="Semantic Web" rel="wikipedia" href=
  5042. "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Semantic_Web">semantic</a> tagging
  5043. has been finally released today after almost a year of intense work
  5044. on it by a group of Web companies active in the semantic
  5045. technologies area, among them Yahoo. It’s been great fun working on
  5046. this and I’m proud to have been involved: while there have been
  5047. vocabularies before for representing tags in RDF, this effort is
  5048. different in at least two respects.</p>
  5049. <p>First, a significant effort of time has been spent on making
  5050. sure the specification meets the needs of all partners involved.
  5051. The support of these companies for the specification will ensure
  5052. that developers in the future can rely on a single format for
  5053. annotation with semantic tags and interchanging <a class=
  5054. "zem_slink" title="Tag (metadata)" rel="wikipedia" href=
  5055. "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tag_%28metadata%29">tag</a> data. The
  5056. website already lists a number of applications but I’m pretty sure
  5057. that a common tagging format will open entirely new possibilities
  5058. in searching, navigating and aggregating web content.</p>
  5059. <p>Second, the format has been developed with publishers in mind,
  5060. in particular in making it as easy as possible to embed semantic
  5061. tags in HTML using <a class="zem_slink" title="RDFa" href=
  5062. "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml-rdfa-primer/" rel="nofollow">RDFa</a>,
  5063. a syntax universally embraced by all those involved. The choice for
  5064. RDF also means that unlike in the case of the rel-tag microformat,
  5065. Common Tags can be applied to any object, not just documents.</p>
  5066. <p>So, it’s time for a new era in tagging!</p>
  5067. <div class="zemanta-pixie" style="margin-top:10px;height:15px;">
  5068. <a class="zemanta-pixie-a" title="Reblog this post [with Zemanta]"
  5069. href=
  5070. "http://reblog.zemanta.com/zemified/3b08e0c8-6431-4426-b59b-bf3f755cdffc/"
  5071. rel="nofollow"><img class="zemanta-pixie-img" style=
  5072. "border:medium none;float:right;" src=
  5073. "https://i2.wp.com/img.zemanta.com/reblog_e.png" alt=
  5074. "Reblog this post [with Zemanta]" /></a></div>
  5075. </div>
  5076. </div>]]></content:encoded>
  5077.  <description>The Common Tag format for semantic tagging has been finally released today after almost a year of intense work on it by a group of Web companies active in the semantic technologies area, among them Yahoo. It’s been great fun working on this and I’m proud to have been involved: while there have been vocabularies before for representing tags in RDF, this effort is different in at least two respects. First, a significant effort of time has been spent on making sure the specification meets the needs of all partners involved. The support of these companies for the specification will ...</description>
  5078. </item>
  5079. <item rdf:about="https://decentralyze.com/2010/11/10/simplified-rdf/">
  5080.  <dc:creator>Sandro Hawke</dc:creator>
  5081.  <dc:source> Decentralyze – Programming the Data Cloud by Sandro Hawke</dc:source>
  5082.  <dc:relation>http://decentralyze.com/</dc:relation>
  5083.  <planet:content xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" rdf:parseType="Literal">
  5084. <div>
  5085. <p><img src=
  5086. "https://i2.wp.com/www.w3.org/2010/06/parallel_properties/simplified-rdf-150.png"
  5087. style="float:right;" /></p>
  5088. <p>I propose that we designate a certain subset of the RDF model as
  5089. “Simplified RDF” and standardize a method of encoding full RDF in
  5090. Simplified RDF. The subset I have in mind is exactly the subset
  5091. used by <a href=
  5092. "http://developers.facebook.com/docs/opengraph">Facebook’s Open
  5093. Graph Protocol (OGP)</a>, and my proposed encoding technique is
  5094. relatively straightforward.</p>
  5095. <p>I’ve been mulling over this approach for a few months, and I’m
  5096. fairly confident it will work, but I don’t claim to have all the
  5097. details perfect yet. Comments and discussion are quite welcome, on
  5098. this posting or on the [email protected] mailing list. This
  5099. discussion, I’m afraid, is going to be heavily steeped in RDF tech;
  5100. simplified RDF will be useful for people who don’t know all the
  5101. details of RDF, but this discussion probably wont be.</p>
  5102. <p>My motivation comes from several directions, including OGP. With
  5103. OGP, Facebook has motivated <a href=
  5104. "http://trends.builtwith.com/docinfo/Open-Graph-Protocol">a huge
  5105. number</a> of Web sites to add RDFa markup to their pages. But the
  5106. RDF they’ve added is quite constrained, and is not practically
  5107. interoperable with the rest of the Semantic Web, because it uses
  5108. simplified RDF. One could argue that Facebook made a mistake here,
  5109. that they should be requiring full “normal” RDF, but my feeling is
  5110. their engineering decisions were correct, that this extreme degree
  5111. of simplification is necessary to get any reasonable uptake.</p>
  5112. <p>I also think simplified RDF will play well with JSON developers.
  5113. <a href=
  5114. "https://decentralyze.com/2010/06/04/from-json-to-rdf-in-six-easy-steps-with-jron/">
  5115. JRON</a> is pretty simple, but simplified RDF would allow it to be
  5116. simpler still. Or, rather, it would mean folks using JRON could
  5117. limit themselves to an even smaller number of “easy steps” (about
  5118. three, depending on how open design issues are resolved).</p>
  5119. <h1>Cutting Out All The Confusing Stuff</h1>
  5120. <p>Simplified RDF makes the following radical restrictions to the
  5121. RDF model and to deployment practice:</p>
  5122. <ol>
  5123. <li>
  5124. <p>The subject URIs are always web page addresses. The
  5125. content-negotiation hack for “hash” URIs and the 303-see-other hack
  5126. for “slash” URIs are both avoided.</p>
  5127. <p>(Open issue: are html fragment URIs okay? Not in OGP, but I
  5128. think it will be okay and useful.)</p>
  5129. </li>
  5130. <li>
  5131. <p>The values of the properties (the “object” components of the RDF
  5132. triples) are always strings. No datatype information is provided in
  5133. the data, and object references are done by just putting the object
  5134. URI into the string, instead of making it a normal URI-label
  5135. node.</p>
  5136. <p>(Open issue: what about language tags? I think RDFa will provide
  5137. this for free in OGP, if the html has a language tag.)</p>
  5138. <p>(Open issue: what about multi-valued (repeated) properties? Are
  5139. they just repeated, or are the multiple values packing into the
  5140. string, perhaps? OGP has multiple administrators listed as
  5141. “USER_ID1,USER_ID2”. JSON lists are another factor here.)</p>
  5142. </li>
  5143. </ol>
  5144. <p>At first inspection this reduction appears to remove so much
  5145. from RDF as to make it essentally useless. Our <a href=
  5146. "http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0129167/">beloved RDF</a> has been
  5147. blown into a hundred pieces and scattered to the wind. It turns
  5148. out, however, it still has enough enough magic to reassemble itself
  5149. (with a little help from its friends, http and rdfs).</p>
  5150. <p>This image may give a feeling for the relationship of full RDF
  5151. and simplified RDF:</p>
  5152. <p><img style="border:2px solid black;" src=
  5153. "http://www.w3.org/2010/06/parallel_properties/ver5-700" /></p>
  5154. <h1>Reassembling Full RDF</h1>
  5155. <p>The basic idea is that given some metadata (mostly: the schema),
  5156. we can construct a new set of triples in full RDF which convey what
  5157. the simplified RDF intended. The new set will be distinguished by
  5158. using different predicates, and the predicates are related by
  5159. schema information available by dereferencing the predicate URI.
  5160. The specific relations used, and other schema information, allows
  5161. us to unambiguously perform the conversion.</p>
  5162. <p>For example, og:title is intended to convey the same basic
  5163. notion as rdfs:label. They are not the same property, though,
  5164. because og:title is applied to a page about the thing which is
  5165. being labeled, rather than the thing itself. So rather than saying
  5166. they are related by owl:equivalentProperty, we say:</p>
  5167. <pre>
  5168.  og:title srdf:twin rdfs:label.
  5169. </pre>
  5170. <p>This ties to them together, saying they are “parallel” or
  5171. “convertable”, and allowing us to use other information in the
  5172. schema(s) for og:title and rdfs:label to enable conversion.</p>
  5173. <p>The conversion goes something like this:</p>
  5174. <ol>
  5175. <li>
  5176. <p>The subject URLs should usually be taken as pages whose
  5177. foaf:primaryTopic is the real subject. (<a href=
  5178. "http://vocab.sindice.com/xfn">Expressing the XFN microformat in
  5179. RDF</a> provides a gentle introduction to this kind of idea.) That
  5180. real subject can be identified with a blank node or with a
  5181. constructed URI using a “thing described by” service such as
  5182. <a href="http://t-d-b.org/">t-d-b.org</a>. A little more work is
  5183. needed on how to make such services efficient, but I think the
  5184. concept is proven. I’d expect facebook to want to run such a
  5185. service.</p>
  5186. <p>In some cases, the subject URL really does identify the intended
  5187. subject, such as when the triple is giving the license information
  5188. for the web page itself. These cases can be distinguished in the
  5189. schema by indicating the simplified RDF property is an
  5190. IndirectProperty or MetadataProperty.</p>
  5191. </li>
  5192. <li>
  5193. <p>The object (value) can be reconstructed by looking at the range
  5194. of the full-RDF twin. For example, given that something has an
  5195. og:latitude of “37.416343”, og:latitude and example:latitude are
  5196. twins, and example:latitude has a range of xs:decimal, we can
  5197. conclude the thing has an example:latitude of
  5198. “37.416343”^^xs:decimal.</p>
  5199. <p>Similarly, the Simplified RDF technique of puting URIs in
  5200. strings for the object can be undone by know the twin is an
  5201. ObjectProperty, or has some non-Literal range.</p>
  5202. <p>I believe language tagging could also be wrapped into the
  5203. predicate (like comment_fr, comment_en, comment_jp, etc) if that
  5204. kind of thing turns out to be necessary, using an OWL 2 range
  5205. restrictions on the rdf:langRange facet.</p>
  5206. <h1>Next Steps</h1>
  5207. <p>So, that’s a rough sketch, and I need to wrap this up. If you’re
  5208. at ISWC, I’ll be giving a 2 minute lightning talk about this at
  5209. lunch later today. But if you’ve ready this far, the talk wont say
  5210. say anything you don’t already know.</p>
  5211. <p>FWIW, I believe this is implementable in RIF Core, which would
  5212. mean data consumers which do RIF Core processing could get this
  5213. functionality automatically. But since we don’t have any data
  5214. consumer libraries which do that yet, it’s probably easiest to
  5215. implement this with normal code for now.</p>
  5216. <p>I think this is a fairly urgent topic because of the adoption
  5217. curve (and energy) on OGP, and because it might possibly inform the
  5218. design of a standand JSON serialization for RDF, which I’m
  5219. expecting W3C to work on very soon.</p>
  5220. </li>
  5221. </ol>
  5222. </div>
  5223. </planet:content>
  5224.  <dc:date rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#dateTime">2019-12-10T17:09:25.000000Z</dc:date>
  5225.  <title>Simplified RDF</title>
  5226.  <link>https://decentralyze.com/2010/11/10/simplified-rdf/</link>
  5227.  <content:encoded rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#XMLLiteral"><![CDATA[
  5228. <div xmlns='http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml'>
  5229. <div>
  5230. <p><img src=
  5231. "https://i2.wp.com/www.w3.org/2010/06/parallel_properties/simplified-rdf-150.png"
  5232. style="float:right;" /></p>
  5233. <p>I propose that we designate a certain subset of the RDF model as
  5234. “Simplified RDF” and standardize a method of encoding full RDF in
  5235. Simplified RDF. The subset I have in mind is exactly the subset
  5236. used by <a href=
  5237. "http://developers.facebook.com/docs/opengraph">Facebook’s Open
  5238. Graph Protocol (OGP)</a>, and my proposed encoding technique is
  5239. relatively straightforward.</p>
  5240. <p>I’ve been mulling over this approach for a few months, and I’m
  5241. fairly confident it will work, but I don’t claim to have all the
  5242. details perfect yet. Comments and discussion are quite welcome, on
  5243. this posting or on the [email protected] mailing list. This
  5244. discussion, I’m afraid, is going to be heavily steeped in RDF tech;
  5245. simplified RDF will be useful for people who don’t know all the
  5246. details of RDF, but this discussion probably wont be.</p>
  5247. <p>My motivation comes from several directions, including OGP. With
  5248. OGP, Facebook has motivated <a href=
  5249. "http://trends.builtwith.com/docinfo/Open-Graph-Protocol">a huge
  5250. number</a> of Web sites to add RDFa markup to their pages. But the
  5251. RDF they’ve added is quite constrained, and is not practically
  5252. interoperable with the rest of the Semantic Web, because it uses
  5253. simplified RDF. One could argue that Facebook made a mistake here,
  5254. that they should be requiring full “normal” RDF, but my feeling is
  5255. their engineering decisions were correct, that this extreme degree
  5256. of simplification is necessary to get any reasonable uptake.</p>
  5257. <p>I also think simplified RDF will play well with JSON developers.
  5258. <a href=
  5259. "https://decentralyze.com/2010/06/04/from-json-to-rdf-in-six-easy-steps-with-jron/">
  5260. JRON</a> is pretty simple, but simplified RDF would allow it to be
  5261. simpler still. Or, rather, it would mean folks using JRON could
  5262. limit themselves to an even smaller number of “easy steps” (about
  5263. three, depending on how open design issues are resolved).</p>
  5264. <h1>Cutting Out All The Confusing Stuff</h1>
  5265. <p>Simplified RDF makes the following radical restrictions to the
  5266. RDF model and to deployment practice:</p>
  5267. <ol>
  5268. <li>
  5269. <p>The subject URIs are always web page addresses. The
  5270. content-negotiation hack for “hash” URIs and the 303-see-other hack
  5271. for “slash” URIs are both avoided.</p>
  5272. <p>(Open issue: are html fragment URIs okay? Not in OGP, but I
  5273. think it will be okay and useful.)</p>
  5274. </li>
  5275. <li>
  5276. <p>The values of the properties (the “object” components of the RDF
  5277. triples) are always strings. No datatype information is provided in
  5278. the data, and object references are done by just putting the object
  5279. URI into the string, instead of making it a normal URI-label
  5280. node.</p>
  5281. <p>(Open issue: what about language tags? I think RDFa will provide
  5282. this for free in OGP, if the html has a language tag.)</p>
  5283. <p>(Open issue: what about multi-valued (repeated) properties? Are
  5284. they just repeated, or are the multiple values packing into the
  5285. string, perhaps? OGP has multiple administrators listed as
  5286. “USER_ID1,USER_ID2”. JSON lists are another factor here.)</p>
  5287. </li>
  5288. </ol>
  5289. <p>At first inspection this reduction appears to remove so much
  5290. from RDF as to make it essentally useless. Our <a href=
  5291. "http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0129167/">beloved RDF</a> has been
  5292. blown into a hundred pieces and scattered to the wind. It turns
  5293. out, however, it still has enough enough magic to reassemble itself
  5294. (with a little help from its friends, http and rdfs).</p>
  5295. <p>This image may give a feeling for the relationship of full RDF
  5296. and simplified RDF:</p>
  5297. <p><img style="border:2px solid black;" src=
  5298. "http://www.w3.org/2010/06/parallel_properties/ver5-700" /></p>
  5299. <h1>Reassembling Full RDF</h1>
  5300. <p>The basic idea is that given some metadata (mostly: the schema),
  5301. we can construct a new set of triples in full RDF which convey what
  5302. the simplified RDF intended. The new set will be distinguished by
  5303. using different predicates, and the predicates are related by
  5304. schema information available by dereferencing the predicate URI.
  5305. The specific relations used, and other schema information, allows
  5306. us to unambiguously perform the conversion.</p>
  5307. <p>For example, og:title is intended to convey the same basic
  5308. notion as rdfs:label. They are not the same property, though,
  5309. because og:title is applied to a page about the thing which is
  5310. being labeled, rather than the thing itself. So rather than saying
  5311. they are related by owl:equivalentProperty, we say:</p>
  5312. <pre>
  5313.  og:title srdf:twin rdfs:label.
  5314. </pre>
  5315. <p>This ties to them together, saying they are “parallel” or
  5316. “convertable”, and allowing us to use other information in the
  5317. schema(s) for og:title and rdfs:label to enable conversion.</p>
  5318. <p>The conversion goes something like this:</p>
  5319. <ol>
  5320. <li>
  5321. <p>The subject URLs should usually be taken as pages whose
  5322. foaf:primaryTopic is the real subject. (<a href=
  5323. "http://vocab.sindice.com/xfn">Expressing the XFN microformat in
  5324. RDF</a> provides a gentle introduction to this kind of idea.) That
  5325. real subject can be identified with a blank node or with a
  5326. constructed URI using a “thing described by” service such as
  5327. <a href="http://t-d-b.org/">t-d-b.org</a>. A little more work is
  5328. needed on how to make such services efficient, but I think the
  5329. concept is proven. I’d expect facebook to want to run such a
  5330. service.</p>
  5331. <p>In some cases, the subject URL really does identify the intended
  5332. subject, such as when the triple is giving the license information
  5333. for the web page itself. These cases can be distinguished in the
  5334. schema by indicating the simplified RDF property is an
  5335. IndirectProperty or MetadataProperty.</p>
  5336. </li>
  5337. <li>
  5338. <p>The object (value) can be reconstructed by looking at the range
  5339. of the full-RDF twin. For example, given that something has an
  5340. og:latitude of “37.416343”, og:latitude and example:latitude are
  5341. twins, and example:latitude has a range of xs:decimal, we can
  5342. conclude the thing has an example:latitude of
  5343. “37.416343”^^xs:decimal.</p>
  5344. <p>Similarly, the Simplified RDF technique of puting URIs in
  5345. strings for the object can be undone by know the twin is an
  5346. ObjectProperty, or has some non-Literal range.</p>
  5347. <p>I believe language tagging could also be wrapped into the
  5348. predicate (like comment_fr, comment_en, comment_jp, etc) if that
  5349. kind of thing turns out to be necessary, using an OWL 2 range
  5350. restrictions on the rdf:langRange facet.</p>
  5351. <h1>Next Steps</h1>
  5352. <p>So, that’s a rough sketch, and I need to wrap this up. If you’re
  5353. at ISWC, I’ll be giving a 2 minute lightning talk about this at
  5354. lunch later today. But if you’ve ready this far, the talk wont say
  5355. say anything you don’t already know.</p>
  5356. <p>FWIW, I believe this is implementable in RIF Core, which would
  5357. mean data consumers which do RIF Core processing could get this
  5358. functionality automatically. But since we don’t have any data
  5359. consumer libraries which do that yet, it’s probably easiest to
  5360. implement this with normal code for now.</p>
  5361. <p>I think this is a fairly urgent topic because of the adoption
  5362. curve (and energy) on OGP, and because it might possibly inform the
  5363. design of a standand JSON serialization for RDF, which I’m
  5364. expecting W3C to work on very soon.</p>
  5365. </li>
  5366. </ol>
  5367. </div>
  5368. </div>]]></content:encoded>
  5369.  <description>I propose that we designate a certain subset of the RDF model as “Simplified RDF” and standardize a method of encoding full RDF in Simplified RDF. The subset I have in mind is exactly the subset used by Facebook’s Open Graph Protocol (OGP) , and my proposed encoding technique is relatively straightforward. I’ve been mulling over this approach for a few months, and I’m fairly confident it will work, but I don’t claim to have all the details perfect yet. Comments and discussion are quite welcome, on this posting or on the [email protected] mailing list. This discussion, I’m afraid, is ...</description>
  5370. </item>
  5371. <item rdf:about="https://blog.ldodds.com/2019/07/08/lets-talk-about-plugs/">
  5372.  <dc:creator>Leigh Dodds</dc:creator>
  5373.  <dc:source>Lost Boy by Leigh Dodds</dc:source>
  5374.  <dc:relation>http://ldodds.com/blog/</dc:relation>
  5375.  <planet:content xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" rdf:parseType="Literal">
  5376. <div>
  5377. <p><em>This is a summary of a short talk I gave internally at the
  5378. ODI to help illustrate some of the important aspects of data
  5379. standards for non-technical folk. I thought I’d write it up here
  5380. too, in case its useful for anyone else. Let me know what you
  5381. think.</em></p>
  5382. <p>We benefit from standards in every aspect of our daily lives.
  5383. But because we take them for granted, we don’t tend to think about
  5384. them very much. At the ODI we’re frequently talking about standards
  5385. for data which, if you don’t have a technical background, might be
  5386. even harder to wrap your heard around.</p>
  5387. <p>A good example can help to illustrate the value of standards.
