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  22. <title>Savor The JOMO With This Week&#8217;s Quiz</title>
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  92. <title>The Important Rise Of &#8220;#DemThrones&#8221;</title>
  93. <link>https://www.dictionary.com/e/the-important-rise-of-demthrones/</link>
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  95. <pubDate>Fri, 17 May 2019 23:34:38 +0000</pubDate>
  96. <dc:creator><![CDATA[John Kelly]]></dc:creator>
  97. <category><![CDATA[Arts & Entertainment]]></category>
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  106. <description><![CDATA[<img width="800" height="800" src="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-demthrones.jpg" class="attachment-large size-large" alt="Getty" srcset="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-demthrones.jpg 800w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-demthrones-150x150.jpg 150w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-demthrones-300x300.jpg 300w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-demthrones-768x768.jpg 768w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-demthrones-380x380.jpg 380w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-demthrones-500x500.jpg 500w" sizes="(max-width: 800px) 100vw, 800px" /><br/><p>by Kimberly C. Ellis, PhD I remember that Sunday so clearly. I saw something called &#8220;#RedWedding&#8221; trending on Twitter and when I clicked on the hashtag, I discovered it was related to the hit television show Game of Thrones already into its third season. I decided that night I would find out about the show, watch it for the first time, and learn about this Red &#8230;</p>
  107. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.dictionary.com/e/the-important-rise-of-demthrones/">The Important Rise Of &#8220;#DemThrones&#8221;</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.dictionary.com/e">Everything After Z by Dictionary.com</a>.</p>
  108. ]]></description>
  109. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<img width="800" height="800" src="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-demthrones.jpg" class="attachment-large size-large" alt="Getty" srcset="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-demthrones.jpg 800w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-demthrones-150x150.jpg 150w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-demthrones-300x300.jpg 300w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-demthrones-768x768.jpg 768w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-demthrones-380x380.jpg 380w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-demthrones-500x500.jpg 500w" sizes="(max-width: 800px) 100vw, 800px" /><br/><p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">by Kimberly C. Ellis, PhD</span></em></p>
  110. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">I remember that Sunday so clearly. I saw something called &#8220;#RedWedding&#8221; trending on Twitter and when I clicked on the hashtag, I discovered it was related to the hit television show <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/e/s/game-of-thrones/" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>Game of Thrones</em></a> already into its third season.</span></p>
  111. <p>I decided that night I would find out about the show, watch it for the first time, and learn about this Red Wedding. My goodness, why did I do that? I was in the <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/throes" target="_blank" rel="noopener">throes</a> of caring for my mother who was suffering from dementia, and now I had to grapple with <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/e/fictional-characters/valar-morghulis/" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>valar morghulis</em></a>, “all men must die”?</p>
  112. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Now, as I watch </span><i><span style="font-weight: 400;">Game of Thrones </span></i><span style="font-weight: 400;">come to an equally red end after eight seasons, it’s a different hashtag that has brought me—and so many of those online—so much culture, so much creativity, so much life: &#8220;#DemThrones.&#8221; Or, what its creators have called  &#8220;</span>the greatest TV show hashtag of all time.&#8221;</p>
  113. <h2>What is &#8220;#DemThrones&#8221;?</h2>
  114. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The term and hashtag &#8220;#</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">DemThrones&#8221;</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"> is rooted in the <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/black-english" target="_blank" rel="noopener">African American Vernacular English</a> </span><i><span style="font-weight: 400;">dem</span></i><span style="font-weight: 400;">, meaning “them,” and the popular HBO television show, </span><i><span style="font-weight: 400;">Game of Thrones</span></i><span style="font-weight: 400;"> (i.e., Them Thrones).</span></p>
  115. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Based on George R.R. Martin’s fantasy series</span><i><span style="font-weight: 400;"> A Song of Ice and Fire</span></i><span style="font-weight: 400;">,</span><i><span style="font-weight: 400;"> Game of Thrones</span></i><span style="font-weight: 400;"> is one of the most popular television shows in history. The show is also a hit on Twitter, with fans live-tweeting the telecast under the official hashtags, &#8220;#GameofThrones&#8221; and the abbreviated &#8220;#GoT.&#8221;</span></p>
  116. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">&#8220;#DemThrones,&#8221; however, is an unofficial, unlicensed, and organically created social television hashtag, largely used by another cultural phenomenon: <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/e/slang/black-twitter" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Black Twitter</a>.</span></p>
  117. <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-width="500" data-dnt="true">
  118. <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Mane hold up <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/DemThrones?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#DemThrones</a> <a href="https://t.co/BYuX8yo9mF">pic.twitter.com/BYuX8yo9mF</a></p>
  119. <p>&mdash; msagfoodie (@AndraCollins) <a href="https://twitter.com/AndraCollins/status/1128270335239950337?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">May 14, 2019</a></p></blockquote>
  120. <p><script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script></p>
  121. <h2>The Origins of &#8220;#DemThrones&#8221; on Black Twitter</h2>
  122. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">There is no &#8220;#DemThrones,&#8221; and its internet culture, without Black Twitter. </span></p>
  123. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">First, Black Twitter users began creating their own cultural behaviors, norms, and language usage on Twitter since the platform’s inception in 2006, and was well established by the time HBO’s </span><i><span style="font-weight: 400;">Game of Thrones</span></i><span style="font-weight: 400;">  premiered in 2011. </span></p>
  124. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Second, while generating hashtags is central to Twitter, Black Twitter users have always created distinct hashtags reflective of their heritage and norms. &#8220;#DemThrones&#8221; is an immediately recognizable cultural product of the Black <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/vernacular" target="_blank" rel="noopener">vernacular</a> tradition—and not just the African American one, as the use of </span><i><span style="font-weight: 400;">dem</span></i><span style="font-weight: 400;"> for “them” is an extremely common linguistic form for English speakers from Africa and throughout the African <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/diaspora" target="_blank" rel="noopener">diaspora</a>. </span></p>
  125. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Third, the creators of the hashtag are a group of three African American men known as </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">FiyaStarter (@hotfiyastarter)</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">. They first used the phrase </span><i><span style="font-weight: 400;">Dem Thrones</span></i><span style="font-weight: 400;"> on their website and then, subsequently, their </span><a href="https://www.podomatic.com/podcasts/fiyastarter" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><span style="font-weight: 400;">podcast of the same name</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">. </span></p>
  126. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">As FiyaStarter member Sam explained in an interview, &#8220;#DemThrones&#8221; &#8220;was first mentioned on our podcast in Spring 2012, during a recap of an episode of [Season 2] … I&#8217;m sure we used the term before that, as that&#8217;s just how we speak to each other.&#8221; </span></p>
  127. <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-width="500" data-dnt="true">
  128. <p lang="en" dir="ltr"><a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/iHATEtheon?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#iHATEtheon</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/rodimusprime?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@rodimusprime</a> Damn Theon gotta kill this old man to show everyone has &quot;The Juice&quot;? Time to pay the iron price dog. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/DemThrones?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#DemThrones</a></p>
  129. <p>&mdash; FiyaStarter (@HotFiyaStarter) <a href="https://twitter.com/HotFiyaStarter/status/203159888996737024?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">May 17, 2012</a></p></blockquote>
  130. <p><script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script></p>
  131. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">So, FiyaStarter’s audience would have first heard them use the vernacular in speech form. It only became the hashtag &#8220;#DemThrones&#8221; as they began to <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/live-tweet" target="_blank" rel="noopener">live-tweet</a> the show and promote their podcast on it—and not until the second season, at that. </span></p>
  132. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Ironically, the creators did not intend for the hashtag to go viral and did not create it with Black Twitter as the end user in mind. Rather, their usage was organic and <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/idiosyncratic" target="_blank" rel="noopener">idiosyncratic</a>. &#8220;It was a little off-putting at first, having Black Twitter take our slang and run with it,” Sam explained, “because we had never had any real interaction with the vast majority of people using it.”</span></p>
  133. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">But &#8220;#DemThrones&#8221; went viral nonetheless, and African American culture met mainstream American pop culture. The rest is, literally, history.</span></p>
  134. <h2>The rise of &#8220;#DemThrones&#8221;</h2>
  135. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The rise of &#8220;#DemThrones&#8221; owes much of its vitality to the podcaster, Rod Morrow (@rodimusprime), who hosts the successful podcast </span><a href="http://www.theblackguywhotips.com/" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><i><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Black Guy Who Tips</span></i></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> with his wife Karen Morrow (@SayDatAgain, whose </span><i><span style="font-weight: 400;">dat</span></i><span style="font-weight: 400;">, “that,” also showcases African American Vernacular English).  </span></p>
  136. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Already a popular tweeter and well-known participant of Black Twitter, Morrow live-tweeted airings of </span><i><span style="font-weight: 400;">Game of Thrones</span></i><span style="font-weight: 400;"> solely using the hashtag &#8220;#DemThrones.&#8221; He also recapped the show on his podcast, using &#8220;#DemThrones.&#8221;</span></p>
  137. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">&#8220;#DemThrones&#8221; took on a life of its own, and Rod’s usage of the hashtag became so widespread, he was often mis-credited as its creator.</span></p>
  138. <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-width="500" data-dnt="true">
  139. <p lang="en" dir="ltr">This is how black <a href="https://twitter.com/GameOfThrones?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@GameOfThrones</a> fans have built their own universe out of Westeros with <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/DemThrones?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#DemThrones</a> <a href="https://t.co/TbyuUeXtVm">pic.twitter.com/TbyuUeXtVm</a></p>
  140. <p>&mdash; VICE News (@vicenews) <a href="https://twitter.com/vicenews/status/1118538024961413122?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">April 17, 2019</a></p></blockquote>
  141. <p><script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script></p>
  142. <h2>Beyond <i>Game of Thrones</i></h2>
  143. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">&#8220;#DemThrones&#8221; is not just a high five to African American culture. It is a broader signifier of Black Twitter—of a safe, fun, spectacular, and wide-open space, of a <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/democratize" target="_blank" rel="noopener">democratized</a> speech whose incisive discourse and dialogues, whose monologues and laugh-out-loud memes, are distinctly rooted in Black culture. That’s what makes it so great.</span></p>
  144. <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-width="500" data-dnt="true">
  145. <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Let&#39;s give it up for the tall women, of which I am one! Here&#39;s to Jamie and Brienne making love&#8212;finally! <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/DemThrones?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#DemThrones</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/GameofThrones?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#GameofThrones</a> <a href="https://t.co/ewLGAeDRCz">pic.twitter.com/ewLGAeDRCz</a></p>
  146. <p>&mdash; Dr. Goddess, First of Her Name, Queen of Chocolate (@drgoddess) <a href="https://twitter.com/drgoddess/status/1125210616011083776?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">May 6, 2019</a></p></blockquote>
  147. <p><script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script></p>
  148. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">&#8220;#DemThrones&#8221; is a much-needed microphone to express oneself in real time and sounding board for post-show discussions. Participating in or following along with the swift commentary of &#8220;#DemThrones&#8221; is next-level fun in a digital beauty shop, barbershop, after-church meal, rent party,</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"> and <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/juke-joint" target="_blank" rel="noopener">juke joint</a> all in one. Its social engagement and success are at once historic and a grande ole time.</span></p>
  149. <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-width="500" data-dnt="true">
  150. <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Me, before I joined <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/DemThrones?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#DemThrones</a> Twitter vs me after <a href="https://t.co/Wb5we4mwF6">pic.twitter.com/Wb5we4mwF6</a></p>
  151. <p>&mdash; Jemele Hill (@jemelehill) <a href="https://twitter.com/jemelehill/status/1117552583286063105?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">April 14, 2019</a></p></blockquote>
  152. <p><script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script></p>
  153. <h2>&#8220;#DemThrones.&#8221; Whose thrones?</h2>
  154. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">On April 14, 2019, during the season premiere of the final season of </span><i><span style="font-weight: 400;">Game of Thrones</span></i><span style="font-weight: 400;">, the Home Box Office used &#8220;#DemThrones&#8221; on its official @HBO twitter account for the first time in its eight-season run—all by itself and without any explanation. None was necessary. </span></p>
  155. <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-width="500" data-dnt="true">
  156. <p lang="en" dir="ltr">How about <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/DemThrones?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#DemThrones</a> <a href="https://t.co/9FdHN19Rj1">pic.twitter.com/9FdHN19Rj1</a></p>
  157. <p>&mdash; HBO (@HBO) <a href="https://twitter.com/HBO/status/1117607716770471936?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">April 15, 2019</a></p></blockquote>
  158. <p><script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script></p>
  159. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">That HBO made &#8220;#DemThrones&#8221; mainstream, though it had been popular on Black Twitter since 2012, reveals so much how language reaffirms marginalized communities and identities—and how they get <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/e/pop-culture/cultural-appropriation" target="_blank" rel="noopener">appropriated</a> in the mainstream. It reveals so much about who creates language, who gets credit, and who benefits. </span></p>
  160. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Sam, from FiyaStarter, stated that their reaction to @HBO’s usage was &#8220;validating on one level, but we couldn&#8217;t ignore the fact that [HBO] didn&#8217;t want us using the phrase to make T-shirts.” </span></p>
  161. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Asked of spin-off hashtags like &#8220;#ThronesYall&#8221; and &#8220;#DemDeadz&#8221; (for </span><i><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Walking Dead</span></i><span style="font-weight: 400;">), Sam underscored the importance of credit: </span></p>
  162. <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Bottom line: once you create something and put it out there, it takes on a life of its own. It just wasn&#8217;t cool seeing people &#8220;create&#8221; hashtags that were so absolutely rooted in our slang. The idea that &#8220;Dem Thrones&#8221; was just a lucky one-off rather than the inevitable result of this slang we created for ourselves was the worst part of the whole ordeal of trying to get our due as creators. It&#8217;s not like we didn&#8217;t have have years of evidence, dating back to 2005, on our website to prove it. </span></em></p>
  163. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Rod never took anything related to &#8220;#DemThrones&#8221; too seriously: &#8220;</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">I’m more about having fun with my fellow black people watching a show … At the same time I didn’t and don’t want anything from it. The thing I got was all these black people having a good time.&#8221;</span></p>
  164. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">By celebrating &#8220;#DemThrones&#8221; on Dictionary.com, we honor African American Vernacular English, Black Twitter, the creators and communities of the hashtag—all cast in its own distinct and significant cultural irons.</span></p>
  165. <p><em>Quotes were lightly edited for clarity.</em></p>
  166. <hr />
  167. <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;"><a href="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/DemThrones-Cosplay.png"><img class="wp-image-135116 alignright" src="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/DemThrones-Cosplay.png" alt="" width="317" height="242" /></a>Kimberly C. Ellis, Ph.D. is popularly known as </span><a href="http://twitter.com/drgoddess" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><span style="font-weight: 400;">@DrGoddess</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> and described as “the champion of Black Twitter.” </span></em></p>
  168. <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">She is the creator of the first and only international live-tweet on “Blackness in Game of Thrones” (and using the &#8220;#DemThrones&#8221; hashtag), and can be found live-tweeting the show every week. She is the author of the upcoming book </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Bombastic Brilliance of Black Twitter</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"> and created a documentary on her mother’s journey with dementia, </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">“You’re Beautiful to Me.”</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"> She also leads the world-travel group </span><a href="http://atripofftheoldblock.triplaunch.co" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><span style="font-weight: 400;">“A Trip Off the Old Block,”</span></a> which includes<span style="font-weight: 400;"> </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Game of Thrones</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"> filming locations.</span></em></p>
  169. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.dictionary.com/e/the-important-rise-of-demthrones/">The Important Rise Of &#8220;#DemThrones&#8221;</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.dictionary.com/e">Everything After Z by Dictionary.com</a>.</p>
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  178. <contentTitle>the-important-rise-of-demthrones</contentTitle> </item>
  179. <item>
  180. <title>The Most Surprisingly Serendipitous Words Of The Day</title>
  181. <link>https://www.dictionary.com/e/word-of-the-day-20-part-ii/</link>
  182. <comments>https://www.dictionary.com/e/word-of-the-day-20-part-ii/#respond</comments>
  183. <pubDate>Fri, 17 May 2019 17:03:36 +0000</pubDate>
  184. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Renae Hurlbutt]]></dc:creator>
  185. <category><![CDATA[Word Trends & Stories]]></category>
  186. <tag><![CDATA[category-wordtrends]]></tag>
  187. <tag><![CDATA[interest-politics]]></tag>
  188. <tag><![CDATA[interest-popculture]]></tag>
  189. <tag><![CDATA[interest-wotd]]></tag>
  190. <tag><![CDATA[related]]></tag>
  191. <tag><![CDATA[type-article]]></tag>
  192.  