  5388. People frequently refer to telephone lines, railway tracks, etc.
  5389. But there’s an example that we all have plenty of personal
  5390. experience with.</p>
  5391. <p>Lets talk about plugs!</p>
  5392. <p><a href=
  5393. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2019/07/3-pin-plug.jpg"><img data-attachment-id="1537"
  5394. data-permalink=
  5395. "https://blog.ldodds.com/2019/07/08/lets-talk-about-plugs/3-pin-plug/"
  5396. data-orig-file=
  5397. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2019/07/3-pin-plug.jpg"
  5398. data-orig-size="700,700" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta=
  5399. "{&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;orientation&quot;:&quot;0&quot;}"
  5400. data-image-title="3-pin-plug" data-image-description=""
  5401. data-medium-file=
  5402. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2019/07/3-pin-plug.jpg?w=300"
  5403. data-large-file=
  5404. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2019/07/3-pin-plug.jpg?w=700"
  5405. class="aligncenter size-medium wp-image-1537" src=
  5406. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2019/07/3-pin-plug.jpg?w=300&amp;h=300"
  5407. alt="" width="300" height="300" srcset=
  5408. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2019/07/3-pin-plug.jpg?w=300&amp;h=300 300w, https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2019/07/3-pin-plug.jpg?w=600&amp;h=600 600w, https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2019/07/3-pin-plug.jpg?w=150&amp;h=150 150w"
  5409. sizes="(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px" /></a></p>
  5410. <p>You can confidently plug any of your devices into a wall socket
  5411. and it will just work. No thought required.</p>
  5412. <p>Have you ever thought about what it would be like if plugs and
  5413. wall sockets were all different sizes and shapes?</p>
  5414. <p>You couldn’t rely on being able to consistently plug your device
  5415. into any random socket, so you’d have to carry around loads of
  5416. different cables. Manufacturers might not design their plugs and
  5417. sockets very well so there might be greater risks of electrocution
  5418. or fires. Or maybe the company that built your new house decided to
  5419. only fit a specific type of wall socket because its agree a deal
  5420. with an electrical manufacturer, so when you move in you needed to
  5421. buy a completely new set of devices.</p>
  5422. <p>We don’t live in that world thankfully. As a nation we’ve agreed
  5423. that all of our plugs should be designed the same way.</p>
  5424. <p><a href=
  5425. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2019/07/plug.gif"><img data-attachment-id="1542"
  5426. data-permalink=
  5427. "https://blog.ldodds.com/2019/07/08/lets-talk-about-plugs/plug/"
  5428. data-orig-file=
  5429. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2019/07/plug.gif"
  5430. data-orig-size="480,480" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta=
  5431. "{&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;orientation&quot;:&quot;0&quot;}"
  5432. data-image-title="plug" data-image-description="" data-medium-file=
  5433. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2019/07/plug.gif?w=300"
  5434. data-large-file=
  5435. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2019/07/plug.gif?w=480"
  5436. class="aligncenter size-medium wp-image-1542" src=
  5437. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2019/07/plug.gif?w=300&amp;h=300"
  5438. alt="" width="300" height="300" /></a></p>
  5439. <p>That’s all a standard is. A <a href=
  5440. "http://standards.theodi.org/introduction/what-are-open-standards-for-data/">
  5441. documented, reusable agreement</a> that everyone uses.</p>
  5442. <p>Notice that a single standard, “<em>how to design a really great
  5443. plug</em>“, has multiple benefits. Safety is increased. We save
  5444. time and money. Manufacturers can be confident that their equipment
  5445. will work in any home or office.</p>
  5446. <p>That’s true of different standards too. <a href=
  5447. "http://standards.theodi.org/creating-impact/">Standards have
  5448. economic, policy, technical and social impacts</a>.</p>
  5449. <p>Open up a UK plug and it looks a bit like this.</p>
  5450. <p><a href=
  5451. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2019/07/500px-three_pin_mains_plug_uk.svg_.png">
  5452. <img data-attachment-id="1538" data-permalink=
  5453. "https://blog.ldodds.com/2019/07/08/lets-talk-about-plugs/500px-three_pin_mains_plug_uk-svg/"
  5454. data-orig-file=
  5455. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2019/07/500px-three_pin_mains_plug_uk.svg_.png"
  5456. data-orig-size="500,382" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta=
  5457. "{&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;orientation&quot;:&quot;0&quot;}"
  5458. data-image-title="500px-Three_pin_mains_plug_(UK).svg"
  5459. data-image-description="" data-medium-file=
  5460. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2019/07/500px-three_pin_mains_plug_uk.svg_.png?w=300"
  5461. data-large-file=
  5462. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2019/07/500px-three_pin_mains_plug_uk.svg_.png?w=500"
  5463. class="aligncenter size-medium wp-image-1538" src=
  5464. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2019/07/500px-three_pin_mains_plug_uk.svg_.png?w=300&amp;h=229"
  5465. alt="" width="300" height="229" srcset=
  5466. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2019/07/500px-three_pin_mains_plug_uk.svg_.png?w=300&amp;h=229 300w, https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2019/07/500px-three_pin_mains_plug_uk.svg_.png?w=150&amp;h=115 150w, https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2019/07/500px-three_pin_mains_plug_uk.svg_.png 500w"
  5467. sizes="(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px" /></a></p>
  5468. <p>Notice that there are colours for different types of wires (2,
  5469. 3, 4). And that fuses (5) are expected to be the same size and
  5470. shape. Those are all standards too. The wiring and voltages are
  5471. standardised too.</p>
  5472. <p>So the wiring, wall sockets and plugs in your house are designed
  5473. affording to a whole family of different standards, that are
  5474. designed to work with one another.</p>
  5475. <p>We can design more complex systems from smaller standards. It
  5476. helps us make new things faster, because we are reusing existing
  5477. work.</p>
  5478. <p>That’s a lot of time and agreement that we all benefit from.
  5479. Someone somewhere has invested the time and energy into thinking
  5480. all of that through. Lucky us!</p>
  5481. <p>When we visit other countries, we learn that their plugs and
  5482. sockets are different. Oh no!</p>
  5483. <p><a href=
  5484. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2019/07/foreign.gif"><img data-attachment-id="1541"
  5485. data-permalink=
  5486. "https://blog.ldodds.com/2019/07/08/lets-talk-about-plugs/foreign/"
  5487. data-orig-file=
  5488. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2019/07/foreign.gif"
  5489. data-orig-size="480,270" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta=
  5490. "{&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;orientation&quot;:&quot;0&quot;}"
  5491. data-image-title="foreign" data-image-description=""
  5492. data-medium-file=
  5493. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2019/07/foreign.gif?w=300"
  5494. data-large-file=
  5495. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2019/07/foreign.gif?w=480"
  5496. class="aligncenter size-medium wp-image-1541" src=
  5497. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2019/07/foreign.gif?w=300&amp;h=169"
  5498. alt="" width="300" height="169" /></a></p>
  5499. <p>That can be a bit frustrating, and means we have to spend a bit
  5500. more money and remember to pack the right adapters. It’d be nice if
  5501. the whole world agreed on how to design a plug. But that seems
  5502. unlikely. It would cost a lot of time and money in replacing wiring
  5503. and sockets.</p>
  5504. <p>But maybe those different designs are intentional? Perhaps there
  5505. are different local expectations around safety, for example. Or in
  5506. what devices people might be using in their homes. There might be
  5507. reasons why different communities choose to design and adopt
  5508. slightly different standards. Because they’re meeting slightly
  5509. different needs. But sometimes those differences might be
  5510. unnecessary. It can be hard to tell sometimes.</p>
  5511. <p>The people most impacted by these differences aren’t tourists,
  5512. its the manufacturers that have to design equipment to work in
  5513. different locations. Which is why your electrical devices normally
  5514. has a separate cable. So, depending on whether you travel or
  5515. whether you’re a device manufacturer you’ll have different
  5516. perceptions of how much a problem that is.</p>
  5517. <p><strong>All of the above is true for data
  5518. standards.</strong></p>
  5519. <p>Standards for data are agreements that help us collect, access,
  5520. share, use and publish data in consistent ways.&#160; They have a
  5521. range of different impacts.</p>
  5522. <p>There are lots of different types of standard and we combine
  5523. them together to create different ways to successfully exchange
  5524. data. Different communities often have their own standards for
  5525. similar things, e.g. for describing metadata or accessing data via
  5526. an API.</p>
  5527. <p>Sometimes those are simple differences that an adapter can
  5528. easily fix. Sometimes those differences are because the standards
  5529. are designed to meet different needs.</p>
  5530. <p><a href=
  5531. "http://standards.theodi.org/introduction/types-of-open-standards-for-data/">
  5532. <img class="aligncenter size-medium" src=
  5533. "https://i1.wp.com/standards.theodi.org/introduction/we-can-standardise-open-data-institute.jpg"
  5534. width="3508" height="2481" /></a></p>
  5535. <p>Unfortunately we don’t live in a world of standardised data
  5536. plugs and wires and fuses. We live in that other world. The one
  5537. where its hard to connect one thing to another thing. Where the
  5538. stuff coming down the wires is completely unexpected. And we get
  5539. repeated shocks from accidental releases of data.</p>
  5540. <p>I guarantee that in every user research, interview, government
  5541. consultation or call for evidence, people will be consistently
  5542. highlighting the need for more standards for data. People will
  5543. often say this explicitly, “We need more standards!”. But sometimes
  5544. they refer to the need in other ways: “We need make data more
  5545. discoverable!” (metadata standards) or “We need to make it easier
  5546. to safely release data!” (standardised codes of practice).</p>
  5547. <p>Unfortunately that’s not always that helpful because when you
  5548. probe a little deeper you find that people are talking about lots
  5549. of different things. Some people want to standardise the wiring.
  5550. Others just want to agree on a voltage. While others are still
  5551. debating the definition of “fuse”. These are all useful and
  5552. important things. You just need to dig a little deeper to find the
  5553. most useful place to start.</p>
  5554. <p>Its also not always clear whose job it is to actually create
  5555. those standards. Because we take standards for granted, we’re not
  5556. always clear about how they get created. Or how long it takes and
  5557. what process to follow to ensure they’re well designed.</p>
  5558. <p>The reason we published the <strong><a href=
  5559. "http://standards.theodi.org/">open standards for data
  5560. guidebook</a></strong> was to help communities get started in
  5561. designing the standards they need.</p>
  5562. <p><a href=
  5563. "http://standards.theodi.org/introduction/how-open-standards-are-developed/">
  5564. <img class="alignnone size-medium" src=
  5565. "https://i2.wp.com/standards.theodi.org/introduction/stages-in-standards-development-open-data-institute.jpg"
  5566. width="3508" height="2481" /></a></p>
  5567. <p>Standards development needs time and investment, as someone
  5568. somewhere needs to do the work of creating them. That, as ever, is
  5569. the really hard part.</p>
  5570. <p>Standards are part of the data infrastructure that help us
  5571. unlock value from data. We need to invest in creating and
  5572. maintaining them like we do other parts of our infrastructure.</p>
  5573. <p>Don’t just listen to me, <a href=
  5574. "http://standards.theodi.org/community/community-voices/">listen to
  5575. some of the people who’ve being creating standards for their
  5576. communities</a>.</p>
  5577. </div>
  5578. </planet:content>
  5579.  <dc:date rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#dateTime">2019-12-10T17:07:40.000000Z</dc:date>
  5580.  <title>Lets talk about plugs</title>
  5581.  <link>https://blog.ldodds.com/2019/07/08/lets-talk-about-plugs/</link>
  5582.  <content:encoded rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#XMLLiteral"><![CDATA[
  5583. <div xmlns='http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml'>
  5584. <div>
  5585. <p><em>This is a summary of a short talk I gave internally at the
  5586. ODI to help illustrate some of the important aspects of data
  5587. standards for non-technical folk. I thought I’d write it up here
  5588. too, in case its useful for anyone else. Let me know what you
  5589. think.</em></p>
  5590. <p>We benefit from standards in every aspect of our daily lives.
  5591. But because we take them for granted, we don’t tend to think about
  5592. them very much. At the ODI we’re frequently talking about standards
  5593. for data which, if you don’t have a technical background, might be
  5594. even harder to wrap your heard around.</p>
  5595. <p>A good example can help to illustrate the value of standards.
  5596. People frequently refer to telephone lines, railway tracks, etc.
  5597. But there’s an example that we all have plenty of personal
  5598. experience with.</p>
  5599. <p>Lets talk about plugs!</p>
  5600. <p><a href=
  5601. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2019/07/3-pin-plug.jpg"><img data-attachment-id="1537"
  5602. data-permalink=
  5603. "https://blog.ldodds.com/2019/07/08/lets-talk-about-plugs/3-pin-plug/"
  5604. data-orig-file=
  5605. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2019/07/3-pin-plug.jpg"
  5606. data-orig-size="700,700" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta=
  5607. "{&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;orientation&quot;:&quot;0&quot;}"
  5608. data-image-title="3-pin-plug" data-image-description=""
  5609. data-medium-file=
  5610. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2019/07/3-pin-plug.jpg?w=300"
  5611. data-large-file=
  5612. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2019/07/3-pin-plug.jpg?w=700"
  5613. class="aligncenter size-medium wp-image-1537" src=
  5614. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2019/07/3-pin-plug.jpg?w=300&amp;h=300"
  5615. alt="" width="300" height="300" srcset=
  5616. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2019/07/3-pin-plug.jpg?w=300&amp;h=300 300w, https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2019/07/3-pin-plug.jpg?w=600&amp;h=600 600w, https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2019/07/3-pin-plug.jpg?w=150&amp;h=150 150w"
  5617. sizes="(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px" /></a></p>
  5618. <p>You can confidently plug any of your devices into a wall socket
  5619. and it will just work. No thought required.</p>
  5620. <p>Have you ever thought about what it would be like if plugs and
  5621. wall sockets were all different sizes and shapes?</p>
  5622. <p>You couldn’t rely on being able to consistently plug your device
  5623. into any random socket, so you’d have to carry around loads of
  5624. different cables. Manufacturers might not design their plugs and
  5625. sockets very well so there might be greater risks of electrocution
  5626. or fires. Or maybe the company that built your new house decided to
  5627. only fit a specific type of wall socket because its agree a deal
  5628. with an electrical manufacturer, so when you move in you needed to
  5629. buy a completely new set of devices.</p>
  5630. <p>We don’t live in that world thankfully. As a nation we’ve agreed
  5631. that all of our plugs should be designed the same way.</p>
  5632. <p><a href=
  5633. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2019/07/plug.gif"><img data-attachment-id="1542"
  5634. data-permalink=
  5635. "https://blog.ldodds.com/2019/07/08/lets-talk-about-plugs/plug/"
  5636. data-orig-file=
  5637. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2019/07/plug.gif"
  5638. data-orig-size="480,480" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta=
  5639. "{&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;orientation&quot;:&quot;0&quot;}"
  5640. data-image-title="plug" data-image-description="" data-medium-file=
  5641. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2019/07/plug.gif?w=300"
  5642. data-large-file=
  5643. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2019/07/plug.gif?w=480"
  5644. class="aligncenter size-medium wp-image-1542" src=
  5645. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2019/07/plug.gif?w=300&amp;h=300"
  5646. alt="" width="300" height="300" /></a></p>
  5647. <p>That’s all a standard is. A <a href=
  5648. "http://standards.theodi.org/introduction/what-are-open-standards-for-data/">
  5649. documented, reusable agreement</a> that everyone uses.</p>
  5650. <p>Notice that a single standard, “<em>how to design a really great
  5651. plug</em>“, has multiple benefits. Safety is increased. We save
  5652. time and money. Manufacturers can be confident that their equipment
  5653. will work in any home or office.</p>
  5654. <p>That’s true of different standards too. <a href=
  5655. "http://standards.theodi.org/creating-impact/">Standards have
  5656. economic, policy, technical and social impacts</a>.</p>
  5657. <p>Open up a UK plug and it looks a bit like this.</p>
  5658. <p><a href=
  5659. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2019/07/500px-three_pin_mains_plug_uk.svg_.png">
  5660. <img data-attachment-id="1538" data-permalink=
  5661. "https://blog.ldodds.com/2019/07/08/lets-talk-about-plugs/500px-three_pin_mains_plug_uk-svg/"
  5662. data-orig-file=
  5663. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2019/07/500px-three_pin_mains_plug_uk.svg_.png"
  5664. data-orig-size="500,382" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta=
  5665. "{&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;orientation&quot;:&quot;0&quot;}"
  5666. data-image-title="500px-Three_pin_mains_plug_(UK).svg"
  5667. data-image-description="" data-medium-file=
  5668. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2019/07/500px-three_pin_mains_plug_uk.svg_.png?w=300"
  5669. data-large-file=
  5670. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2019/07/500px-three_pin_mains_plug_uk.svg_.png?w=500"
  5671. class="aligncenter size-medium wp-image-1538" src=
  5672. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2019/07/500px-three_pin_mains_plug_uk.svg_.png?w=300&amp;h=229"
  5673. alt="" width="300" height="229" srcset=
  5674. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2019/07/500px-three_pin_mains_plug_uk.svg_.png?w=300&amp;h=229 300w, https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2019/07/500px-three_pin_mains_plug_uk.svg_.png?w=150&amp;h=115 150w, https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2019/07/500px-three_pin_mains_plug_uk.svg_.png 500w"
  5675. sizes="(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px" /></a></p>
  5676. <p>Notice that there are colours for different types of wires (2,
  5677. 3, 4). And that fuses (5) are expected to be the same size and
  5678. shape. Those are all standards too. The wiring and voltages are
  5679. standardised too.</p>
  5680. <p>So the wiring, wall sockets and plugs in your house are designed
  5681. affording to a whole family of different standards, that are
  5682. designed to work with one another.</p>
  5683. <p>We can design more complex systems from smaller standards. It
  5684. helps us make new things faster, because we are reusing existing
  5685. work.</p>
  5686. <p>That’s a lot of time and agreement that we all benefit from.
  5687. Someone somewhere has invested the time and energy into thinking
  5688. all of that through. Lucky us!</p>
  5689. <p>When we visit other countries, we learn that their plugs and
  5690. sockets are different. Oh no!</p>
  5691. <p><a href=
  5692. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2019/07/foreign.gif"><img data-attachment-id="1541"
  5693. data-permalink=
  5694. "https://blog.ldodds.com/2019/07/08/lets-talk-about-plugs/foreign/"
  5695. data-orig-file=
  5696. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2019/07/foreign.gif"
  5697. data-orig-size="480,270" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta=
  5698. "{&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;orientation&quot;:&quot;0&quot;}"
  5699. data-image-title="foreign" data-image-description=""
  5700. data-medium-file=
  5701. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2019/07/foreign.gif?w=300"
  5702. data-large-file=
  5703. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2019/07/foreign.gif?w=480"
  5704. class="aligncenter size-medium wp-image-1541" src=
  5705. "https://leighdodds.files.wordpress.com/2019/07/foreign.gif?w=300&amp;h=169"
  5706. alt="" width="300" height="169" /></a></p>
  5707. <p>That can be a bit frustrating, and means we have to spend a bit
  5708. more money and remember to pack the right adapters. It’d be nice if
  5709. the whole world agreed on how to design a plug. But that seems
  5710. unlikely. It would cost a lot of time and money in replacing wiring
  5711. and sockets.</p>
  5712. <p>But maybe those different designs are intentional? Perhaps there
  5713. are different local expectations around safety, for example. Or in
  5714. what devices people might be using in their homes. There might be
  5715. reasons why different communities choose to design and adopt
  5716. slightly different standards. Because they’re meeting slightly
  5717. different needs. But sometimes those differences might be
  5718. unnecessary. It can be hard to tell sometimes.</p>
  5719. <p>The people most impacted by these differences aren’t tourists,
  5720. its the manufacturers that have to design equipment to work in
  5721. different locations. Which is why your electrical devices normally
  5722. has a separate cable. So, depending on whether you travel or
  5723. whether you’re a device manufacturer you’ll have different
  5724. perceptions of how much a problem that is.</p>
  5725. <p><strong>All of the above is true for data
  5726. standards.</strong></p>
  5727. <p>Standards for data are agreements that help us collect, access,
  5728. share, use and publish data in consistent ways.&#160; They have a
  5729. range of different impacts.</p>
  5730. <p>There are lots of different types of standard and we combine
  5731. them together to create different ways to successfully exchange
  5732. data. Different communities often have their own standards for
  5733. similar things, e.g. for describing metadata or accessing data via
  5734. an API.</p>
  5735. <p>Sometimes those are simple differences that an adapter can
  5736. easily fix. Sometimes those differences are because the standards
  5737. are designed to meet different needs.</p>
  5738. <p><a href=
  5739. "http://standards.theodi.org/introduction/types-of-open-standards-for-data/">
  5740. <img class="aligncenter size-medium" src=
  5741. "https://i1.wp.com/standards.theodi.org/introduction/we-can-standardise-open-data-institute.jpg"
  5742. width="3508" height="2481" /></a></p>
  5743. <p>Unfortunately we don’t live in a world of standardised data
  5744. plugs and wires and fuses. We live in that other world. The one
  5745. where its hard to connect one thing to another thing. Where the
  5746. stuff coming down the wires is completely unexpected. And we get
  5747. repeated shocks from accidental releases of data.</p>
  5748. <p>I guarantee that in every user research, interview, government
  5749. consultation or call for evidence, people will be consistently
  5750. highlighting the need for more standards for data. People will
  5751. often say this explicitly, “We need more standards!”. But sometimes
  5752. they refer to the need in other ways: “We need make data more
  5753. discoverable!” (metadata standards) or “We need to make it easier
  5754. to safely release data!” (standardised codes of practice).</p>
  5755. <p>Unfortunately that’s not always that helpful because when you
  5756. probe a little deeper you find that people are talking about lots
  5757. of different things. Some people want to standardise the wiring.
  5758. Others just want to agree on a voltage. While others are still
  5759. debating the definition of “fuse”. These are all useful and
  5760. important things. You just need to dig a little deeper to find the
  5761. most useful place to start.</p>
  5762. <p>Its also not always clear whose job it is to actually create
  5763. those standards. Because we take standards for granted, we’re not
  5764. always clear about how they get created. Or how long it takes and
  5765. what process to follow to ensure they’re well designed.</p>
  5766. <p>The reason we published the <strong><a href=
  5767. "http://standards.theodi.org/">open standards for data
  5768. guidebook</a></strong> was to help communities get started in
  5769. designing the standards they need.</p>
  5770. <p><a href=
  5771. "http://standards.theodi.org/introduction/how-open-standards-are-developed/">
  5772. <img class="alignnone size-medium" src=
  5773. "https://i2.wp.com/standards.theodi.org/introduction/stages-in-standards-development-open-data-institute.jpg"
  5774. width="3508" height="2481" /></a></p>
  5775. <p>Standards development needs time and investment, as someone
  5776. somewhere needs to do the work of creating them. That, as ever, is
  5777. the really hard part.</p>
  5778. <p>Standards are part of the data infrastructure that help us
  5779. unlock value from data. We need to invest in creating and
  5780. maintaining them like we do other parts of our infrastructure.</p>
  5781. <p>Don’t just listen to me, <a href=
  5782. "http://standards.theodi.org/community/community-voices/">listen to
  5783. some of the people who’ve being creating standards for their
  5784. communities</a>.</p>
  5785. </div>
  5786. </div>]]></content:encoded>
  5787.  <description>This is a summary of a short talk I gave internally at the ODI to help illustrate some of the important aspects of data standards for non-technical folk. I thought I’d write it up here too, in case its useful for anyone else. Let me know what you think. We benefit from standards in every aspect of our daily lives. But because we take them for granted, we don’t tend to think about them very much. At the ODI we’re frequently talking about standards for data which, if you don’t have a technical background, might be even harder to wrap ...</description>
  5788. </item>
  5789. <item rdf:about="https://cloud.wordpress.com/2010/01/25/book-launch-for-the-social-semantic-web/">
  5790.  <dc:creator>John Breslin</dc:creator>
  5791.  <dc:source>Cloudlands by John Breslin</dc:source>
  5792.  <dc:relation>http://www.johnbreslin.com/blog/</dc:relation>
  5793.  <planet:content xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" rdf:parseType="Literal">
  5794. <div>
  5795. <p>We had the official book launch of “<a href=
  5796. "http://socialsemanticweb.net">The Social Semantic Web</a>” last
  5797. month in the President’s Drawing Room at NUI Galway. The book was
  5798. officially launched by Dr. James J. Browne, President of <a href=
  5799. "http://www.nuigalway.ie/">NUI Galway</a>. The book was authored by
  5800. myself, Dr. Alexandre Passant and Prof. Stefan Decker from the
  5801. <a href="http://www.deri.ie/">Digital Enterprise Research
  5802. Institute</a> at NUI Galway (sponsored by <a href=
  5803. "http://www.sfi.ie/">SFI</a>). Here is a short blurb:</p>
  5804. <blockquote>
  5805. <p><a class="zem_slink" href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_2.0"
  5806. title="Web 2.0" rel="wikipedia">Web 2.0</a>, a platform where
  5807. people are connecting through their shared objects of interest, is
  5808. encountering boundaries in the areas of information integration,
  5809. portability, search, and demanding tasks like querying. The
  5810. <a class="zem_slink" href=
  5811. "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Semantic_Web" title="Semantic Web"
  5812. rel="wikipedia">Semantic Web</a> is an ideal platform for
  5813. interlinking and performing operations on the diverse data
  5814. available from Web 2.0, and has produced a variety of approaches to
  5815. overcome limitations with Web 2.0. In this book, Breslin et al.
  5816. describe some of the applications of Semantic Web technologies to
  5817. Web 2.0. The book is intended for professionals, researchers,
  5818. graduates, practitioners and developers.</p>
  5819. </blockquote>
  5820. <p>Some photographs from the launch event are below.</p>
  5821. <a href=
  5822. 'https://cloud.wordpress.com/2010/01/25/book-launch-for-the-social-semantic-web/20100122a/'><img width="99"
  5823. height="150" src=
  5824. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20100122a2.jpg?w=99&amp;h=150"
  5825. class="attachment-thumbnail size-thumbnail" alt="" srcset=
  5826. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20100122a2.jpg?w=99 99w, https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20100122a2.jpg?w=198 198w"
  5827. sizes="(max-width: 99px) 100vw, 99px" data-attachment-id="1815"
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  5834. data-image-title="20100122a" data-image-description=""
  5835. data-medium-file=
  5836. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20100122a2.jpg?w=199"
  5837. data-large-file=
  5838. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20100122a2.jpg?w=275" /></a>
  5839. <a href=
  5840. 'https://cloud.wordpress.com/2010/01/25/book-launch-for-the-social-semantic-web/20100122b/'>
  5841. <img width="150" height="100" src=
  5842. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20100122b2.jpg?w=150&amp;h=100"
  5843. class="attachment-thumbnail size-thumbnail" alt="" srcset=
  5844. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20100122b2.jpg?w=150 150w, https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20100122b2.jpg?w=300 300w"
  5845. sizes="(max-width: 150px) 100vw, 150px" data-attachment-id="1816"
  5846. data-permalink=
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  5848. data-orig-file=
  5849. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20100122b2.jpg"
  5850. data-orig-size="550,365" data-comments-opened="0" data-image-meta=
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  5852. data-image-title="20100122b" data-image-description=""
  5853. data-medium-file=
  5854. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20100122b2.jpg?w=300"
  5855. data-large-file=
  5856. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20100122b2.jpg?w=550" /></a>
  5857. <a href=
  5858. 'https://cloud.wordpress.com/2010/01/25/book-launch-for-the-social-semantic-web/20100122c/'>
  5859. <img width="150" height="100" src=
  5860. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20100122c2.jpg?w=150&amp;h=100"
  5861. class="attachment-thumbnail size-thumbnail" alt="" srcset=
  5862. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20100122c2.jpg?w=150 150w, https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20100122c2.jpg?w=300 300w"
  5863. sizes="(max-width: 150px) 100vw, 150px" data-attachment-id="1817"
  5864. data-permalink=
  5865. "https://cloud.wordpress.com/2010/01/25/book-launch-for-the-social-semantic-web/20100122c/"
  5866. data-orig-file=
  5867. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20100122c2.jpg"
  5868. data-orig-size="550,365" data-comments-opened="0" data-image-meta=
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  5871. data-medium-file=
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  5873. data-large-file=
  5874. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20100122c2.jpg?w=550" /></a>
  5875. <a href=
  5876. 'https://cloud.wordpress.com/2010/01/25/book-launch-for-the-social-semantic-web/20100122d/'>
  5877. <img width="150" height="100" src=
  5878. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20100122d2.jpg?w=150&amp;h=100"
  5879. class="attachment-thumbnail size-thumbnail" alt="" srcset=
  5880. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20100122d2.jpg?w=150 150w, https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20100122d2.jpg?w=300 300w"
  5881. sizes="(max-width: 150px) 100vw, 150px" data-attachment-id="1818"
  5882. data-permalink=
  5883. "https://cloud.wordpress.com/2010/01/25/book-launch-for-the-social-semantic-web/20100122d/"
  5884. data-orig-file=
  5885. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20100122d2.jpg"
  5886. data-orig-size="550,365" data-comments-opened="0" data-image-meta=
  5887. "{&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;}"
  5888. data-image-title="20100122d" data-image-description=""
  5889. data-medium-file=
  5890. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20100122d2.jpg?w=300"
  5891. data-large-file=
  5892. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20100122d2.jpg?w=550" /></a>
  5893. <a href=
  5894. 'https://cloud.wordpress.com/2010/01/25/book-launch-for-the-social-semantic-web/20100122e/'>
  5895. <img width="150" height="100" src=
  5896. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20100122e2.jpg?w=150&amp;h=100"
  5897. class="attachment-thumbnail size-thumbnail" alt="" srcset=
  5898. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20100122e2.jpg?w=150 150w, https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20100122e2.jpg?w=300 300w"
  5899. sizes="(max-width: 150px) 100vw, 150px" data-attachment-id="1819"
  5900. data-permalink=
  5901. "https://cloud.wordpress.com/2010/01/25/book-launch-for-the-social-semantic-web/20100122e/"
  5902. data-orig-file=
  5903. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20100122e2.jpg"
  5904. data-orig-size="550,365" data-comments-opened="0" data-image-meta=
  5905. "{&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;}"
  5906. data-image-title="20100122e" data-image-description=""
  5907. data-medium-file=
  5908. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20100122e2.jpg?w=300"
  5909. data-large-file=
  5910. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20100122e2.jpg?w=550" /></a>
  5911. <a href=
  5912. 'https://cloud.wordpress.com/2010/01/25/book-launch-for-the-social-semantic-web/20100122f/'>
  5913. <img width="150" height="100" src=
  5914. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20100122f2.jpg?w=150&amp;h=100"
  5915. class="attachment-thumbnail size-thumbnail" alt="" srcset=
  5916. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20100122f2.jpg?w=150 150w, https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20100122f2.jpg?w=300 300w"
  5917. sizes="(max-width: 150px) 100vw, 150px" data-attachment-id="1820"
  5918. data-permalink=
  5919. "https://cloud.wordpress.com/2010/01/25/book-launch-for-the-social-semantic-web/20100122f/"
  5920. data-orig-file=
  5921. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20100122f2.jpg"
  5922. data-orig-size="550,365" data-comments-opened="0" data-image-meta=
  5923. "{&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;}"
  5924. data-image-title="20100122f" data-image-description=""
  5925. data-medium-file=
  5926. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20100122f2.jpg?w=300"
  5927. data-large-file=
  5928. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20100122f2.jpg?w=550" /></a>
  5929. <a href=
  5930. 'https://cloud.wordpress.com/2010/01/25/book-launch-for-the-social-semantic-web/20100122g/'>
  5931. <img width="150" height="100" src=
  5932. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20100122g2.jpg?w=150&amp;h=100"
  5933. class="attachment-thumbnail size-thumbnail" alt="" srcset=
  5934. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20100122g2.jpg?w=150 150w, https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20100122g2.jpg?w=300 300w"
  5935. sizes="(max-width: 150px) 100vw, 150px" data-attachment-id="1821"
  5936. data-permalink=
  5937. "https://cloud.wordpress.com/2010/01/25/book-launch-for-the-social-semantic-web/20100122g/"
  5938. data-orig-file=
  5939. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20100122g2.jpg"
  5940. data-orig-size="550,365" data-comments-opened="0" data-image-meta=
  5941. "{&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;}"
  5942. data-image-title="20100122g" data-image-description=""
  5943. data-medium-file=
  5944. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20100122g2.jpg?w=300"
  5945. data-large-file=
  5946. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20100122g2.jpg?w=550" /></a>
  5947. <a href=
  5948. 'https://cloud.wordpress.com/2010/01/25/book-launch-for-the-social-semantic-web/20100122h/'>
  5949. <img width="150" height="100" src=
  5950. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20100122h2.jpg?w=150&amp;h=100"
  5951. class="attachment-thumbnail size-thumbnail" alt="" srcset=
  5952. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20100122h2.jpg?w=150 150w, https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20100122h2.jpg?w=300 300w"
  5953. sizes="(max-width: 150px) 100vw, 150px" data-attachment-id="1822"
  5954. data-permalink=
  5955. "https://cloud.wordpress.com/2010/01/25/book-launch-for-the-social-semantic-web/20100122h/"
  5956. data-orig-file=
  5957. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20100122h2.jpg"
  5958. data-orig-size="550,365" data-comments-opened="0" data-image-meta=
  5959. "{&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;}"
  5960. data-image-title="20100122h" data-image-description=""
  5961. data-medium-file=
  5962. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20100122h2.jpg?w=300"
  5963. data-large-file=
  5964. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20100122h2.jpg?w=550" /></a>
  5965. <a href=
  5966. 'https://cloud.wordpress.com/2010/01/25/book-launch-for-the-social-semantic-web/20101022i/'>
  5967. <img width="150" height="100" src=
  5968. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20101022i2.jpg?w=150&amp;h=100"
  5969. class="attachment-thumbnail size-thumbnail" alt="" srcset=
  5970. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20101022i2.jpg?w=150 150w, https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20101022i2.jpg?w=300 300w"
  5971. sizes="(max-width: 150px) 100vw, 150px" data-attachment-id="1813"
  5972. data-permalink=
  5973. "https://cloud.wordpress.com/2010/01/25/book-launch-for-the-social-semantic-web/20101022i/"
  5974. data-orig-file=
  5975. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20101022i2.jpg"
  5976. data-orig-size="426,283" data-comments-opened="0" data-image-meta=
  5977. "{&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;5&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;Andrew Downes&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;NIKON D3&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;1260203078&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;(C)2009 Andrew Downes, all rights reserved&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;40&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;400&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0.076923076923077&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;}"
  5978. data-image-title="20101022i" data-image-description=""
  5979. data-medium-file=
  5980. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20101022i2.jpg?w=300"
  5981. data-large-file=
  5982. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20101022i2.jpg?w=426" /></a>
  5983. <a href=
  5984. 'https://cloud.wordpress.com/2010/01/25/book-launch-for-the-social-semantic-web/20101022j/'>
  5985. <img width="150" height="100" src=
  5986. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20101022j2.jpg?w=150&amp;h=100"
  5987. class="attachment-thumbnail size-thumbnail" alt="" srcset=
  5988. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20101022j2.jpg?w=150 150w, https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20101022j2.jpg?w=300 300w"
  5989. sizes="(max-width: 150px) 100vw, 150px" data-attachment-id="1814"
  5990. data-permalink=
  5991. "https://cloud.wordpress.com/2010/01/25/book-launch-for-the-social-semantic-web/20101022j/"
  5992. data-orig-file=
  5993. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20101022j2.jpg"
  5994. data-orig-size="426,283" data-comments-opened="0" data-image-meta=
  5995. "{&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;5&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;Andrew Downes&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;NIKON D3&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;1260202729&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;(C)2009 Andrew Downes, all rights reserved&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;24&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;400&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0.025&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;}"
  5996. data-image-title="20101022j" data-image-description=""
  5997. data-medium-file=
  5998. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20101022j2.jpg?w=300"
  5999. data-large-file=
  6000. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20101022j2.jpg?w=426" /></a>
  6001. <div style="margin-top:10px;height:15px;" class="zemanta-pixie">
  6002. <a class="zemanta-pixie-a" href=
  6003. "http://reblog.zemanta.com/zemified/59cc15cc-5651-4719-88dc-ac7e94d1a395/"
  6004. title="Reblog this post [with Zemanta]" rel="nofollow"><img style=
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  6009. </planet:content>
  6010.  <dc:date rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#dateTime">2019-12-10T17:05:35.000000Z</dc:date>
  6011.  <title>Book launch for "The Social Semantic Web"</title>
  6012.  <link>https://cloud.wordpress.com/2010/01/25/book-launch-for-the-social-semantic-web/</link>
  6013.  <content:encoded rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#XMLLiteral"><![CDATA[
  6014. <div xmlns='http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml'>
  6015. <div>
  6016. <p>We had the official book launch of “<a href=
  6017. "http://socialsemanticweb.net">The Social Semantic Web</a>” last
  6018. month in the President’s Drawing Room at NUI Galway. The book was
  6019. officially launched by Dr. James J. Browne, President of <a href=
  6020. "http://www.nuigalway.ie/">NUI Galway</a>. The book was authored by
  6021. myself, Dr. Alexandre Passant and Prof. Stefan Decker from the
  6022. <a href="http://www.deri.ie/">Digital Enterprise Research
  6023. Institute</a> at NUI Galway (sponsored by <a href=
  6024. "http://www.sfi.ie/">SFI</a>). Here is a short blurb:</p>
  6025. <blockquote>
  6026. <p><a class="zem_slink" href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_2.0"
  6027. title="Web 2.0" rel="wikipedia">Web 2.0</a>, a platform where
  6028. people are connecting through their shared objects of interest, is
  6029. encountering boundaries in the areas of information integration,
  6030. portability, search, and demanding tasks like querying. The
  6031. <a class="zem_slink" href=
  6032. "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Semantic_Web" title="Semantic Web"
  6033. rel="wikipedia">Semantic Web</a> is an ideal platform for
  6034. interlinking and performing operations on the diverse data
  6035. available from Web 2.0, and has produced a variety of approaches to
  6036. overcome limitations with Web 2.0. In this book, Breslin et al.