  193. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://www.dictionary.com/e/?p=135035</guid>
  194. <description><![CDATA[<img width="800" height="800" src="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-WOTD-20-v2.jpg" class="attachment-large size-large" alt="" srcset="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-WOTD-20-v2.jpg 800w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-WOTD-20-v2-150x150.jpg 150w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-WOTD-20-v2-300x300.jpg 300w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-WOTD-20-v2-768x768.jpg 768w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-WOTD-20-v2-380x380.jpg 380w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-WOTD-20-v2-500x500.jpg 500w" sizes="(max-width: 800px) 100vw, 800px" /><br/><p>We&#8217;re back celebrating our Word of the Day’s birthday! Because there&#8217;s plenty left to reminisce about from the last 10 years. In Part II of our lexical stroll down memory lane (see Part I, 1999–2008, here), we will be examining word selections from 2009–2018, unearthing serendipitous synchronicities and offering perspicacious perspectives into notable events and trends of the last decade. Oops, just kidding, because our first call &#8230;</p>
  195. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.dictionary.com/e/word-of-the-day-20-part-ii/">The Most Surprisingly Serendipitous Words Of The Day</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.dictionary.com/e">Everything After Z by Dictionary.com</a>.</p>
  196. ]]></description>
  197. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<img width="800" height="800" src="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-WOTD-20-v2.jpg" class="attachment-large size-large" alt="" srcset="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-WOTD-20-v2.jpg 800w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-WOTD-20-v2-150x150.jpg 150w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-WOTD-20-v2-300x300.jpg 300w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-WOTD-20-v2-768x768.jpg 768w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-WOTD-20-v2-380x380.jpg 380w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-WOTD-20-v2-500x500.jpg 500w" sizes="(max-width: 800px) 100vw, 800px" /><br/><p><span style="font-weight: 400;">We&#8217;re back celebrating our Word of the Day’s birthday! Because there&#8217;s plenty left to reminisce about from the last 10 years.</span></p>
  198. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In Part II of our lexical stroll down memory lane (<a href="https://www.dictionary.com/e/word-of-the-day-turns-20/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">see Part I, 1999–2008, here</a>), we will be examining word selections from 2009–2018, unearthing </span><a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/serendipitous" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><i><span style="font-weight: 400;">serendipitous</span></i></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> synchronicities and offering </span><a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/perspicacious" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><i><span style="font-weight: 400;">perspicacious</span></i></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> perspectives into notable events and trends of the last decade. </span></p>
  199. <p>Oops, just kidding, because our first call out is actually from this year. In tribute to all you <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/bibliophage?s=t"><i><span style="font-weight: 400;">bibliophages</span></i></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">, we asked some of our favorite authors to select words throughout our birthday month. Like h</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">ost of CNN’s </span><i><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Lead</span></i><span style="font-weight: 400;"> and author of </span><i><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Outpost</span></i><span style="font-weight: 400;"> and </span><i><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Hellfire Club</span></i> <span style="font-weight: 400;">Jake Tapper, who chose the first birthday-month word</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">, </span><i><span style="font-weight: 400;"><a href="https://www.dictionary.com/e/word-of-the-day/guddle-2019-05-01/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">guddle</a>. </span></i></p>
  200. <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-width="500" data-dnt="true">
  201. <p lang="en" dir="ltr">I picked the word of the day! Thanks, <a href="https://twitter.com/Dictionarycom?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@Dictionarycom</a>! <a href="https://t.co/iwOy67rWGi">https://t.co/iwOy67rWGi</a></p>
  202. <p>&mdash; Jake Tapper (@jaketapper) <a href="https://twitter.com/jaketapper/status/1123549271582806016?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">May 1, 2019</a></p></blockquote>
  203. <p><script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script></p>
  204. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">And then came bestselling <a href="https://twitter.com/rgay/status/1126139816813318144" target="_blank" rel="noopener">author of </a></span><a href="https://twitter.com/rgay/status/1126139816813318144"><i><span style="font-weight: 400;">Bad Feminist</span></i><span style="font-weight: 400;"> and </span><i><span style="font-weight: 400;">Hunger</span></i> </a><span style="font-weight: 400;"><a href="https://twitter.com/rgay/status/1126139816813318144">Roxane Gay</a>, who chose the seasonally appropriate word </span><a href="https://www.dictionary.com/e/word-of-the-day/blossom-2019-05-08/" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><i><span style="font-weight: 400;">blossom</span></i></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> the following week. Award-winning author of </span><i><span style="font-weight: 400;">Speak</span></i><span style="font-weight: 400;"> and </span><i><span style="font-weight: 400;">Shout </span></i><span style="font-weight: 400;">(</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">to name a few)</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"> </span><span style="font-weight: 400;"><a href="https://twitter.com/halseanderson/status/1128618337477582848" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Laurie Halse Anderson chose next</a>, picking the word </span><a href="https://www.dictionary.com/e/word-of-the-day/consent-2019-05-15/" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><i><span style="font-weight: 400;">consent</span></i></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> on the third Wednesday of the month to raise awareness around consent-based sexual relations.</span></p>
  205. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Stay tuned for more author picks as the logophilic festivities continue. Now, on to those serendipitous words!</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"><br />
  206. </span></p>
  207. <h2><strong>cormorant</strong></h2>
  208. <p>“a greedy person.”<br />
  209. – March 16, 2009</p>
  210. <p>A <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/cormorant" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>cormorant</em></a> is a type of water bird. But, thanks to its perceived voraciousness, the cormorant can represent gluttony and greed in literature, figured as Satan in Milton&#8217;s <em>Paradise Lost</em> and maligned in Shakespeare&#8217;s <em>Love&#8217;s Labour&#8217;s Lost</em>.</p>
  211. <p>We featured this word on March 16, 2009, the date when President Obama expressed outrage at the insurance company AIG giving bonuses to its top executives from taxpayer bailout money, and said he would do everything in his power to stop it. “This is a corporation that finds itself in financial distress due to recklessness and greed,” <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2009/POLITICS/03/16/AIG.bonuses/index.html" target="_blank" rel="noopener">he said</a>.</p>
  212. <h2><strong>suspire</strong></h2>
  213. <p>“to sigh; utter with long, sighing breaths.”<br />
  214. – May 22, 2010</p>
  215. <p>We’re pretty sure nobody has this date marked on their calendar as one to remember from the last decade. But, May 22, 2010 was the day Nicolaus Copernicus—the 16th century Polish astronomer who proposed the heliocentric theory of our planetary system, which the Catholic Church came to condemn—was <a href="https://www.mercurynews.com/2010/05/22/astronomer-copernicus-reburied-as-hero/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">reburied as a hero</a>. Ah, sweet vindication.</p>
  216. <p>We imagine Copernicus somewhere in the great beyond <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/suspire" target="_blank" rel="noopener">suspiring</a> with an eye-roll &#8230; “Finally.”</p>
  217. <h2><strong>scurrilous</strong></h2>
  218. <p>“grossly or obscenely abusive.”<br />
  219. – April 17, 2011</p>
  220. <p>The word <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/scurrilous" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>scurrilous</em></a> is most often used to describe remarks that are vulgar and injurious, as in &#8220;He was the victim of scurrilous attacks.&#8221; It ultimately comes from Latin <span id="etymologySpanBlock1"><em>scurra </em>meaning</span> &#8220;buffoon.&#8221; Eighteenth-century lexicographer Samuel Johnson made the connection plain in his definition: &#8220;using such language as only the licence [sic] of a buffoon can warrant.&#8221;</p>
  221. <p>The word is also used to describe demeanor, as in &#8220;the scurrilous imposter.&#8221; We wonder if Word of the Day fans found it useful back in April 2011 for talking about a certain, shall we say, <i>graphic</i> new series called <em>Game of Thrones</em>, which premiered the day this word was featured. Winter is coming.</p>
  222. <h2><strong>terpsichorean</strong></h2>
  223. <p>“pertaining to dancing.”<br />
  224. – November 18, 2012</p>
  225. <p>The year 2012 does not have a monopoly on dancing (you can dance if you want to), but the timing of this word selection brings a smile as it was featured right around the time the South Korean superstar Psy had transfixed viewers with his so-called invisible-horse dance in the megahit “<a href="https://www.dictionary.com/e/slang/gangnam-style/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Gangnam Style</a>.”</p>
  226. <p>By November of 2012, “Gangnam Style” was well on its way to a billion views on YouTube (a milestone that was hit a month later). Today “Gangnam Style” has more than 3.3 billion views and counting, and we’re still trying to master his equestrian <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/terpsichorean" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>terpsichorean</em></a> style.</p>
  227. <h2><strong>logomachy</strong></h2>
  228. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">a dispute about or concerning words.”<br />
  229. </span>– May 7, 2013</p>
  230. <p>Although it may feel like heated disputes about words and their meanings are a new phenomenon (hi, Twitter), we assure you, lexical quibbles are as old as English itself, or at least as old as Early Modern English, when this word choice entered the lexicon (first attested in 1569).</p>
  231. <p>2013 was the year that the word <i>twerk</i> bounced into the spotlight—with a little “help” from Miley Cyrus—and sparked many a debate about its origins and staying power. And, of course, that meant <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/twerk" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><i>twerk</i></a> was added to Dictionary.com in 2013 as well (along with a few others that tend to spark <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/logomachy" target="_blank" rel="noopener">logomachies</a>, including <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/selfie" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><i>selfie</i></a>, <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/mansplain" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><i>mansplain</i></a>, and <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/cronut" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><i>cronut</i></a>).</p>
  232. <h2><strong>meliorism</strong></h2>
  233. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“the doctrine that the world tends to become better or may be made better by human effort.”<br />
  234. </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">– May 28, 2014</span></p>
  235. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Rooted in the Latin </span><i><span style="font-weight: 400;">melior</span></i><span style="font-weight: 400;">, meaning “better,” </span><a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/meliorism" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><i><span style="font-weight: 400;">meliorism</span></i></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> came in the middle of a year defined by <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/black-lives-matter" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Black Lives Matter</a> and its campaign for the equality of black people and against the violence they face. </span></p>
  236. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The movement might be considered a powerful example of </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">meliorism</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">. Whether in protests on the streets or through hashtags on social media, its activism seeks to make the world a better place for the marginalized.</span></p>
  237. <h2><strong>e pluribus unum</strong></h2>
  238. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“out of many, one.”<br />
  239. </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">– July 4, 2015</span></p>
  240. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">This unofficial motto of the US, meaning “out of many, one” in Latin and featured on our Great Seal and currency, dates back to the early days of the country, when the original 13 colonies united into a single nation.</span></p>
  241. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Since then, </span><a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/e-pluribus-unum" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><i><span style="font-weight: 400;">e pluribus unum</span></i></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> has evolved to express an idea of American unity in diversity. That belief rang a lot truer for many people when we featured this expression on Independence Day 2015. Just over a week before, the Supreme Court issued a landmark ruling that same-sex marriage is a legal right from sea to shining sea.</span></p>
  242. <h2><strong>suffrage</strong></h2>
  243. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“the right to vote, especially in a political election.”<br />
  244. </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">– November 8, 2016</span></p>
  245. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Perhaps you’ve noticed a theme as we’ve moved into the mid-2010s. Politics, identity, and language. </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Increasingly in the news, culture, and social media environment of the 2010s, Word of the Day has become a lens for many users, a way of looking at or reflecting on the affairs of the day. </span></p>
  246. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Like </span><a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/suffrage" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><i><span style="font-weight: 400;">suffrage</span></i></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">, which we featured on Election Day 2016, marked by the election of Donald Trump to the White House. What did y&#8217;all see in this word choice? Is it any different now?</span></p>
  247. <h2><strong>multitudinous</strong></h2>