  6037. describe some of the applications of Semantic Web technologies to
  6038. Web 2.0. The book is intended for professionals, researchers,
  6039. graduates, practitioners and developers.</p>
  6040. </blockquote>
  6041. <p>Some photographs from the launch event are below.</p>
  6042. <a href=
  6043. 'https://cloud.wordpress.com/2010/01/25/book-launch-for-the-social-semantic-web/20100122a/'><img width="99"
  6044. height="150" src=
  6045. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20100122a2.jpg?w=99&amp;h=150"
  6046. class="attachment-thumbnail size-thumbnail" alt="" srcset=
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  6058. data-large-file=
  6059. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20100122a2.jpg?w=275" /></a>
  6060. <a href=
  6061. 'https://cloud.wordpress.com/2010/01/25/book-launch-for-the-social-semantic-web/20100122b/'>
  6062. <img width="150" height="100" src=
  6063. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20100122b2.jpg?w=150&amp;h=100"
  6064. class="attachment-thumbnail size-thumbnail" alt="" srcset=
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  6078. <a href=
  6079. 'https://cloud.wordpress.com/2010/01/25/book-launch-for-the-social-semantic-web/20100122c/'>
  6080. <img width="150" height="100" src=
  6081. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20100122c2.jpg?w=150&amp;h=100"
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  6096. <a href=
  6097. 'https://cloud.wordpress.com/2010/01/25/book-launch-for-the-social-semantic-web/20100122d/'>
  6098. <img width="150" height="100" src=
  6099. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20100122d2.jpg?w=150&amp;h=100"
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  6114. <a href=
  6115. 'https://cloud.wordpress.com/2010/01/25/book-launch-for-the-social-semantic-web/20100122e/'>
  6116. <img width="150" height="100" src=
  6117. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20100122e2.jpg?w=150&amp;h=100"
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  6132. <a href=
  6133. 'https://cloud.wordpress.com/2010/01/25/book-launch-for-the-social-semantic-web/20100122f/'>
  6134. <img width="150" height="100" src=
  6135. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20100122f2.jpg?w=150&amp;h=100"
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  6150. <a href=
  6151. 'https://cloud.wordpress.com/2010/01/25/book-launch-for-the-social-semantic-web/20100122g/'>
  6152. <img width="150" height="100" src=
  6153. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20100122g2.jpg?w=150&amp;h=100"
  6154. class="attachment-thumbnail size-thumbnail" alt="" srcset=
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  6156. sizes="(max-width: 150px) 100vw, 150px" data-attachment-id="1821"
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  6161. data-orig-size="550,365" data-comments-opened="0" data-image-meta=
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  6168. <a href=
  6169. 'https://cloud.wordpress.com/2010/01/25/book-launch-for-the-social-semantic-web/20100122h/'>
  6170. <img width="150" height="100" src=
  6171. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20100122h2.jpg?w=150&amp;h=100"
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  6179. data-orig-size="550,365" data-comments-opened="0" data-image-meta=
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  6182. data-medium-file=
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  6184. data-large-file=
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  6186. <a href=
  6187. 'https://cloud.wordpress.com/2010/01/25/book-launch-for-the-social-semantic-web/20101022i/'>
  6188. <img width="150" height="100" src=
  6189. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/20101022i2.jpg?w=150&amp;h=100"
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  6192. sizes="(max-width: 150px) 100vw, 150px" data-attachment-id="1813"
  6193. data-permalink=
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  6195. data-orig-file=
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  6197. data-orig-size="426,283" data-comments-opened="0" data-image-meta=
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  6205. 'https://cloud.wordpress.com/2010/01/25/book-launch-for-the-social-semantic-web/20101022j/'>
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  6222. <div style="margin-top:10px;height:15px;" class="zemanta-pixie">
  6223. <a class="zemanta-pixie-a" href=
  6224. "http://reblog.zemanta.com/zemified/59cc15cc-5651-4719-88dc-ac7e94d1a395/"
  6225. title="Reblog this post [with Zemanta]" rel="nofollow"><img style=
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  6229. </div>
  6230. </div>]]></content:encoded>
  6231.  <description>We had the official book launch of “ The Social Semantic Web ” last month in the President’s Drawing Room at NUI Galway. The book was officially launched by Dr. James J. Browne, President of NUI Galway . The book was authored by myself, Dr. Alexandre Passant and Prof. Stefan Decker from the Digital Enterprise Research Institute at NUI Galway (sponsored by SFI ). Here is a short blurb: Web 2.0 , a platform where people are connecting through their shared objects of interest, is encountering boundaries in the areas of information integration, portability, search, and demanding tasks like querying. ...</description>
  6232. </item>
  6233. <item rdf:about="https://cloud.wordpress.com/2009/12/23/another-successful-defense-by-uldis-bojars-in-november/">
  6234.  <dc:creator>John Breslin</dc:creator>
  6235.  <dc:source>Cloudlands by John Breslin</dc:source>
  6236.  <dc:relation>http://www.johnbreslin.com/blog/</dc:relation>
  6237.  <planet:content xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" rdf:parseType="Literal">
  6238. <div>
  6239. <p><a href="http://captsolo.net/">Uldis Bojars</a> submitted his
  6240. PhD thesis entitled “The SIOC MEthodology for Lightweight Ontology
  6241. Development” to the University in September 2009. We had a nice
  6242. night out to celebrate in one of our favourite haunts, <a href=
  6243. "http://www.oscarsbistro.ie/">Oscars Bistro</a>.</p>
  6244. <figure data-shortcode="caption" id="attachment_1792"
  6245. aria-describedby="caption-attachment-1792" style="width: 320px"
  6246. class="wp-caption aligncenter"><img data-attachment-id="1792"
  6247. data-permalink=
  6248. "https://cloud.wordpress.com/2009/12/23/another-successful-defense-by-uldis-bojars-in-november/20091223c/"
  6249. data-orig-file=
  6250. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/20091223c2.jpg"
  6251. data-orig-size="320,240" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta=
  6252. "{&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;}"
  6253. data-image-title="20091223c" data-image-description=""
  6254. data-medium-file=
  6255. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/20091223c2.jpg?w=300"
  6256. data-large-file=
  6257. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/20091223c2.jpg?w=320"
  6258. src=
  6259. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/20091223c2.jpg?w=740"
  6260. alt="Jodi, John, Alex, Julie, Liga, Sheila and Smita" title=
  6261. "20091223c" class="size-full wp-image-1792" srcset=
  6262. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/20091223c2.jpg 320w, https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/20091223c2.jpg?w=150 150w, https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/20091223c2.jpg?w=300 300w"
  6263. sizes="(max-width: 320px) 100vw, 320px" />
  6264. <figcaption id="caption-attachment-1792" class="wp-caption-text">
  6265. Jodi, John, Alex, Julie, Liga, Sheila and Smita</figcaption>
  6266. </figure>
  6267. <p>This was followed by a successful defense at the end of November
  6268. 2009. The examiners were <a href=
  6269. "http://www.wiwiss.fu-berlin.de/en/institute/pwo/bizer/index.html">Chris
  6270. Bizer</a> and <a href="http://www.stefandecker.org/">Stefan
  6271. Decker</a>. Uldis even wore a suit for the event, see below.</p>
  6272. <figure data-shortcode="caption" id="attachment_1793"
  6273. aria-describedby="caption-attachment-1793" style="width: 320px"
  6274. class="wp-caption aligncenter"><img data-attachment-id="1793"
  6275. data-permalink=
  6276. "https://cloud.wordpress.com/2009/12/23/another-successful-defense-by-uldis-bojars-in-november/20091223d/"
  6277. data-orig-file=
  6278. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/20091223d2.jpg"
  6279. data-orig-size="320,240" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta=
  6280. "{&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;}"
  6281. data-image-title="20091223d" data-image-description=""
  6282. data-medium-file=
  6283. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/20091223d2.jpg?w=300"
  6284. data-large-file=
  6285. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/20091223d2.jpg?w=320"
  6286. src=
  6287. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/20091223d2.jpg?w=740"
  6288. alt="I will rule the world!" title="20091223d" class=
  6289. "size-full wp-image-1793" srcset=
  6290. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/20091223d2.jpg 320w, https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/20091223d2.jpg?w=150 150w, https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/20091223d2.jpg?w=300 300w"
  6291. sizes="(max-width: 320px) 100vw, 320px" />
  6292. <figcaption id="caption-attachment-1793" class="wp-caption-text">I
  6293. will rule the world!</figcaption>
  6294. </figure>
  6295. <p>Uldis established a formal <a class="zem_slink" href=
  6296. "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ontology" title="Ontology" rel=
  6297. "wikipedia">ontology</a> design process called the SIOC
  6298. MEthodology, based on an evolution of existing methodologies that
  6299. have been streamlined, experience developing the <a href=
  6300. "http://rdfs.org/sioc/spec/">SIOC ontology</a>, and observations
  6301. regarding the development of lightweight ontologies on the Web.
  6302. Ontology promotion and dissemination is established as a core part
  6303. of the ontology development process. To demonstrate the usage of
  6304. the SIOC MEthodology, Uldis described the <a href=
  6305. "http://sioc-project.org/">SIOC project</a> case study which brings
  6306. together the <a class="zem_slink" href=
  6307. "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_web" title="Social web" rel=
  6308. "wikipedia">Social Web</a> and the <a class="zem_slink" href=
  6309. "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Semantic_Web" title="Semantic Web"
  6310. rel="wikipedia">Semantic Web</a> by providing semantic
  6311. interoperability between social websites. This framework allows
  6312. data to be exported, aggregated and consumed from social websites
  6313. using the SIOC ontology (in the SIOC application food chain).
  6314. Uldis’ research work has been published in 4 journal articles, 8
  6315. conference papers, 13 workshop papers, and 1 book chapter. The SIOC
  6316. framework has also been adopted in 33 third-party applications. The
  6317. <a href=
  6318. "https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/3886">Semantic
  6319. Radar</a> tool he initiated for Firefox has been downloaded 24,000
  6320. times. His scholarship was funded by <a href=
  6321. "http://www.sfi.ie/">Science Foundation Ireland</a> under grant
  6322. numbers SFI/02/CE1/I131 (Líon) and SFI/08/CE/I1380 (Líon 2).</p>
  6323. <p>We wish Uldis all the best in his future career, and hope he
  6324. will continue to communicate and collaborate with researchers in
  6325. <a href="http://www.deri.ie/">DERI</a>, <a href=
  6326. "http://www.nuigalway.ie/">NUI Galway</a> in the future.</p>
  6327. <div style="margin-top:10px;height:15px;" class="zemanta-pixie">
  6328. <a class="zemanta-pixie-a" href=
  6329. "http://reblog.zemanta.com/zemified/46500fa9-a4f5-4282-a6f0-306d75f53822/"
  6330. title="Reblog this post [with Zemanta]" rel="nofollow"><img style=
  6331. "border:medium none;float:right;" class="zemanta-pixie-img" src=
  6332. "https://i2.wp.com/img.zemanta.com/reblog_e.png" alt=
  6333. "Reblog this post [with Zemanta]" /></a></div>
  6334. </div>
  6335. </planet:content>
  6336.  <dc:date rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#dateTime">2019-12-10T17:05:35.000000Z</dc:date>
  6337.  <title>Another successful defense by Uldis Bojars in
  6338. November</title>
  6339.  <link>https://cloud.wordpress.com/2009/12/23/another-successful-defense-by-uldis-bojars-in-november/</link>
  6340.  <content:encoded rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#XMLLiteral"><![CDATA[
  6341. <div xmlns='http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml'>
  6342. <div>
  6343. <p><a href="http://captsolo.net/">Uldis Bojars</a> submitted his
  6344. PhD thesis entitled “The SIOC MEthodology for Lightweight Ontology
  6345. Development” to the University in September 2009. We had a nice
  6346. night out to celebrate in one of our favourite haunts, <a href=
  6347. "http://www.oscarsbistro.ie/">Oscars Bistro</a>.</p>
  6348. <figure data-shortcode="caption" id="attachment_1792"
  6349. aria-describedby="caption-attachment-1792" style="width: 320px"
  6350. class="wp-caption aligncenter"><img data-attachment-id="1792"
  6351. data-permalink=
  6352. "https://cloud.wordpress.com/2009/12/23/another-successful-defense-by-uldis-bojars-in-november/20091223c/"
  6353. data-orig-file=
  6354. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/20091223c2.jpg"
  6355. data-orig-size="320,240" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta=
  6356. "{&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;}"
  6357. data-image-title="20091223c" data-image-description=""
  6358. data-medium-file=
  6359. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/20091223c2.jpg?w=300"
  6360. data-large-file=
  6361. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/20091223c2.jpg?w=320"
  6362. src=
  6363. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/20091223c2.jpg?w=740"
  6364. alt="Jodi, John, Alex, Julie, Liga, Sheila and Smita" title=
  6365. "20091223c" class="size-full wp-image-1792" srcset=
  6366. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/20091223c2.jpg 320w, https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/20091223c2.jpg?w=150 150w, https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/20091223c2.jpg?w=300 300w"
  6367. sizes="(max-width: 320px) 100vw, 320px" />
  6368. <figcaption id="caption-attachment-1792" class="wp-caption-text">
  6369. Jodi, John, Alex, Julie, Liga, Sheila and Smita</figcaption>
  6370. </figure>
  6371. <p>This was followed by a successful defense at the end of November
  6372. 2009. The examiners were <a href=
  6373. "http://www.wiwiss.fu-berlin.de/en/institute/pwo/bizer/index.html">Chris
  6374. Bizer</a> and <a href="http://www.stefandecker.org/">Stefan
  6375. Decker</a>. Uldis even wore a suit for the event, see below.</p>
  6376. <figure data-shortcode="caption" id="attachment_1793"
  6377. aria-describedby="caption-attachment-1793" style="width: 320px"
  6378. class="wp-caption aligncenter"><img data-attachment-id="1793"
  6379. data-permalink=
  6380. "https://cloud.wordpress.com/2009/12/23/another-successful-defense-by-uldis-bojars-in-november/20091223d/"
  6381. data-orig-file=
  6382. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/20091223d2.jpg"
  6383. data-orig-size="320,240" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta=
  6384. "{&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;}"
  6385. data-image-title="20091223d" data-image-description=""
  6386. data-medium-file=
  6387. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/20091223d2.jpg?w=300"
  6388. data-large-file=
  6389. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/20091223d2.jpg?w=320"
  6390. src=
  6391. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/20091223d2.jpg?w=740"
  6392. alt="I will rule the world!" title="20091223d" class=
  6393. "size-full wp-image-1793" srcset=
  6394. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/20091223d2.jpg 320w, https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/20091223d2.jpg?w=150 150w, https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/20091223d2.jpg?w=300 300w"
  6395. sizes="(max-width: 320px) 100vw, 320px" />
  6396. <figcaption id="caption-attachment-1793" class="wp-caption-text">I
  6397. will rule the world!</figcaption>
  6398. </figure>
  6399. <p>Uldis established a formal <a class="zem_slink" href=
  6400. "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ontology" title="Ontology" rel=
  6401. "wikipedia">ontology</a> design process called the SIOC
  6402. MEthodology, based on an evolution of existing methodologies that
  6403. have been streamlined, experience developing the <a href=
  6404. "http://rdfs.org/sioc/spec/">SIOC ontology</a>, and observations
  6405. regarding the development of lightweight ontologies on the Web.
  6406. Ontology promotion and dissemination is established as a core part
  6407. of the ontology development process. To demonstrate the usage of
  6408. the SIOC MEthodology, Uldis described the <a href=
  6409. "http://sioc-project.org/">SIOC project</a> case study which brings
  6410. together the <a class="zem_slink" href=
  6411. "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_web" title="Social web" rel=
  6412. "wikipedia">Social Web</a> and the <a class="zem_slink" href=
  6413. "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Semantic_Web" title="Semantic Web"
  6414. rel="wikipedia">Semantic Web</a> by providing semantic
  6415. interoperability between social websites. This framework allows
  6416. data to be exported, aggregated and consumed from social websites
  6417. using the SIOC ontology (in the SIOC application food chain).
  6418. Uldis’ research work has been published in 4 journal articles, 8
  6419. conference papers, 13 workshop papers, and 1 book chapter. The SIOC
  6420. framework has also been adopted in 33 third-party applications. The
  6421. <a href=
  6422. "https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/3886">Semantic
  6423. Radar</a> tool he initiated for Firefox has been downloaded 24,000
  6424. times. His scholarship was funded by <a href=
  6425. "http://www.sfi.ie/">Science Foundation Ireland</a> under grant
  6426. numbers SFI/02/CE1/I131 (Líon) and SFI/08/CE/I1380 (Líon 2).</p>
  6427. <p>We wish Uldis all the best in his future career, and hope he
  6428. will continue to communicate and collaborate with researchers in
  6429. <a href="http://www.deri.ie/">DERI</a>, <a href=
  6430. "http://www.nuigalway.ie/">NUI Galway</a> in the future.</p>
  6431. <div style="margin-top:10px;height:15px;" class="zemanta-pixie">
  6432. <a class="zemanta-pixie-a" href=
  6433. "http://reblog.zemanta.com/zemified/46500fa9-a4f5-4282-a6f0-306d75f53822/"
  6434. title="Reblog this post [with Zemanta]" rel="nofollow"><img style=
  6435. "border:medium none;float:right;" class="zemanta-pixie-img" src=
  6436. "https://i2.wp.com/img.zemanta.com/reblog_e.png" alt=
  6437. "Reblog this post [with Zemanta]" /></a></div>
  6438. </div>
  6439. </div>]]></content:encoded>
  6440.  <description>Uldis Bojars submitted his PhD thesis entitled “The SIOC MEthodology for Lightweight Ontology Development” to the University in September 2009. We had a nice night out to celebrate in one of our favourite haunts, Oscars Bistro . Jodi, John, Alex, Julie, Liga, Sheila and Smita This was followed by a successful defense at the end of November 2009. The examiners were Chris Bizer and Stefan Decker . Uldis even wore a suit for the event, see below. I will rule the world! Uldis established a formal ontology design process called the SIOC MEthodology, based on an evolution of existing methodologies ...</description>
  6441. </item>
  6442. <item rdf:about="https://cloud.wordpress.com/2009/12/23/haklae-kim-and-his-successful-defense-in-september/">
  6443.  <dc:creator>John Breslin</dc:creator>
  6444.  <dc:source>Cloudlands by John Breslin</dc:source>
  6445.  <dc:relation>http://www.johnbreslin.com/blog/</dc:relation>
  6446.  <planet:content xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" rdf:parseType="Literal">
  6447. <div>
  6448. <p>This is a few months late but better late then never! We said
  6449. goodbye to PhD researcher <a href=
  6450. "http://www.blogweb.co.kr/">Haklae Kim</a> in May of this year when
  6451. he returned to Korea and took up a position with Samsung
  6452. Electronics soon afterward. We had a nice going away lunch for
  6453. Haklae with the rest of the team from the <a href=
  6454. "http://soso.deri.ie/">Social Software Unit</a> (picture
  6455. below).</p>
  6456. <figure data-shortcode="caption" id="attachment_1783"
  6457. aria-describedby="caption-attachment-1783" style="width: 310px"
  6458. class="wp-caption aligncenter"><a href=
  6459. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/20091223a2.jpg"><img data-attachment-id="1783"
  6460. data-permalink=
  6461. "https://cloud.wordpress.com/2009/12/23/haklae-kim-and-his-successful-defense-in-september/20091223a/"
  6462. data-orig-file=
  6463. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/20091223a2.jpg"
  6464. data-orig-size="800,600" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta=
  6465. "{&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;2.8&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;N95 8GB&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;1242310724&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;5.6&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;160&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0.029&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;}"
  6466. data-image-title="20091223a" data-image-description=""
  6467. data-medium-file=
  6468. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/20091223a2.jpg?w=300"
  6469. data-large-file=
  6470. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/20091223a2.jpg?w=740"
  6471. src=
  6472. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/20091223a2.jpg?w=300&amp;h=225"
  6473. alt="Sheila, Uldis, John, Haklae, Julie, Alex and Smita" title=
  6474. "20091223a" width="300" height="225" class=
  6475. "size-medium wp-image-1783" srcset=
  6476. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/20091223a2.jpg?w=300&amp;h=225 300w, https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/20091223a2.jpg?w=600&amp;h=450 600w, https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/20091223a2.jpg?w=150&amp;h=113 150w"
  6477. sizes="(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px" /></a>
  6478. <figcaption id="caption-attachment-1783" class="wp-caption-text">
  6479. Sheila, Uldis, John, Haklae, Julie, Alex and Smita</figcaption>
  6480. </figure>
  6481. <p>Haklae returned to Galway in September to defend his PhD
  6482. entitled “Leveraging a Semantic Framework for Augmenting Social
  6483. Tagging Practices in Heterogeneous Content Sharing Platforms”. The
  6484. examiners were <a href="http://www.stefandecker.org/">Stefan
  6485. Decker</a>, <a href="http://www.tomgruber.org/">Tom Gruber</a> and
  6486. <a href=
  6487. "http://www.lalic.paris4.sorbonne.fr/MEMBRES/page_perso.php?nom=Laublet">
  6488. Philippe Laublet</a>. Haklae successfully defended his thesis
  6489. during the viva, and he will be awarded his PhD in 2010. We got a
  6490. nice photo of the examiners during the viva which was conducted via
  6491. <a href="http://www.cisco.com/web/go/telepresence/index.html">Cisco
  6492. Telepresence</a>, with Stefan (in Galway) “resting” his hand on
  6493. Tom’s shoulder (in San Jose)!</p>
  6494. <figure data-shortcode="caption" id="attachment_1785"
  6495. aria-describedby="caption-attachment-1785" style="width: 310px"
  6496. class="wp-caption aligncenter"><a href=
  6497. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/20091223b2.jpg"><img data-attachment-id="1785"
  6498. data-permalink=
  6499. "https://cloud.wordpress.com/2009/12/23/haklae-kim-and-his-successful-defense-in-september/20091223b/"
  6500. data-orig-file=
  6501. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/20091223b2.jpg"
  6502. data-orig-size="800,600" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta=
  6503. "{&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;3.3&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;EX-P505&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;1253037538&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;6.3&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0.033333333333333&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;}"
  6504. data-image-title="20091223b" data-image-description=""
  6505. data-medium-file=
  6506. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/20091223b2.jpg?w=300"
  6507. data-large-file=
  6508. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/20091223b2.jpg?w=740"
  6509. src=
  6510. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/20091223b2.jpg?w=300&amp;h=225"
  6511. alt=
  6512. "Philippe Laublet, Haklae Kim, Tom Gruber, Stefan Decker and John Breslin"
  6513. title="20091223b" width="300" height="225" class=
  6514. "size-medium wp-image-1785" srcset=
  6515. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/20091223b2.jpg?w=300&amp;h=225 300w, https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/20091223b2.jpg?w=600&amp;h=450 600w, https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/20091223b2.jpg?w=150&amp;h=113 150w"
  6516. sizes="(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px" /></a>
  6517. <figcaption id="caption-attachment-1785" class="wp-caption-text">
  6518. Philippe Laublet, Haklae Kim, Tom Gruber, Stefan Decker and John
  6519. Breslin</figcaption>
  6520. </figure>
  6521. <p>Haklae created a formal model called <a href=
  6522. "http://scot-project.org/">SCOT</a> (Social Semantic Cloud of Tags)
  6523. that can semantically describe tagging activities. The SCOT
  6524. ontology provides enhanced features for representing tagging and
  6525. folksonomies. This model can be used for sharing and exchanging
  6526. tagging data across different platforms. To demonstrate the usage
  6527. of SCOT, Haklae developed the <a href=
  6528. "http://int.ere.st/">int.ere.st</a> open tagging platform that
  6529. combined techniques from both the <a class="zem_slink" href=
  6530. "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_web" title="Social web" rel=
  6531. "wikipedia">Social Web</a> and the Semantic Web. The SCOT model
  6532. also provides benefits for constructing social networks. Haklae’s
  6533. work allows the discovery of social relationships by analysing
  6534. tagging practices in SCOT metadata. He performed these analyses
  6535. using both Formal Concept Analysis and tag clustering algorithms.
  6536. The SCOT model has also been adopted in six applications (<a class=
  6537. "zem_slink" href="http://www.openlinksw.com/" title=
  6538. "OpenLink Software" rel="nofollow">OpenLink</a> <a class=
  6539. "zem_slink" href="http://virtuoso.openlinksw.com/" title=
  6540. "Virtuoso Universal Server" rel="nofollow">Virtuoso</a>, SPARCool,
  6541. RelaxSEO, RDFa on Rails, OpenRDF, SCAN), and the int.ere.st service
  6542. has 1,200 registered members. Haklae’s research work was published
  6543. in 2 journal articles, 15 conference papers, 3 workshop papers, and
  6544. 2 book chapters. His scholarship was funded by <a href=
  6545. "http://www.sfi.ie/">Science Foundation Ireland</a> under grant
  6546. numbers SFI/02/CE1/I131 (Líon) and SFI/08/CE/I1380 (Líon 2).</p>
  6547. <p>We wish Haklae all the best in his future career, and hope he
  6548. will continue to communicate and collaborate with researchers in
  6549. <a href="http://www.deri.ie/">DERI</a>, <a href=
  6550. "http://www.nuigalway.ie/">NUI Galway</a> in the future.</p>
  6551. <div style="margin-top:10px;height:15px;" class="zemanta-pixie">
  6552. <a class="zemanta-pixie-a" href=
  6553. "http://reblog.zemanta.com/zemified/4d3f8bbf-0d0e-4bb6-980a-13883edba784/"
  6554. title="Reblog this post [with Zemanta]" rel="nofollow"><img style=
  6555. "border:medium none;float:right;" class="zemanta-pixie-img" src=
  6556. "https://i2.wp.com/img.zemanta.com/reblog_e.png" alt=
  6557. "Reblog this post [with Zemanta]" /></a></div>
  6558. </div>
  6559. </planet:content>
  6560.  <dc:date rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#dateTime">2019-12-10T17:05:35.000000Z</dc:date>
  6561.  <title>Haklae Kim and his successful defense in September</title>
  6562.  <link>https://cloud.wordpress.com/2009/12/23/haklae-kim-and-his-successful-defense-in-september/</link>
  6563.  <content:encoded rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#XMLLiteral"><![CDATA[
  6564. <div xmlns='http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml'>
  6565. <div>
  6566. <p>This is a few months late but better late then never! We said
  6567. goodbye to PhD researcher <a href=
  6568. "http://www.blogweb.co.kr/">Haklae Kim</a> in May of this year when
  6569. he returned to Korea and took up a position with Samsung
  6570. Electronics soon afterward. We had a nice going away lunch for
  6571. Haklae with the rest of the team from the <a href=
  6572. "http://soso.deri.ie/">Social Software Unit</a> (picture
  6573. below).</p>
  6574. <figure data-shortcode="caption" id="attachment_1783"
  6575. aria-describedby="caption-attachment-1783" style="width: 310px"
  6576. class="wp-caption aligncenter"><a href=
  6577. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/20091223a2.jpg"><img data-attachment-id="1783"
  6578. data-permalink=
  6579. "https://cloud.wordpress.com/2009/12/23/haklae-kim-and-his-successful-defense-in-september/20091223a/"
  6580. data-orig-file=
  6581. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/20091223a2.jpg"
  6582. data-orig-size="800,600" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta=
  6583. "{&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;2.8&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;N95 8GB&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;1242310724&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;5.6&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;160&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0.029&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;}"
  6584. data-image-title="20091223a" data-image-description=""
  6585. data-medium-file=
  6586. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/20091223a2.jpg?w=300"
  6587. data-large-file=
  6588. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/20091223a2.jpg?w=740"
  6589. src=
  6590. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/20091223a2.jpg?w=300&amp;h=225"
  6591. alt="Sheila, Uldis, John, Haklae, Julie, Alex and Smita" title=
  6592. "20091223a" width="300" height="225" class=
  6593. "size-medium wp-image-1783" srcset=
  6594. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/20091223a2.jpg?w=300&amp;h=225 300w, https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/20091223a2.jpg?w=600&amp;h=450 600w, https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/20091223a2.jpg?w=150&amp;h=113 150w"
  6595. sizes="(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px" /></a>
  6596. <figcaption id="caption-attachment-1783" class="wp-caption-text">
  6597. Sheila, Uldis, John, Haklae, Julie, Alex and Smita</figcaption>
  6598. </figure>
  6599. <p>Haklae returned to Galway in September to defend his PhD
  6600. entitled “Leveraging a Semantic Framework for Augmenting Social
  6601. Tagging Practices in Heterogeneous Content Sharing Platforms”. The
  6602. examiners were <a href="http://www.stefandecker.org/">Stefan
  6603. Decker</a>, <a href="http://www.tomgruber.org/">Tom Gruber</a> and
  6604. <a href=
  6605. "http://www.lalic.paris4.sorbonne.fr/MEMBRES/page_perso.php?nom=Laublet">
  6606. Philippe Laublet</a>. Haklae successfully defended his thesis
  6607. during the viva, and he will be awarded his PhD in 2010. We got a
  6608. nice photo of the examiners during the viva which was conducted via
  6609. <a href="http://www.cisco.com/web/go/telepresence/index.html">Cisco
  6610. Telepresence</a>, with Stefan (in Galway) “resting” his hand on
  6611. Tom’s shoulder (in San Jose)!</p>
  6612. <figure data-shortcode="caption" id="attachment_1785"
  6613. aria-describedby="caption-attachment-1785" style="width: 310px"
  6614. class="wp-caption aligncenter"><a href=
  6615. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/20091223b2.jpg"><img data-attachment-id="1785"
  6616. data-permalink=
  6617. "https://cloud.wordpress.com/2009/12/23/haklae-kim-and-his-successful-defense-in-september/20091223b/"
  6618. data-orig-file=
  6619. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/20091223b2.jpg"
  6620. data-orig-size="800,600" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta=
  6621. "{&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;3.3&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;EX-P505&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;1253037538&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;6.3&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0.033333333333333&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;}"
  6622. data-image-title="20091223b" data-image-description=""
  6623. data-medium-file=
  6624. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/20091223b2.jpg?w=300"
  6625. data-large-file=
  6626. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/20091223b2.jpg?w=740"
  6627. src=
  6628. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/20091223b2.jpg?w=300&amp;h=225"
  6629. alt=
  6630. "Philippe Laublet, Haklae Kim, Tom Gruber, Stefan Decker and John Breslin"
  6631. title="20091223b" width="300" height="225" class=
  6632. "size-medium wp-image-1785" srcset=
  6633. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/20091223b2.jpg?w=300&amp;h=225 300w, https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/20091223b2.jpg?w=600&amp;h=450 600w, https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/20091223b2.jpg?w=150&amp;h=113 150w"
  6634. sizes="(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px" /></a>
  6635. <figcaption id="caption-attachment-1785" class="wp-caption-text">
  6636. Philippe Laublet, Haklae Kim, Tom Gruber, Stefan Decker and John
  6637. Breslin</figcaption>
  6638. </figure>
  6639. <p>Haklae created a formal model called <a href=
  6640. "http://scot-project.org/">SCOT</a> (Social Semantic Cloud of Tags)
  6641. that can semantically describe tagging activities. The SCOT
  6642. ontology provides enhanced features for representing tagging and
  6643. folksonomies. This model can be used for sharing and exchanging
  6644. tagging data across different platforms. To demonstrate the usage
  6645. of SCOT, Haklae developed the <a href=
  6646. "http://int.ere.st/">int.ere.st</a> open tagging platform that
  6647. combined techniques from both the <a class="zem_slink" href=
  6648. "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_web" title="Social web" rel=
  6649. "wikipedia">Social Web</a> and the Semantic Web. The SCOT model
  6650. also provides benefits for constructing social networks. Haklae’s
  6651. work allows the discovery of social relationships by analysing
  6652. tagging practices in SCOT metadata. He performed these analyses
  6653. using both Formal Concept Analysis and tag clustering algorithms.
  6654. The SCOT model has also been adopted in six applications (<a class=
  6655. "zem_slink" href="http://www.openlinksw.com/" title=
  6656. "OpenLink Software" rel="nofollow">OpenLink</a> <a class=
  6657. "zem_slink" href="http://virtuoso.openlinksw.com/" title=
  6658. "Virtuoso Universal Server" rel="nofollow">Virtuoso</a>, SPARCool,
  6659. RelaxSEO, RDFa on Rails, OpenRDF, SCAN), and the int.ere.st service
  6660. has 1,200 registered members. Haklae’s research work was published
  6661. in 2 journal articles, 15 conference papers, 3 workshop papers, and
  6662. 2 book chapters. His scholarship was funded by <a href=
  6663. "http://www.sfi.ie/">Science Foundation Ireland</a> under grant
  6664. numbers SFI/02/CE1/I131 (Líon) and SFI/08/CE/I1380 (Líon 2).</p>
  6665. <p>We wish Haklae all the best in his future career, and hope he
  6666. will continue to communicate and collaborate with researchers in
  6667. <a href="http://www.deri.ie/">DERI</a>, <a href=
  6668. "http://www.nuigalway.ie/">NUI Galway</a> in the future.</p>
  6669. <div style="margin-top:10px;height:15px;" class="zemanta-pixie">
  6670. <a class="zemanta-pixie-a" href=
  6671. "http://reblog.zemanta.com/zemified/4d3f8bbf-0d0e-4bb6-980a-13883edba784/"
  6672. title="Reblog this post [with Zemanta]" rel="nofollow"><img style=
  6673. "border:medium none;float:right;" class="zemanta-pixie-img" src=
  6674. "https://i2.wp.com/img.zemanta.com/reblog_e.png" alt=
  6675. "Reblog this post [with Zemanta]" /></a></div>
  6676. </div>
  6677. </div>]]></content:encoded>
  6678.  <description>This is a few months late but better late then never! We said goodbye to PhD researcher Haklae Kim in May of this year when he returned to Korea and took up a position with Samsung Electronics soon afterward. We had a nice going away lunch for Haklae with the rest of the team from the Social Software Unit (picture below). Sheila, Uldis, John, Haklae, Julie, Alex and Smita Haklae returned to Galway in September to defend his PhD entitled “Leveraging a Semantic Framework for Augmenting Social Tagging Practices in Heterogeneous Content Sharing Platforms”. The examiners were Stefan Decker , ...</description>
  6679. </item>
  6680. <item rdf:about="https://cloud.wordpress.com/2009/10/28/some-of-my-very-preliminary-opinions-on-google-wave/">
  6681.  <dc:creator>John Breslin</dc:creator>
  6682.  <dc:source>Cloudlands by John Breslin</dc:source>
  6683.  <dc:relation>http://www.johnbreslin.com/blog/</dc:relation>
  6684.  <planet:content xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" rdf:parseType="Literal">
  6685. <div>
  6686. <p>I was interviewed by <a href=
  6687. "http://www.linkedin.com/in/mboran">Marie Boran</a> from <a href=
  6688. "http://www.siliconrepublic.com/">Silicon Republic</a> recently for
  6689. an interesting article she was writing entitled “<a href=
  6690. "http://www.independent.ie/business/technology/will-google-wave-topple-the-email-status-quo-and-change-the-way-we-work-1914281.html">Will
  6691. Google Wave topple the e-mail status quo and change the way we
  6692. work?</a>“. I thought that maybe my longer answers may be of
  6693. interest and am pasting them below.</p>
  6694. <p><i>Disclaimer: My knowledge of <a class="zem_slink" href=
  6695. "http://google.com" title="Google" rel="nofollow">Google</a>
  6696. <a class="zem_slink" href="http://wave.google.com/" title=
  6697. "Google Wave" rel="nofollow">Wave</a> is second hand through
  6698. various videos and demonstrations I’ve seen… Also, my answers were
  6699. written pretty quickly!</i></p>
  6700. <p><b>As someone who is both behind Ireland’s biggest online
  6701. community boards.ie and a researcher at DERI on the <a class=
  6702. "zem_slink" href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Semantic_Web" title=
  6703. "Semantic Web" rel="wikipedia">Semantic Web</a>, are you excited
  6704. about Google Wave?</b></p>
  6705. <blockquote>
  6706. <p>Technically, I think it’s an exciting development –
  6707. commercially, it obviously provides potential for others (Google
  6708. included) to set up a competing service to us (!), but I think what
  6709. is good is the way it has been shown that Google Wave can integrate
  6710. with existing platforms. For example, there’s a nice demo showing
  6711. how Google Wave plus <a class="zem_slink" href=
  6712. "http://www.mediawiki.org/" title="MediaWiki" rel=
  6713. "nofollow">MediaWiki</a> (the software that powers the Wikipedia)
  6714. can be used to help editors who are simultaneously editing a wiki
  6715. page. If it can be done for wikis, it could aid with lots of things
  6716. relevant to online communities like boards.ie. For example,
  6717. moderators could see what other moderators are online at the same
  6718. time, communicate on issues such as troublesome users, posts with
  6719. questionable content, and then avoid stepping on each other’s toes
  6720. when dealing with issues.</p>
  6721. </blockquote>
  6722. <p><b>Does it potential for collaborative research projects? Or is
  6723. it heavyweight/serious enough?</b></p>
  6724. <blockquote>
  6725. <p>I think it has some potential when combined with other tools
  6726. that people are using already. There’s an example from SAP of
  6727. Google Wave being integrated with a business process modelling
  6728. application. People always seem to step back to e-mail for doing
  6729. various research actions. While wikis and the like can be useful
  6730. tools for quickly drafting research ideas, papers, projects, etc.,
  6731. there is that element of not knowing who is doing stuff at the same
  6732. time as you. Just as people are using <a class="zem_slink" href=
  6733. "http://www.google.com/talk/" title="Google Talk" rel=
  6734. "nofollow">Gtalk</a> to augment Gmail by being able to communicate
  6735. in contacts in real-time when browsing e-mails, Google Wave could
  6736. potentially be integrated with other platforms such as
  6737. collaborative work environments, document sharing systems, etc. It
  6738. may not be heavyweight enough on its own but at least it can
  6739. augment what we already use.</p>
  6740. </blockquote>
  6741. <p><b>Where does Google Wave sit in terms of the development of the
  6742. Semantic Web?</b></p>
  6743. <blockquote>
  6744. <p>I think it could be a huge source of data for the Semantic Web.
  6745. What we find with various social and collaborative platforms is
  6746. that people are voluntarily creating lots of useful related data
  6747. about various objects (people, events, hobbies, organisations) and
  6748. having a more real-time approach to creating content
  6749. collaboratively will only make that source of data bigger and
  6750. hopefully more interlinked. I’d hope that data from Google Wave can
  6751. be made available using technologies such as SIOC from DERI, NUI
  6752. Galway and the Online Presence Ontology (something we are also
  6753. working on).</p>
  6754. </blockquote>
  6755. <p><b>If we are to use Google Wave to pull in feeds from all over
  6756. the Web will both RSS and widgets become sexy again?</b></p>
  6757. <blockquote>
  6758. <p>I haven’t seen the example of Wave pulling in feeds, but in
  6759. theory, what I could imagine is that real-time updating of
  6760. information from various sources could allow that stream of current
  6761. information to be updated, commented upon and forwarded to various
  6762. other Waves in a very dynamic way. We’ve seen how <a class=
  6763. "zem_slink" href="http://twitter.com/" title="Twitter" rel=
  6764. "nofollow">Twitter</a> has already provided some new life for RSS
  6765. feeds in terms of services like Twitterfeed automatically pushing
  6766. RSS updates to Twitter, and this results in some significant
  6767. amounts of rebroadcasting of that content via retweets etc.</p>
  6768. <p>Certainly, one of the big things about Wave is its integration
  6769. of various third-party widgets, and I think once it is fully
  6770. launched we will see lots of cool applications building on the APIs
  6771. that they provide. There’s been a few basic demonstrator gadgets
  6772. shown already like polls, board games and event planning, but it’ll
  6773. be the third-party ones that make good use of the real-time
  6774. collaboration that will probably be the most interesting, as
  6775. there’ll be many more people with ideas compared to some internal
  6776. developers.</p>
  6777. </blockquote>
  6778. <p><b>Is Wave the first serious example of a communications
  6779. platform that will only be as good as the third-party developers
  6780. that contribute to it?</b></p>
  6781. <blockquote>
  6782. <p>Not really. I think that title applies to many of the
  6783. communications platforms we use on the Web. <a class="zem_slink"
  6784. href="http://facebook.com" title="Facebook" rel=
  6785. "nofollow">Facebook</a> was a busy service but really took off once
  6786. the user-contributable applications layer was added. Drupal was
  6787. obviously the work of a core group of people but again the
  6788. third-party contributions outweigh those of the few that made
  6789. it.</p>
  6790. </blockquote>
  6791. <p><b>We already have e-mail and IM combined in Gmail and Google
  6792. Docs covers the collaborative element so people might be thinking
  6793. ‘what is so new, groundbreaking or beneficial about Wave?’ What’s
  6794. your opinion on this?</b></p>
  6795. <blockquote>
  6796. <p>Perhaps the real-time editing and updating process. Often times,
  6797. it’s difficult to go back in a conversation and add to or fix
  6798. something you’ve said earlier. But it’s not just a matter of
  6799. rewriting the past – you can also go back and see what people said
  6800. before they made an update (“rewind the Wave”).</p>
  6801. </blockquote>
  6802. <p><b>Is Google heading towards unified communications with Wave,
  6803. and is it possible that it will combine Gmail, Wave and Google
  6804. Voice in the future?</b></p>
  6805. <blockquote>
  6806. <p>I guess Wave could be one portion of a UC suite but I think the
  6807. Wave idea doesn’t encompass all of the parts…</p>
  6808. </blockquote>
  6809. <p><b>Do you think Google is looking to pull in conversations the
  6810. way <a class="zem_slink" href="http://friendfeed.com" title=
  6811. "FriendFeed" rel="nofollow">FriendFeed</a>, Facebook and Twitter
  6812. does? If so, will it succeed?</b></p>
  6813. <blockquote>
  6814. <p>Yes, certainly Google have had interests in this area with their
  6815. acquisition of <a class="zem_slink" href="http://www.jaiku.com"
  6816. title="Jaiku" rel="nofollow">Jaiku</a> some time back (everyone
  6817. assumed this would lead to a competitor to Twitter; most recently
  6818. they made the Jaiku engine available as <a class="zem_slink" href=
  6819. "http://www.wikinvest.com/concept/Open_Source" title="Open Source"
  6820. rel="nofollow">open source</a>). I am not sure if Google intends to
  6821. make available a single entry point to all public waves that would
  6822. rival Twitter or Facebook status updates, but if so, it could be a
  6823. very powerful competitor.</p>
  6824. </blockquote>
  6825. <p><b>Is it possible that Wave will become as widely used and
  6826. ubiquitous as Gmail?</b></p>
  6827. <blockquote>
  6828. <p>It will take some critical mass to get it going, integrating it
  6829. into Gmail could be a good first step.</p>
  6830. </blockquote>
  6831. <p><b>And finally – is the game changing in your opinion?</b></p>
  6832. <blockquote>
  6833. <p>Certainly, we’ve moved from frequently updated blogs (every few
  6834. hours/days) to more frequently updated microblogs (every few
  6835. minutes/seconds) to being able to not just update in real-time but
  6836. go back and easily add to / update what’s been said any time in the
  6837. past. <b>People want the freshest content, and this is another step
  6838. towards not just providing content that is fresh now but a way of
  6839. freshening the content we’ve made in the past.</b></p>
  6840. </blockquote>
  6841. <div class="zemanta-pixie" style="margin-top:10px;height:15px;">
  6842. <a class="zemanta-pixie-a" href=
  6843. "http://reblog.zemanta.com/zemified/bede799f-9d1e-4c3d-8bdd-186e335fbb65/"
  6844. title="Reblog this post [with Zemanta]" rel="nofollow"><img class=
  6845. "zemanta-pixie-img" src=
  6846. "https://i2.wp.com/img.zemanta.com/reblog_e.png" alt=
  6847. "Reblog this post [with Zemanta]" style=
  6848. "border:none;float:right;" /></a></div>
  6849. </div>
  6850. </planet:content>
  6851.  <dc:date rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#dateTime">2019-12-10T17:05:35.000000Z</dc:date>
  6852.  <title>Some of my (very) preliminary opinions on Google
  6853. Wave</title>
  6854.  <link>https://cloud.wordpress.com/2009/10/28/some-of-my-very-preliminary-opinions-on-google-wave/</link>
  6855.  <content:encoded rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#XMLLiteral"><![CDATA[
  6856. <div xmlns='http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml'>
  6857. <div>
  6858. <p>I was interviewed by <a href=
  6859. "http://www.linkedin.com/in/mboran">Marie Boran</a> from <a href=
  6860. "http://www.siliconrepublic.com/">Silicon Republic</a> recently for
  6861. an interesting article she was writing entitled “<a href=
  6862. "http://www.independent.ie/business/technology/will-google-wave-topple-the-email-status-quo-and-change-the-way-we-work-1914281.html">Will
  6863. Google Wave topple the e-mail status quo and change the way we
  6864. work?</a>“. I thought that maybe my longer answers may be of
  6865. interest and am pasting them below.</p>
  6866. <p><i>Disclaimer: My knowledge of <a class="zem_slink" href=
  6867. "http://google.com" title="Google" rel="nofollow">Google</a>
  6868. <a class="zem_slink" href="http://wave.google.com/" title=
  6869. "Google Wave" rel="nofollow">Wave</a> is second hand through
  6870. various videos and demonstrations I’ve seen… Also, my answers were
  6871. written pretty quickly!</i></p>
  6872. <p><b>As someone who is both behind Ireland’s biggest online
  6873. community boards.ie and a researcher at DERI on the <a class=
  6874. "zem_slink" href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Semantic_Web" title=
  6875. "Semantic Web" rel="wikipedia">Semantic Web</a>, are you excited
  6876. about Google Wave?</b></p>
  6877. <blockquote>
  6878. <p>Technically, I think it’s an exciting development –
  6879. commercially, it obviously provides potential for others (Google
  6880. included) to set up a competing service to us (!), but I think what
  6881. is good is the way it has been shown that Google Wave can integrate
  6882. with existing platforms. For example, there’s a nice demo showing
  6883. how Google Wave plus <a class="zem_slink" href=
  6884. "http://www.mediawiki.org/" title="MediaWiki" rel=
  6885. "nofollow">MediaWiki</a> (the software that powers the Wikipedia)
  6886. can be used to help editors who are simultaneously editing a wiki
  6887. page. If it can be done for wikis, it could aid with lots of things
  6888. relevant to online communities like boards.ie. For example,
  6889. moderators could see what other moderators are online at the same
  6890. time, communicate on issues such as troublesome users, posts with
  6891. questionable content, and then avoid stepping on each other’s toes
  6892. when dealing with issues.</p>
  6893. </blockquote>
  6894. <p><b>Does it potential for collaborative research projects? Or is
  6895. it heavyweight/serious enough?</b></p>
  6896. <blockquote>
  6897. <p>I think it has some potential when combined with other tools
  6898. that people are using already. There’s an example from SAP of
  6899. Google Wave being integrated with a business process modelling
  6900. application. People always seem to step back to e-mail for doing
  6901. various research actions. While wikis and the like can be useful
  6902. tools for quickly drafting research ideas, papers, projects, etc.,
  6903. there is that element of not knowing who is doing stuff at the same
  6904. time as you. Just as people are using <a class="zem_slink" href=
  6905. "http://www.google.com/talk/" title="Google Talk" rel=
  6906. "nofollow">Gtalk</a> to augment Gmail by being able to communicate
  6907. in contacts in real-time when browsing e-mails, Google Wave could
  6908. potentially be integrated with other platforms such as
  6909. collaborative work environments, document sharing systems, etc. It
  6910. may not be heavyweight enough on its own but at least it can
  6911. augment what we already use.</p>
  6912. </blockquote>
  6913. <p><b>Where does Google Wave sit in terms of the development of the
  6914. Semantic Web?</b></p>
  6915. <blockquote>
  6916. <p>I think it could be a huge source of data for the Semantic Web.