  248. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“existing, occurring, or present in great numbers; very numerous.”<br />
  249. </span>– January 21, 2017</p>
  250. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The day after the inauguration of Donald Trump met the Women’s March, where over 200,000 people gathered in the nation’s capital—and many millions more across the US and world—in protests for the rights of women and other oppressed groups. </span></p>
  251. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Considered the largest single-day protest in the US, the Women’s March can truly be described as </span><a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/multitudinous" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><i><span style="font-weight: 400;">multitudinous</span></i></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">, or “very numerous,” the adjective form of </span><a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/multitude" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><i><span style="font-weight: 400;">multitude</span></i></a>.</p>
  252. <h2><strong>Minerva</strong></h2>
  253. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“a woman of great wisdom.”<br />
  254. </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">– March 8, 2018</span></p>
  255. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Speaking of women’s rights, March 8 is International Women’s Day, an apt occasion for </span><a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/minerva" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><i><span style="font-weight: 400;">Minerva</span></i></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">. This word for a wise woman takes up the mantle of the Roman goddess of wisdom and the arts, Minerva, an analog to Athena of ancient Greece. </span></p>
  256. <p><i><span style="font-weight: 400;">Minerva</span></i><span style="font-weight: 400;"> is also the namesake of Minerva McGonagall, who became Headmistress of Hogwarts in the Harry Potter universe. </span></p>
  257. <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-width="500" data-dnt="true">
  258. <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Minerva = A woman of great wisdom. </p>
  259. <p>Also Minerva = Headmistress of Hogwarts. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/InternationalWomensDay?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#InternationalWomensDay</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/WordOfTheDay?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#WordOfTheDay</a><a href="https://t.co/NEInx3fBqp">https://t.co/NEInx3fBqp</a> <a href="https://t.co/0USjYOrXei">pic.twitter.com/0USjYOrXei</a></p>
  260. <p>&mdash; Dictionary.com (@Dictionarycom) <a href="https://twitter.com/Dictionarycom/status/971796702217801729?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">March 8, 2018</a></p></blockquote>
  261. <p><script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script></p>
  262. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">No matter how far the technology has come since the <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/antediluvian" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>antediluvian</em></a> dial-up days of 1999, the appetite—the <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/appetence" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>appetence</em></a>, <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/edacity" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>edacity</em></a>, the <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/maw" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>maw</em></a>—for Word of the Day remains <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/brobdingnagian" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>Brobdingnagian</em></a>.</span></p>
  263. <p>Plus, there&#8217;s all of you. <a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BxFn2sgFpbY/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link" target="_blank" rel="noopener">The real birthday present has been hearing from our readers</a>, who are sharing your favorite Word of the Day selections with us on social media. Your reactions to Word of the Day make it truly great.</p>
  264. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Thanks for 20 years, and we look forward to many more. We certainly think they&#8217;ve made us &#8230; all the wiser.</span></p>
  265. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.dictionary.com/e/word-of-the-day-20-part-ii/">The Most Surprisingly Serendipitous Words Of The Day</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.dictionary.com/e">Everything After Z by Dictionary.com</a>.</p>
  266. ]]></content:encoded>
  267. <wfw:commentRss>https://www.dictionary.com/e/word-of-the-day-20-part-ii/feed/</wfw:commentRss>
  268. <slash:comments>0</slash:comments>
  269. <contentTitle>word-of-the-day-20-part-ii</contentTitle> </item>
  270. <item>
  271. <title>We’re All Guilty Of Whataboutism: Here&#8217;s Why</title>
  272. <link>https://www.dictionary.com/e/whataboutisms/</link>
  273. <comments>https://www.dictionary.com/e/whataboutisms/#respond</comments>
  274. <pubDate>Thu, 16 May 2019 02:00:17 +0000</pubDate>
  275. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Dictionary.com]]></dc:creator>
  276. <category><![CDATA[Ways to Say]]></category>
  277. <tag><![CDATA[category-waystosay]]></tag>
  278. <tag><![CDATA[interest-comebacks]]></tag>
  279. <tag><![CDATA[interest-insults]]></tag>
  280. <tag><![CDATA[interest-politics]]></tag>
  281. <tag><![CDATA[related]]></tag>
  282. <tag><![CDATA[type-article]]></tag>
  283.  
  284. <guid isPermaLink="false">http://www.dictionary.com/e/?p=27437</guid>
  285. <description><![CDATA[<img width="800" height="800" src="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/800x800-whataboutisms.jpg" class="attachment-large size-large" alt="Getty" srcset="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/800x800-whataboutisms.jpg 800w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/800x800-whataboutisms-150x150.jpg 150w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/800x800-whataboutisms-300x300.jpg 300w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/800x800-whataboutisms-768x768.jpg 768w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/800x800-whataboutisms-380x380.jpg 380w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/800x800-whataboutisms-500x500.jpg 500w" sizes="(max-width: 800px) 100vw, 800px" /><br/><p>Attention World: Your Favorite Comeback Sucks There are all sorts of retorts people resort to when criticized or called out for a mistake or wrongdoing of some kind. (Heaven forbid anyone just say, “I’m sorry. I was wrong,” anymore.) One of the most maddening kinds is increasingly being referred to as whataboutism. You know it when you hear it. “Hey, weren’t you supposed to do the &#8230;</p>
  286. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.dictionary.com/e/whataboutisms/">We’re All Guilty Of Whataboutism: Here&#8217;s Why</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.dictionary.com/e">Everything After Z by Dictionary.com</a>.</p>
  287. ]]></description>
  288. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<img width="800" height="800" src="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/800x800-whataboutisms.jpg" class="attachment-large size-large" alt="Getty" srcset="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/800x800-whataboutisms.jpg 800w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/800x800-whataboutisms-150x150.jpg 150w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/800x800-whataboutisms-300x300.jpg 300w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/800x800-whataboutisms-768x768.jpg 768w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/800x800-whataboutisms-380x380.jpg 380w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/800x800-whataboutisms-500x500.jpg 500w" sizes="(max-width: 800px) 100vw, 800px" /><br/><h2>Attention World: Your Favorite Comeback Sucks</h2>
  289. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">There are all sorts of <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/retort" target="_blank" rel="noopener">retorts</a> people resort to when criticized or called out for a mistake or wrongdoing of some kind. (Heaven forbid anyone just say, “I’m sorry. I was wrong,” anymore.) One of the most maddening kinds is increasingly being referred to as </span><span style="font-weight: 400;"><em>whataboutism</em>. </span></p>
  290. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">You know it when you hear it. “Hey, weren’t you supposed to do the dishes last night?” you ask your roommate as you stare at a sink full of crusty dishes. Instead of acknowledging it, apologizing, and jumping to clean up, your roommate opens a fresh can of whataboutism: “But what about that time last week when you were supposed to take out the garbage and you didn’t?” Wait, what? </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Can&#8217;t they just do the dishes?! </span></p>
  291. <h2><span style="color: #333333;">The Russians coined <em>whataboutism</em>?!</span></h2>
  292. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">This kind of <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/doltish" target="_blank" rel="noopener">doltish</a> deflection is infuriating. <em>Whataboutism</em> is considered a form of the logical <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/fallacy" target="_blank" rel="noopener">fallacy</a> called <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/tu-quoque" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>tu quoque</em></a><em>, </em>Latin for &#8220;you also&#8221;</span><span class="s1">—more like &#8220;And so are you!&#8221; in contemporary speech. The idea, here, is that a person charged with some offense tries to discredit the accuser by charging them with a similar one or bringing up a different issue altogether—none of which is relevant to the original accusation. It&#8217;s basically like blowing a raspberry at someone and saying <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/e/slang/you-are/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">&#8220;I know you are, but what am I?&#8221;</a> </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Classy, right?</span></p>
  293. <p>The term <em>whataboutism</em> has been dated to 1978, when it applied to propaganda techniques used by the Soviet Union during the Cold War. When the West criticized the Soviet Union, say, over human rights abuses, the Soviet Union would point out crimes committed by the West (e.g., the practice of <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/e/historical-current-events/lynching" target="_blank" rel="noopener">lynching</a> in the United States). The term <em>whataboutery</em> is found slightly earlier, in 1974, used of the conflict between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland. Both terms are based on the structure of the common retort <em>What about &#8230;?</em></p>
  294. <h2><span style="color: #333333;">The whereabouts of <em>whataboutism</em></span></h2>
  295. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">If we’re being honest, we’re all guilty of whataboutism. It’s often a knee-jerk response or a last-resort defense when we’ve got no good way to answer a criticism or charge. It’s also a pretty good way to shift the attention off your mistake and onto your accuser.</span></p>
  296. <p>But one man, in particular, has thrust <em>whataboutism</em><span style="font-weight: 400;">—as a word and practice—into the spotlight. You guessed it: President Donald Trump. Search interest in the term jumped during the investigation of Russian meddling into the 2016 presidential election, including the Trump campaign&#8217;s <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/e/what-does-the-word-possible-do-to-meaning/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">possible</a> collusion and conspiracy with them. In response to various allegations, Trump has often taken to those two very words that give <em>whataboutism</em> its name:   </span></p>
  297. <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-width="500" data-dnt="true">
  298. <p lang="en" dir="ltr">What about all of the contact with the Clinton campaign and the Russians? Also, is it true that the DNC would not let the FBI in to look?</p>
  299. <p>&mdash; Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) <a href="https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/843813078076719107?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">March 20, 2017</a></p></blockquote>
  300. <p><script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script></p>
  301. <p>Trump has what-about&#8217;ed<em> </em>off Twitter, too. In December 2018, for instance, Trump deflected on allegations his campaign violated campaign finance laws:</p>
  302. <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Nobody except for me would be looked at like this. Nobody. What about Congress, where they have a slush fund? And millions and millions of dollars is paid out each year. They have a slush fund. Millions—they don’t talk about campaign finance anything. Have you ever heard of campaign finance laws? Have they listed that on their campaign finance sheets? No.</span></em></p>
  303. <p>Trump, however, isn&#8217;t the only what-about-er about town. Whataboutism has been used, or called out, in the context of some of the other leading issues in the late 2010s, such as the Me Too Movement. After Senator Al Franken, for example, stepped down over sexual misconduct allegations in 2017–18, many accused him of whataboutism when he raised the fact that Trump has faced sexual assault allegations.</p>
  304. <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-width="500" data-dnt="true">
  305. <p lang="en" dir="ltr">I have been bothered all day by <a href="https://twitter.com/alfranken?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@alfranken</a> “whataboutism” in his resignation speech. Take ownership for what you did and don’t point the finger at others to distract from your own abuse of women! <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/metoo?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#metoo</a></p>
  306. <p>&mdash; Tiffani McCoy (@TiffaniMcCoy1) <a href="https://twitter.com/TiffaniMcCoy1/status/938985682164367360?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">December 8, 2017</a></p></blockquote>
  307. <p><script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script></p>
  308. <p>Not all whataboutism roads lead to Trump, we promise &#8230; but they do very often lead back to politics and Twitter. Whataboutism gets leveled at topics ranging from <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/e/politics/reverse-racism/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">race</a> to <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/brexit" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Brexit</a> to, yes, those original whatabouts, Russia.</p>
  309. <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-width="500" data-dnt="true">
  310. <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Reverse Racism is a myth. Prime “Whataboutism” <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/BHM?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#BHM</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/BlackHistoryMonth?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#BlackHistoryMonth</a></p>
  311. <p>&mdash; New York Liberty (0-0) <img src="https://s.w.org/images/core/emoji/2.3/72x72/270a-1f3fe.png" alt="✊🏾" class="wp-smiley" style="height: 1em; max-height: 1em;" /><img src="https://s.w.org/images/core/emoji/2.3/72x72/1f438.png" alt="🐸" class="wp-smiley" style="height: 1em; max-height: 1em;" /><img src="https://s.w.org/images/core/emoji/2.3/72x72/1f496.png" alt="💖" class="wp-smiley" style="height: 1em; max-height: 1em;" /><img src="https://s.w.org/images/core/emoji/2.3/72x72/264a.png" alt="♊" class="wp-smiley" style="height: 1em; max-height: 1em;" /> (@Timiah_SweetTea) <a href="https://twitter.com/Timiah_SweetTea/status/1096450966814187522?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">February 15, 2019</a></p></blockquote>