  6917. What we find with various social and collaborative platforms is
  6918. that people are voluntarily creating lots of useful related data
  6919. about various objects (people, events, hobbies, organisations) and
  6920. having a more real-time approach to creating content
  6921. collaboratively will only make that source of data bigger and
  6922. hopefully more interlinked. I’d hope that data from Google Wave can
  6923. be made available using technologies such as SIOC from DERI, NUI
  6924. Galway and the Online Presence Ontology (something we are also
  6925. working on).</p>
  6926. </blockquote>
  6927. <p><b>If we are to use Google Wave to pull in feeds from all over
  6928. the Web will both RSS and widgets become sexy again?</b></p>
  6929. <blockquote>
  6930. <p>I haven’t seen the example of Wave pulling in feeds, but in
  6931. theory, what I could imagine is that real-time updating of
  6932. information from various sources could allow that stream of current
  6933. information to be updated, commented upon and forwarded to various
  6934. other Waves in a very dynamic way. We’ve seen how <a class=
  6935. "zem_slink" href="http://twitter.com/" title="Twitter" rel=
  6936. "nofollow">Twitter</a> has already provided some new life for RSS
  6937. feeds in terms of services like Twitterfeed automatically pushing
  6938. RSS updates to Twitter, and this results in some significant
  6939. amounts of rebroadcasting of that content via retweets etc.</p>
  6940. <p>Certainly, one of the big things about Wave is its integration
  6941. of various third-party widgets, and I think once it is fully
  6942. launched we will see lots of cool applications building on the APIs
  6943. that they provide. There’s been a few basic demonstrator gadgets
  6944. shown already like polls, board games and event planning, but it’ll
  6945. be the third-party ones that make good use of the real-time
  6946. collaboration that will probably be the most interesting, as
  6947. there’ll be many more people with ideas compared to some internal
  6948. developers.</p>
  6949. </blockquote>
  6950. <p><b>Is Wave the first serious example of a communications
  6951. platform that will only be as good as the third-party developers
  6952. that contribute to it?</b></p>
  6953. <blockquote>
  6954. <p>Not really. I think that title applies to many of the
  6955. communications platforms we use on the Web. <a class="zem_slink"
  6956. href="http://facebook.com" title="Facebook" rel=
  6957. "nofollow">Facebook</a> was a busy service but really took off once
  6958. the user-contributable applications layer was added. Drupal was
  6959. obviously the work of a core group of people but again the
  6960. third-party contributions outweigh those of the few that made
  6961. it.</p>
  6962. </blockquote>
  6963. <p><b>We already have e-mail and IM combined in Gmail and Google
  6964. Docs covers the collaborative element so people might be thinking
  6965. ‘what is so new, groundbreaking or beneficial about Wave?’ What’s
  6966. your opinion on this?</b></p>
  6967. <blockquote>
  6968. <p>Perhaps the real-time editing and updating process. Often times,
  6969. it’s difficult to go back in a conversation and add to or fix
  6970. something you’ve said earlier. But it’s not just a matter of
  6971. rewriting the past – you can also go back and see what people said
  6972. before they made an update (“rewind the Wave”).</p>
  6973. </blockquote>
  6974. <p><b>Is Google heading towards unified communications with Wave,
  6975. and is it possible that it will combine Gmail, Wave and Google
  6976. Voice in the future?</b></p>
  6977. <blockquote>
  6978. <p>I guess Wave could be one portion of a UC suite but I think the
  6979. Wave idea doesn’t encompass all of the parts…</p>
  6980. </blockquote>
  6981. <p><b>Do you think Google is looking to pull in conversations the
  6982. way <a class="zem_slink" href="http://friendfeed.com" title=
  6983. "FriendFeed" rel="nofollow">FriendFeed</a>, Facebook and Twitter
  6984. does? If so, will it succeed?</b></p>
  6985. <blockquote>
  6986. <p>Yes, certainly Google have had interests in this area with their
  6987. acquisition of <a class="zem_slink" href="http://www.jaiku.com"
  6988. title="Jaiku" rel="nofollow">Jaiku</a> some time back (everyone
  6989. assumed this would lead to a competitor to Twitter; most recently
  6990. they made the Jaiku engine available as <a class="zem_slink" href=
  6991. "http://www.wikinvest.com/concept/Open_Source" title="Open Source"
  6992. rel="nofollow">open source</a>). I am not sure if Google intends to
  6993. make available a single entry point to all public waves that would
  6994. rival Twitter or Facebook status updates, but if so, it could be a
  6995. very powerful competitor.</p>
  6996. </blockquote>
  6997. <p><b>Is it possible that Wave will become as widely used and
  6998. ubiquitous as Gmail?</b></p>
  6999. <blockquote>
  7000. <p>It will take some critical mass to get it going, integrating it
  7001. into Gmail could be a good first step.</p>
  7002. </blockquote>
  7003. <p><b>And finally – is the game changing in your opinion?</b></p>
  7004. <blockquote>
  7005. <p>Certainly, we’ve moved from frequently updated blogs (every few
  7006. hours/days) to more frequently updated microblogs (every few
  7007. minutes/seconds) to being able to not just update in real-time but
  7008. go back and easily add to / update what’s been said any time in the
  7009. past. <b>People want the freshest content, and this is another step
  7010. towards not just providing content that is fresh now but a way of
  7011. freshening the content we’ve made in the past.</b></p>
  7012. </blockquote>
  7013. <div class="zemanta-pixie" style="margin-top:10px;height:15px;">
  7014. <a class="zemanta-pixie-a" href=
  7015. "http://reblog.zemanta.com/zemified/bede799f-9d1e-4c3d-8bdd-186e335fbb65/"
  7016. title="Reblog this post [with Zemanta]" rel="nofollow"><img class=
  7017. "zemanta-pixie-img" src=
  7018. "https://i2.wp.com/img.zemanta.com/reblog_e.png" alt=
  7019. "Reblog this post [with Zemanta]" style=
  7020. "border:none;float:right;" /></a></div>
  7021. </div>
  7022. </div>]]></content:encoded>
  7023.  <description>I was interviewed by Marie Boran from Silicon Republic recently for an interesting article she was writing entitled “ Will Google Wave topple the e-mail status quo and change the way we work? “. I thought that maybe my longer answers may be of interest and am pasting them below. Disclaimer: My knowledge of Google Wave is second hand through various videos and demonstrations I’ve seen… Also, my answers were written pretty quickly! As someone who is both behind Ireland’s biggest online community boards.ie and a researcher at DERI on the Semantic Web , are you excited about Google Wave? ...</description>
  7024. </item>
  7025. <item rdf:about="https://cloud.wordpress.com/2009/06/24/open-government-and-linked-data-now-its-time-to-draft/">
  7026.  <dc:creator>John Breslin</dc:creator>
  7027.  <dc:source>Cloudlands by John Breslin</dc:source>
  7028.  <dc:relation>http://www.johnbreslin.com/blog/</dc:relation>
  7029.  <planet:content xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" rdf:parseType="Literal">
  7030. <div>
  7031. <p>For the past few months, there have been a variety of calls for
  7032. feedback and suggestions on how <a class="zem_slink" href=
  7033. "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States" title="United States"
  7034. rel="wikipedia">the US</a> Government can move towards becoming
  7035. more open and transparent, especially in terms of their dealings
  7036. with citizens and also for disseminating information about their
  7037. recent financial stimulus package.</p>
  7038. <p>As part of this, the <a href=
  7039. "http://www.thenationaldialogue.org/">National Dialogue</a> forum
  7040. was set up to solicit solutions for ways of monitoring the
  7041. “expenditure and use of recovery funds”. <a class="zem_slink" href=
  7042. "http://www.w3.org/People/Berners-Lee/" title="Tim Berners-Lee"
  7043. rel="nofollow">Tim Berners-Lee</a> wrote a proposal on how <a href=
  7044. "http://www.thenationaldialogue.org/ideas/linked-open-data/">linked
  7045. open data could provide semantically-rich, linkable and reusable
  7046. data from Recovery.gov</a>. I also <a href=
  7047. "http://www.johnbreslin.com/blog/2009/05/02/idea-for-linked-open-data-from-the-us-recovery-effort/">
  7048. blogged about this recently</a>, detailing some ideas for how
  7049. discussions by citizens on the various uses of expenditure
  7050. (represented using <a class="zem_slink" href=
  7051. "http://sioc-project.org/" title="SIOC" rel="nofollow">SIOC</a> and
  7052. <a class="zem_slink" href=
  7053. "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FOAF_%28software%29" title=
  7054. "FOAF (software)" rel="wikipedia">FOAF</a>) could be linked
  7055. together with financial grant information (in custom
  7056. vocabularies).</p>
  7057. <p>More recently, the <a href=
  7058. "http://www.whitehouse.gov/open/">Open Government Initiative</a>
  7059. solicited ideas for a <a class="zem_slink" href=
  7060. "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Federal_government_of_the_United_States"
  7061. title="Federal government of the United States" rel=
  7062. "wikipedia">government</a> that is “more transparent,
  7063. participatory, and collaborative”, and the brainstorming and
  7064. discussion phases have just ended. This process is now in its
  7065. <a href="http://www.mixedink.com/OpenGov/">third phase</a>, where
  7066. the ideas proposed to solve various challenges are to be more
  7067. formally drafted in a collaborative manner.</p>
  7068. <p>What is surprising about this is how few submissions and
  7069. contributions have been put into <a href=
  7070. "http://www.mixedink.com/OpenGov/">this third and final phase</a>
  7071. (see graph below), especially considering that there is only one
  7072. week for this to be completed. Some topics have zero submissions,
  7073. e.g. “Data Transparency via Data.gov: Putting More Data
  7074. Online”.</p>
  7075. <p><a href=
  7076. "http://www.mixedink.com/OpenGov/"><img data-attachment-id="1733"
  7077. data-permalink=
  7078. "https://cloud.wordpress.com/2009/06/24/open-government-and-linked-data-now-its-time-to-draft/20090624b/"
  7079. data-orig-file=
  7080. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/06/20090624b2.png"
  7081. data-orig-size="497,531" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta=
  7082. "{&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;}"
  7083. data-image-title="20090624b" data-image-description=""
  7084. data-medium-file=
  7085. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/06/20090624b2.png?w=281"
  7086. data-large-file=
  7087. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/06/20090624b2.png?w=497"
  7088. src=
  7089. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/06/20090624b2.png?w=740"
  7090. alt="20090624b" title="20090624b" class=
  7091. "alignnone size-full wp-image-1733" srcset=
  7092. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/06/20090624b2.png 497w, https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/06/20090624b2.png?w=140 140w, https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/06/20090624b2.png?w=281 281w"
  7093. sizes="(max-width: 497px) 100vw, 497px" /></a></p>
  7094. <p>This doesn’t mean that people aren’t still thinking about this.
  7095. On Monday, Tim Berners-Lee published a personal draft document
  7096. entitled “<a href=
  7097. "http://www.w3.org/DesignIssues/GovData.html">Putting Government
  7098. Data Online</a>“. But we need more contributions from the <a class=
  7099. "zem_slink" href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linked_Data" title=
  7100. "Linked Data" rel="wikipedia">Linked Data</a> community to the
  7101. drafts during <a href="http://www.mixedink.com/OpenGov/">phase
  7102. three</a> of the Open Government Directive if we truly believe that
  7103. this solution can make a difference.</p>
  7104. <div class="info">For those who want to learn more about Linked
  7105. Data, click on the image below to go to <a href=
  7106. "http://www.ted.com/talks/view/id/484">Tim Berners-Lee’s TED talk
  7107. on Linked Data</a>.
  7108. <p>(I watched it again today, and added a little speech bubble to
  7109. the image below to express my delight at seeing SIOC profiles on
  7110. the Linked Open Data cloud slide.)</p>
  7111. <p>We also have a recently-established <a href=
  7112. "http://linkeddata.deri.ie/">Linked Data Research Centre</a> at
  7113. <a class="zem_slink" href=
  7114. "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_Enterprise_Research_Institute"
  7115. title="Digital Enterprise Research Institute" rel=
  7116. "wikipedia">DERI</a> in <a class="zem_slink" href=
  7117. "http://www.nuigalway.ie/" title=
  7118. "National University of Ireland, Galway" rel="nofollow">NUI
  7119. Galway</a>.</p>
  7120. </div>
  7121. <p><a href=
  7122. "http://www.ted.com/talks/view/id/484"><img data-attachment-id=
  7123. "1732" data-permalink=
  7124. "https://cloud.wordpress.com/2009/06/24/open-government-and-linked-data-now-its-time-to-draft/20090624a/"
  7125. data-orig-file=
  7126. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/06/20090624a2.png"
  7127. data-orig-size="444,325" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta=
  7128. "{&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;}"
  7129. data-image-title="20090624a" data-image-description=""
  7130. data-medium-file=
  7131. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/06/20090624a2.png?w=300"
  7132. data-large-file=
  7133. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/06/20090624a2.png?w=444"
  7134. src=
  7135. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/06/20090624a2.png?w=740"
  7136. alt="20090624a" title="20090624a" class=
  7137. "alignnone size-full wp-image-1732" srcset=
  7138. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/06/20090624a2.png 444w, https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/06/20090624a2.png?w=150 150w, https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/06/20090624a2.png?w=300 300w"
  7139. sizes="(max-width: 444px) 100vw, 444px" /></a></p>
  7140. <div style="margin-top:10px;height:15px;" class="zemanta-pixie">
  7141. <a class="zemanta-pixie-a" href=
  7142. "http://reblog.zemanta.com/zemified/0bc88ccd-ea6b-4930-b1f7-fccafa3eca9b/"
  7143. title="Reblog this post [with Zemanta]" rel="nofollow"><img style=
  7144. "border:medium none;float:right;" class="zemanta-pixie-img" src=
  7145. "https://i2.wp.com/img.zemanta.com/reblog_e.png" alt=
  7146. "Reblog this post [with Zemanta]" /></a></div>
  7147. </div>
  7148. </planet:content>
  7149.  <dc:date rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#dateTime">2019-12-10T17:05:35.000000Z</dc:date>
  7150.  <title>Open government and Linked Data; now it's time to
  7151. draft…</title>
  7152.  <link>https://cloud.wordpress.com/2009/06/24/open-government-and-linked-data-now-its-time-to-draft/</link>
  7153.  <content:encoded rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#XMLLiteral"><![CDATA[
  7154. <div xmlns='http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml'>
  7155. <div>
  7156. <p>For the past few months, there have been a variety of calls for
  7157. feedback and suggestions on how <a class="zem_slink" href=
  7158. "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States" title="United States"
  7159. rel="wikipedia">the US</a> Government can move towards becoming
  7160. more open and transparent, especially in terms of their dealings
  7161. with citizens and also for disseminating information about their
  7162. recent financial stimulus package.</p>
  7163. <p>As part of this, the <a href=
  7164. "http://www.thenationaldialogue.org/">National Dialogue</a> forum
  7165. was set up to solicit solutions for ways of monitoring the
  7166. “expenditure and use of recovery funds”. <a class="zem_slink" href=
  7167. "http://www.w3.org/People/Berners-Lee/" title="Tim Berners-Lee"
  7168. rel="nofollow">Tim Berners-Lee</a> wrote a proposal on how <a href=
  7169. "http://www.thenationaldialogue.org/ideas/linked-open-data/">linked
  7170. open data could provide semantically-rich, linkable and reusable
  7171. data from Recovery.gov</a>. I also <a href=
  7172. "http://www.johnbreslin.com/blog/2009/05/02/idea-for-linked-open-data-from-the-us-recovery-effort/">
  7173. blogged about this recently</a>, detailing some ideas for how
  7174. discussions by citizens on the various uses of expenditure
  7175. (represented using <a class="zem_slink" href=
  7176. "http://sioc-project.org/" title="SIOC" rel="nofollow">SIOC</a> and
  7177. <a class="zem_slink" href=
  7178. "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FOAF_%28software%29" title=
  7179. "FOAF (software)" rel="wikipedia">FOAF</a>) could be linked
  7180. together with financial grant information (in custom
  7181. vocabularies).</p>
  7182. <p>More recently, the <a href=
  7183. "http://www.whitehouse.gov/open/">Open Government Initiative</a>
  7184. solicited ideas for a <a class="zem_slink" href=
  7185. "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Federal_government_of_the_United_States"
  7186. title="Federal government of the United States" rel=
  7187. "wikipedia">government</a> that is “more transparent,
  7188. participatory, and collaborative”, and the brainstorming and
  7189. discussion phases have just ended. This process is now in its
  7190. <a href="http://www.mixedink.com/OpenGov/">third phase</a>, where
  7191. the ideas proposed to solve various challenges are to be more
  7192. formally drafted in a collaborative manner.</p>
  7193. <p>What is surprising about this is how few submissions and
  7194. contributions have been put into <a href=
  7195. "http://www.mixedink.com/OpenGov/">this third and final phase</a>
  7196. (see graph below), especially considering that there is only one
  7197. week for this to be completed. Some topics have zero submissions,
  7198. e.g. “Data Transparency via Data.gov: Putting More Data
  7199. Online”.</p>
  7200. <p><a href=
  7201. "http://www.mixedink.com/OpenGov/"><img data-attachment-id="1733"
  7202. data-permalink=
  7203. "https://cloud.wordpress.com/2009/06/24/open-government-and-linked-data-now-its-time-to-draft/20090624b/"
  7204. data-orig-file=
  7205. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/06/20090624b2.png"
  7206. data-orig-size="497,531" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta=
  7207. "{&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;}"
  7208. data-image-title="20090624b" data-image-description=""
  7209. data-medium-file=
  7210. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/06/20090624b2.png?w=281"
  7211. data-large-file=
  7212. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/06/20090624b2.png?w=497"
  7213. src=
  7214. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/06/20090624b2.png?w=740"
  7215. alt="20090624b" title="20090624b" class=
  7216. "alignnone size-full wp-image-1733" srcset=
  7217. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/06/20090624b2.png 497w, https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/06/20090624b2.png?w=140 140w, https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/06/20090624b2.png?w=281 281w"
  7218. sizes="(max-width: 497px) 100vw, 497px" /></a></p>
  7219. <p>This doesn’t mean that people aren’t still thinking about this.