  312. <p><script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script></p>
  313. <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-width="500" data-dnt="true">
  314. <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Trying to filter out the negative impact of <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/brexit?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#brexit</a> on the UK and EU economies is senseless. Whatever would have been happening is being exaggerated by the chaos. If recessive, brexit makes it deeper. If growing, the growth rate is being dampened. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/whataboutism?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#whataboutism</a></p>
  315. <p>&mdash; Chris Lowndes (@chrislowndes) <a href="https://twitter.com/chrislowndes/status/1092685892097953792?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">February 5, 2019</a></p></blockquote>
  316. <p><script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script></p>
  317. <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-width="500" data-dnt="true">
  318. <p lang="en" dir="ltr">There&#39;s a distinction to be made between torture and murder of a critic and bombing enemies in a combat. Similarly with Putin, the whataboutism is a false equivalence.</p>
  319. <p>The history of US extrajudicial action is worthy of criticism; that doesn&#39;t mean others cannot be criticized. <a href="https://t.co/qOdm0fl8OS">https://t.co/qOdm0fl8OS</a></p>
  320. <p>&mdash; ATATurkeySandwich <img src="https://s.w.org/images/core/emoji/2.3/72x72/1f40b.png" alt="🐋" class="wp-smiley" style="height: 1em; max-height: 1em;" /><img src="https://s.w.org/images/core/emoji/2.3/72x72/1f991.png" alt="🦑" class="wp-smiley" style="height: 1em; max-height: 1em;" /><img src="https://s.w.org/images/core/emoji/2.3/72x72/1f40c.png" alt="🐌" class="wp-smiley" style="height: 1em; max-height: 1em;" /> (@barmping) <a href="https://twitter.com/barmping/status/1095703778295046144?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">February 13, 2019</a></p></blockquote>
  321. <p><script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script></p>
  322. <p>And, yes, plenty of everyday whataboutism<em> </em>gets called out, too. It seems like the tactic of our times.</p>
  323. <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-width="500" data-dnt="true">
  324. <p lang="en" dir="ltr">But every case of whataboutism and trivialisation of LGBT struggles shows that some people view LGBT struggles as a joke, as not legitimate and not as HUMAN rights <a href="https://t.co/BFaBH1o8Kt">pic.twitter.com/BFaBH1o8Kt</a></p>
  325. <p>&mdash; Jonathan Holliday (@jonsholliday) <a href="https://twitter.com/jonsholliday/status/1097465472335925253?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">February 18, 2019</a></p></blockquote>
  326. <p><script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script></p>
  327. <h2>Personal responsibility—remember that?</h2>
  328. <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Whataboutism is worrisome because it pushes aside personal responsibility. Apologies—at least </span><a href="https://www.dictionary.com/e/words-that-ruin-an-apology/" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><span style="font-weight: 400;">apologies done right</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">—seem to be a dying breed when everyone seems to point fingers and dodges, ducks, or dances around any admission that they may not be perfect. Might someone be hypocritical calling you out for something they’ve done too? Yes, but that doesn’t excuse your refusal to act responsibly and offer a genuine, thoughtful apology.</span></p>
  329. <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-width="500" data-dnt="true">
  330. <p lang="en" dir="ltr">How do you point out hypocrisy without engaging in whataboutism?</p>
  331. <p>&mdash; Armin Navabi (@ArminNavabi) <a href="https://twitter.com/ArminNavabi/status/1096144176989667328?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">February 14, 2019</a></p></blockquote>
  332. <p><script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script></p>
  333. <p>We&#8217;re never going to completely wipe out whataboutism, but <span style="font-weight: 400;">we can work to change our own behavior. The next time someone calls you out, you might say, “Yes, you’re right”&#8230; then go do those dishes. One little step forward at a time.</span></p>
  334. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.dictionary.com/e/whataboutisms/">We’re All Guilty Of Whataboutism: Here&#8217;s Why</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.dictionary.com/e">Everything After Z by Dictionary.com</a>.</p>
  335. ]]></content:encoded>
  336. <wfw:commentRss>https://www.dictionary.com/e/whataboutisms/feed/</wfw:commentRss>
  337. <slash:comments>0</slash:comments>
  338. <contentTitle>whataboutisms</contentTitle> </item>
  339. <item>
  340. <title>What Are The Right Words To Use When Talking About Suicide</title>
  341. <link>https://www.dictionary.com/e/right-words-about-suicide/</link>
  342. <comments>https://www.dictionary.com/e/right-words-about-suicide/#respond</comments>
  343. <pubDate>Wed, 15 May 2019 07:30:31 +0000</pubDate>
  344. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Ashley Austrew]]></dc:creator>
  345. <category><![CDATA[Word Trends & Stories]]></category>
  346. <tag><![CDATA[category-wordtrends]]></tag>
  347. <tag><![CDATA[interest-etiquette]]></tag>
  348. <tag><![CDATA[interest-taboo]]></tag>
  349. <tag><![CDATA[interest-waystosay]]></tag>
  350. <tag><![CDATA[related]]></tag>
  351. <tag><![CDATA[type-article]]></tag>
  352.  
  353. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://www.dictionary.com/e/?p=134359</guid>
  354. <description><![CDATA[<img width="800" height="800" src="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-words-suicide.jpg" class="attachment-large size-large" alt="Getty" srcset="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-words-suicide.jpg 800w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-words-suicide-150x150.jpg 150w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-words-suicide-300x300.jpg 300w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-words-suicide-768x768.jpg 768w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-words-suicide-380x380.jpg 380w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-words-suicide-500x500.jpg 500w" sizes="(max-width: 800px) 100vw, 800px" /><br/><p>Warning: This article deals with the sensitive topic of suicide. If you (or someone you know) need support, call the toll-free, 24/7 National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255. You can also text HOME to 741741 for free, which offers 24/7 support from the Crisis Text Line. According to the Centers for Disease Control, in 2016 suicide became the second leading cause of death for Americans ages 10–34 and the fourth &#8230;</p>
  355. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.dictionary.com/e/right-words-about-suicide/">What Are The Right Words To Use When Talking About Suicide</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.dictionary.com/e">Everything After Z by Dictionary.com</a>.</p>
  356. ]]></description>
  357. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<img width="800" height="800" src="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-words-suicide.jpg" class="attachment-large size-large" alt="Getty" srcset="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-words-suicide.jpg 800w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-words-suicide-150x150.jpg 150w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-words-suicide-300x300.jpg 300w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-words-suicide-768x768.jpg 768w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-words-suicide-380x380.jpg 380w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-words-suicide-500x500.jpg 500w" sizes="(max-width: 800px) 100vw, 800px" /><br/><p><strong>Warning:</strong> <em>This article deals with the sensitive topic of suicide. If you (or someone you know) need support, call the toll-free, 24/7 <a role="link" href="http://www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">National Suicide Prevention Lifeline</a> at 1-800-273-8255. You can also text HOME to 741741 for free, which offers 24/7 support from the <a role="link" href="http://www.crisistextline.org/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Crisis Text Line</a>.</em></p>
  358. <p>According to the Centers for Disease Control, in 2016 suicide became the <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/products/databriefs/db330.htm" target="_blank" rel="noopener">second leading cause of death for Americans ages 10–34</a> and the fourth leading cause for those 35–54. This issue has been highlighted by the suicide deaths of several high-profile people in recent years, like designer Kate Spade, chef Anthony Bourdain, and musician Chester Bennington.</p>
  359. <p>When someone dies by suicide, it&#8217;s typical to hear the phrase <em>committed suicide</em>. Recently, though, that expression has come under fire for victim-blaming and reinforcing the <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/stigma" target="_blank" rel="noopener">stigma</a> surrounding mental illness.</p>
  360. <p>So, what is the right phrase to use?</p>
  361. <h2>The problem with <em>committed suicide</em></h2>
  362. <p><a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/suicide" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>Suicide</em></a> is the &#8220;intentional taking of one&#8217;s own life.&#8221; Evidenced in the mid-1600s, <em>suicide</em> is formed from the Latin <em>sui</em>, &#8220;of oneself,&#8221; and &#8211;<em>cide</em>, a combining form meaning &#8220;killing,&#8221; seen in other such words as <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/homicide" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>homicide</em></a> or <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/insecticide" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>insecticide</em></a>.</p>
  363. <p>Because <em>suicide</em> is usually seen as a deliberate act, many feel that it&#8217;s logical to describe it as something a person <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/commit" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>commits</em></a> (i.e., &#8220;does, performs, perpetrates&#8221;). The issue, though, is that when we use the word <em>commit</em> to describe suicide, it implies that a choice was made in the same way that one might choose to commit a crime or a sin. However, those who die by suicide usually do not feel as though they have a choice.</p>
  364. <p>Many who die by suicide struggle with mental illness, such as depression and anxiety. Others may be <a href="https://www.nami.org/Blogs/NAMI-Blog/September-2018/5-Common-Myths-About-Suicide-Debunked" target="_blank" rel="noopener">victims of trauma</a> or facing major life stressors—such as physical or sexual abuse, homelessness, legal problems, loss of a loved one, persecution, and rejection—that make them feel as though suicide is the only way to stop their suffering. Describing someone as having <em>committed suicide</em> makes it sound like they perpetrated a crime on themselves, when, in reality, they were a victim.</p>
  365. <p>Nonetheless, <em>committed </em>remains the main term used by most people and the media to describe the act of suicide. When the father of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting victim died in an apparent suicide in March 2019, it was widely reported that he &#8220;committed suicide.&#8221; Similar language was used when two students who survived the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting died in March. This is in spite of the fact that an alliance of prominent mental health and media organizations <a href="http://reportingonsuicide.org/recommendations/#dodonts" target="_blank" rel="noopener">advise journalists against the phrase <em>committed suicide</em></a> when reporting on suicide deaths.</p>
  366. <h2>What should we say instead?</h2>
  367. <p>The recommended terminology to use when discussing suicide is <em>died by suicide</em>, according to Dr. Daniel J. Reidenberg, the executive director of Suicide Awareness Voices of Education. Suicide is often stigmatized as being a choice or selfish act, and saying that someone &#8220;committed suicide&#8221; can reinforce those ideas. Neutral phrasing strips away some of the blame and shame that is too often associated with these losses.</p>
  368. <p>This is important not only for changing the way people talk about mental health, but also for encouraging those suffering from suicidal <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/ideation" target="_blank" rel="noopener">ideation</a>—or thinking about, considering, or planning suicide—to be more open with their struggles and seek help. Research shows that <a href="https://www.psychologicalscience.org/news/releases/stigma-as-a-barrier-to-mental-health-care.html" target="_blank" rel="noopener">mental health stigma indeed can play a major role in preventing people from seeking treatment</a>.</p>
  369. <p>Changing our language may not seem significant, but the way we discuss suicide and mental health issues matters more than ever. A study published in April 2019 showed that the suicide rate in boys aged 10–17 jumped significantly in the month after the 2017 debut of Netflix&#8217;s <em>13 Reasons Why</em>, a show which not only frequently discusses suicide but also depicts a teen dying by suicide.</p>
  370. <p>Moreover, <a href="https://www.va.gov/opa/pressrel/pressrelease.cfm?id=2951" target="_blank" rel="noopener">US veterans are 22 percent more likely than non-veterans to die by suicide</a>, over 40 percent of <a href="https://www.hrc.org/blog/new-study-reveals-shocking-rates-of-attempted-suicide-among-trans-adolescen" target="_blank" rel="noopener">non-binary youth self-report that they have attempted suicide</a>, and suicide rates are rising for many other groups across the US too.</p>
  371. <p>It is essential to reach out to those who are at risk and advocate for better treatment options and increased access to mental healthcare. It is also important to do everything we can to replace the stigma surrounding suicide with a culture—and language—of <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/e/pop-culture/semicolon-tattoo/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">honesty and support</a>.</p>
  372. <p>Replacing <em>committed suicide</em> to <em>died by suicide</em> is a small change that can have a big impact.</p>
  373. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.dictionary.com/e/right-words-about-suicide/">What Are The Right Words To Use When Talking About Suicide</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.dictionary.com/e">Everything After Z by Dictionary.com</a>.</p>
  374. ]]></content:encoded>
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  377. <contentTitle>right-words-about-suicide</contentTitle> </item>
  378. <item>
  379. <title>Should We Use Emoji In Work Emails?</title>
  380. <link>https://www.dictionary.com/e/emoji-at-work/</link>
  381. <comments>https://www.dictionary.com/e/emoji-at-work/#respond</comments>
  382. <pubDate>Tue, 14 May 2019 07:49:00 +0000</pubDate>
  383. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Ashley Austrew]]></dc:creator>
  384. <category><![CDATA[Word Trends & Stories]]></category>
  385. <tag><![CDATA[category-wordtrends]]></tag>
  386. <tag><![CDATA[interest-emoji]]></tag>
  387. <tag><![CDATA[interest-etiquette]]></tag>
  388. <tag><![CDATA[interest-work]]></tag>
  389. <tag><![CDATA[related]]></tag>
  390. <tag><![CDATA[type-article]]></tag>
  391.  
  392. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://www.dictionary.com/e/?p=133639</guid>
  393. <description><![CDATA[<img width="800" height="800" src="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-emojis-at-work-v2.jpg" class="attachment-large size-large" alt="Getty" srcset="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-emojis-at-work-v2.jpg 800w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-emojis-at-work-v2-150x150.jpg 150w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-emojis-at-work-v2-300x300.jpg 300w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-emojis-at-work-v2-768x768.jpg 768w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-emojis-at-work-v2-380x380.jpg 380w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-emojis-at-work-v2-500x500.jpg 500w" sizes="(max-width: 800px) 100vw, 800px" /><br/><p>A few decades ago, if you told someone that people would soon be sending one another electronic messages full of cartoon smiley faces, they would have looked at you like, well, 🙃. But, the future is now, and we do indeed send each other emails, texts, and tweets all day long that contain hearts and sparkles, crying faces and laughing faces, and all sorts of creatures, &#8230;</p>
  394. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.dictionary.com/e/emoji-at-work/">Should We Use Emoji In Work Emails?</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.dictionary.com/e">Everything After Z by Dictionary.com</a>.</p>
  395. ]]></description>
  396. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<img width="800" height="800" src="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-emojis-at-work-v2.jpg" class="attachment-large size-large" alt="Getty" srcset="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-emojis-at-work-v2.jpg 800w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-emojis-at-work-v2-150x150.jpg 150w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-emojis-at-work-v2-300x300.jpg 300w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-emojis-at-work-v2-768x768.jpg 768w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-emojis-at-work-v2-380x380.jpg 380w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-emojis-at-work-v2-500x500.jpg 500w" sizes="(max-width: 800px) 100vw, 800px" /><br/><p>A few decades ago, if you told someone that people would soon be sending one another electronic messages full of cartoon smiley faces, they would have looked at you like, well, <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/e/emoji/upside-down-face-emoji/" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="https://s.w.org/images/core/emoji/2.3/72x72/1f643.png" alt="🙃" class="wp-smiley" style="height: 1em; max-height: 1em;" /></a>.</p>
  397. <p>But, the future is now, and we do indeed send each other emails, texts, and tweets all day long that contain hearts and sparkles, crying faces and laughing faces, and all sorts of creatures, great <img src="https://s.w.org/images/core/emoji/2.3/72x72/1f991.png" alt="🦑" class="wp-smiley" style="height: 1em; max-height: 1em;" /> and small<img src="https://s.w.org/images/core/emoji/2.3/72x72/1f41b.png" alt="🐛" class="wp-smiley" style="height: 1em; max-height: 1em;" />.</p>
  398. <p>Not everyone is always on board with emoji, however. When it comes to sending emails that are serious or professional in nature, some worry that using emoji makes them look childish. Others simply don&#8217;t like them.</p>
  399. <p>So, what&#8217;s an emoji user to do? <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/e/emoji/person-shrugging-emoji/" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="https://s.w.org/images/core/emoji/2.3/72x72/1f937-1f3fd.png" alt="🤷🏽" class="wp-smiley" style="height: 1em; max-height: 1em;" /></a></p>
  400. <h2>When did we start using emoji?</h2>
  401. <p>Emoji were in part inspired by emoticons. An <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/emoticon" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>emoticon</em></a> is &#8220;a digital icon or sequence of keyboard symbols that serve to represent a facial expression, such as <img src="https://s.w.org/images/core/emoji/2.3/72x72/1f642.png" alt="🙂" class="wp-smiley" style="height: 1em; max-height: 1em;" /> for a smiling face&#8221; or <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/e/emoji/heart-symbol/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">&lt;3</a> for a heart. The word is a portmanteau of <em>emotion</em> and <em>icon</em>.</p>
  402. <p>Emoticons are credited to Scott Fahlman, a professor at Carnegie Mellon University, in 1982. It became apparent that he and his colleagues needed a way to convey when they were joking or being sarcastic on a text-only university online message board. He proposed using the smiley face <img src="https://s.w.org/images/core/emoji/2.3/72x72/1f642.png" alt="🙂" class="wp-smiley" style="height: 1em; max-height: 1em;" />  to indicate jokes and a sad face : -( to indicate seriousness, much like many of us still do today.</p>
  403. <p>The concept caught on as the internet became more popular and more mainstream. Soon, there were emoticons to express winking, crying, and even kissing. Then, in the late 1990s, Japanese cell phone carriers SoftBank (in 1997, ultimately the basis of Apple&#8217;s leading emoji) and NTT Docomo (<a href="https://www.dictionary.com/e/love-adding-emoji-dictionary/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">who released an influential set in 1999</a>) changed the game by introducing some of the first emoji.</p>
  404. <p><em><a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/emoji" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Emoji</a></em> are &#8220;small digital pictures or pictorial symbols that represent a thing, feeling, concept, etc.&#8221; The word literally means &#8220;picture letter&#8221;or &#8220;picture character&#8221; in Japanese. At this time, screen space was limited, and so emoji aided communication by expressing big concepts in a small space.</p>
  405. <p>Emoji went mainstream outside Japan after 2010, when they were standardized by Unicode, an organization that provides a universal character set for computers. Today, the ever-growing family of emoji can be found on keyboards and screens all across the globe—with a 2016 report finding over 90% of people online using them.</p>
  406. <h2>So, should we use emoji at work?</h2>
  407. <p>As of March 2019, there are 3,019 emoji in the Unicode Standard, and some of the most popular ones are <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/e/emoji/face-with-tears-of-joy-emoji/" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>Face with Tears of Joy <img src="https://s.w.org/images/core/emoji/2.3/72x72/1f602.png" alt="😂" class="wp-smiley" style="height: 1em; max-height: 1em;" /></em></a>, <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/e/emoji/red-heart-emoji/" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>Red Heart</em> <img src="https://s.w.org/images/core/emoji/2.3/72x72/2764.png" alt="❤" class="wp-smiley" style="height: 1em; max-height: 1em;" /></a>, <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/e/emoji/smiling-face-with-heart-shaped-eyes-emoji/" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>Smiling Face with Heart Eyes <img src="https://s.w.org/images/core/emoji/2.3/72x72/1f60d.png" alt="😍" class="wp-smiley" style="height: 1em; max-height: 1em;" /></em></a>, <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/e/emoji/thinking-face-emoji/" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>Thinking Face <img src="https://s.w.org/images/core/emoji/2.3/72x72/1f914.png" alt="🤔" class="wp-smiley" style="height: 1em; max-height: 1em;" /></em></a>, and <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/e/emoji/fire-emoji/" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>Fire <img src="https://s.w.org/images/core/emoji/2.3/72x72/1f525.png" alt="🔥" class="wp-smiley" style="height: 1em; max-height: 1em;" /></em></a>.</p>
  408. <p>By 2017, over five billion—yes, billion—emoji were being sent on Facebook Messenger every day, and around half of all comments on Instagram include an emoji. <img src="https://s.w.org/images/core/emoji/2.3/72x72/1f92f.png" alt="🤯" class="wp-smiley" style="height: 1em; max-height: 1em;" /> So, it only makes sense that emoji would start to creep into our emails as well, right?</p>
  409. <p>While the use of emojis in personal emails generally isn&#8217;t the subject of controversy, people have strong opinions about whether or not it&#8217;s OK to use them in professional emails.</p>
  410. <p>Some people are 100 percent anti-emoji in work emails:</p>
  411. <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-width="500" data-dnt="true">
  412. <p lang="en" dir="ltr">I will not debase myself and use emojis in work email I refuse</p>
  413. <p>&mdash; <img src="https://s.w.org/images/core/emoji/2.3/72x72/1f197.png" alt="🆗" class="wp-smiley" style="height: 1em; max-height: 1em;" /> steve (@steve_jorbz) <a href="https://twitter.com/steve_jorbz/status/1072938796369543168?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">December 12, 2018</a></p></blockquote>
  414. <p><script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script></p>
  415. <p>Others reserve their irritation for specific types of emoji:</p>
  416. <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-width="500" data-dnt="true">
  417. <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Nothing irks me more than when someone uses a wink face emoji in a work email. It’s honestly soooo creepy. <img src="https://s.w.org/images/core/emoji/2.3/72x72/1f922.png" alt="🤢" class="wp-smiley" style="height: 1em; max-height: 1em;" /><img src="https://s.w.org/images/core/emoji/2.3/72x72/1f92e.png" alt="🤮" class="wp-smiley" style="height: 1em; max-height: 1em;" /></p>
  418. <p>&mdash; Christine Dean (@Cdeannnnn) <a href="https://twitter.com/Cdeannnnn/status/1085589357568892929?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">January 16, 2019</a></p></blockquote>
  419. <p><script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script></p>
  420. <p>But, a lot of people don&#8217;t seem to have a problem punctuating their emails with smiles, frowns, winks, laugh-cries, and every other available emoji.</p>
  421. <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-width="500" data-dnt="true">
  422. <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Should you use emojis in a work email? What do you think?<img src="https://s.w.org/images/core/emoji/2.3/72x72/1f914.png" alt="🤔" class="wp-smiley" style="height: 1em; max-height: 1em;" /></p>
  423. <p>Answer below and sign up for the British Council&#39;s new online course, Writing Better Emails, to find out what the experts say about it! <a href="https://t.co/Kq0ywi0IXT">https://t.co/Kq0ywi0IXT</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/LearnEnglish_BC?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@LearnEnglish_BC</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/FLbetteremail?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#FLbetteremail</a></p>
  424. <p>&mdash; FutureLearn (@FutureLearn) <a href="https://twitter.com/FutureLearn/status/956272901434560512?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">January 24, 2018</a></p></blockquote>
  425. <p><script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script></p>
  426. <p>The main reason why some people are against emoji in work contexts is because they think using them seems unprofessional and immature. In fact, a 2017 study published in <em>Psychological and Personality Science</em> found that people who use smiley faces in professional emails may be perceived as less competent.</p>
  427. <p>However, emoji are already a major part of the work landscape. A 2014 survey found that 76 percent of Americans use emoji in professional communication. Gmail and Outlook both have emoji keyboards. Messaging services like Slack, used by many companies, encourage users to use a variety of emoji, including some custom ones. In early 2019, a <em>Wall Street Journal</em> op-ed even advocated for the occasional use of emoji in professional emails, mostly because emails can be misunderstood and adding an emoji can help to clarify the writer&#8217;s intent.</p>
  428. <h2>How to use emoji thoughtfully</h2>
  429. <p>The trick with using emoji at work seems to be knowing when to use it. Alison Green, the workplace expert behind the popular website Ask A Manager, says emoji are fine in moderation, but we should consider the type of message we&#8217;re writing, who we are sending it to, and our company&#8217;s overall culture.</p>
  430. <p>A close colleague, for instance, could casually show thanks and appreciation in a Slack chat or quick email with <em>Smiling Face with Smiling Eyes</em> <strong><img src="https://s.w.org/images/core/emoji/2.3/72x72/263a.png" alt="☺" class="wp-smiley" style="height: 1em; max-height: 1em;" /> </strong>or <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/e/emoji/folded-hands-emoji/" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>Folded Hands</em> <img src="https://s.w.org/images/core/emoji/2.3/72x72/1f64f.png" alt="🙏" class="wp-smiley" style="height: 1em; max-height: 1em;" /></a>. But a boss making an official announcement about company-wide layoffs with <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/e/emoji/loudly-crying-face-emoji/" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>Loudly Crying Face</em> <img src="https://s.w.org/images/core/emoji/2.3/72x72/1f62d.png" alt="😭" class="wp-smiley" style="height: 1em; max-height: 1em;" /></a>? Not so appropriate.</p>
  431. <p>We should also be mindful of clarity. One of the virtues of emoji is that they help convey tone and emotion, so often lost in electronic communication, but overloading emails with hearts and smileys can be distracting and drown out what we are trying to say. Be careful, too, about which emoji is sent. Many emoji are straightforward, like <em>Hedgehog</em> <img src="https://s.w.org/images/core/emoji/2.3/72x72/1f994.png" alt="🦔" class="wp-smiley" style="height: 1em; max-height: 1em;" />; it&#8217;s a hedgehog. But, others can easily be misinterpreted, such as <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/e/emoji/grimacing-face-emoji/" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>Grimacing Face</em> <img src="https://s.w.org/images/core/emoji/2.3/72x72/1f62c.png" alt="😬" class="wp-smiley" style="height: 1em; max-height: 1em;" /></a>, whose applications widely vary. Then there are emoji, such as <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/e/emoji/peach-emoji/" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>Peach</em> <img src="https://s.w.org/images/core/emoji/2.3/72x72/1f351.png" alt="🍑" class="wp-smiley" style="height: 1em; max-height: 1em;" /></a>, who&#8217;ve taken on slang lives of their own that we&#8217;re pretty sure you don&#8217;t want to send to your coworkers.</p>
  432. <p>Emoji are a part of everyday communication for most people, and that includes at work. Nonetheless, it&#8217;s always wise for us to be thoughtful about how we communicate.</p>
  433. <p>And, if in doubt, check out Dictionary.com&#8217;s <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/e/emoji/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">guide to emoji</a> to make sure your workplace emoji use is <img src="https://s.w.org/images/core/emoji/2.3/72x72/1f44d.png" alt="👍" class="wp-smiley" style="height: 1em; max-height: 1em;" />.</p>
  434. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.dictionary.com/e/emoji-at-work/">Should We Use Emoji In Work Emails?</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.dictionary.com/e">Everything After Z by Dictionary.com</a>.</p>
  435. ]]></content:encoded>
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  438. <contentTitle>emoji-at-work</contentTitle> </item>
  439. <item>
  440. <title>Sharpen Your Perspicacity With This Week&#8217;s Quiz</title>
  441. <link>https://www.dictionary.com/e/word-of-the-day-quiz-may-6-may-12-2019/</link>
  442. <comments>https://www.dictionary.com/e/word-of-the-day-quiz-may-6-may-12-2019/#respond</comments>
  443. <pubDate>Mon, 13 May 2019 07:01:32 +0000</pubDate>
  444. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Nick Koch]]></dc:creator>
  445. <category><![CDATA[Quizzes]]></category>
  446. <tag><![CDATA[category-quizzes]]></tag>
  447. <tag><![CDATA[category-wotd]]></tag>
  448. <tag><![CDATA[interest-vocabulary]]></tag>
  449. <tag><![CDATA[interest-wotd]]></tag>
  450. <tag><![CDATA[type-quiz]]></tag>
  451. <tag><![CDATA[type-quizzes]]></tag>
  452.  