  7220. On Monday, Tim Berners-Lee published a personal draft document
  7221. entitled “<a href=
  7222. "http://www.w3.org/DesignIssues/GovData.html">Putting Government
  7223. Data Online</a>“. But we need more contributions from the <a class=
  7224. "zem_slink" href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linked_Data" title=
  7225. "Linked Data" rel="wikipedia">Linked Data</a> community to the
  7226. drafts during <a href="http://www.mixedink.com/OpenGov/">phase
  7227. three</a> of the Open Government Directive if we truly believe that
  7228. this solution can make a difference.</p>
  7229. <div class="info">For those who want to learn more about Linked
  7230. Data, click on the image below to go to <a href=
  7231. "http://www.ted.com/talks/view/id/484">Tim Berners-Lee’s TED talk
  7232. on Linked Data</a>.
  7233. <p>(I watched it again today, and added a little speech bubble to
  7234. the image below to express my delight at seeing SIOC profiles on
  7235. the Linked Open Data cloud slide.)</p>
  7236. <p>We also have a recently-established <a href=
  7237. "http://linkeddata.deri.ie/">Linked Data Research Centre</a> at
  7238. <a class="zem_slink" href=
  7239. "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_Enterprise_Research_Institute"
  7240. title="Digital Enterprise Research Institute" rel=
  7241. "wikipedia">DERI</a> in <a class="zem_slink" href=
  7242. "http://www.nuigalway.ie/" title=
  7243. "National University of Ireland, Galway" rel="nofollow">NUI
  7244. Galway</a>.</p>
  7245. </div>
  7246. <p><a href=
  7247. "http://www.ted.com/talks/view/id/484"><img data-attachment-id=
  7248. "1732" data-permalink=
  7249. "https://cloud.wordpress.com/2009/06/24/open-government-and-linked-data-now-its-time-to-draft/20090624a/"
  7250. data-orig-file=
  7251. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/06/20090624a2.png"
  7252. data-orig-size="444,325" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta=
  7253. "{&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;}"
  7254. data-image-title="20090624a" data-image-description=""
  7255. data-medium-file=
  7256. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/06/20090624a2.png?w=300"
  7257. data-large-file=
  7258. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/06/20090624a2.png?w=444"
  7259. src=
  7260. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/06/20090624a2.png?w=740"
  7261. alt="20090624a" title="20090624a" class=
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  7264. sizes="(max-width: 444px) 100vw, 444px" /></a></p>
  7265. <div style="margin-top:10px;height:15px;" class="zemanta-pixie">
  7266. <a class="zemanta-pixie-a" href=
  7267. "http://reblog.zemanta.com/zemified/0bc88ccd-ea6b-4930-b1f7-fccafa3eca9b/"
  7268. title="Reblog this post [with Zemanta]" rel="nofollow"><img style=
  7269. "border:medium none;float:right;" class="zemanta-pixie-img" src=
  7270. "https://i2.wp.com/img.zemanta.com/reblog_e.png" alt=
  7271. "Reblog this post [with Zemanta]" /></a></div>
  7272. </div>
  7273. </div>]]></content:encoded>
  7274.  <description>For the past few months, there have been a variety of calls for feedback and suggestions on how the US Government can move towards becoming more open and transparent, especially in terms of their dealings with citizens and also for disseminating information about their recent financial stimulus package. As part of this, the National Dialogue forum was set up to solicit solutions for ways of monitoring the “expenditure and use of recovery funds”. Tim Berners-Lee wrote a proposal on how linked open data could provide semantically-rich, linkable and reusable data from Recovery.gov . I also blogged about this recently , ...</description>
  7275. </item>
  7276. <item rdf:about="https://cloud.wordpress.com/2009/05/29/blogtalk-2009-6th-international-social-software-conference-call-for-proposals-september-1st-and-2nd-jeju-korea/">
  7277.  <dc:creator>John Breslin</dc:creator>
  7278.  <dc:source>Cloudlands by John Breslin</dc:source>
  7279.  <dc:relation>http://www.johnbreslin.com/blog/</dc:relation>
  7280.  <planet:content xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" rdf:parseType="Literal">
  7281. <div>
  7282. <p><a href=
  7283. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/05/20090529a3.png"><img data-attachment-id="1723"
  7284. data-permalink=
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  7301. <p><b><i>BlogTalk 2009</i></b><br />
  7302. <i>The 6th International Conf. on Social Software</i><br />
  7303. <i>September 1st and 2nd, 2009</i><br />
  7304. <i><a class="zem_slink" href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jeju-do"
  7305. title="Jeju-do" rel="wikipedia">Jeju Island</a>, Korea</i></p>
  7306. <p><b>Overview</b></p>
  7307. <p>Following the international success of the last five BlogTalk
  7308. events, the next BlogTalk – to be held in Jeju Island, Korea on
  7309. September 1st and 2nd, 2009 – is continuing with its focus on
  7310. <a class="zem_slink" href=
  7311. "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_software" title=
  7312. "Social software" rel="wikipedia">social software</a>, while
  7313. remaining committed to the diverse cultures, practices and tools of
  7314. our emerging networked society. The conference (which this year
  7315. will be co-located with <a href=
  7316. "http://www.liftconference.com/lift-asia-09">Lift Asia 09</a>) is
  7317. designed to maintain a sustainable dialog between developers,
  7318. innovative academics and scholars who study social software and
  7319. social media, practitioners and administrators in corporate and
  7320. educational settings, and other general members of the social
  7321. software and social media communities.</p>
  7322. <p>We invite you to submit a proposal for presentation at the
  7323. BlogTalk 2009 conference. Possible areas include, but are not
  7324. limited to:</p>
  7325. <ul>
  7326. <li>Forms and consequences of emerging social software
  7327. practices</li>
  7328. <li>Social software in enterprise and educational environments</li>
  7329. <li>The political impact of social software and social media</li>
  7330. <li>Applications, prototypes, concepts and standards</li>
  7331. </ul>
  7332. <p><b>Participants and proposal categories</b></p>
  7333. <p>Due to the interdisciplinary nature of the conference, audiences
  7334. will come from different fields of practice and will have different
  7335. professional backgrounds. We strongly encourage proposals to bridge
  7336. these cultural differences and to be understandable for all groups
  7337. alike. Along those lines, we will offer three different submission
  7338. categories:</p>
  7339. <ul>
  7340. <li>Academic</li>
  7341. <li>Developer</li>
  7342. <li>Practitioner</li>
  7343. </ul>
  7344. <p>For academics, BlogTalk is an ideal conference for presenting
  7345. and exchanging research work from current and future social
  7346. software projects at an international level. For developers, the
  7347. conference is a great opportunity to fly ideas, visions and
  7348. prototypes in front of a distinguished audience of peers, to
  7349. discuss, to link-up and to learn (developers may choose to give a
  7350. practical demonstration rather than a formal presentation if they
  7351. so wish). For practitioners, this is a venue to discuss use cases
  7352. for social software and social media, and to report on any results
  7353. you may have with like-minded individuals.</p>
  7354. <p><b>Submitting your proposals</b></p>
  7355. <p>You must submit a one-page abstract of the work you intend to
  7356. present for review purposes (not to exceed 600 words). Please
  7357. upload your submission along with some personal information using
  7358. the <a href=
  7359. "http://www.easychair.org/conferences/?conf=blogtalk2009">EasyChair
  7360. conference area for BlogTalk 2009</a>. You will receive a
  7361. confirmation of the arrival of your submission immediately. The
  7362. submission <b>deadline is June 27th, 2009</b>.</p>
  7363. <p>Following notification of acceptance, you will be invited to
  7364. submit a short or long paper (four or eight pages respectively) for
  7365. the conference proceedings. BlogTalk is a <a class="zem_slink"
  7366. href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peer_review" title="Peer review"
  7367. rel="wikipedia">peer-reviewed</a> conference.</p>
  7368. <p><b>Timeline and important dates</b></p>
  7369. <ul>
  7370. <li><a href=
  7371. "http://www.easychair.org/conferences/?conf=blogtalk2009">One-page
  7372. abstract submission</a> deadline: <b>June 27th, 2009</b></li>
  7373. <li>Notification of acceptance or rejection: <b>July 13th,
  7374. 2009</b></li>
  7375. <li>Full paper submission deadline: <b>August 27th, 2009</b></li>
  7376. </ul>
  7377. <p><i>(Due to the tight schedule we expect that there will be no
  7378. deadline extension. As with previous BlogTalk conferences, we will
  7379. work hard to endow a fund for supporting travel costs. As soon as
  7380. we review all of the papers we will be able to announce more
  7381. details.)</i></p>
  7382. <p><b>Topics</b></p>
  7383. <table border="0">
  7384. <tbody>
  7385. <tr>
  7386. <td>Application Portability<br />
  7387. Bookmarking<br />
  7388. Business<br />
  7389. Categorisation<br />
  7390. Collaboration<br />
  7391. Content Sharing<br />
  7392. Data Acquisition<br />
  7393. Data Mining<br />
  7394. Data Portability<br />
  7395. Digital Rights<br />
  7396. Education<br />
  7397. Enterprise<br />
  7398. Ethnography<br />
  7399. Folksonomies and Tagging<br />
  7400. Human Computer Interaction<br />
  7401. Identity<br />
  7402. Microblogging<br />
  7403. Mobile<br />
  7404. Multimedia</td>
  7405. <td>Podcasting<br />
  7406. Politics<br />
  7407. Portals<br />
  7408. Psychology<br />
  7409. Recommender Systems<br />
  7410. RSS and Syndication<br />
  7411. Search<br />
  7412. Semantic Web<br />
  7413. Social Media<br />
  7414. Social Networks<br />
  7415. Social Software<br />
  7416. Transparency and Openness<br />
  7417. Trend Analysis<br />
  7418. Trust and Reputation<br />
  7419. Virtual Worlds<br />
  7420. Web 2.0<br />
  7421. Weblogs<br />
  7422. Wikis</td>
  7423. </tr>
  7424. </tbody>
  7425. </table>
  7426. <div style="margin-top:10px;height:15px;" class="zemanta-pixie">
  7427. <a class="zemanta-pixie-a" href=
  7428. "http://reblog.zemanta.com/zemified/cc71758a-3deb-464a-95ae-b7f7f3d2cdc6/"
  7429. title="Reblog this post [with Zemanta]" rel="nofollow"><img style=
  7430. "border:medium none;float:right;" class="zemanta-pixie-img" src=
  7431. "https://i2.wp.com/img.zemanta.com/reblog_e.png" alt=
  7432. "Reblog this post [with Zemanta]" /></a></div>
  7433. </div>
  7434. </planet:content>
  7435.  <dc:date rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#dateTime">2019-12-10T17:05:35.000000Z</dc:date>
  7436.  <title>BlogTalk 2009 (6th International Social Software Conference)
  7437. – Call for Proposals – September 1st and 2nd – Jeju, Korea</title>
  7438.  <link>https://cloud.wordpress.com/2009/05/29/blogtalk-2009-6th-international-social-software-conference-call-for-proposals-september-1st-and-2nd-jeju-korea/</link>
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  7461. <p><b><i>BlogTalk 2009</i></b><br />
  7462. <i>The 6th International Conf. on Social Software</i><br />
  7463. <i>September 1st and 2nd, 2009</i><br />
  7464. <i><a class="zem_slink" href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jeju-do"
  7465. title="Jeju-do" rel="wikipedia">Jeju Island</a>, Korea</i></p>
  7466. <p><b>Overview</b></p>
  7467. <p>Following the international success of the last five BlogTalk
  7468. events, the next BlogTalk – to be held in Jeju Island, Korea on
  7469. September 1st and 2nd, 2009 – is continuing with its focus on
  7470. <a class="zem_slink" href=
  7471. "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_software" title=
  7472. "Social software" rel="wikipedia">social software</a>, while
  7473. remaining committed to the diverse cultures, practices and tools of
  7474. our emerging networked society. The conference (which this year
  7475. will be co-located with <a href=
  7476. "http://www.liftconference.com/lift-asia-09">Lift Asia 09</a>) is
  7477. designed to maintain a sustainable dialog between developers,
  7478. innovative academics and scholars who study social software and
  7479. social media, practitioners and administrators in corporate and
  7480. educational settings, and other general members of the social
  7481. software and social media communities.</p>
  7482. <p>We invite you to submit a proposal for presentation at the
  7483. BlogTalk 2009 conference. Possible areas include, but are not
  7484. limited to:</p>
  7485. <ul>
  7486. <li>Forms and consequences of emerging social software
  7487. practices</li>
  7488. <li>Social software in enterprise and educational environments</li>
  7489. <li>The political impact of social software and social media</li>
  7490. <li>Applications, prototypes, concepts and standards</li>
  7491. </ul>
  7492. <p><b>Participants and proposal categories</b></p>
  7493. <p>Due to the interdisciplinary nature of the conference, audiences
  7494. will come from different fields of practice and will have different
  7495. professional backgrounds. We strongly encourage proposals to bridge
  7496. these cultural differences and to be understandable for all groups
  7497. alike. Along those lines, we will offer three different submission
  7498. categories:</p>
  7499. <ul>
  7500. <li>Academic</li>
  7501. <li>Developer</li>
  7502. <li>Practitioner</li>
  7503. </ul>
  7504. <p>For academics, BlogTalk is an ideal conference for presenting
  7505. and exchanging research work from current and future social
  7506. software projects at an international level. For developers, the
  7507. conference is a great opportunity to fly ideas, visions and
  7508. prototypes in front of a distinguished audience of peers, to
  7509. discuss, to link-up and to learn (developers may choose to give a
  7510. practical demonstration rather than a formal presentation if they
  7511. so wish). For practitioners, this is a venue to discuss use cases
  7512. for social software and social media, and to report on any results
  7513. you may have with like-minded individuals.</p>
  7514. <p><b>Submitting your proposals</b></p>
  7515. <p>You must submit a one-page abstract of the work you intend to
  7516. present for review purposes (not to exceed 600 words). Please
  7517. upload your submission along with some personal information using
  7518. the <a href=
  7519. "http://www.easychair.org/conferences/?conf=blogtalk2009">EasyChair
  7520. conference area for BlogTalk 2009</a>. You will receive a
  7521. confirmation of the arrival of your submission immediately. The
  7522. submission <b>deadline is June 27th, 2009</b>.</p>
  7523. <p>Following notification of acceptance, you will be invited to
  7524. submit a short or long paper (four or eight pages respectively) for
  7525. the conference proceedings. BlogTalk is a <a class="zem_slink"
  7526. href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peer_review" title="Peer review"
  7527. rel="wikipedia">peer-reviewed</a> conference.</p>
  7528. <p><b>Timeline and important dates</b></p>
  7529. <ul>
  7530. <li><a href=
  7531. "http://www.easychair.org/conferences/?conf=blogtalk2009">One-page
  7532. abstract submission</a> deadline: <b>June 27th, 2009</b></li>
  7533. <li>Notification of acceptance or rejection: <b>July 13th,
  7534. 2009</b></li>
  7535. <li>Full paper submission deadline: <b>August 27th, 2009</b></li>
  7536. </ul>
  7537. <p><i>(Due to the tight schedule we expect that there will be no
  7538. deadline extension. As with previous BlogTalk conferences, we will
  7539. work hard to endow a fund for supporting travel costs. As soon as
  7540. we review all of the papers we will be able to announce more
  7541. details.)</i></p>
  7542. <p><b>Topics</b></p>
  7543. <table border="0">
  7544. <tbody>
  7545. <tr>
  7546. <td>Application Portability<br />
  7547. Bookmarking<br />
  7548. Business<br />
  7549. Categorisation<br />
  7550. Collaboration<br />
  7551. Content Sharing<br />
  7552. Data Acquisition<br />
  7553. Data Mining<br />
  7554. Data Portability<br />
  7555. Digital Rights<br />
  7556. Education<br />
  7557. Enterprise<br />
  7558. Ethnography<br />
  7559. Folksonomies and Tagging<br />
  7560. Human Computer Interaction<br />
  7561. Identity<br />
  7562. Microblogging<br />
  7563. Mobile<br />
  7564. Multimedia</td>
  7565. <td>Podcasting<br />
  7566. Politics<br />
  7567. Portals<br />
  7568. Psychology<br />
  7569. Recommender Systems<br />
  7570. RSS and Syndication<br />
  7571. Search<br />
  7572. Semantic Web<br />
  7573. Social Media<br />
  7574. Social Networks<br />
  7575. Social Software<br />
  7576. Transparency and Openness<br />
  7577. Trend Analysis<br />
  7578. Trust and Reputation<br />
  7579. Virtual Worlds<br />
  7580. Web 2.0<br />
  7581. Weblogs<br />
  7582. Wikis</td>
  7583. </tr>
  7584. </tbody>
  7585. </table>
  7586. <div style="margin-top:10px;height:15px;" class="zemanta-pixie">
  7587. <a class="zemanta-pixie-a" href=
  7588. "http://reblog.zemanta.com/zemified/cc71758a-3deb-464a-95ae-b7f7f3d2cdc6/"
  7589. title="Reblog this post [with Zemanta]" rel="nofollow"><img style=
  7590. "border:medium none;float:right;" class="zemanta-pixie-img" src=
  7591. "https://i2.wp.com/img.zemanta.com/reblog_e.png" alt=
  7592. "Reblog this post [with Zemanta]" /></a></div>
  7593. </div>
  7594. </div>]]></content:encoded>
  7595.  <description>BlogTalk 2009 The 6th International Conf. on Social Software September 1st and 2nd, 2009 Jeju Island , Korea Overview Following the international success of the last five BlogTalk events, the next BlogTalk – to be held in Jeju Island, Korea on September 1st and 2nd, 2009 – is continuing with its focus on social software , while remaining committed to the diverse cultures, practices and tools of our emerging networked society. The conference (which this year will be co-located with Lift Asia 09 ) is designed to maintain a sustainable dialog between developers, innovative academics and scholars who study social ...</description>
  7596. </item>
  7597. <item rdf:about="https://cloud.wordpress.com/2009/05/02/idea-for-linked-open-data-from-the-us-recovery-effort/">
  7598.  <dc:creator>John Breslin</dc:creator>
  7599.  <dc:source>Cloudlands by John Breslin</dc:source>
  7600.  <dc:relation>http://www.johnbreslin.com/blog/</dc:relation>
  7601.  <planet:content xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" rdf:parseType="Literal">
  7602. <div>
  7603. <p><a href="http://www.w3.org/People/Berners-Lee/">Tim
  7604. Berners-Lee</a> recently posted an important request for the
  7605. provision of <a href=
  7606. "http://www.thenationaldialogue.org/ideas/linked-open-data/">Linked
  7607. Open Data from the US recovery effort</a> <a class="zem_slink"
  7608. href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Website" title="Website" rel=
  7609. "wikipedia">website</a> <a href=
  7610. "http://www.recovery.gov/">Recovery.gov</a>.</p>
  7611. <p>The <a href=
  7612. "http://www.thenationaldialogue.org/info/about/">National
  7613. Dialogue</a> website (set up to solicit ideas for <a class=
  7614. "zem_slink" href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Data_collection"
  7615. title="Data collection" rel="wikipedia">data collection</a>,
  7616. storage, warehousing, analysis and visualisation; <a class=
  7617. "zem_slink" href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_design" title=
  7618. "Web design" rel="wikipedia">website design</a>; waste, fraud and
  7619. abuse detection; and other solutions for transparency and
  7620. accountability) says that for Recovery.gov to be a useful portal
  7621. for citizens, it “requires finding innovative ways to integrate,
  7622. track, and display data from thousands of federal, state, and local
  7623. entities”.</p>
  7624. <p>If you support the idea of <a href=
  7625. "http://www.linkeddata.org/">Linked Open Data</a> from
  7626. Recovery.gov, you can have a read and provide some justifications
  7627. on <a href=
  7628. "http://www.thenationaldialogue.org/ideas/linked-open-data/">this
  7629. thread</a>.</p>
  7630. <p>(I’ve recently given some initial ideas about how <a href=
  7631. "http://dret.typepad.com/dretblog/2009/03/stimulus-feed-guidelines.html">
  7632. grant feed data</a> could be linked with user contributions in the
  7633. form of associated threaded discussions on different topics, see
  7634. picture below, all to be exposed as Linked Open Data using custom
  7635. schemas plus <a class="zem_slink" href=
  7636. "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Semantically-Interlinked_Online_Communities"
  7637. title="Semantically-Interlinked Online Communities" rel=
  7638. "wikipedia">SIOC</a> and <a class="zem_slink" href=
  7639. "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FOAF_%28software%29" title=
  7640. "FOAF (software)" rel="wikipedia">FOAF</a> across a number of
  7641. agencies / funding programs / websites.)</p>
  7642. <p><a href=
  7643. "http://wiki.sioc-project.org/index.php/Image:SIOC_and_Recovery_gov.png">
  7644. <img data-attachment-id="1700" data-permalink=
  7645. "https://cloud.wordpress.com/2009/05/02/idea-for-linked-open-data-from-the-us-recovery-effort/20090502a/"
  7646. data-orig-file=
  7647. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/05/20090502a2.png"
  7648. data-orig-size="1000,648" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta=
  7649. "{&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;}"
  7650. data-image-title="20090502a" data-image-description=""
  7651. data-medium-file=
  7652. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/05/20090502a2.png?w=300"
  7653. data-large-file=
  7654. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/05/20090502a2.png?w=740"
  7655. src=
  7656. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/05/20090502a2.png?w=300&amp;h=194"
  7657. alt="20090502a" title="20090502a" class=
  7658. "alignnone size-medium wp-image-1700" width="300" height="194"
  7659. srcset=
  7660. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/05/20090502a2.png?w=300&amp;h=194 300w, https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/05/20090502a2.png?w=600&amp;h=388 600w, https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/05/20090502a2.png?w=150&amp;h=97 150w"
  7661. sizes="(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px" /></a></p>
  7662. <div style="margin-top:10px;height:15px;" class="zemanta-pixie">
  7663. <a class="zemanta-pixie-a" href=
  7664. "http://reblog.zemanta.com/zemified/23372209-c3c5-413a-8f3f-b253b03c394f/"
  7665. title="Reblog this post [with Zemanta]" rel="nofollow"><img style=
  7666. "border:medium none;float:right;" class="zemanta-pixie-img" src=
  7667. "https://i2.wp.com/img.zemanta.com/reblog_e.png" alt=
  7668. "Reblog this post [with Zemanta]" /></a></div>
  7669. </div>
  7670. </planet:content>
  7671.  <dc:date rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#dateTime">2019-12-10T17:05:35.000000Z</dc:date>
  7672.  <title>Idea for Linked Open Data from the US recovery
  7673. effort</title>
  7674.  <link>https://cloud.wordpress.com/2009/05/02/idea-for-linked-open-data-from-the-us-recovery-effort/</link>
  7675.  <content:encoded rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#XMLLiteral"><![CDATA[
  7676. <div xmlns='http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml'>
  7677. <div>
  7678. <p><a href="http://www.w3.org/People/Berners-Lee/">Tim
  7679. Berners-Lee</a> recently posted an important request for the
  7680. provision of <a href=
  7681. "http://www.thenationaldialogue.org/ideas/linked-open-data/">Linked
  7682. Open Data from the US recovery effort</a> <a class="zem_slink"
  7683. href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Website" title="Website" rel=
  7684. "wikipedia">website</a> <a href=
  7685. "http://www.recovery.gov/">Recovery.gov</a>.</p>
  7686. <p>The <a href=
  7687. "http://www.thenationaldialogue.org/info/about/">National
  7688. Dialogue</a> website (set up to solicit ideas for <a class=
  7689. "zem_slink" href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Data_collection"
  7690. title="Data collection" rel="wikipedia">data collection</a>,
  7691. storage, warehousing, analysis and visualisation; <a class=
  7692. "zem_slink" href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_design" title=
  7693. "Web design" rel="wikipedia">website design</a>; waste, fraud and
  7694. abuse detection; and other solutions for transparency and
  7695. accountability) says that for Recovery.gov to be a useful portal
  7696. for citizens, it “requires finding innovative ways to integrate,
  7697. track, and display data from thousands of federal, state, and local
  7698. entities”.</p>
  7699. <p>If you support the idea of <a href=
  7700. "http://www.linkeddata.org/">Linked Open Data</a> from
  7701. Recovery.gov, you can have a read and provide some justifications
  7702. on <a href=
  7703. "http://www.thenationaldialogue.org/ideas/linked-open-data/">this
  7704. thread</a>.</p>
  7705. <p>(I’ve recently given some initial ideas about how <a href=
  7706. "http://dret.typepad.com/dretblog/2009/03/stimulus-feed-guidelines.html">
  7707. grant feed data</a> could be linked with user contributions in the
  7708. form of associated threaded discussions on different topics, see
  7709. picture below, all to be exposed as Linked Open Data using custom
  7710. schemas plus <a class="zem_slink" href=
  7711. "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Semantically-Interlinked_Online_Communities"
  7712. title="Semantically-Interlinked Online Communities" rel=
  7713. "wikipedia">SIOC</a> and <a class="zem_slink" href=
  7714. "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FOAF_%28software%29" title=
  7715. "FOAF (software)" rel="wikipedia">FOAF</a> across a number of
  7716. agencies / funding programs / websites.)</p>
  7717. <p><a href=
  7718. "http://wiki.sioc-project.org/index.php/Image:SIOC_and_Recovery_gov.png">
  7719. <img data-attachment-id="1700" data-permalink=
  7720. "https://cloud.wordpress.com/2009/05/02/idea-for-linked-open-data-from-the-us-recovery-effort/20090502a/"
  7721. data-orig-file=
  7722. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/05/20090502a2.png"
  7723. data-orig-size="1000,648" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta=
  7724. "{&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;}"
  7725. data-image-title="20090502a" data-image-description=""
  7726. data-medium-file=
  7727. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/05/20090502a2.png?w=300"
  7728. data-large-file=
  7729. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/05/20090502a2.png?w=740"
  7730. src=
  7731. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/05/20090502a2.png?w=300&amp;h=194"
  7732. alt="20090502a" title="20090502a" class=
  7733. "alignnone size-medium wp-image-1700" width="300" height="194"
  7734. srcset=
  7735. "https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/05/20090502a2.png?w=300&amp;h=194 300w, https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/05/20090502a2.png?w=600&amp;h=388 600w, https://cloud.files.wordpress.com/2009/05/20090502a2.png?w=150&amp;h=97 150w"
  7736. sizes="(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px" /></a></p>
  7737. <div style="margin-top:10px;height:15px;" class="zemanta-pixie">
  7738. <a class="zemanta-pixie-a" href=
  7739. "http://reblog.zemanta.com/zemified/23372209-c3c5-413a-8f3f-b253b03c394f/"
  7740. title="Reblog this post [with Zemanta]" rel="nofollow"><img style=
  7741. "border:medium none;float:right;" class="zemanta-pixie-img" src=
  7742. "https://i2.wp.com/img.zemanta.com/reblog_e.png" alt=
  7743. "Reblog this post [with Zemanta]" /></a></div>
  7744. </div>
  7745. </div>]]></content:encoded>
  7746.  <description>Tim Berners-Lee recently posted an important request for the provision of Linked Open Data from the US recovery effort website Recovery.gov . The National Dialogue website (set up to solicit ideas for data collection , storage, warehousing, analysis and visualisation; website design ; waste, fraud and abuse detection; and other solutions for transparency and accountability) says that for Recovery.gov to be a useful portal for citizens, it “requires finding innovative ways to integrate, track, and display data from thousands of federal, state, and local entities”. If you support the idea of Linked Open Data from Recovery.gov, you can have a ...</description>
  7747. </item>
  7748. <item rdf:about="https://trueg.wordpress.com/2014/10/22/conditional-sharing-virtuoso-acl-groups-revisited/">
  7749.  <dc:creator>Sebastian Trueg</dc:creator>
  7750.  <dc:source>Semantic Desktop by Sebastian Trueg</dc:source>
  7751.  <dc:relation>http://trueg.wordpress.com/</dc:relation>
  7752.  <planet:content xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" rdf:parseType="Literal">
  7753. <div>
  7754. <p><a title="Protecting And Sharing Linked Data With Virtuoso"
  7755. href="https://trueg.wordpress.com/2014/09/03/protecting-and-sharing-linked-data-with-virtuoso/">
  7756. Previously we saw</a> how <a title=
  7757. "Sharing Files With Whomever Is Simple" href=
  7758. "https://trueg.wordpress.com/2014/09/02/sharing-files-with-whomever-is-simple/">
  7759. ACLs can be used</a> in Virtuoso to protect different types of
  7760. resources. Today we will look into conditional groups which allow
  7761. to share resources or grant permissions to a dynamic group of
  7762. individuals. This means that we do not maintain a list of group
  7763. members but instead define a set of conditions which an individual
  7764. needs to fulfill in order to be part of the group in question.</p>
  7765. <p>That does sound very dry. Let’s just jump to an example:</p>
  7766. <pre>
  7767. @prefix oplacl: &lt;http://www.openlinksw.com/ontology/acl#&gt; .
  7768. [] a oplacl:ConditionalGroup ;
  7769.  foaf:name "People I know" ;
  7770.  oplacl:hasCondition [
  7771.    a oplacl:QueryCondition ;
  7772.    oplacl:hasQuery """ask where { graph &lt;urn:my&gt; { &lt;urn:me&gt; foaf:knows ^{uri}^ } }"""
  7773.  ] .</pre>
  7774. <p>This group is based on a single condition which uses a simple
  7775. SPARQL ASK query. The ask query contains a variable
  7776. <code>^{uri}^</code> which the ACL engine will replace with the URI
  7777. of the authenticated user. The group contains anyone who is in a
  7778. <code>foaf:knows</code> relationship to <code>urn:me</code> in
  7779. named graph <code>urn:my</code>. (Ideally the latter graph should
  7780. be <a title="Protecting And Sharing Linked Data With Virtuoso"
  7781. href="https://trueg.wordpress.com/2014/09/03/protecting-and-sharing-linked-data-with-virtuoso/">
  7782. write-protected using ACLs as described before</a>.)</p>
  7783. <p>Now we use this group in ACL rules. That means we first create
  7784. it:</p>
  7785. <pre>$ curl -X POST \
  7786.    --data-binary @group.ttl \
  7787.    -H"Content-Type: text/turtle" \
  7788.    -u dba:dba \
  7789.    http://localhost:8890/acl/groups</pre>
  7790. <p>As a result we get a description of the newly created group
  7791. which also contains its URI. Let’s imagine this URI is
  7792. <code><a href="http://localhost:8890/acl/groups/1" rel=
  7793. "nofollow">http://localhost:8890/acl/groups/1</a></code>.</p>
  7794. <p>To mix things up we will use the group for sharing permission to
  7795. access a service instead of files or named graphs. Like many of the
  7796. Virtuoso-hosted services the URI Shortener is ACL controlled. We
  7797. can restrict access to it using ACLs.</p>
  7798. <p>As always the URI Shortener has its own ACL scope which we need
  7799. to enable for the ACL system to kick in:</p>
  7800. <pre>sparql
  7801. prefix oplacl: &lt;http://www.openlinksw.com/ontology/acl#&gt;
  7802. with &lt;urn:virtuoso:val:config&gt;
  7803. delete {
  7804.  oplacl:DefaultRealm oplacl:hasDisabledAclScope &lt;urn:virtuoso:val:scopes:curi&gt; .
  7805. }
  7806. insert {
  7807.  oplacl:DefaultRealm oplacl:hasEnabledAclScope &lt;urn:virtuoso:val:scopes:curi&gt; .
  7808. };</pre>
  7809. <p>Now we can go ahead and create our new ACL rule which allows
  7810. anyone in our conditional group to shorten URLs:</p>
  7811. <pre>[] a acl:Authorization ;
  7812.  oplacl:hasAccessMode oplacl:Write ;
  7813.  acl:accessTo &lt;http://localhost:8890/c&gt; ;
  7814.  acl:agent &lt;http://localhost:8890/acl/groups/1&gt; ;
  7815.  oplacl:hasScope &lt;urn:virtuoso:val:scopes:curi&gt; ;
  7816.  oplacl:hasRealm oplacl:DefaultRealm .</pre>
  7817. <p>Finally we add one URI to the conditional group as follows:</p>
  7818. <pre>sparql
  7819. insert into &lt;urn:my&gt; {
  7820.  &lt;urn:me&gt; foaf:knows &lt;http://www.facebook.com/sebastian.trug&gt; .
  7821. };</pre>
  7822. <p>As a result my facebook account has access to the URL
  7823. Shortener:<br />
  7824. <a href=
  7825. "http://web.ods.openlinksw.com/DAV/home/trueg/Public/curi.png"><img class="aligncenter"
  7826. style="border:1px solid #000000;" src=
  7827. "https://i1.wp.com/web.ods.openlinksw.com/DAV/home/trueg/Public/curi.png"
  7828. alt="Virtuoso URI Shortener" width="930" height="434" /></a></p>
  7829. <p>The example we saw here uses a simple query to determine the
  7830. members of the conditional group. These queries could get much more
  7831. complex and multiple query conditions could be combined. In
  7832. addition Virtuoso handles a set of non-query conditions (see also
  7833. <a href=
  7834. "http://www.openlinksw.com/describe/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.openlinksw.com%2Fontology%2Facl%23GenericCondition&amp;graph=urn%3Aontology%3Asemantic%3Amapping&amp;graph=urn%3Aopl%3Ashop%3Aoffering%3Asponging%3Acache%3Aofficial&amp;graph=urn%3Aontology%3Acartridges%3Amapping&amp;graph=urn%3Adata%3Aopenlink%3Aproducts&amp;graph=urn%3Aopenlink%3Aschema%3Ageneral%3Amappings">
  7835. oplacl:GenericCondition</a>). The most basic one being the
  7836. following which matches any authenticated person:</p>
  7837. <pre>[] a oplacl:ConditionalGroup ;
  7838.  foaf:name "Valid Identifiers" ;
  7839.  oplacl:hasCondition [
  7840.    a oplacl:GroupCondition, oplacl:GenericCondition ;
  7841.    oplacl:hasCriteria oplacl:NetID ;
  7842.    oplacl:hasComparator oplacl:IsNotNull ;
  7843.    oplacl:hasValue 1
  7844.  ] .</pre>
  7845. <p>This shall be enough on conditional groups for today. There will
  7846. be more playing around with ACLs in the future…</p>
  7847. </div>
  7848. </planet:content>
  7849.  <dc:date rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#dateTime">2019-12-09T19:20:33.000000Z</dc:date>
  7850.  <title>Conditional Sharing – Virtuoso ACL Groups Revisited</title>
  7851.  <link>https://trueg.wordpress.com/2014/10/22/conditional-sharing-virtuoso-acl-groups-revisited/</link>
  7852.  <content:encoded rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#XMLLiteral"><![CDATA[
  7853. <div xmlns='http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml'>
  7854. <div>
  7855. <p><a title="Protecting And Sharing Linked Data With Virtuoso"
  7856. href="https://trueg.wordpress.com/2014/09/03/protecting-and-sharing-linked-data-with-virtuoso/">
  7857. Previously we saw</a> how <a title=
  7858. "Sharing Files With Whomever Is Simple" href=
  7859. "https://trueg.wordpress.com/2014/09/02/sharing-files-with-whomever-is-simple/">
  7860. ACLs can be used</a> in Virtuoso to protect different types of
  7861. resources. Today we will look into conditional groups which allow
  7862. to share resources or grant permissions to a dynamic group of
  7863. individuals. This means that we do not maintain a list of group
  7864. members but instead define a set of conditions which an individual
  7865. needs to fulfill in order to be part of the group in question.</p>
  7866. <p>That does sound very dry. Let’s just jump to an example:</p>
  7867. <pre>
  7868. @prefix oplacl: &lt;http://www.openlinksw.com/ontology/acl#&gt; .
  7869. [] a oplacl:ConditionalGroup ;
  7870.  foaf:name "People I know" ;
  7871.  oplacl:hasCondition [
  7872.    a oplacl:QueryCondition ;
  7873.    oplacl:hasQuery """ask where { graph &lt;urn:my&gt; { &lt;urn:me&gt; foaf:knows ^{uri}^ } }"""
  7874.  ] .</pre>
  7875. <p>This group is based on a single condition which uses a simple
  7876. SPARQL ASK query. The ask query contains a variable
  7877. <code>^{uri}^</code> which the ACL engine will replace with the URI
  7878. of the authenticated user. The group contains anyone who is in a
  7879. <code>foaf:knows</code> relationship to <code>urn:me</code> in
  7880. named graph <code>urn:my</code>. (Ideally the latter graph should
  7881. be <a title="Protecting And Sharing Linked Data With Virtuoso"
  7882. href="https://trueg.wordpress.com/2014/09/03/protecting-and-sharing-linked-data-with-virtuoso/">
  7883. write-protected using ACLs as described before</a>.)</p>
  7884. <p>Now we use this group in ACL rules. That means we first create
  7885. it:</p>
  7886. <pre>$ curl -X POST \
  7887.    --data-binary @group.ttl \
  7888.    -H"Content-Type: text/turtle" \
  7889.    -u dba:dba \
  7890.    http://localhost:8890/acl/groups</pre>
  7891. <p>As a result we get a description of the newly created group
  7892. which also contains its URI. Let’s imagine this URI is
  7893. <code><a href="http://localhost:8890/acl/groups/1" rel=
  7894. "nofollow">http://localhost:8890/acl/groups/1</a></code>.</p>
  7895. <p>To mix things up we will use the group for sharing permission to
  7896. access a service instead of files or named graphs. Like many of the
  7897. Virtuoso-hosted services the URI Shortener is ACL controlled. We
  7898. can restrict access to it using ACLs.</p>
  7899. <p>As always the URI Shortener has its own ACL scope which we need
  7900. to enable for the ACL system to kick in:</p>
  7901. <pre>sparql
  7902. prefix oplacl: &lt;http://www.openlinksw.com/ontology/acl#&gt;
  7903. with &lt;urn:virtuoso:val:config&gt;
  7904. delete {
  7905.  oplacl:DefaultRealm oplacl:hasDisabledAclScope &lt;urn:virtuoso:val:scopes:curi&gt; .
  7906. }
  7907. insert {
  7908.  oplacl:DefaultRealm oplacl:hasEnabledAclScope &lt;urn:virtuoso:val:scopes:curi&gt; .
  7909. };</pre>
  7910. <p>Now we can go ahead and create our new ACL rule which allows
  7911. anyone in our conditional group to shorten URLs:</p>
  7912. <pre>[] a acl:Authorization ;
  7913.  oplacl:hasAccessMode oplacl:Write ;
  7914.  acl:accessTo &lt;http://localhost:8890/c&gt; ;
  7915.  acl:agent &lt;http://localhost:8890/acl/groups/1&gt; ;
  7916.  oplacl:hasScope &lt;urn:virtuoso:val:scopes:curi&gt; ;
  7917.  oplacl:hasRealm oplacl:DefaultRealm .</pre>
  7918. <p>Finally we add one URI to the conditional group as follows:</p>
  7919. <pre>sparql
  7920. insert into &lt;urn:my&gt; {
  7921.  &lt;urn:me&gt; foaf:knows &lt;http://www.facebook.com/sebastian.trug&gt; .
  7922. };</pre>
  7923. <p>As a result my facebook account has access to the URL
  7924. Shortener:<br />
  7925. <a href=
  7926. "http://web.ods.openlinksw.com/DAV/home/trueg/Public/curi.png"><img class="aligncenter"
  7927. style="border:1px solid #000000;" src=
  7928. "https://i1.wp.com/web.ods.openlinksw.com/DAV/home/trueg/Public/curi.png"
  7929. alt="Virtuoso URI Shortener" width="930" height="434" /></a></p>
  7930. <p>The example we saw here uses a simple query to determine the
  7931. members of the conditional group. These queries could get much more
  7932. complex and multiple query conditions could be combined. In
  7933. addition Virtuoso handles a set of non-query conditions (see also
  7934. <a href=
  7935. "http://www.openlinksw.com/describe/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.openlinksw.com%2Fontology%2Facl%23GenericCondition&amp;graph=urn%3Aontology%3Asemantic%3Amapping&amp;graph=urn%3Aopl%3Ashop%3Aoffering%3Asponging%3Acache%3Aofficial&amp;graph=urn%3Aontology%3Acartridges%3Amapping&amp;graph=urn%3Adata%3Aopenlink%3Aproducts&amp;graph=urn%3Aopenlink%3Aschema%3Ageneral%3Amappings">
  7936. oplacl:GenericCondition</a>). The most basic one being the
  7937. following which matches any authenticated person:</p>
  7938. <pre>[] a oplacl:ConditionalGroup ;
  7939.  foaf:name "Valid Identifiers" ;
  7940.  oplacl:hasCondition [
  7941.    a oplacl:GroupCondition, oplacl:GenericCondition ;
  7942.    oplacl:hasCriteria oplacl:NetID ;
  7943.    oplacl:hasComparator oplacl:IsNotNull ;
  7944.    oplacl:hasValue 1
  7945.  ] .</pre>
  7946. <p>This shall be enough on conditional groups for today. There will
  7947. be more playing around with ACLs in the future…</p>
  7948. </div>
  7949. </div>]]></content:encoded>
  7950.  <description>Previously we saw how ACLs can be used in Virtuoso to protect different types of resources. Today we will look into conditional groups which allow to share resources or grant permissions to a dynamic group of individuals. This means that we do not maintain a list of group members but instead define a set of conditions which an individual needs to fulfill in order to be part of the group in question. That does sound very dry. Let’s just jump to an example: @prefix oplacl: &amp;lt;http://www.openlinksw.com/ontology/acl#&amp;gt; . [] a oplacl:ConditionalGroup ; foaf:name "People I know" ; oplacl:hasCondition [ a oplacl:QueryCondition ...</description>
  7951. </item>
  7952. </rdf:RDF>

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