  453. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://www.dictionary.com/e/?p=134912</guid>
  454. <description><![CDATA[<img width="800" height="800" src="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/wotd_800x800.jpg" class="attachment-large size-large" alt="" srcset="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/wotd_800x800.jpg 800w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/wotd_800x800-150x150.jpg 150w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/wotd_800x800-300x300.jpg 300w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/wotd_800x800-768x768.jpg 768w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/wotd_800x800-380x380.jpg 380w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/wotd_800x800-500x500.jpg 500w" sizes="(max-width: 800px) 100vw, 800px" /><br/><p>Shoo away that popinjay and cozy up to this week&#8217;s Word of the Day Quiz. &#124; May 6– May 12, 2019 If the quiz doesn&#8217;t display, please try opening in the Chrome browser. Interested in Words of the Day from the past? Check out this one that we brought to life &#8230; &#160; Tell us your favorite word from this week below (and share it &#8230;</p>
  455. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.dictionary.com/e/word-of-the-day-quiz-may-6-may-12-2019/">Sharpen Your Perspicacity With This Week&#8217;s Quiz</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.dictionary.com/e">Everything After Z by Dictionary.com</a>.</p>
  456. ]]></description>
  457. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<img width="800" height="800" src="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/wotd_800x800.jpg" class="attachment-large size-large" alt="" srcset="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/wotd_800x800.jpg 800w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/wotd_800x800-150x150.jpg 150w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/wotd_800x800-300x300.jpg 300w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/wotd_800x800-768x768.jpg 768w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/wotd_800x800-380x380.jpg 380w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/wotd_800x800-500x500.jpg 500w" sizes="(max-width: 800px) 100vw, 800px" /><br/><h2>Shoo away that popinjay and cozy up to this week&#8217;s Word of the Day Quiz. | May 6– May 12, 2019</h2>
  458. <h2><em style="font-size: 16px;">If the quiz doesn&#8217;t display, please try <a href="http://www.dictionary.com/e/word-of-the-day-quiz-may-6-may-12-2019/">opening</a> in the Chrome browser.</em></h2>
  459. <div class="apester-media" data-media-id="5cd6534753f4568c65491782"></div>
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  462. <h2>Interested in Words of the Day from the past? Check out this one that we brought to life &#8230;</h2>
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  501. <p style="text-align: left;">Tell us your favorite word from this week below (and share it with your friends on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/dictionarycom" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Facebook</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/dictionarycom" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Twitter</a>)!</p>
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  503. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.dictionary.com/e/word-of-the-day-quiz-may-6-may-12-2019/">Sharpen Your Perspicacity With This Week&#8217;s Quiz</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.dictionary.com/e">Everything After Z by Dictionary.com</a>.</p>
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  507. <contentTitle>word-of-the-day-quiz-may-6-may-12-2019</contentTitle> </item>
  508. <item>
  509. <title>What Word Is Your State Looking Up On Mother&#8217;s Day?</title>
  510. <link>https://www.dictionary.com/e/mothers-day-words-by-state-2018/</link>
  511. <comments>https://www.dictionary.com/e/mothers-day-words-by-state-2018/#respond</comments>
  512. <pubDate>Thu, 09 May 2019 23:00:00 +0000</pubDate>
  513. <dc:creator><![CDATA[John Kelly]]></dc:creator>
  514. <category><![CDATA[Holidays]]></category>
  515. <category><![CDATA[Word Trends & Stories]]></category>
  516. <tag><![CDATA[category-holidays]]></tag>
  517. <tag><![CDATA[interest-kidsparenting]]></tag>
  518. <tag><![CDATA[interest-Mothers-Day]]></tag>
  519. <tag><![CDATA[interest-vocabulary]]></tag>
  520. <tag><![CDATA[related]]></tag>
  521. <tag><![CDATA[type-article]]></tag>
  522.  
  523. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://www.dictionary.com/e/?p=134876</guid>
  524. <description><![CDATA[<img width="800" height="800" src="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-motherday-map.png" class="attachment-large size-large" alt="" srcset="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-motherday-map.png 800w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-motherday-map-150x150.png 150w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-motherday-map-300x300.png 300w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-motherday-map-768x768.png 768w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-motherday-map-380x380.png 380w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-motherday-map-500x500.png 500w" sizes="(max-width: 800px) 100vw, 800px" /><br/><p>By now, we trust you’re not looking up when Mother’s Day is. Surely you’re just consulting the dictionary for the perfect words to grace your mother&#8217;s card, right? Well, the numbers don’t lie—and especially not to mothers. Our Data Scientists analyzed what users looked up on Dictionary.com on Mother’s Day in 2018 and found these as the top trends by state. They give and they &#8230;</p>
  525. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.dictionary.com/e/mothers-day-words-by-state-2018/">What Word Is Your State Looking Up On Mother&#8217;s Day?</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.dictionary.com/e">Everything After Z by Dictionary.com</a>.</p>
  526. ]]></description>
  527. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<img width="800" height="800" src="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-motherday-map.png" class="attachment-large size-large" alt="" srcset="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-motherday-map.png 800w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-motherday-map-150x150.png 150w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-motherday-map-300x300.png 300w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-motherday-map-768x768.png 768w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-motherday-map-380x380.png 380w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-motherday-map-500x500.png 500w" sizes="(max-width: 800px) 100vw, 800px" /><br/><p><a href="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/1000x700-motherday-map.jpg"><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-134936" src="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/1000x700-motherday-map.jpg" alt="" width="1000" height="700" srcset="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/1000x700-motherday-map.jpg 1000w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/1000x700-motherday-map-300x210.jpg 300w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/1000x700-motherday-map-768x538.jpg 768w" sizes="(max-width: 1000px) 100vw, 1000px" /></a></p>
  528. <p class="p1"><span class="s1">By now, we trust you’re not looking up when <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/mother-s-day" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Mother’s Day</a> is. Surely you’re just consulting the dictionary for the perfect words to grace your mother&#8217;s card, right?</span></p>
  529. <p class="p1"><span class="s1">Well, the numbers don’t lie—and especially not to mothers. Our Data Scientists analyzed what users looked up on Dictionary.com on Mother’s Day in 2018 and found these as the top trends by state.</span></p>
  530. <h2 class="p1"><span class="s1">They give and they give</span></h2>
  531. <p class="p1"><span class="s1">Mothers give so much of themselves, and that’s reflected in the chief theme of our Mother’s Day lookups: <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/selflessness" target="_blank" rel="noopener">selflessness</a>. </span></p>
  532. <p class="p1"><span class="s1">In Connecticut, Maine, North Carolina, Oregon, and West Virginia, people were searching for <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/selfless" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><i>selfless</i></a>, “having little or no concern for oneself, especially with regard to fame, position, money, etc.” Related searches include <i>selflessly </i></span><span class="s2">(</span><span class="s1">Tennessee), <i>selflessness</i> (New York), and <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/unselfish" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><i>unselfish</i></a> (Texas). </span></p>
  533. <p class="p1"><span class="s1">Top searches in other states showcase other qualities we admire in our moms. Arkansas and Oklahoma were looking up <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/virtuous" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><i>virtuous</i></a>, “morally excellent, upright,” while Maryland and Virginia were researching <i><a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/unconditional" target="_blank" rel="noopener">unconditional</a> love</i>, or &#8220;love given without conditions.&#8221;</span></p>
  534. <p class="p1"><span class="s1">Supermoms met word power in some of the leading lookups for Delaware, New Jersey, and Wisconsin, respectively: <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/sagacious" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>sagacious</em></a> (&#8220;shrewd&#8221;), <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/splendiferous" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><i>splendiferous</i></a> (&#8220;splendid, magnificent&#8221;) and <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/munificent" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><i>munificent </i></a>(&#8220;very generous&#8221;). </span></p>
  535. <p class="p1"><span class="s1">When not searching <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/beauty" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><i>beauty</i></a>, Kansans were looking up <i><a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/luminous" target="_blank" rel="noopener">luminous</a> energy</i>. We don’t have that exact phrase in the dictionary, but maybe we should! New Hampshirites, meanwhile, were apparently checking their spelling of <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/ingenious" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><i>ingenious</i></a> when typing in “ingenius.”</span></p>
  536. <p class="p1"><span class="s1">Here are some other state searches highlighting motherly attributes:</span></p>
  537. <ul class="ul1">
  538. <li class="li1"><span class="s1"><a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/above-and-beyond" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>above and beyond</em></a> (California)</span></li>
  539. <li class="li1"><span class="s1"><a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/heroine" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>heroine</em></a> (Iowa)</span></li>
  540. <li class="li1"><span class="s1"><a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/nurturing" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>nurturing</em></a> (Indiana)</span></li>
  541. <li class="li1"><span class="s1"><a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/sincerity" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>sincerity</em></a> (Utah)</span></li>
  542. <li class="li1"><span class="s1"><a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/tenaciousness" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>tenaciousness</em></a> (Tennessee)</span></li>
  543. <li class="li1"><span class="s1"><a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/wonderful" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>wonderful</em></a> (Minnesota)</span></li>
  544. </ul>
  545. <h2 class="p1"><span class="s1">“Mother” nature</span></h2>
  546. <p class="p1"><span class="s1">Speaking of <i>motherly</i>, various mother-related words constituted the most searches in the followings states. </span></p>
  547. <p class="p1"><span class="s1"><a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/mothering" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><i>Mothering</i></a> trended in Arizona, Illinois, Michigan, North Carolina, Ohio, South Carolina, and Washington. The word, which means “the nurturing of an infant or small child by its mother,” can describe loving care more generally.</span></p>
  548. <p class="p1"><span class="s1">Perhaps appropriately for the seat of the federal government, Washington, DC was interested in <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/matriarch" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><i>matriarch</i></a>, “the female head of a family or tribal line&#8221; (along with the less stately <em>hostest with the mostest</em>).  </span></p>
  549. <p class="p1"><span class="s1">Missouri was interested in <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/matronymic" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><i>matronymic</i></a>, referring to a name derived from a mother or female ancestor.</span></p>
  550. <p class="p1"><span class="s1">In other states, we saw familiar, maternal names and terms of address across generations (whose adjective form, <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/generational" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><i>generational</i></a>, coincidentally spiked in Alabama):</span></p>
  551. <ul class="ul1">
  552. <li class="li1"><span class="s1"><a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/ma-am" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>ma’am</em></a> (Nevada)</span></li>
  553. <li class="li1"><span class="s1"><a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/mom" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>mom</em></a> (North Dakota)</span></li>
  554. <li class="li1"><span class="s1"><a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/mommie" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>mommie</em></a> (Florida)</span></li>
  555. <li class="li1"><span class="s1"><em>moms</em> (Georgia, Massachusetts, Oregon)</span></li>
  556. <li class="li1"><span class="s1"><a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/mother" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>mother</em></a> (Alaska)</span></li>
  557. <li class="li1"><span class="s1"><a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/nana" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>nana</em></a> (a nod to grandmothers in Kentucky, North Carolina, and Ohio)</span></li>
  558. </ul>
  559. <p class="p1"><span class="s1">Surely, folks in these great places know what <i>mom</i> means, so why would they look them up? Perhaps they wanted to know how the dictionary defines them in order to think about the characteristics of a mother or the identity of one. </span></p>
  560. <p class="p1"><span class="s1">Indeed, searches for <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/motherhood" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><i>motherhood</i></a> trended in Delaware, Montana, and Nebraska. Rhode Islanders were especially interested in <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/motherhood" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><i>progenitor</i></a>, “a biologically related ancestor” or “a predecessor or precursor” more generally. Mississippians were especially interested in <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/mother-figure" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><i>mother figure</i></a>, &#8220;a woman embodying or seeming to embody the qualities of an idealized conception of the female parent, eliciting from others the emotional responses that a child typically has toward its mother.” </span></p>
  561. <p class="p1"><span class="s1">Were people in Vermont and Wisconsin thinking more critically about the place of mothers in culture? <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/responsibility" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><i>Responsibilities</i></a> and <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/gender-role" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><i>gender role </i></a>trended in those states, respectively.</span></p>
  562. <h2 class="p1"><span class="s1">Do you kiss your mother with that mouth?!</span></h2>
  563. <p class="p1"><span class="s1">Elsewhere in America, people’s minds were clearly … elsewhere. <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/milf" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><i>Milf</i></a> was trending in Colorado and Louisiana. New Jersey was also interested in <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/soccer-mom" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><i>soccer mom</i></a>. </span></p>
  564. <p class="p1"><span class="s1">Then there’s Wyoming. Perhaps our friends in the Equality State needed to look up when Mother’s Day was, after all. Top searches there included <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/bandwidth" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><i>bandwidth</i></a>, &#8220;precuation&#8221; (misspelling for <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/precaution" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>precaution</em></a>), and <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/begrudgingly" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><i>begrudgingly</i></a>.</span></p>
  565. <p class="p1"><span class="s1">Take it from these states. We could send the mothers in our lives some flowers, like the <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/bluebonnet" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><i>bluebonnets</i></a> that trended in Pennsylvania, treat them to some <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/indulgence" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><i>indulgence </i></a>(New Mexico), or if time is of the essence, make a <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/promise" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><i>promise</i></a> (South Dakota) to do something special.</span></p>
  566. <p class="p1"><span class="s1">Above all, whether over the phone or over brunch, we can thank our mothers for the <i><a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/happiness" target="_blank" rel="noopener">happiness</a> </i>they bring us, the <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/courage" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>courage</em></a> they show, and how <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/strong" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>strong</em></a> they are—all top trends in Hawaii. </span></p>
  567. <p class="p1"><span class="s1">Those are words to earn any mother&#8217;s <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/seal-of-approval" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>seal</em> <em>of</em> <i>approval</i></a> (Idaho).</span></p>
  568. <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.dictionary.com/e/mothers-day-words-by-state-2018/">What Word Is Your State Looking Up On Mother&#8217;s Day?</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.dictionary.com/e">Everything After Z by Dictionary.com</a>.</p>
  569. ]]></content:encoded>
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  571. <slash:comments>0</slash:comments>
  572. <media:thumbnail url="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/1000x700-motherday-map-150x150.jpg" />
  573. <media:content url="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/1000x700-motherday-map.jpg" medium="image">
  574. <media:title type="html">1000&#215;700-motherday-map</media:title>
  575. <media:thumbnail url="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/1000x700-motherday-map-150x150.jpg" />
  576. </media:content>
  577. <contentTitle>mothers-day-words-by-state-2018</contentTitle> </item>
  578. <item>
  579. <title>Terms That Twitter And YouTube Created</title>
  580. <link>https://www.dictionary.com/e/s/twitter-and-youtube-terms/</link>
  581. <pubDate>Thu, 09 May 2019 07:30:00 +0000</pubDate>
  582. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Minrose Straussman]]></dc:creator>
  583. <category><![CDATA[Slang]]></category>
  584. <tag><![CDATA[category-slang]]></tag>
  585. <tag><![CDATA[interest-social-media]]></tag>
  586. <tag><![CDATA[interest-Twitter]]></tag>
  587. <tag><![CDATA[interest-YouTube]]></tag>
  588. <tag><![CDATA[related]]></tag>
  589. <tag><![CDATA[type-slideshow]]></tag>
  590.  
  591. <guid isPermaLink="false">https://www.dictionary.com/e/?post_type=crb_slideshow&#038;p=132297</guid>
  592. <description><![CDATA[<img width="800" height="800" src="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-twitter-youtube.jpg" class="attachment-large size-large" alt="Getty" srcset="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-twitter-youtube.jpg 800w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-twitter-youtube-150x150.jpg 150w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-twitter-youtube-300x300.jpg 300w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-twitter-youtube-768x768.jpg 768w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-twitter-youtube-380x380.jpg 380w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-twitter-youtube-500x500.jpg 500w" sizes="(max-width: 800px) 100vw, 800px" /><br/><p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.dictionary.com/e/s/twitter-and-youtube-terms/">Terms That Twitter And YouTube Created</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.dictionary.com/e">Everything After Z by Dictionary.com</a>.</p>
  593. ]]></description>
  594. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<img width="800" height="800" src="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-twitter-youtube.jpg" class="attachment-large size-large" alt="Getty" srcset="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-twitter-youtube.jpg 800w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-twitter-youtube-150x150.jpg 150w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-twitter-youtube-300x300.jpg 300w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-twitter-youtube-768x768.jpg 768w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-twitter-youtube-380x380.jpg 380w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-twitter-youtube-500x500.jpg 500w" sizes="(max-width: 800px) 100vw, 800px" /><br/><p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.dictionary.com/e/s/twitter-and-youtube-terms/">Terms That Twitter And YouTube Created</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.dictionary.com/e">Everything After Z by Dictionary.com</a>.</p>
  595. ]]></content:encoded>
  596. <media:thumbnail url="https://www.dictionary.com/e/www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-twitter-youtube.jpg" />
  597. <media:content url="https://www.dictionary.com/e/www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/800x800-twitter-youtube.jpg" medium="image">
  598. <media:title type="html">Getty</media:title>
  599. </media:content>
  600. <contentTitle>twitter-and-youtube-terms</contentTitle><dictionary:slides><dictionary:slide title="" image="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/1000x700-twitter-youtube-1-500x500.jpg"><![CDATA[<p>Less than two decades ago, social media was in its infancy. Sure, there were LiveJournal and MySpace, but they had nowhere near the reach and impact of contemporary platforms like Twitter and YouTube.</p>
  601. <p>YouTube launched in 2005 and, just over a year later, Twitter began. As of 2019, every day over 500 million tweets are sent on Twitter and over 5 billion—yes, billion—videos are watched on YouTube. That's a lot of cat videos.</p>
  602. <p>These sites have transformed the internet—and our lives as we know them, including our language. So, get internet-<a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/savvy" target="_blank" rel="noopener">savvy</a> with these words and expressions born from our new, digital normal.</p>
  603. ]]></dictionary:slide><dictionary:slide title="subtweet" image="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/1000x700-twitter-youtube-2-500x500.jpg"><![CDATA[<p>You've probably heard of tweets. These are the messages sent out on Twitter. But tweets have an evil twin, you might say: <em><a href="https://www.dictionary.com/e/slang/subtweet/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">subtweets</a></em>. A <em>subtweet </em>is "a negative post, especially on Twitter, targeting a certain person without directly mentioning them or their username."</p>
  604. <p>A blend of <em><a href="http://www.dictionary.com/browse/subliminal" target="_blank" rel="noopener">subliminal</a> </em>and <em><a href="http://www.dictionary.com/browse/tweet" target="_blank" rel="noopener">tweet</a>, </em>the term <em>subtweet</em> emerges on Twitter in 2009. An early instance, and illustration of the social-media practice, comes from @Chelsea_x_Rae that year: “I hate when I see people who dnt txt [sic] or call me or even tweet me anymore make general tweets. ... Yes that was a SubTweet.”</p>
  605. <p>As this tweeter makes clear, the subject of a <em>subtweet</em> shouldn’t know it’s about them, as <em>subtweeting</em> is the internet equivalent of talking behind someone’s back (hence, <em>subliminal tweet</em>). A <em>subtweet</em> is usually sent when someone wants to avoid confrontation with the subject but still wants to complain about them.</p>
  606. ]]></dictionary:slide><dictionary:slide title="snitch-tagging" image="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/1000x700-twitter-youtube-3-500x500.jpg"><![CDATA[<p>If <em>subtweets </em>are passive aggressive, <em><a href="https://www.dictionary.com/e/slang/snitch-tagging/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">snitch-tagging</a> </em>is active-aggressive. <em>Snitch-tagging</em> is "the act of tagging the subject of a negative post about them, especially on Twitter, that they weren't already <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/e/slang/tagged" target="_blank" rel="noopener">tagged</a> in."</p>
  607. <p>Let’s say you're <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/trash-talking" target="_blank" rel="noopener">talking trash</a>, <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/e/slang/throwing-shade" target="_blank" rel="noopener">throwing shade</a>, or otherwise subtweeting someone on Twitter. <em>Snitch-tagging </em>happens when another person then responds to your post tagging that person. This effectively <em>snitches</em> on you and airs your shady comment, as if to say, “Hey, this dude is talking about you behind your back!” Ouch.</p>
  608. <p>No one likes a snitch, as they say—and no one likes a <em>snitch-tagger </em>either. <em>Snitch-tagging</em> is considered cowardly, disrespectful, and aggressive, especially because it can invite <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/e/slang/dog-pile" target="_blank" rel="noopener">dog-piling</a>.</p>
  609. ]]></dictionary:slide><dictionary:slide title="ratio" image="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/1000x700-twitter-youtube-4-500x500.jpg"><![CDATA[<p>Let's talk about <em><a href="https://www.dictionary.com/e/pop-culture/ratio/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">ratios</a></em>. No, not the kind you find out about in math class. We're talking about the kind on social media, particularly Twitter.</p>
  610. <p>On Twitter, a <em>ratio</em>, or <em>getting</em> <em>ratioed</em>, is when replies to a tweet vastly outnumber likes or retweets. This means people are objecting to the tweet and considering its content bad. This idea, here, is that expressing approval of something on Twitter is easy: you simply like or retweet the comment. It takes more effort, however, to leave a negative comment, so, if lots of people do so, then it must be a sign the tweet has really stepped in it and is not being well received.</p>
  611. <p>While it started on Twitter and is most commonly found there, users’ posts can be <em>ratioed </em>on nearly any social media platform, including Reddit and Instagram.</p>
  612. ]]></dictionary:slide><dictionary:slide title="Twitterstorms &amp; tweetstorms" image="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/1000x700-twitter-youtube-5-500x500.jpg"><![CDATA[<p>As its name suggests, a <em><a href="https://www.dictionary.com/e/slang/twitterstorm/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Twitterstorm</a> </em>erupts like a storm on the social media network Twitter. The word <em>storm</em> also suggests the spontaneous, unpredictable flurry of activity and interest around a topic, which can feel chaotic and be damaging to persons or brands at the center of the metaphorical storm.</p>
  613. <p><em>Twitterstorms</em> often begin when one user tweets in anger about a subject, often <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/e/slang/triggered" target="_blank" rel="noopener">triggered</a> by a controversial or insensitive comment by a brand or politician. The response mushrooms into broader outrage on the site as the message gets retweeted and quoted, often catching the attention of media outlets and users with larger numbers of following.</p>
  614. <p>Sometimes <em>Twitterstorm</em> is used to describe a rapid series of tweets posted by a single person in a short timeframe, particularly if these tweets are angry in tone. However, these series—where a user threads together a series of tweets to discuss a topic at greater length than Twitter’s 280-character limit allows—are more commonly called <em>tweetstorms</em>.</p>
  615. ]]></dictionary:slide><dictionary:slide title="Black Twitter" image="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/1000x700-twitter-youtube-6-500x500.jpg"><![CDATA[<p>Twitter gets a bad rap for being a contentious place, full of negativity. But if there's one good thing about it, it's that it allows people to come together and share stories about their experiences. That's the case with <em><a href="https://www.dictionary.com/e/slang/black-twitter/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Black Twitter</a></em>.</p>
  616. <p><em>Black Twitter</em> is "the collective identity of black users on Twitter." In a sense, <em>Black Twitter</em> is a digital community that allows black people to connect and bond over what it means to be black. This includes both the lighthearted and the grim aspects. The focus tends to be reflective of black Americans’ experience, though not exclusively.</p>
  617. <p>People often mention how multipurpose <em>Black Twitter</em> is. The community offers a supportive culture where members can discuss topics, such as institutionalized racism, problematic people, racist messaging, as well as lighter topics like pop culture, movies, and memes. Perhaps most importantly, it offers <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/immersion" target="_blank" rel="noopener">immersion</a> in a black community where one’s concerns or perspectives are validated.</p>
  618. ]]></dictionary:slide><dictionary:slide title="reply girls" image="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/1000x700-twitter-youtube-7-500x500.jpg"><![CDATA[<p>We've gone over a lot of Twitter terminology. But, YouTube has its own set of sayings and expressions, too.</p>
  619. <p>One insider term is the somewhat saucy <em><a href="https://www.dictionary.com/e/slang/reply-girls/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">reply girls</a></em>. In the early 2010s, <em>reply girls</em> were a type of female YouTube user who, by exploiting the video platforms's <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/algorithm" target="_blank" rel="noopener">algorithm</a> and using sexually suggestive <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/thumbnail" target="_blank" rel="noopener">thumbnails</a> for videos, earned enough views on their channels to monetize their content. The <em>reply girl</em> craze began on July 18, 2011 with the uploading of a series of videos by Alejandra Gaitan on her YouTube channel <em>thereplygirl</em>, hence the name.</p>
  620. <p>Given that <em>reply girl</em> videos have for the most part disappeared from YouTube following its 2012 algorithm change, the term has for the most part also retreated from internet culture. However, <em>reply girl</em> is still occasionally mentioned in discussing YouTube’s handling (or mishandling) of the <em>reply girl </em>phenomenon. Others may allude to <em>reply girls </em>as a joke about getting rich quick.</p>
  621. ]]></dictionary:slide><dictionary:slide title="Smash or Pass" image="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/1000x700-twitter-youtube-8-500x500.jpg"><![CDATA[<p>Another sexualized phenomenon on YouTube is <em><a href="https://www.dictionary.com/e/slang/smash-or-pass/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Smash or Pass</a></em>. <em>Smash or Pass</em> is "a game in which participants vote on whether they would <em>smash</em> (hook up with) or <em>pass</em> (not hook up with) another person (e.g., celebrity, stranger) based on a picture or video of them." Ugh, internet culture.</p>
  622. <p>The game slowly picked up speed online throughout the 2010s before exploding in popularity when YouTube personalities such as <a href="http://www.dictionary.com/e/pop-culture/its-everyday-bro/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">PewDiePie</a> got involved beginning in December 2016. By January and February 2017, Google lookups for <em>smash or pass</em> had hit their all-time high.</p>
  623. <p><em>Smash or Pass</em> videos, in which a few commentators flip through galleries of images and discuss whether they would <em>Smash or Pass</em>, are plastered all over YouTube. Some videos are broad-ranging, while others focus on particular subjects, such as popular YouTube creators, A-list celebrities, or professional athletes.</p>
  624. <p>Don’t think <em>Smash or Pass</em> is all about sex, though. As the game’s popularity expanded, so did its range of subject matter. From food to cartoon characters, anything can be metaphorically <em>smashed or passed</em> with varying levels of seriousness.</p>
  625. ]]></dictionary:slide><dictionary:slide title="ASMR" image="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/1000x700-twitter-youtube-9-500x500.jpg"><![CDATA[<p>Maybe you've heard of <em><a href="https://www.dictionary.com/e/slang/asmr/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">ASMR</a></em> and wondered what it stands for. Well, here you go: <em>ASMR </em>stands for <em>autonomous sensory meridian response</em>, a term for "a calming, pleasurable feeling often accompanied by a tingling sensation."</p>
  626. <p>The tingle is said to originate in a person’s head and spread to the spine (and sometimes the limbs) in response to stimulation. The stimuli that trigger ASMR vary from person to person. Some of the most common ones include whispers, white noise, lip smacking, having a person’s complete attention (as in having one’s hair cut by a hairdresser), as well as brushing, chewing, tapping, scratching, and crinkling.</p>
  627. <p><em>ASMR </em>videos are all over YouTube. An example might be “ASMR Calligraphy Sounds” or “Gentle Head Massage and Shampoo ASMR / Soft Spoken / <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/binaural" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Binaural</a>.” People also use the term to discuss their individual <em>ASMR</em> experiences. A person who creates <em>ASMR</em> content is called an <em>ASMRtist</em>, which is a <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/portmanteau" target="_blank" rel="noopener">portmanteau</a> of <em>ASMR</em> and <em>artist</em>, of course.</p>
  628. ]]></dictionary:slide><dictionary:slide title="unboxing" image="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/1000x700-twitter-youtube-10-500x500.jpg"><![CDATA[<p>Besides ASMR videos, another surprising genre on YouTube is <em><a href="https://www.dictionary.com/e/slang/unboxing/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">unboxing</a> </em>videos. <em>Unboxing </em>is "the act of documenting oneself, mostly on video, of opening a packaged product from a box and displaying, reviewing, and showing off its contents."</p>
  629. <p><em>Unboxing </em>videos, which typically feature <em>unboxing [the featured object]</em> in their titles, have only gotten more popular as YouTube has become such a giant of internet video. Many channels are dedicated exclusively to <em>unboxing</em> everything from toys to makeup, and some <em>unboxing</em> videos have earned more than 250 million views.</p>
  630. <p><em>Unboxing </em>videos are so much a part of YouTube that internet celebrity PewDiePie celebrated being the first (and, at the time, only) YouTuber to reach 50 million subscribers with an <em>unboxing </em>video of his custom YouTube Play Button.</p>
  631. <p>People gonna people, but we get the appeal. <em>Unboxing</em> is almost like you get to open the items yourself.</p>
  632. ]]></dictionary:slide><dictionary:slide title="Vlogmas" image="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/1000x700-twitter-youtube-12-500x500.jpg"><![CDATA[<p>Speaking of opening packages, some people look forward to December because they love Christmas, Hanukkah, or Kwanza. Others look forward to it for <em><a href="https://www.dictionary.com/e/pop-culture/vlogmas/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Vlogmas</a></em>.</p>
  633. <p><em>Vlogmas </em>is a tradition among YouTubers to <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/vlog" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>vlog</em></a>, or <em>video-blog</em>, every day in December until Christmas (December 25). <em>Vlogmas </em>is a blend of the words <em>vlog</em>, a video version of a blog, and <em>Christmas</em>, the December 25th holiday where Christians celebrate the birth of Jesus Christ and, more <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/secular" target="_blank" rel="noopener">secularly</a>, people honor Santa Claus.</p>
  634. <p>Like Christmas, <em>Vlogmas </em>planning begins even before Thanksgiving. This leads to vloggers typically take a Christmas angle on their normal content during <em>Vlogmas</em>. Merry merry.</p>
  635. ]]></dictionary:slide><dictionary:slide title="The Wadsworth Constant" image="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/1000x700-twitter-youtube-11-500x500.jpg"><![CDATA[<p>There are all kinds of (unofficial) <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/e/slang/rules-of-the-internet/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Rules of the Internet</a>. Apparently, there are Rules of YouTube, too. One of those is the so-called <em><a href="https://www.dictionary.com/e/pop-culture/the-wadsworth-constant/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Wadsworth Constant</a></em>.</p>
  636. <p><em>The Wadsworth Constant</em> is "the idea (and 2011 meme) that one can safely skip past the first 30 percent of any YouTube video without missing any important content." <em>Wadsworth</em> is taken from the username of a Redditor who first formulated the <em>constant</em>, a term which riffs on a <em><a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/constant" target="_blank" rel="noopener">constant</a></em> in physics.</p>
  637. <p>Reddit is the spiritual home to <em>the Wadsworth Constant</em>. There’s even an entire <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/e/slang/subreddit" target="_blank" rel="noopener">subreddit</a>, r/wadsworth, devoted to it. Programmers love to play with <em>the Wadsworth Constant</em> too<em>.</em> The coding platform GitHub is awash in bots, browser extensions, and scripts to automate skipping the first third of just about anything.</p>
  638. <p>We know that attention can be short and time precious in the digital age. So, thanks for not applying the <em>Wadsworth Constant</em> to this slideshow.</p>
  639. ]]></dictionary:slide></dictionary:slides> </item>
  640. <item>
  641. <title>13 Funny Quotes That&#8217;ll Make Your Day</title>
  642. <link>https://www.dictionary.com/e/s/funny-quotes-thatll-make-your-day/</link>
  643. <pubDate>Wed, 08 May 2019 07:01:47 +0000</pubDate>
  644. <dc:creator><![CDATA[Dictionary.com]]></dc:creator>
  645. <category><![CDATA[Quotes]]></category>
  646. <tag><![CDATA[category-quotes]]></tag>
  647. <tag><![CDATA[interest-humor]]></tag>
  648. <tag><![CDATA[related]]></tag>
  649. <tag><![CDATA[type-slideshow]]></tag>
  650.  
  651. <guid isPermaLink="false">http://www.dictionary.com/e/?post_type=crb_slideshow&#038;p=31216</guid>
  652. <description><![CDATA[<img width="500" height="500" src="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/1_4_2017_Gore_Vidal.jpg" class="attachment-large size-large" alt="" srcset="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/1_4_2017_Gore_Vidal.jpg 500w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/1_4_2017_Gore_Vidal-150x150.jpg 150w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/1_4_2017_Gore_Vidal-300x300.jpg 300w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/1_4_2017_Gore_Vidal-380x380.jpg 380w" sizes="(max-width: 500px) 100vw, 500px" /><br/><p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.dictionary.com/e/s/funny-quotes-thatll-make-your-day/">13 Funny Quotes That&#8217;ll Make Your Day</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.dictionary.com/e">Everything After Z by Dictionary.com</a>.</p>
  653. ]]></description>
  654. <content:encoded><![CDATA[<img width="500" height="500" src="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/1_4_2017_Gore_Vidal.jpg" class="attachment-large size-large" alt="" srcset="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/1_4_2017_Gore_Vidal.jpg 500w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/1_4_2017_Gore_Vidal-150x150.jpg 150w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/1_4_2017_Gore_Vidal-300x300.jpg 300w, https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/1_4_2017_Gore_Vidal-380x380.jpg 380w" sizes="(max-width: 500px) 100vw, 500px" /><br/><p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.dictionary.com/e/s/funny-quotes-thatll-make-your-day/">13 Funny Quotes That&#8217;ll Make Your Day</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.dictionary.com/e">Everything After Z by Dictionary.com</a>.</p>
  655. ]]></content:encoded>
  656. <media:thumbnail url="https://www.dictionary.com/e/www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/1_4_2017_Gore_Vidal.jpg" />
  657. <media:content url="https://www.dictionary.com/e/www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/1_4_2017_Gore_Vidal.jpg" medium="image" />
  658. <contentTitle>funny-quotes-thatll-make-your-day</contentTitle><dictionary:slides><dictionary:slide title="&quot;I just got out of the hospital. I was in a speed reading accident. I hit a book mark and flew across the room.&quot;" image="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/steven_wright-500x500.jpg"><![CDATA[<p style="text-align: center;">Steven Wright</p>
  659. ]]></dictionary:slide><dictionary:slide title="&quot;All you need is love. But a little chocolate now and then doesn&#039;t hurt.&quot;" image="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/charles_m-500x500.jpg"><![CDATA[<p style="text-align: center;">Charles M. Schulz</p>
  660. ]]></dictionary:slide><dictionary:slide title="&quot;I&#039;d rather take coffee than compliments just now.&quot;" image="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/09_29_16_Alcott-1-500x500.jpg"><![CDATA[<p style="text-align: center;">Louisa May Alcott</p>
  661. ]]></dictionary:slide><dictionary:slide title="&quot;The four most beautiful words in our common language: I told you so.&quot;" image="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/1_4_2017_Gore_Vidal.jpg"><![CDATA[<p style="text-align: center;">Gore Vidal</p>
  662. ]]></dictionary:slide><dictionary:slide title="&quot;‘Sleep is good’, he said, ‘and books are better.‘&quot;" image="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/george_martin.jpg"><![CDATA[<p style="text-align: center;">George R.R. Martin</p>
  663. ]]></dictionary:slide><dictionary:slide title="&quot;I do things like get in a taxi and say, &#039;The library, and step on it.&#039;&quot;" image="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/7_15_17_david_foster-500x500.jpg"><![CDATA[<p style="text-align: center;">David Foster Wallace</p>
  664. ]]></dictionary:slide><dictionary:slide title="&quot;Some people have a way with words, and other people...oh, uh, not have way.&quot;" image="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/steve_martin-500x500.jpg"><![CDATA[<p style="text-align: center;">Steve Martin</p>
  665. ]]></dictionary:slide><dictionary:slide title="&quot;You only live once, but if you do it right, once is enough.&quot;" image="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/mae_west-500x500.jpg"><![CDATA[<p style="text-align: center;">Mae West</p>
  666. ]]></dictionary:slide><dictionary:slide title="&quot;The poets have been mysteriously silent on the subject of cheese.&quot;" image="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/quote_poetry_17-500x500.jpg"><![CDATA[<p style="text-align: center;">Gilbert K. Chesterton</p>
  667. ]]></dictionary:slide><dictionary:slide title="&quot;Outside of a dog, a book is a man&#039;s best friend. Inside of a dog, it&#039;s too dark to read.&quot;" image="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/11_27_2016_groucho_marx-500x500.jpg"><![CDATA[<p style="text-align: center;">Groucho Marx</p>
  668. ]]></dictionary:slide><dictionary:slide title="&quot;So many books, so little time.&quot;" image="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/04_04_2017_Frank_Zappa.jpg"><![CDATA[<p style="text-align: center;"><span data-sheets-value="{&quot;1&quot;:2,&quot;2&quot;:&quot;Frank Zappa&quot;}" data-sheets-userformat="{&quot;2&quot;:256,&quot;11&quot;:0}">Frank Zappa</span></p>
  669. ]]></dictionary:slide><dictionary:slide title="&quot;I&#039;m happy. Which often looks like crazy.&quot;" image="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/5_13_17_david_henry_hwang-500x500.jpg"><![CDATA[<p style="text-align: center;">David Henry Hwang</p>
  670. <p>&nbsp;</p>
  671. ]]></dictionary:slide><dictionary:slide title="&quot;I was reading the dictionary. I thought it was a poem about everything.&quot;" image="https://www.dictionary.com/e/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/steven_wright_2-500x500.jpg"><![CDATA[<p style="text-align: center;">Steven Wright</p>
  672. ]]></dictionary:slide></dictionary:slides> </item>
  673. </channel>
  674. </rss>
  675.  
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